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SOUVENIR i-^s 

OP THE * \ ^_J 

Centennial Exhibition: yi-x- 



CONNECTICUT'S REPRESENTATION AT PHILADELPHIA, 1876. 



EMBEACING A 



CONDENSED HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN AND PROGRESS 
OF THE GREAT INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION, 



COMPREHENSIVE ACCOUNT OF CONNECTICUT S RECORD THEREIN; SKETCH OF GEN. 

JOSEPH R. HAWLEY, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES COMMISSION; 

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRINCIPAL INDUSTRIAL AND OTHER 

EXHIBITS FROM THE STATE, WITH COMPLETE 

LISTS OF THE EXHIBITORS; THE VALUABLE AID GIVEN BY CONNECTICUT "WOMEN; 

ENCAMPMENT OF THE CONNECTICUT NATIONAL GUARD; MILITARY AND 

OTHER EXCURSIONS TO PHILADELPHIA; THE "COTTAGE"; 

REMINISCENCES OF THE GREAT EXHIBITION, Etc. 



A LIST OF OYER FORTY THOUSAND CONNECTICUT VISITORS. 



Embellislied with Numerous Portraits, Engravings of Notable Exhibits, Buildings, etc. 



PUBLISHED BY 
GEO. D. CURTIS, HARTFORD, CONN. 

18 77. 



coptmght 
By George D. Curtis, 

1877. 




NTRODUCTION. 



THE representation of the State of Connecticut in the Inter- 
national Exhibition at Philadelphia — larger in proportion to 
her area and population than that of any other State in the Union — 
suggested to the writer the thought that a volume devoted to 
Connecticut's record in the exhibition might be acceptable to the 
thousands who are proud of the distinction she achieved. Early 
in the history of the enterprise a position of highest honor and of 
very grave responsibilities was conferred upon one of her citizens, 
Gen. Joseph R. Hawley. To him was given the presidency of the 
United States Centennial Commission, and the ability and energy 
which marked the performance of his duties at Philadelphia con- 
tributed largely to the success of the affair; a success that went 
hand in hand with a financial victory unknown to any similar 
enterprise conducted "by the great nations of Europe. 

In nearly every branch of the exhibition Connecticut was largely 
represented, notably so in the departments of manufactured goods, 
where the exhibits afforded abundant proof of the ingenuity of 
her inventors and the skill of her artisans. Excellence of work- 
manship was especially marked in the finer grades of articles, the 
exhibits of arms, silver ware, brass goods, silks, cloths, etc., being 
unsurpassed by those from any other State in the Union, in their 
variety, their perfection, and their durability. In this volume, the 

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4 INTRODUCTIOK. 

purpose lias been to give full credit to every manufacturing interest 
for the results that were achieved, and to several of the leading 
industries special prominence has been given, with illustrations of 
their triumphs of workmanship. The skill of the ladies of Con- 
necticut was represented by exhibits in the departments of literature, 
art, etc. These merited and have received extended notice. In 
addition to contributing to the interest of the various branches of 
the exhibition, the people of Connecticut aided the enterprise by 
their liberal attendance. The forty thousand visitors whose names 
are given in the closing pages of this work, represent a large 
percentage of the adult population of the State, and undoubtedly 
there were many who failed to place their names upon the registers 
in the Connecticut Cottage, from which the list was compiled. 

The principal aim of this work being to give a record of Con- 
necticut's participation in the exhibition, it has not been deemed 
essential to more than briefly review the history and progress of 
the nation's Centennial triumph. That task has been accompUshed 
in numerous and exhaustive volumes. Biit in this, every feature 
identified with Connecticut or her people has been made prominent, 
and no labor has been spared to obtain complete and authentic 
information. The writer gratefully acknowledges the many 
courtesies extended to him during his work, and if the readers of 
this volume find in its perusal as much pleasure as did the -v^Titer 
in its preparation, he will feel assured that his labor has not been 
in vain. 

Haktfoed, Conn., November, 1877. 




LLUSTRATIONS. 



Portrait of Gen. Joseph R. Hawlet, of Coim., President 

OP THE IT. S. Centennial Commission, . . Frontispiece. 

Bird's-Eye View of tiie Exhibition Grounds, 
Main Building, 
Machinery Hall, . 



5. Art Gallery, 

6. Horticultural Hall, 

7. AYoiMen's Pavilion, 

8. Agricultural Building, 

9. Centennial Memorial IMedals, 

10. The Connecticut Cottage, 

11. The "Columbus" Water-Cooler, 

12. Colt's Revolvers — Old and New Styles, 

13. Gatling Gun, .... 

14. Gardner Gun, .... 

15. Exhibit op the Whitney Arms Co., 

16. Winchester Repeating Arms Co's Exhibits, 

17. The Sharps' Rifle, 

18. WiLLiMANTic Linen Co's Exhibit, 

19. Cheney Bros.' Pavilion, 
SO. Carpet — Hartford Carpet Co., 

21. The Great Tower Clock — Seth Thomas Co 

22. The Buffalo Hunt — Meriden Britannia Co., 

23. The "Forest and Stream" Prize Cup — Meriden Britan 

NiA Co. , ..... 

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19 
21 
22 
29 
30 
32 
33 
38 
71 



84 
85 
87 
89 
90 
91 
94 
93 
99 
101 

102 



b ILLUSTKATIONS. 

24. Repousse Set — Meriden Britannia Co., 

25. Punch Bowl and Cups — Meriden Britannia Co., 

26. Ornamental Piece — Middletown Plate Co., 

27. Punch Bowl and Cups — Middletown Plate Co., . 

28. Bronze Vase and Lamp — Bradley & Hubbard Co., West 

Meriden, ...... 

29. Gas Chandelier — Bradley & Hubbard Co., West Meri 

DEN, ....... 

30. Portrait of Elias Howe, Jr., Inventor of the Sewing 

Machine, ...... 

31. Model of the Original Sewing Machine, . 

32. Portrait of Allen B. Wilson, Inventor op the Wheeler 

«& Wii.soN Sewing Machine, 

33. The Wheeler & Wilson Co's Pavilion, 

34. The Wheeler & Wilson "New No. 8" Machine, 

35. The Weed Sewing Machine Co's Pavilion, 

36. B. Shoninger's Combination Cymbella Organ, 

37. Award Medals, ...... 

38. Fac-Simile of the Centennial Postage Stamp, 

39. The Baxter Engine (Sectional view), 

40. The Baxter Engine (Front view), 

41. Plow, Cultivator, etc. — Higganum Manufg. Co., 

42. Hay Spreader, etc. — Higganum Manufg. Co., 

43. Falling Front Coach — H. Killam & Co., . 

44. Cabriolet — B. Manville & Co., 

45. The "Antietam Soldier" Statue, 

46. Camp of the Connecticut Brigade at Philadelphia, 

47. Portrait of Brig. -Gen. Wm. Randel Smith, C. N. G., 

48. Portraits of Field and Staff Officers, First Regiment 

C. N. G., 

49. Portraits op Field and Staff Officers, Second Regi 

MENT, C. N. G., 

50. Portraits of Field and Staff Officers, Third Reguient 

C. N. G., 

51. Portraits op Field and Staff Officers, Fourth Regi 

MENT, C. N. G., 

52. Putnam Phalanx — Group, .... 

53. Portrait of Hon. Charles R. Ingersoll, 

54. Portrait op Hon. Richard D. Hubbard, 

55. Portrait op Hon. Francis B. Loomis, 

56. Peculiar Signatures from the Register at the Connec 

TicuT Cottage, ..... 



Fragment op the Charter Oak, 



103 
104 
107 
108 

109 

110 

113 
113 

114 
114 
115 
117 
120 
123 
135 
136 
136 
141 
143 
147 
148 
151 
159 
163 

167 

171 

175 

179 
199 
217 
221 
221 

233 
209 




ONTENTS. 



CHAPTEE I. 

The CENTENisriAL Exhibition. 

Origin of the Great Entei-prise — Early Discouragements and Final 
Triumph of Its Projectors — Aid from the National Government 
and the Several States — General Plan of the Exhibition — Descrip- 
tions of the Principal Buildings, with Notes on the most Promi- 
nent Objects of Interest therein — Ceremonies of the Opening and 
other Notable Days — Statistics of Attendance, etc. — The Close 
of the Exhibition and disposal of the Buildings, ... 12 

CHAPTER 11. 

Gen. Joseph R Hawley, President op the United States Cen- 
tennial Commission. 

Sketch of his Life — Educated for the Law, Abandons its Practice, 
and Enters the Ranks of Journalism — Called to the Field by the 
Guns of Sumter — Faithful Service Rewarded by Rapid Promo- 
tion — Crowned with Civic Honors by the People of his State — 
Chosen as President of the United States Centennial Commission — 
His services in that Responsible Office — Extracts from his Address 
at Stcinway Hall on the Results of the Exhibition, . 39 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER III. 



Connecticut's Early Interest in the Exhibition. 

Action of the General Assembly In 1875 — Philadelphia Visited by a 
Legislative Committee — A State Board of Managers Created — Ap- 
propriation of $25,000 to Insure Proper Representation of State 
Industries — The Debate in the House of Representatives — Amus- 
ing Explanations of Votes — Text of the Appropriation Bill — The 
State's Return from its Investment — Special Committees Ap- 
pointed to Enlist the Cooperation of Manufacturers and Others — 
Prompt and Cheerful Aid Given, ..... 48 



CHAPTER IV. 

Centennial Work by Ladies of the State. 

Organization of the "Centennial Association of Connecticut "Wo- 
men" and its Several Local Br;iiic'lies — Various Enterprises for 
Securing Funds for the Women's Pavilion at Philadelphia — Mar- 
tha Washington Tea-Parties in New Haven and Greenwich — The 
Loan Exhibitions of Relics at Hartford, etc. — The Lady Wash- 
ington Reception at Stamford — Purcliases of Centennial Stock 
and Contributions to the Women's Department — Aid to the Exhi- 
bition of Historical Relics at Philadelphia, . . .56 



CHAPTER V. 

The Cottage. 

Description of the Building — Its Cost, etc. — Valuable Relics Loaned 
for Decorating its Interior — List of the Contributors — Arrange- 
ments for the Convenience of Connecticut Visitors — Sale of 
the Cottage, and Removal from the Grounds — Its Present Loca- 
tion — The Old Well — Recollections, humorous and otherwise, of 
Incidents at the Cottage — Queer Sayings and Doings of Visitors — 
The Connecticut Brown Stone Portals, .... 70 



CHAPTER VI. 

Connecticut Exhibits (Part I). 

Display of Manufactured Goods and Mechanical Triumphs in the 
Main Building and Machinery Hall — The Leading Firms of the 
State Represented — Iron, Steel, Brass, Silk, Woolen, Cotton, and 
other Goods — Evidences of the Ingenuity of Connecticut's In- 
ventors and Skill of her Workmen — List of the Exhibitors — 
Notes on Some of the Most Important Exhibits, . . .81 



CONTENTS. 9 

CHAPTER VII. 

Connecticut Exhibits (Part II). 
The "Women's Department— Exhibition of Evidences of the Skill 
and Industry of tlie Ladies of Connecticut — Articles both Useful 
and Ornamental — Art, Literature, Household Industries, and the 
Trades Represented — The United States Building — A Variety of 
Interesting Exhibits from the State — The Centennial Envelope 
Machine — Iron and Steel Manufacturing — Representation of the 
Fishing Industries — Products of Connecticut Mines and Quarries, 
etc., etc., ... . ■ . . . 138 

CHAPTER VIII. 

Connecticut Exhibits (Part III). 
Agi'icultural Building — Improved Implements shown — Products of 
the Soil, etc. — Paintings in the Art Department — Miscellaneous 
Exhibits in the Annexes and Grounds — The ' ' Antietam Soldier " 
Statue — Granite Statuary and Monuments, . . . 139 

CHAPTER IX. 

Encampment of the National Guard. 
The Origin of the Encampment Project — Description of "Camp 
Israel Putnam " — The Journey to Philadelphia, Record of Nine 
Days in Camp — The Parades, etc. — Recollections of the "Hash 
House " — The Parade in New York — List of Commissioned and 
Non-commissioned Officers of the Brigade at Philadelphia, 153 

CHAPTER X. 

Visit of The General Assembly. 
Legislative "Work Abandoned for an Excursion to Philadelphia — 
A Large and a Jolly Party — Incidents En Route — The Midnight 
Rush for Hotel Accommodations — A Day on the Grounds — Visit 
to the Connecticut Cottage — Reception by General Hawley — 
The Return to the " Land of Steady Habits " — List of the Excur- 
sionists, ........ 188 

CHAPTER XL 

Excursions from Connecticut. 
The New Haven Grays in the "Centennial Legion" — Ceremonies 
During their Visit to Philadelphia — Roster of the Company — Visit 
of the Putnam Phalanx — Their Reception, Parade, and Banquet — 
The Governor's Horse Guard's Trip — Voyage of the Steamer 
"Frances" from Bridgeport — The Piscatorius Club's Sail from 
Hartford to Philadelphia — Minor Excursion Parties, . . 196 



10 CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER XII. 

The Charter Oak. 

Exhibition at Philadelphia of Articles Made from its Wood — Sketch 
of the Historic Tree — Origin of its Celebrity — The Action of a 
Connecticut Patriot — Its Long Life and Final Overthrow — Care- 
ful Preservation of its Parts for Relics— The "Charter Oak" 
Chair in the State House, . . . , . . 208 



CHAPTER XIII. 

Connecticut's Chief Magistrates. 

The State's "Centennial Governor" — Sketch of Hon. Charles R 
Ingersoll of New Haven — His Early Life, Political Triumphs, 
etc. — The People's Choice in the Centennial Year — Governor 
Richard D. Hubbard of Hartford, and Lieut. -Governor Francis 
B. Loomis of New London, ..... 215 

CHAPTER XIV. 

Visiting the Exhibition. 

Moderate Interest during its Early Days — Gradual Spread of the 
"Centennial Fever" — The Throngs of September and October — 
Extra Transportation Facilities Afforded — Searching for Quarters 
in Philadelphia — " Connecticut Day " — Gleanings from the Reg- 
isters at the Cottage — Days of Notable Attendance of Visitors — 
Remarks on Peculiar Signatures, etc., .... 227 



CHAPTER XV. 

List of Connecticut Visitors. 

Over Forty Thousand Names of Residents of the State Who Went 
to the Centennial Exhibition — Arranged Alphabetically by Cities, 
Towns, and Villages, ....... 237 



Personal REcoLiiECTiONS of the Exhibition. 341 

Photographs. 



BOUVENIR 



OF THE 



CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION, 



CHAPTER L 



THE INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION. 

Okigin of the Great Enterprise— Early Discouragements and 
FINAL Triumph of its Projectors — Aid from the National 
Government and the several States — General Plan of 
THE Exhibition — Descriptions op the Principal Buildings, 
WITH Notes on the most Prominent Objects of Interest 
therein — Ceremonies of the Opening and other Notable 
Days— Statistics of Attendance, etc. — Close of the Exhi- 
bition, AND Disposal of the Buildings. 

The International Exhibition at Philadelpbia, in our Centennial 
year, was on such a grand scale that any extended description is 
impracticable in this volume. The aim herein is to record 
only the participation of a single State, Connecticut, and therefore 
the account of the exhibition in general is necessarily limited to 
a review of its history and results. 

Keflecting upon the triumphant success of the exhibition, the 
question naturally arises, "Who first proposed it ? It will be remem- 
bered that as the centennial anniversary of our independence ap- 
proached, several projects were suggested for its celebration on a 
scale suflBciently grand to create an interest in every section of the 
country. As early as 1870 the project of an exhibition, on the 

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12 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

extensive plan of tliose of Paris, London, and other European 
capitals, was brought forward, somewhat in the nature of a sug- 
gestion, but the honor of presenting the plan to the public in a 
definite form is claimed to be due to four gentlemen, — Gen. 
Charles B. Norton, who was one of the United States Commission- 
ers at the Paris Exhibition in 1867; Hon. John Bigelow, who had 
represented this government at the court of France; Col. M. R. 
Muckle, of Philadelphia ; and Prof. John L. Campbell, of "Wabash 
College, Indiana. As might have been anticipated, their plans 
met with considerable opposition, due in no small degree to local 
jealousies because Philadelphia had been fixed upon as the most 
appropriate place for the exhibition. The strong point urged in 
its favor was, that it was there that the Declaration of Independ- 
ence was signed, — that important initial step of our forefathers 
toward freeing the colonies from the rule of Great Britain. In 
time, the opposition gradually weakened, and the project first re- 
ceived substantial assistance from the Franklin Institute of Phil- 
adelphia, whose managers came to its aid, and presented to the 
municipal authorities a petition for the use of a part of Fairmount 
Park. Action of a favorable nature was taken, and a joint 
commission representing both chambers was appointed, to consider 
the proposition, with John L. Shoemaker as chairman. From this 
time the projectors of the great enterprise met with encourage- 
ment at every hand. The Pennsylvania legislature memorialized 
Congress in aid of their plans, and appointed a special committee 
to act with the Philadelphia Joint Commission in submitting the 
matter to the national government. In March, 1870, Mr. Morrell 
presented the initiatory bill in the House of Representatives, and 
after being variously amended, it was passed the following spring. 
This provided for the holding of the exhibition at Philadelphia 
under the auspices of the government, and for the appointment, 
by the President, of a national commission, to be composed of one 
commissioner and an alternate from each state and territory, the 
appointees to be nominated by the governors thereof. An import- 
ant and express provision in this bill was that the national govern- 
ment should not become liable "for any expense attending the 
exhibition, or by reason of the same.""' In March, 1872, the gen- 
tlemen who had been appointed, representing twenty four states 
and three territories, met at Philadelphia, and on the 5th of that 
month the United States Centennial Commission was formally 
organized. Connecticut v/as represented by Gen. Joseph R. Haw- 



HISTORY OF THE ENTERPKIHE. 13 

ley, of Hartford, and Prof. Wm. Phipps Blake, of New Haven, 
and upon the former was conferred the high honor of the pres- 
idency of the commission. The triumphant success of the exhi- 
bition under his management is sufficient proof of the wisdom 
and excellence of the selection. Prof. Blake's services throughout 
the exhibition were also of high value. In 1873 he v/as selected 
by his colleagues of the U. S. Centennial Commission to visit the 
Exhibition at Vienna, and the series of reports made after his 
return, and the experience there acquired were important aids in 
directing the American enterprise. For a full year before the 
appointment of Director General Goshorn, Prof. Blake was the 
executive officer of the United States Commission. 

In July, 1873, the city of Philadelphia set apart for the purposes 
of the exhibition a beautiful tract of four hundred and fifty acres 
in Fairmount Park, located below George's Hill and Belmont, and 
on the Fourth of July the formal surrender of the property was 
made to Gen. Hawley, as president of the commission, the mili- 
tary and civic organizations of Philadelphia participating in the 
attendant ceremonies, and an immense concourse of spectators 
being present. On the day previous, President Ulysses S. Grant 
issued a proclamation to the people of the country, declaring 
"that there will be held at the city of Philadelphia, in the State of 
Pennsylvania, an International Exhibition of Arts, Manufactures, 
and Products of the Soil and Mine, to be opened on the 1 9th of 
April, Anno Domini 1876, and closed on the 19th day of October 
in the same year. And in the intei'est of peace, civilization, and 
domestic and international friendship and intercourse, I commend 
the celebration and exhibition to the people of the United States ; 
and in behalf of this government and people, I cordially commend 
them to all nations who may be pleased to take part therein." The 
United States having been invited by foreign governments in the 
past to participate in exhibitions held in their countries, it was 
deemed proper, as a matter of international courtesy, to pursue a 
similar course, and Congress, in June, 1874, authorized the Presi- 
dent to extend such invitations. Favorable responses were re- 
ceived from twenty-four different nations, all of which were sub- 
sequently represented, their exhibits being admitted into the 
country free of the usual custom-house charges. The United 
States also entered the list of exhibitors under the provisions of 
an act of Congress, and a Board of Commissioners was appointed 
to represent the several executive departments, charged with the 
preparation, arrangement, and safe-keeping of the articles to be 



14 SOUVENIR OIT THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

shown. The ninety-eighth anniversary of the independence of 
the nation was celebrated by the breaking of ground for the exhi- 
bition buildings, the ceremonies being of an imposing character. 
Meantime, attention had been given to plans for meeting the 
enormous expenses of the exhibition. In June, 1872, Congress 
passed a bill creating the Centennial Board of Finance, and au- 
thorizing the issue of stock to a sum not exceeding ten millions of 
dollars, in shares of ten dollars each. The closing section stipu- 
lated that as soon as possible after the close of the exhibition, the 
property should be converted into cash, and after all liabilities 
had been paid, the remaining assets should be divided among the 
stockholders, pro rata, in full satisfaction of the capital stock. 
Under this act, the Centennial Board of Finance was organized, 
with John Y/elsh, a wealthy Philadelphian, as president. The 
certificates of stock were soon afterward designed by two Ameri- 
can artists, Messrs. Darley and Ferris, and the printing and en- 
graving was done at the Treasury Department in Washington, in 
the highest style of steel engraving. The design was at once 
appropriate and beautiful. Pyramidal in character, "America" 
formed the apex, with Fame and Art personified sitting at her feet; 
the busts of Washington and Grant at either side, typical of the 
commencement and end of the century. America was represented 
as welcoming the representatives of foreign nations, who bore 
symbols of their national industries and resources. Independence 
Hall and the National Capitol appeared in the background, and 
beneath the former stood Fulton and Fitch, with their steamboat 
models, and under the latter, FrankHn and Morse, with electric 
and telegraph instruments. On the right, facing America, Howe 
presented his sewing-machine, and a shipwright the model of a 
clipper ship. The freedman. Continental and Federal soldier, and 
a mechanic, formed a group on the right, and the farmer, planter, 
miner, trapper, and Indian, all presenting symbols of their avoca- 
tions, a group on the left. Trumbull's painting of the signing of 
the Declaration of Independence formed the center of the base, 
and on the right of it, was exemplified progress — the busy manu- 
facturing city in contrast with the neglected windmill. Civiliza- 
tion was represented to the left of the base, the railroad, telegraph, 
steamship, and reaping machine being contrasted with the Cones- 
toga wagon, mail rider, sailing vessel, and laborer with a sickle.* 

* Certificate No. 1 was purchased by Gen. Hawley, of Connecticut, and 
was for some time on exhibition in the State House, at Hartford. 



HISTORY OF THE ENTERPRISE. 15 

"WTien placed upon the market in competition with other stocks 
promising more favorable returns, the certificates did not have that 
general and popular sale that had been anticipated. However, 
the sales were fairly large; New Jersey subscribed for $100,000 
worth of the stock, and $10,000 each were taken by Connecticut, 
New Hampshire, and Delaware, and nearly $250,000 by a sub- 
scription raised in New York city. The fact becoming evident 
that serious delays must result from the light subscriptions, largely 
due to the panic of 1873, a Bureau of Ke venue was organized for 
the especial purpose of raising funds. This Bureau performed its 
work ably and effectively, in popularizing the stock, and a consid- 
erable sum was also realized from the sale of " memorial medals," 
coined (at cost) at the United States mint, in Philadelphia, under 
authority of an Act of Congress. They were of four styles: small 
gilt, $1; large bronze, $2; small silver, $3; large gilt, $5. 

Both the city of Philadelphia and the State of Pennsylvania 
responded nobly to the call for financial aid, the former appropri- 
ating an aggregate of $1,500,000, and the State the sum of $1,- 
000,000. In 1874 an effort was made to secure assistance from 
the national government, but a bill appropriating $3,000,000 was 
defeated in May by 139 nays to 90 yeas, the western vote against 
the measure equaling the votes from all of the Eastern and 
Southern States in its favor. Despite this discouraging defeat, 
the Centennial managers went on with the work of erecting the 
buildings, cheered to some extent by the subscriptions to the 
stock, and appropriations made by the several States (to the 
amount of $400,000), to be used for the erection of State build- 
ings, and for meeting the necessary expenses of their Centennial 
commissioners. This substantial manifestation of faith in the 
success of the exhibition, coupled with the active interest shown 
by foreign nations, prompted the friends of the project to again 
ask the aid of the national government. Their efforts were finally 
crowned with success. Congress appropriating $1,500,000 in Feb- 
ruary, 1876, in addition to a half million previously appropriated 
to defray the cost of the Government Building, etc. This first- 
named sum, on account of which it was stipulated that the gov- 
ernment should be a preferred creditor, placed the exhibition 
beyond any danger of financial deficiency.* A fruitful source of 

* Some montlis after the exhibition closed the money was refunded to 
the government and its receipt was acknowledged in a letter from the 
First Comptroller of the Treasury to the Treasurer of the Centennial 



16 SOUVENIE OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

income was found in the sale of concessions, i. e., the right to 
transact various kinds of business on the grounds. These realized 
nearly half a million, including $100,000 for the exclusive right 
of printing and selling the official catalogue; a percentage realiz- 
ing $20,000 or more, for the privilege of running the narrow 
gauge railway, $6,000 each for the German and French restau- 
rants, $16,150 for the Department of Pubhc Comfort; $3 per 
barrel royalty on beer, about $50,000; $35,000 for the telegraph 
and messenger service; $18,000 for the rolling chair right; $52,- 
000 for the exclusive right to sell soda water; $18,000 for cigars 
and tobacco; and $7,000 for pop-corn; $3,000 for a glass factory; 
and $136,000 for various other privileges. 

The finances being satisfactorily arranged, the erection of the 
immense buildings was vigorously pushed, Machinery Hall being 
first finished, and followed in their order by the Main Building, 
and Agricultural, Horticultural, and Memorial Halls, In January 
of the Centennial year, the reception of goods was commenced, 
and various vexatious delays occurring, it became necessary to 
prosecute this work for several days after the date which had been 
finally appointed for the formal opening of the exhibition, May 10th. 

The opening day was one long to be remembered. During the 
week preceding, visitors thronged into the city rapidly, and the 
people of Philadelphia busied themselves in decorating with flags, 
banners, and streamers, until it presented an appearance which 
almost defied description. On the morning of the 10th, excursion 
trains added thousands to the throng of residents and visitors, and 
great streams of humanity steadily flowed along the broad thor- 
oughfares toward the exhibition grounds. Adjoining the grounds, 
a city of hotels, stores, and dwellings had sprung into existence, 
and these presented a gala-day appearance with their lavish decora- 
tions. At 10.15 A. M., the ceremonies opened with the national 
airs of the United States, Austria, Brazil, France, and Germany, 
by a grand orchestra, under the direction of Theodore Thomas. 
"When its music ceased, President Grant arrived upon the grounds, 
and, as he took his seat on the grand stand, there burst from the 
orchestra the strains of the grand Centennial Inauguration March, 

Board of Finance, giving a full and honorable acquittance. Tliis closed 
the account, and the bond of $500,000, given by one hundred citizens of 
Philadelphia for the faithful disbursement of the money, by John Welsh, 
President, and Frederick Fraley, Treasurer, of the Board was returned as 
fulfilled. 



HISTORY OF THE ENTERPEISE. 17 

composed by Eicliard Wagner. Prayer by Bishop Simpson, of 
the Metbodist church, and the singing of Whittier's Centennial 
hymn by a chorus of one thousand voices followed, and the Exhi- 
bition buildings and grounds were then formally presented by Mr. 
"Welsh, President of the Board of Finance, to the Centennial Com- 
mission; Gen. Hawley, its president, responding with this simple 
acknowledgment : 

"Mr. President of the Centennial Board of Finance: — 
The Centennial Commission accepts the trust with grateful and 
fraternal acknowledgment of the great services of the Board of 
Finance." 

The Centennial Cantata, by Sydney Lanier of Georgia, was 
sung by the chorus, with orchestral accompaniment, to beauti- 
ful and impressive music composed by Dudley Buck, who was 
called for at the close of the cantata and enthusiastically cheered 
by the multitude. The next feature in the programme was the 
presentation of the Exhibition by Gen. Hawley to the President 
of the United States; and this concluded, the President declared 
the Exhibition officially opened. As the announcement fell from 
the lips of the Chief Magistrate, Gen. Hawley gave a signal, and 
the Stars and Stripes ascended to the peak of the staff rising from 
the north transept of the Main Building, and at a moment later, 
the national and foreign flags on other buildings throughout the 
grounds were flung to the breeze, amid the grand strains of the 
Hallelujah Chorus by the combined chorus and orchestra. The 
flags were saluted by one hundred guns from the battery on 
George's Hill, forming a grand bass to the merry peal of the 
chimes of bells in Machinery Hall. The procession of official 
visitors was then formed, headed by the President, and moved to 
Machinery Hall, where the great Corliss engine was set in motion 
by the President and the Emperor of Brazil. Immediately the 
myriad wheels and bands throughout the great building were set 
in motion — a marvelous change from inaction to activity. There- 
upon, the doors of all the exhibition buildings were thrown open 
to the throngs that had gathered within the grounds, and the 
Exhibition had entered upon its career. After all its discour- 
agements and delays, it was an accomplished fact, an honor to 
its projectors and those who had labored to bring it to perfection, 
and a credit to the nation m its centennial year. 

Any detailed account of its history will not be attempted, yet 
certain events of importance are worthy of mention. The one 



18 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

hundredth anniversary of the independence of the United States 
was celebrated with grand ceremonies, beginning with a minor 
celebration at Independence Hall on the 1st of July. The evening 
of July 3d was marked by an immense proeession, and at mid- 
night from the new liberty bell of the Hall thirteen strokes 
resounded upon the air, followed by (as a local writer expresses it) 
"such a shout as had never been heard in Philadelphia before." 
The day was ushered in by the roar of cannon at sunrise, and 
in the early morning there was a grand mihtary parade, including 
in line the Centennial Legion. This was composed of a picked 
company from each of the thirteen original States, Connecticut 
being represented by New Haven's favorite organization, the New 
Haven Grays. The ceremonies of the day at Independence HaU 
included music of a patriotic character by Gilmore's Orchestra; 
the singing of Oliver Wendell Holmes' hymn, "Welcome to all 
Nations," the reading of the Declaration of Independence, from 
the original manuscript, by Kichard Henry Lee, of Virginia, a 
grandson of the patriot of the Revolution; the reading of an Ode 
by Bayard Taylor; an address by Hon. William M. Evarts, of New 
York; and in conclusion, the singing of the "Hallelujah Chorus," 
from the Messiah, and the "One Hundredth Psalm," in which 
there were blended in one immense volume of sound the voices of 
tens of thousands of spectators. The night was marked by a 
general illumination of the city, and display of fireworks at Fair- 
mount Park. 

A day of very great interest (to the exhibitors, at least) was the 
27th of September, when the award of medals and diplomas was 
made to the successful competitors. The ceremonies occurred in 
Judges' Hall, and were marked by music and addresses. The 
system of awards was somewhat pecuUar, dispensing with the 
feature of graduated medals, and, instead, requiring the judges to 
make written reports on the comparative merits of each article. 
The medals were of bronze, four inches in diameter, the largest 
ever made in this country, and were struck at the Philadelphia 
mint; about 12,000 were presented. The award of a medal, under 
the regulations, was regarded solely as an evidence of merit; the 
comparative advantages of the different articles being set forth in 
the written reports. Up to this date (January 1, 1878), no com- 
plete ofQcial report of the awards has been made. 

November witnessed the close of the great Exhibition, after a 
career of success unprecedented in history. On the morning of 



20 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXniBITION. 

the appointed day (the tenth), the weather was rainy and cheerless, 
yet immense throngs visited the grounds, and continued to pour 
in until late in the afternoon. The rain necessitated the holding 
of the ceremonies in Judges' Hall, instead of the open air. Presi- 
dent Grant was present, surrounded by an assemblage of distin- 
guished persons from every section of the country, together with 
the ambassadors of several foreign nations. After music and 
prayer, Hon. D. J. Morrell, Chairman of the Executive Committee 
of the United States Centennial Commission, delivered an address 
of a congratulatory nature, which was very appropriately supple- 
mented by the rendering, by the combined chorus and orchestra, 
of Dettingen's Te Deum. Other addresses were delivered by John 
"Welsh, President of the Centennial Board of Finance; Hon. A. T. 
Goshorn, Director-General of the Centennial Exhibition; and Gen. 
Joseph R. Hawley, President of the United States Centennial 
Commission. The audience and chorus then mingled their voices 
in the grand old national anthem, "My Country 'tis of Thee," and 
at 3.37 p. M. President Grant formally closed the Exhibition with 
the announcement: 

"Ladies and Gentlemen, — I have novv^ the honor to declare the 
Exhibition closed." 

On the instant, an electric signal, communicating with Machinery 
Hall, checked the great Corliss engine, and the message, "The 
President has this moment closed the International Exhibition," 
sped by wire to the principal cities of Europe, Canada, and the 
United States. The Exhibition had reached its end. 

In the foregoing pages, no attempt has been made to describe 
the wonders of the exhibition, and in the description of the build- 
ings which follow, reference will be made only to some of the 
more notable objects of interest. 

The Main Building. 

The largest of the five principal exhibition buildings was the 
Main Building, claimed to have been the largest ever erected in 
the world. On first witnessing it, the visitor was impressed with 
its marvelous extent, and it was difficult to appreciate the fact 
that it covered an area of 936,000 square feet, or more than 
twenty-one aci^es. The central avenue, or nave, was one hundred 
and twenty feet wide, and one-third of a mile in length. R. J. 
Dobbins, a prominent Philadelphia builder, erected the edifice, 
and used 7,000,000 feet of lumber, and 8,000,000 pounds of iron; 



HISTORY OF THE ENTERPRISE. 23 

tlie services of 3,000 men being required to place these immense 
quantities of material in position. In the autumn of 1874, the 
foundations were laid; in May, 1875, the contractors began the 
erection of the iron work, of which the building was almost wholly 
constructed, and by the 15th of February of the Centennial year, 
the immense structure was pronounced complete, and was deliv- 
ered to the Board of Finance. Viewed from the gallery, after 
the decorations were arranged, and the exhibits in place, the 
interior presented a fairy scene, with its grand pavilions, splendid 
show-cases, tasteful displays of rich goods of every description, 
and its sparkling fountains. The wants of visitors were abund- 
antly provided for — restaurants, cloak-rooms, telegraph stations, 
soda fountains, telegraph offices, letter-boxes, safes for the keeping 
of valuables that visitors might not wish to retain on their persons, 
a steam elevator to the gallery or roof, etc. Three of the seven 
departments into which the exhibits were divided, were allotted 
to the main building, viz. : mining and metallurgy, manufactures, 
education, and science. Beginning with the United States exhibit, 
a prominent feature was the great organ, costing $15,000, and 
of the same general natiire was the great Eoosevelt organ in the 
north gallery, with which was connected an electric echo organ 
and an electric suspended organ, all three being played from one 
keyboard. Among other interesting objects in the United States 
department, were models of schools and school furniture, displays 
of the works issued by the Harpers, and other leading publishers, 
Bibles in twenty-nine languages, including a copy of the first 
English Bible printed in America, in 1781, a classified collection 
of all the postage stamps of this and foreign nations: full exhibits 
of silk, woolen, and cotton goods; also of hardware (in which 
Connecticut was well represented); watches and watch -making 
machinery; military uniforms, including a figure of Emperor 
TVilliam of Germany; solid silver models of the Pullman palace 
cars; silver-plated wares, of which the Meriden Britannia Company 
made a noticeable display, and also the Gorham Manufacturing 
Company, the latter exhibiting a magnificent "Century Vase," of 
solid silver, four feet in height, and costing $7,000; cologne 
fountains, free to the visitor; rich displays of furniture (some 
placed in elegantly furnished apartments); and pianos and organs 
by all the leading manufacturers of the country. 

In the British department, the leading attraction was a display 
of bronzes, silver ware, etc., valued at $500,000, and including 



24 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

the " Ilelicon vase," in repousse, and richly enameled (costing' 
$30,000), and reproductions in electro-deposit of ancient works of 
art from British museums. Lady visitors were especially inter- 
ested in a splendid pavilion of hangings of purple velvet, richly 
decorated with specimens of embroidery, the work of ladies of the 
English nobility. Lace, silk, ribbon, and woolen fabrics were 
extensively shown, and a pretty feature was a case of complete 
toilettes for ladies, arranged upon wax figures. The cutlery exhibit 
was exceedingly attractive, and the same remark will apply to the 
exhibits of Axminster, "Wilton, and other costly carpets and rugs, 
alike charming in design and colors. The illustrations and speci- 
mens of fine cut printing, shown by the London GrapliiG and 
London Illustrated News, formed an unusually attractive feature, 
and a full afternoon might well have been devoted to their exam- 
ination. The India exhibit was rare and curious — richly embroid- 
ered silks, carved furniture, weapons studded with precious stones, 
lacquered ware, quaintly-made fans, carpets rich with their Oriental 
coloring, and lastly, an extensive collection of photographs of 
scenes in the East Indies, and of the natives of that distant clime. 
Of the other British dependencies, the exhibits were of a miscella- 
neous character, none of marked interest. 

The largest exhibit in the French section was of porcelain, 
faience, and majolica work, in which the French workmen are 
unsurpassed. The manufacturers of Paris and Lyons made a 
charming shov/ing of velvets and silks, in every design and shade — 
brilliant and bewildering. Several rich court dresses, displayed 
on wax figures, were generally admired. Aubusson tapestries, 
Goupil's, Hachette & Go's illustrated works; the perfumery exhibit; 
maps and plans of the famous Suez canal; musical, scientific, and 
philosophical instruments, and cutlery in charming designs, com- 
manded attention as specialities, but the leading attraction of the 
French section was the wide variety of goods known as Articles cle 
Paris, including thousands of articles formed of the precious 
metals, also steel, ivory, crystal, leather, etc., and used in the 
household or for the adornment of the person. In this class of 
work, the French have no superiors, and their exhibit well illus- 
trated the remarkable taste and ingenuity of their designers and 
workmen. 

Germany also made a large exhibit of artistic works, notably of 
porcelain, including three vases decorated with costly paintings, 
bronzes, and antique shields and swords, rich silks and satins, linens 



HISTORY OF THE ENTERPRISE, 25 

and damasks, ivory articles, Berlin worsteds, scientific and musical 
instruments, quaintly -carved clock-cases from the Black Forest, 
costly furs, inlaid work from Leipzig, church images from Munich, 
together with an altar with figures and painted panels, valued at 
$3,000. Austria's exhibit was most noticeable for its glass work, 
meerschaum goods in elaborate designs, and a rich assortment of 
the world-famed Vienna goods. Italy's display was limited mainly 
to objects of art, and was especially rich in carved work, inlaid 
tables, mosaics, majolica- ware, silks, and Tuscany straw-goods. In 
the Belgian section, there were rich tapestries, laces from Brussels 
and Mechlin, carved pulpits, marble mantels, gold-embroidered 
vestments, and other works of art; while the Netherlands con- 
tributed plans and photographs of the great public works by which 
a part of the country has been rescued from the embrace of the • 
ocean; models of Dutch farms and dwellings, Deft carpets and 
rich goods from the Dutch colonies in the tropics. "Watches, 
wood-carving, and laces were the principal exhibits in the Swiss 
section. The sections of Sweden and Norway will be best remem- 
bered for the groups of wax-figures in costumes, representing the 
different classes of people of those countries. They were remark- 
ably life-like, and were invariably surrounded by throngs of 
admiring spectators. The Chinese and Japanese departments were 
devoted to classes of goods the cheapness of which has brought 
them into American markets; but the articles displayed at the 
Centennial were of the costlier grades, that are rarely imported. 
Carved furniture, silk-embroidered screens, ivory work, China- 
ware, porcelain, lacquered -ware, were exhibited in endless profu- 
sion, and some of the bronze work and porcelain vases were rich 
beyond description. In the Russian section, bronzes and gold and 
silver work were prominent, including table services, enamels on 
gold and silver. A gilt clock, nearly five feet high, presented a 
globe around which the hours moved, a flying angel with one hand 
pointed to the hour, and with the other to heaven. A St. Peters- 
burg firm had a magnificent collection of articles in lapis-lazuli and 
malachite, including a malachite table, ornamented with gilt, worth 
$2,500. As the largest fur-dealing nation in the world, the fur 
exhibit was unsurpassed, and rivahng similar exhibits in the 
Indian and Egyptian collections, was the magnificent display of 
velvets and silks, embroidered with gold. This is but a ghmpse 
of the innumerable attractions of the Main Building — the entire 
volume would fail to give a fair description of its- wonders. 



26 souvenir of the centennial exhibition. 

Machinery Hall. 
This immense structure, next to ttie west of the Main Building, 
had a floor space of twelve acres, and was 1,400 feet long by 360 
feet in width. The cost was $542,300. The general appearance 
was pleasing, both of its exterior and interior. Next to the Main 
Building, it was the principal resort of visitors, and its exhibits 
fully presented the rapid progress of the manufactures in this 
country and other countries. The most notable and conspicuous 
object was the immense Corliss engine, double acting, duplex 
vertical, constructed at the works of George H. Corliss, of Provi- 
dence, R. I., who defrayed its entire cost — $200,000. "Words will 
fail to convey an idea of this great machine to one who has never 
seen it. It rose forty feet above its platform ; its cyhnders were 
of forty-four feet diameter and ten feet stroke, and the fly-wheel, 
weighing fifty-six tons, was thirty feet in diameter. Twenty tubu- 
lar boilers, located in a side building, furnished steam for the 
monster at sixty pounds pressure, giving about 1,400 horse-power. 
It communicated motion to nearly two miles of shafting. The 
exhibits included machines wonderful for the almost human intel- 
ligence of their action, or for the results produced. The hydraulic 
annex, near the Corliss engine, was occupied by an immense 
sunken tank, which furnished water for a long array of hydraulic 
machines which surrounded it. A section was shown of the first 
steam engine ever used in this country, imported from England in 
1753 for pumping from a New Jersey copper mine. It being 
impossible in a limited space to give a detailed description of other 
important exhibits, they vsdU be merely named, leaving it to the 
reader to call to mind their interesting features, and refresh his 
memory from his note-book. Among those probably best remem- 
bered, were the corset weaving machines; the Lyall positive- 
motion loom; the pin machine shown by the Pyramid Pin Co., 
of New Haven, which stuck 180,000 pins per day; the automatic 
spool-cotton winding machines, of the "Willimantic Linen Co.; 
watch-making machines; carpet looms; model of a Virginia tobacco 
factory; India-rubber shoe machines; models of vessels belonging 
to the Massachusetts marine ; the lightning presses, on which were 
printed every morning many thousand copies of the New York 
Herald and Sun, from stereotype plates sent from New York on 
the early train; a Jacquard loom, that wove silk Centennial 
badges ; automatic machines for making envelopes and paper 
collars: Pratt & Whitney's (Hartford) fine assortment of machines 



HISTORY OF THE ENTERPEISE. 27 

for gun and other work; a complete machine-shop fitted up by 
"William Sellers & Co., of Philadelphia; ingenious tack-making 
machines; the 1,200-pounder breech-loading Krupp cannon; singu- 
lar German gas-engines, deriving a steady motive power from the 
explosion of common gas; and a host of minor articles of special 
rather than general interest. 

The Art Gallery. 
Memorial Hall, or as it was more generally termed by visitors, the 
"Art Gallery," differed from the other buildings on the grounds, 
in that it was designed as a permanent structure. The building 
was erected at a cost of $1,500,000 by the State of Pennsylvania 
and city of Philadelphia, as a memorial of the Centennial year, 
and will be occupied hereafter by the Pennsylvania Museum of 
Industrial Art. The material is granite, with roof of iron and 
glass, and the structure is wholly fire-proof. From the center 
rises a four-sided dome, topped by an immense globe, upon which 
rests the figure of Columbia, of colossal size. Enormous bronze 
horses, controlled by female figures, occupy pedestals at either 
side of the front approach, and on the right of the edifice a 
bronze group depicts the firing of a shell from a mortar. 
Spacious as is Memorial Hall, it was quite too limited in area 
for the exhibition of the extensive collections of paintings and 
statuary that were sent to Philadelphia, and it was found neces- 
sary to construct an annex affording 60,000 additional square 
feet of wall space. Entering Memorial Hall by the main 
entrance, the first attraction was the statuary in the rotunda, 
which served to introduce one to the rich treasures of painting 
and of sculpture so lavishly distributed throughout the building 
and the annex. In accordance with the general plan, reference 
will be made only to some of the more striking exhibits. In the 
American department these embraced Eothermal's Battle of 
Gettysburg, Eastman Johnson's favorite " Kentucky Home," 
Moran's "Hot Springs of the Yellowstone," Kensett's "Conway 
Valley," Healy's portraits, Bierstadt's "Valley of the Yosemite," 
Briscoe's fine marine work "A Breezy Day off Dieppe," Prof. 
"Weir's (New Haven) "Gun Foundry " and " Confessional," Page's 
" Farragut Entering Mobile Bay," Thompson's " Old Oaken 
Bucket," etc. In the EngUsh department, the " Marriage of the 
Prince of "Wales," loaned by Queen Victoria, a large and richly 
filled canvas, was the center of attraction, and was always sur- 



28 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

rounded by eager throngs. " Rizpah Defending her Sons from 
the Eagles," in the German section, was the largest canvas in the 
exhibition, and one that commanded wrapt attention. Among 
other works that will be remembered was Clement's "Death of 
Csesar," "Ledaand the Swan," the large equestrian portrait of the 
Crown Prince "William Henry, Wagner's " Scene in the Circus 
Maximus at Rome," "Surrender of Sedan," "The Destruction of 
Pompeii'' Murillo's "Christ on the Cross," and a copy of Raffael's 
" Galileo before the Inquisition," etc. The display of statuary in 
the Italian department was extensive and of surpassing interest. 
The photographic annex, connected with the Art department, was 
located to the eastward of Memorial Hall, and contained a very 
large collection of photographic views, those of the United States 
being of a superior order. 

The United States Building. 
In general interest, the exhibits in this building were not sur- 
passed by those of any other department, and the ample space of 
the passageways was a decided convenience to visitors. The 
structure cost only $110,000. Its exterior was of a pleasing 
design, and inside, the skill of the architect gave to the heavy 
frame-work and columns an appearance of lightness and grace 
that attracted the eye at once. The departments of army and navy 
exhibits were of special interest. The working of the signal 
service, by which coming meteorological changes are predicted, 
was illustrated by a fully-equipped "weather station." The 
Quai'termaster's department exhibited figures clothed in the seve- 
ral uniforms that have been worn in the United States army, 
together with camp equipage, and machinery for making clothing, 
and a cutting machine, cutting through a dozen or twenty thick- 
nesses of cloth. In the ordnance section were found some of the 
principal attractions of the building, notably the operation of 
making cartridges and bullets ; collections of fire-arms from the 
old flint-lock of the Revolutionary war to the repeating rifle of 
to-day, Gatling and other guns of similar design, etc. In the 
Navy department section, a striking object was a full-rigged 
model of the sloop-of-war "Antietam," forty-one feet in length, and 
near by a model of the French line-of -battle ship, "Dante," built 
about 1600, illustrated, by comparison, the changes in naval con- 
struction. Relics of various Arctic exploring expeditions, with 
paintings of Arctic scenery, models of Esquimaux sledges, scores 




ART GALLERY. 



HISTORY OF THE ENTERPRISE. 31" 

of modeiG of forts, batteries, and weapons, and two brass guns 
used by Hernando Cortez in his desperate Mexican expedition, 
each, and all commanded attention. The Treasury department 
showed specimens of paper-money, coast survey charts, and seve- 
ral models of light-houses and their apparatus; the Agricultural 
department, an exhaustive exhibit, in glass cases, of soils, native 
woods, including the giant trees of the Pacific slope, twenty to 
thirty feet in diameter, models of fruits, vegetables, and grains, 
cotton, flax, and other plants of that nature. In addition to 
innumerable patents, the Interior department's exhibit embraced 
curious illustrations of the mode of life, habits, and costumes of the 
Indian tribes, with their weapons and household utensils; a canoe, 
sixty feet in length, made from a single log by the Vancouver 
Island Indians, and a reduced copy of a large wood carving at 
Fort Simpson, British Columbia, representing the body and wings 
of a bird xAth. a dog's head, which the Indians revere as a copy 
of the sacred bird which directed their ancestors from Asia to 
America. In the museum branch were shown Gen. "Washington's 
clothing, camp equipage, etc., magnificent swords presented to 
naval officers by sovereigns of the East, and a singular model of 
an invention by the lamented President Lincoln, for lifting 
steamers over sand-bars on the western rivers. In the Post-Office 
department's section v/as the exhibition post-ofiice, representing, 
in practical operation, every feature of the postal system ; a ma- 
chine manufacturing postal cards, and another making stamped 
envelopes. The extensive and valuable museum of the Smithson- 
ian Institute was well represented by stuffed specimens of Ameri- 
can animals, birds and fishes, weapons and methods of their 
capture, including a finely-executed model illustrating a whaling 
scene, with the harpooning and flaying of the whale shown. On 
the grounds adjoining the Government Building were exhibited 
a sample monitor turret, containing two great fifteen-inch guns, 
boats used in Arctic expeditions, including one made by the crew 
of the " Polaris," from the wreck of their vessel, army wagons of 
the latest designs, rifled cannons and mortars, including a 20-inch 
Eodman gun, requiring a 1,080 lb. shot and 200 lbs. of powder; 
an iron light-house with light and fog-bell coroplete, and a speci- 
men of the "Syren," or steam-fog horn, which can be heard a 
distance of over thirty miles in clear weather. 



32 souvenib of the centennial exhibition. 

The "Woman's Pavilion. 
Tliis structure owed its existence to the labors of the "Woman's 
Centennial Executive Committee, and generous help extended by 
ladies who organized associations throughout the States for the 
purpose of raising funds and arranging for the representation of 
woman's skill and ingenuity. The structure, which was of an 
attractive architectural design, cost but $30,000, and the only 
noticeable fault was that it did not afford sufficient space for the 
exhibits. The entire floor and wall space was 102,400 square feet, 
of which 96,000 feet was available for exhibition purposes, exclu- 
sive of the aisles and fountains. In this department, the exclusive 
management was in the hands of the ladies, and none of the other 
sex were to be found exercising any authority or duties whatever. 
Even the engine which supplied the power for the building was 
controlled by a lady, Miss Emma Allison, of Grimsby, Iowa. 
The exhibits gave high evidence of the ability of woman, not only 
in the departments of labor allotted to her sex by general consent, 
but in some to which the other sex lays principal claim. Some of 
the inventions were of an exceedingly practical and useful nature; 
for instance, a machine for executing the difficult work of washing 
blankets, barrel covers that could be locked, a life-saving mattress, 
a combined chair and traveling-bag, self-fitting dress patterns, 
mangling and dish-washing machines, the latter not only cleans- 
ing but drying the plates. In the department of artistic work, 
however, the exhibits were most numerous. The displays of 
painting and statuary were rather limited, but numerous fine wood 
carvings and ornamented porcelain pieces were shown. Embroid- 
eries and works of that character were to be seen everywhere, the 
handsomest contributions being from foreign countries, notably 
the cases of embroideries and needle-work by the ladies of the 
Eoyal School of Art and Needle-Work, which is under the patron- 
age of Queen Victoria. A set of velvet covers for doors, embroid- 
ered in gold thread, was contributed by the wife of the Bey of 
Tunis, and elegant embroideries, feather work, and paintings 
were sent from the female art schools of Paris. The nuns of the 
Roman Catholic convents and seminaries of Canada offered several 
cases of embroideries of surpassing beauty and elegance, and 
Japan exhibited ornamental screens, painted and inlaid, quaintly- 
figured silks, and lacquered work-boxes, writing-desks, artificial 
flowers, and raised pictures in wool. In th3 Brazilian exhibit 
were some superb specimens of flower-v/ork in leather^ and a beau- 




%'^-4ZZ^-/N 



vs/^arviEN's r>A.vii^ioisr. 



tusT^x;' 



HISTORY OF THE ENTERPRISE. 33 

tiful mode], in cork, of a castle. Somewhat of the same nature 
were models of the Catholic convents, etc., above referred to, 
executed in wood or plaster, while the ladies of this country ex- 
hibited photographic views of various charitable institutions con- 
ducted under their auspices. The literary department, which, by 
the way, was placed in an unfavorable part of the pavilion, was 
rich in the writings of the best-known authoresses of this country, 
foreign writers being very slightly represented. Manufacturing 
was represented by carpet and other looms, in charge of female 
operatives; a silk ribbon loom, whose products, of a national de- 
sign, were extensively purchased for souvenirs; a printing-ofSce, 
with lady compositors at work setting type for the Neio Century 
of the Exhibition (a journal conducted by the ladies in charge of 
the pavilion), and a Hoe printing press, upon which the paper was 
printed. This brief sketch very faintly outlines the varied attrac- 
tions of this department, which afforded material for a full day of 
sight-seeing. 

The Agricultural Building. 

Although only one-third the size of the principal buildings, this 
was a grand structure, constructed mainly of wood and glass, the 
exterior painted a sombre brown, and the roof dark green. It 
consisted of a nave 820 feet in length and 100 wide, crossed by 
three transepts; the entire edifice covering an area of several 
acres. The cost was $260,000. The exhibits were of never-end- 
ing interest, and it is justly claimed that the display was the 
largest and most complete in all its departments ever seen at any 
"World's fair. The showing of agricultural implements indicated 
the rapid strides that the country has taken toward intelligent and 
scientific farming, and the success that has been attained in reliev- 
ing the farmers from the heavy burden of manual labor to vvhich 
their fathers were subjected. " Mowing-machines, plows, grain- 
cleaning machinery, horse-rakes, reapers, and the smaller imple- 
ments v/ere shown in endless variety. A real curiosity in compar- 
ison with the graceful products of to-day, was a rude plow made 
in Connecticut before the Revolutionary war, exhibited by the 
Higganum Manufacturing Co. Model stables were shown, but of 
rather too erpensive a character to be available for other than the 
wealthiest farmers. The wine industry was well represented by 
products of the vineyards of Cahfornia, Ohio, Missouri, and Cen- 
tral New York, and in adjoining aisles were exhibited a variety of 
articles directly or indirectly connectad with agricultural pursixts, 



34 SOUVEXIR OF THE CENTEXXIAL EXHIBITIDX. 

siicli as specimens of starch, self-raising flour, bread, native T/ood.3, 
stuffed animals and birds, cured moss for upholstering, artificial 
hatching apparatus, evaporators for drjdng fruits, etc., pickles, 
preserves, sheaves of wheat, samples of seeds, etc. Oregon exhib- 
ited a specimen: of dried cider from which the water had been 
evaporated, and the residue then rolled around a wooden roller 
ready for transportation. When dissolved in water, it is ready 
for us3. Another curiosity, illustrating the same system, was a 
brick of solidified apple-butter. New Hampshire exhibited two 
stuffed hogs, one killed at nineteen months, and weighing 1,253 
pounds, the other at twenty-one months, weighing 1,307 pounds, 
also a plow thirteen feet in length, which was made for Daniel 
"Webster, and which required four oxen to draw it. A very inter- 
esting exhibit was a large case containing California silk-worms at 
work, and affording an attractive illustration of the habits of these 
valuable little toilers. The foreign exhibits were mainly of agri- 
cultural machinery, canned goods, etc., and Great Britain's section 
contained an ingenious apparatus for suckling young calves, pigs, 
and sheep, consisting of a wooden trough filled with milk, pro- 
jecting tubes ending in rubber nipples. France and Germany 
showed mainly wines, vegetable oils, etc., and Italy had an attrac- 
tive collection of similar products from her warmer climate, 
together with oranges and other fruits which are so largely 
brought to this country from the Mediterranean ports. Russia 
surpassed every other country in her exhibits of grains, which 
were arranged upon pyramidal stands, bags collected at the base, 
and majolica vases at the top holding ripaned ears. The Pomo- 
logical Annex, a large wooden building to the eastward of Agri- 
cultural Hall, was visited mainly during the later days of the 
exhibition, when the fall fruits wera available for display. 

Horticultural Hall. 
The Horticultural Building was one of the handsomest on the 
grounds. The design was graceful, and the variegated colors of 
the exterior were in perfect keeping. Its length was 383 feet, 
and width 193. The cost, $300,000, was defrayed by the city of 
Philadelphia, and the structure is to be a permanent ornament to 
Fairmount Park. During the Exhibition, the conservatory was 
filled with a collection of rare plants and trees, principally of the 
luxurious growth of the tropics. Sago, India-rubber, bananas, 
etc., aie f imiliar in this northern country, yet few have other 



HISTORY OF THE ENTERPRISE. 35 

than a general idea of their growth, hence, the rubber-tree with 
its heavy leaves, the sago, date, cocoa, and fan-palms, the latter 
with its great leaves which find their way to every town and 
village in summer, the banana-tree with its heavy clusters of fruit? 
orange and lemon-trees illustrating the progress of the fruit from 
the bud to maturity, and the camphor-tree with its sharply-cut leaves, 
were alike interesting to the visitor. The hot-houses contained 
thousands of plants from different climes. Landscape gardening 
was variously illustrated, and there was an excellent showing of 
the articles used in the business of the florist. Placed in this hall, 
seemingly for the reason that no good place could be found for it 
elsewhere, was an "electro-magnetic orchestra," made by a Phila- 
delphia firm. The machine was similar to an ordinary orchestrion 
excepting that the music was read off by electricity, and commu- 
nicated to the keys. The notes were cut as perforations in paper 
stretched over metallic plates, and, passing under charged feelers 
or "readers," were distinguished and properly played. Outside 
the building, twenty-five acres were devoted to a grand orna- 
mental garden, which was filled with a large variety of native 
and foreign plants, and on the north side of the building was 
the famous collection of rhododendrons from the Knapp IliU 
nurseries in England. 

Close of the Exhibition, Sale of Buildings, etc. 
Immediately after the close of the Exhibition, the removal of 
articles was commenced, and within ten days the buildings were 
nearly stripped of their contents (excepting those designed to 
remain for the permanent exhibition), and many of the smaller 
buildings had been demolished and removed from the grounds. 
The change from bustling activity to inaction was remarkable. 
"No Admittance " met the eye everywhere, rail fences and cords 
shut out intruders from many of the sections, and the Japanese 
and Chinese buildings were closed in by canvas or board walls. 
Machinery Hall was listless, the great Corliss engine was at rest, 
the machines had ceased their clatter and their buzzing, and many 
of them were enveloped in canvas. The Government Building 
was closed to visitors, Agricultural Hall was in chaos, the Women's 
Pavilion was already stripped by the exhibitors, and the Art Gal- 
lery had but a few sections left complete to attract the visitor. 
Dismantled as it was, the regular admission price of fifty cents 
was maintained, and when an indignant visitor inquired, "Why 



36 SOUVENIB OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

do they charge fifty cents to come in if we are not to see things ? " 
he was met by the reply, "Perhaps the charge is made as much 
to keep out the curious as for any other reason." Persons who 
visited the buildings to make purchases under the impression that 
better bargains might be had after the close, were disappointed, 
for articles were not to be had at any figure. The waiters in the 
great restaurants found time to wait upon the solitary customer 
who dropped in, and the steam-cars often made a circuit of the 
grounds without a passenger. In short, the Exhibition was dead. 

The Main Building was purchased for a permanent exhibition 
for the sum of $250,000, and many of the ornamental structures 
within it, belonging to foreign countries, and also some from 
Machinery Hall, were presented in aid of the project. This exhi- 
bition was in progress through 1877, and with fair prospects of 
its continuance successfully for an indefinite period. The cost 
value of all the buildings was about $2,500,000, and the amount 
realized from the sales was but $296,160, including: Main Build- 
ing, $250,000; the two mineral annexes, $1,000, cost $19,000; the 
Carriage Building, $4,100, cost $55,000 ; Photographic Hall, 
$1,000, cost about $23,000; Art Gallery annex, $3,000, cost 
$110,000; Judges Hall, $1,500, cost $30,000; Medical depart- 
ment building, $300; Public Comfort building, $1,000, cost 
$30,750; Corliss boiler-house, $1,400, cost $20,976; Music Pavil- 
ion, $100; Agricultural Hall, $13,110, cost $275,000; Pomologi- 
cal building, $1,250, cost $19,000; Butter and Cheese building, 
$1,100, cost $15,000; Centennial National Bank building, includ- 
ing fixtures, $600, cost $7,000; Pennsylvania Educational Hall, 
$900, cost $12,000; Turkish Cafe, $250, cost, $4,000; American 
Restaurant, $1,100, cost $30,000, The quaint Japanese house, 
with garden filled with trees, shrubs, and plants from Japan, was 
presented to the City of Philadelphia, by the Japanese Imperial 
Commission. 

One of the best features of the Exhibition was the railway, 
which was patronized not only by tired visitors in passing from 
one place to another, but by many during the hot weather for the 
refreshing coolness resulting from the movement of the open cars. 
A total of 3,784,142 passengers traveled on the trains during the 
Exhibition. 

In the number of exhibitors and attendance, the Philadelphia 
Exhibition surpassed any other ever held, with the single exception 
of that at Paris in 18C7, and perhaps the Vienna Exhibition in 



HISTORY OF THE ENTERPRISE. 37 

1S73. The total number of exhibitors at Philadelphia v/as 30,864, 
and one of the best evidences of its international character, and of 
the interest it excited abroad, is found in the fact that over 20,000 
of the exhibitors were from foreign nations. The United States 
headed the list, of course, and next in order was Spain and her 
colonies, 3,822; with Great Britain and colonies third, 3,584. 

The attendance of visitors was something marvelous. They 
came by tens of thousands. Yet such was the grand scope of the 
Exhibition, that one hundred thousand on a single day did not 
inconveniently crowd the buildings or grounds, excepting at gate- 
ways, passageways in the buildings, or occasional other places 
where the space was unavoidably restricted. In the earlier days, 
during May, June, and part of July, the attendance was compara- 
tively limited, and was largely confined to residents of Pennsyl- 
vania and adjacent States. The record of the opening day showed 
a total of only 76,172 paying visitors, but on the day following 
the number dropped to 14,723, and the next to 10,251, on 
the 16th to only 7,056. The average for the month was but 
19,946, and June witnessed an increase to only 26,756. Meantime, 
the daily expenses of the Exhibition were enormous, and exceeded 
the receipts on many days. The ceremonies of the week of the 
Fourth helped to swell the total for the month, but the average 
daily attendance fell 2,000 short of that of the preceding month, 
— due very largely to the intense heat which prevailed, causing 
numerous cases of sunstroke on the grounds. August's record 
was better, its daily average being 33,650; and in September the 
rush for which the managers had so long and confidently v/aited, 
at last fairly set in. The month opened with 34,182; Connecticut 
day, the Tth, had 64,059; Massachusetts day, a week later, 78,977; 
New York day, the 21st, 117,941 ; and Pennsylvania day, the 28th, 
added such throngs of her citizens to the concourse as to roll up a 
grand total of 257,169. On no day did the attendance fall short 
of 50,000, and the daily average was 81,960. In October the rush 
continued, the average being nearly 90,000; and during the ten clos- 
ing days of the Exhibition in November, the daily average closely 
approximated 100,000, During the 159 days, the total admissions 
were 9,789,392, of which 8,004,325 were paying, making the total 
receipts $3,813,749.75. The free admissions, 1,785,067, were of 
oflBcials, exhibitors, journalists, and employes on the grounds. The 
days of largest attendance of paying visitors, in their order, were; 
3 



38 



SOUYENIR 07 THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



Opening day, May 10th, - - - 76,172 

New Jersey day, Aug. 24th, - - 56,325 

Connecticut day, Sept. 7th, - - 64,059 

September 9th, 99,984 

Massachusetts day, Sept. 14th, - 85,795 

September 20th, .... 101,498 

NewYorkday, Sept. 21et, - - 122,003 

Pennsylvania day, Sept. 28th, - - 257,109 

September 30th, .... 103,385 

Rhode Island day, Oct. 5th, - - 89,000 



New Hampshire day, Oct. 12th, - 101,541 

October 18th, 124,777 

Del. and Maryland day, Oct. 19th, • 161,355 

Ohio day, Oct. 26th, .... 123,300 

October 27th, 95,563 

November 1st, 107,715 

November 2d, 115,298 

November 8th, 90,588 

November 9th, - ... - 170,755 

Closing day, Nov. 10th, - - - 106,474 



It is of course impossible to ascertain the exact number of 
different persons wbo visited the Exhibition, for the records show 
nothing further than the number of admissions. Another interest- 
ing fact, quite as impossible to ascertain, is the number of non-resi- 
dent visitors. These have been estimated at over two miUions, and 
placing the expenditures of each at an exceedingly low average of 
twenty dollars for railroad fares, board, etc., gives a grand total of 
expenditures that is enormous. Philadelphia's generosity to the 
project in its days of discouragement was handsomely repaid 
when the days of its prosperity came; for every half-dollar admis- 
sion fee represented five or ten times that sum paid directly to her 
citizens by visitors for board and other expenses. 




THE CENTENNIAL MEDALS. 

The above engravings represent the largest size of "Centennial 
Medals " heretefore described, and which were purchased in large 
numbers as souvenirs, and to some extent, during the earlier days 
of their sale, with the primary object of aiding the exhibition 
funds. Of handsome workmanship and effective design, these 
medals cannot fail to be regarded by their possessors as attractive 
memorials of the great International Exhibition. 



CHAPTER II 



GEN. JOSEPH R HAWLEY. 

Sketch of His Early Life — Educated for the Law, abandons 
ITS Practice and Enters the Ranks of Journalism — Called 
TO THE Field by the Guns of Sumter — A Fine Military Rec- 
ord Rewarded by Rapid Promotion — Crowned with Civic Hon- 
ors BY the People of His State — Chosen as President of the 
United States Centennial Commission — His Services in that 
Responsible Office — Extract from an Address at Steinway 
Hall on the Results of the Exhibition. 

The choice of a citizen of Connecticut as President of the 
United States Centennial Commission was an honor not only to 
the man, but to the State. It was a position of immense respon- 
sibility, requiring great executive talents, and a brain able to cope 
with the important questions destined to decide the success or the 
failure of the enterprise. The result proved that the selection was 
an excellent one. From the day of his appointment down to the 
close of the Exhibition, Gen. Hawley gave his best energies to the 
work before him. Through all the period of opposition to the 
scheme, when the newspapers were denouncing it as chimerical, 
when funds came but slowly, and during the early days of the 
Exhibition, when the small attendance threatened great financial 
loss. Gen. Hawley never faltered, nor admitted the possibility of 
failure. Associated with him in daily councils, were many 
kindred spirits, and their work not only made the Exhibition the 
greatest success as a display of the arts and industries of all 
nations that the world had ever witnessed, but also insured its 
financial success. Such a record as that is one of which the 
whole nation may justly be proud, and especially Connecticut, that 
one of her honored citizens contributed to results unsurpassed by 
those of any of the great exhibitions of the old world, A few 
words as to the life and pubUc services of Gen. Hawley may prop- 
erly be inserted here. 

(39) 



40 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Joseph R. Hawley was born at Stewartsville, Richmond Co., 
North Carolina. His father, Rev. Francis Hawley, is a native of 
Farmington, Conn., a descendant of one of the early settlers of 
Connecticut. His mother, Mary McLeod, a native of Fayetteville, 
N. C, was of Scotch descent. His father went South at twenty- 
one, engaged in mercantile life, married, and entered the ministry, 
resided in North and South Carolina fourteen years, and returned 
to Connecticut in November, 1837. Young Hawley attended 
the common school and the Hartford Grammar School, and, on 
the removal of the family to Cazenovia, N. Y., in 1842, the 
Oneida Conference Seminary. He entered the sophomore class 
in Hamilton College, N. Y,, in 1844, graduating honorably in 
1847. He stood well in his class as a linguist and successful prize 
speaker, and was a lover of miscellaneous and political reading, a 
fine debater, and active in physical exercises and amusements. 
He received the highest honor conferred by the students them- 
selves, being unanimously elected valedictorian of the Union Lite- 
rary Society, one of the two into which the College was divided. 
After graduation, he taught school three winters, and studied law. 
He entered the law office of John Hooker, Esq., in Farmington, 
in May, 1849, and September 1, 1850, the firm of Hooker & 
Hawley opened a law office in Hartford. 

He was an ardent opponent of American slavery from his ear- 
lier years, and attached himself to the Free Soil party. In the 
spring of 1851, he became Chairman of the Free Soil State Com- 
mittee, and continued as such till the organization was merged in 
the Republican party. He was a frequent contributor to the 
EepubUcan, the weekly paper published as the organ of the Free 
Soilers, and afterwards consolidated with the Press. 

In the meantime, Hooker & Hawley were growing into a pros- 
perous law business. Mr. Hawley was one of the most active in 
the organization of the RepubHcan party in 1854 and 1855, and 
gave several months' time on the stump, and otherwise, to the 
cause in the famous campaign of 1856. In February, 1857, he 
united with "William Faxon, under the firm name of Hawley & 
Faxon, in the purchase of the Hartford Evening Press (daily) and 
Connecticut Press (weekly), which had been in existence one year 
as the organ of the Republican party, and thus finally abandoned 
the practice of law. In the course of the next year or two he 
invited to Hartford, Charles Dudley Warner, then of Chicago, and 
four years later, Stephen A. Hubbard of West Winsted, with 



GEN. JOSEPH R. HAWLEY. 41 

whom he has ever since been associated in editing and publishing. 
After three years of hard labor the Press was put upon a paying 
foundation. Mr. Faxon left it to become Chief Clerk of the 
Navy Department, where he served eight years most honorably 
and usefully, part of the time as Assistant Secretary of the Navy. 

Fort Sumter having fallen, Abraham Lincoln's call for 75,000 
troops reached Hartford, Monday morning, April 15, 1861. J. 
E. Hawley-and Mr. Drake united in raising a miKtary company, 
and Mr. Hawley engaged Sharp's rifles for them at the factory, 
upon his own responsibility. Geo. S. Burnham, as an experienced 
militia oflBcer, was invited to be captain, and accepted, but he was 
made Colonel of the 1st regiment, succeeding Col. Dan Tyler, 
promoted, and Mr. Hawley became captain of Rifle Co. A, First Regi- 
ment of three months' troops, which company was fully enrolled 
and accepted Thursday evening, April 16th — the first purely vol- 
unteer organization completed in the State. 

The regiment proceeded to Washington, entered Virginia in 
May, and was engaged in the battle of Bull Run, July 21st. Capt. 
Hawley was honorably mentioned in the report of Gen. Keys, his 
brigade commander. The regiment's terra of service expired 
that day. Gov. Buckingham appointed Captain Hawley Major, 
and assigned him to duty in charge of recruits at Hartford. He 
united with Col. Alfred H. Terry (now Brigadier-General U. S. A.) 
in raising the 7th Connecticut, of which he became Lieutenant- 
Colonel. 

The regiment was mustered into service Sept. 19, 1861, went to 
"Washington, was assigned to the Port Royal expedition, under 
Gen. T. W. Sherman, and was first to land at Port Royal after its 
capture by the navy, Nov. 10th. It had been selected to lead the 
assault, in case one was necessary. In December, on Tybee Isl- 
and, it united with the 46th New York, in beginning the siege of 
Fort Pulaski. During the bombardment, April 10 and 11, 1862, 
Lt.-Col. Hawley was field officer of the trenches. The regiment 
won the honor of being assigned to the command of the captured 
fort, and entered it immediately. Col. Terry was commissioned a 
brigadier-general. Hawley asked that the regiment might join 
Benham's expedition against Charleston, and it left Pulaski about 
May 30th. It had a prominent part in the bloody battle of Seces- 
sion ville, June 1 6th, and was highly commended for its bravery. 
Hawley received his commission as Colonel a few days after. He 
was engaged in most of the active operations of the Department of 



42 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

the South for the two years ensuing — the battle of Pocotaligo, 
October 20, 1862, the capture of Jacksonville, the fort on the 
St. Johns, under Brennan, etc. In February, 1863, he was assigned 
to the command of Fernandina, Fla., and the surrounding region. 
In April he was called to Port Royal to command that port and 
base of supplies during the iron-clad attack on Sumter. Return- 
ing to Florida, he was ordered to the command of St. Augustine 
and vicinity, but four companies of the regiment, under Lt.-Col. 
Rodman, having suffered severely in leading the landing on Mor- 
ris Island, and the assault on Fort Wagner, August 16, 1863, 
Hawley asked permission of Gen. Gillmore to join them, and did 
so immediately. The regiment had a very honorable part in the 
siege, Capt. Gray commanding the 300-pounder Farrott, others 
managing all the light mortars, and others preparing ammunition 
at the magazines. During the latter part of the siege. Col. Haw- 
ley had command of a brigade. After the surrender of Forts 
Wagner and Gregg, and the complete possession of Morris Island, 
the regiment was ordered to St. Helena Island, where it entered 
vigorously upon battalion drill in small boats, with a view to 
a night assault on Fort Sumter. It lay ten days, in October, on 
Folly Island, expecting nightly an order for the assault. Return- 
ing to St. Helena, it was next ordered to join the Florida expe- 
dition under Gen, Truman Seymour, which, after many hard- 
ships, culminated in the terribly bloody battle of Olustee, February 
20, 1864. Col. Hawley commanded a brigade, composed of the 
7th Connecticut, 3d and 7th New Hampshire, and 8th U. S. 
colored. The Seventh led the assault and covered the retreat as 
skirmishers. 

Of about 5,000 troops engaged on the Union side, the loss was 
nearly 1,900 killed, wounded, and captured. Those captured 
im wounded were comparatively few. After the painful but suc- 
cessful retreat to Jacksonville, which was immediately fortified, 
Gen. Seymour sent forward a warm recommendation that Col. 
Hawley be promoted for gallantry at Olustee. 

In April the regiment was ordered to Virginia, and Hawley, at 
Gloucester, Va., was assigned to the second brigade in the First 
Division (Terry's) in the Tenth Corps, under Gillmore, in Butler's 
Army of the James. In May all the armies moved; Hawley was in 
the landing upon Bermuda Hundred; the heavy battle of Drewry's 
Bluff, the battles in May and June around Bermuda Hundred, the 
movement against Petersburg, under Gillmore, in June, the Deep 



GEN. JOSEPH R. HAWLEY. 43 

Bottom and Deep Run (or Fuessell's Mill) battles of August 14th 
and leth, after which Generals Terry, D. B. Berry, and B. F. 
Butler recommended his promotion. Thence his command was 
sent to the trenches in front of Petersburg. His troops were 
about a month opposite the famous mine, very close to the enemy's 
lines, and incessantly engaged in picket firing and fortifying. Col. 
Hawley started for Connecticut about September 12th, with the 
three years' men of the 6th and 7th, whose terms were expiring, 
and whose taking home, paying off, and discharge, he superin- 
tended. At New Haven he received his promotion as a brigadier. 
Returning to camp in Virginia, after midnight, October 12 th, he 
was by sunrise engaged in the battle of October 13th, on the 
Derby road to Richmond, north of the James, part of a great 
general movement. Assigned temporarily to Birney's division of 
colored troops, he commanded it in the battle of October 27th, 
on the New Market road. 

Very soon after he was detailed to take 3,000 picked troops and 
proceed to New York, to keep the peace during the presidential 
election. Gen. Butler had the general command, and remained 
in the city, the immediate command of the troops at the forts in the 
Narrows and on ferry-boats close around the city, devolving on 
Hawley. It was a wearing trip of a fortnight in the worst 
v/eather. In December, Gen. Terry received orders to capture 
Fort Fisher, and taking about 6,000 troops, turned over the com- 
mand of his division of about 7,000 men to Hawley, who held the 
extreme right of the whole army from Deep Bottom and New 
Market Heights, nearly around to Fort Harrison. A superior offi- 
cer having returned from leave, to take the command, Hawley 
sought and obtained orders to join his old friend Terry, and his 
own brigade at Fort Fisher, and did so. Gen. Terry made him 
chief of staff of the reorganized Tenth Corps, and shortly after, 
in conjunction with Schofield, the combined forces captured Wil- 
mington. As the rebels were chased through that town, Febru- 
ary 22, 1864, their return fire were the last hostile shots he heard 
in the war. 

Gen. Schofield assigned him to the command of "Wilmington, 
Fort Fisher, and the other defenses of the river, and the four 
southeastern counties of North Carolina, with a base of supplies 
for Sherman's army. Wilmington was crowded with refugees. 
Gen. Hawley was obliged for a time to feed 15,000. It was his 
native region, and the political and social reconstruction of society 



44 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

interested him greatly. In March tlie rebels delivered to him 
there very nearly 10,000 Union prisoners from Anderson ville, 
Macon, Salisbury, etc., over 3,000 of whom were sick. A violent 
and deadly typhus fever broke out among them, and the refugees 
in the dirty and neglected town. It was stamped down and 
fought out by vigorous sanitary measures, and by April and May 
it was a healthy place. 

In June, 1865, the work at Wilmington being mostly over. Gen. 
Hawley accepted an invitation from Gen. Terry to become his 
chief of staff at Richmond, where the latter was in command of 
the Department of Virginia. Gen. Terry and staff occixpied the 
Jeff. Davis mansion. The government of the State was military, 
and a multitude of troublesome inquiries and complications were 
constantly arising. Both Terry and Hawley strove diligently for 
peace and reconciliation, not forgetting complete freedom and 
justice for all classes. In October Hawley was breveted Major- 
General for gallant and meritorious services during the war, and 
receiving his final leave of absence, he returned to Hartford, though 
his discharge did not take effect till January 15, 1866. 

He was nominated for governor by the republicans, and elected 
ever James E. English, democrat. He served his term from May, 

1866, to May, 1867. The session of the General Assembly Was 
shorter, and the expenditures of the State were less than during 
any other year since 1860. Defeated by Mr. English in April, 

1867, Gen. Hawley declined any further candidacy. In the mean- 
time, he had brought about a consolidation of the Press and 
Courant, having for active partners C. D. Warner, S. A. Hubbard, 
and W. H. Goodrich, and with immaterial changes, Hawley, 
Goodrich & Co. have published the Courant since 1866. Having 
obtained a contract for the other morning paper, the daily Post, 
they passed it and the evening Press to the parties who have 
since published the consolidated journals as the Hartford Evening 
Post. 

Gen. Hawley took the most active part as editor and speaker in 
every yearly campaign in the State, and frequently in other 
States, speaking two or three months in each presidential cam- 
paign. He has been a delegate or alternate delegate to every 
national convention of his party for many years. He decided to 
leave his command in 1864 to attend the convention at Baltimore. 
In 1868 he came very near obtaining the caucus nomination for 
United States Senator, but Gov. Buckingham was successful, and 



GEN. JOSEPH R. HAWLET. 45 

nobody honored the good war governor more sincerely than Gen. 
Haw ley. A few days afterward Gen. Hawley presided over the 
great national republican convention at Chicago, which nominated 
Gen. Grant for the presidency, and in his opening speech developed 
the sentiment of the convention in favor of sound financial 
measures. He has been two or three terms president of State 
conventions. In 1872 he was secretary of the committee on reso- 
lutions in the Philadelphia Convention. In the Cincinnati Con- 
vention of 1876 he was chairman of the committee on resolutions. 
In the Free Soil National Convention of 1852 he was an active 
member of the committee on resolutions. In 1872 he was a 
candidate for the United States Senatorship. In the republican 
caucus he received ninety-eight votes out of one hundred and ten. 
But a few republicans united with the democracy and reelected 
Hon. 0. S. Ferry. In September of that year Hon. J. L. Strong, 
representative from the First District, died, and Gen. Hawley ran 
against Hon. W. W. Eaton for the vacancy, and was elected. He 
was reelected for two years the next spring, but defeated in 1875 
and 1876. He served three years. He was a member of the 
committee on claims, on the centennial commission, on military 
affairs, and on banking and currency. 

At the first organization of the United States Centennial Com- 
mission in May, 1872, he was elected president of that body, and 
was reelected annually thereafter — the last two terms unanimously. 

From the beginning to the end he had faith that the Exhibition 
would be well managed and successful. The national government 
having directed that an Exhibition be held, he believed the 
national government should contribute to the cost. The financial 
crisis commencing in 1873 having seriously checked the enter- 
prise, the i;sual annual report of the Commission presented the 
facts to President Grant, and application was made to Congress in 
the spring of 1874 for a grant of three millions. Gen. Hawley, 
then a member of the House, made a speech in favor of the appro- 
priation,* May 7, 1874, upon the obligations of the government to 
the Exhibition, He represented its value, the ability of the 
country to present a worthy exhibition, and to manage it well, all 
of which has been amply justified by the splendid success of the 
enterprise. The bill failed then, but in the winter of 1875-6 Con- 
gress loaned the Centennial Board of Finance a million and a 
half, which sufficed. 

Gen. Havv^ley's last Congressional term expired March 4, 1875. 



46 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

The Centennial Commission unanimously voted that he be requested 
to go to Philadelphia and devote his entire time to the work. In 
June he took up his temporary residence in Philadelphia, v/here, 
in connection with Mr. Goshorn, the director-general, and Mr. 
Campbell, the secretary of the Commission, who were already on 
the ground, and Mr. Welsh, the president of the Board of Finance, 
and others, he remained at the work until Jan. 1, 1877, two 
months after the close of the Exhibition. 

In December, a month after the Exhibition had closed, Gen, 
Hawley dehvered an address at Steinway Hall, Nev,r York, which 
gave what may be termed a " bird's-eye view " of the results of 
our national triumph. The following extracts are taken from 
this address: "Philadelphia was the only place v/here could 
properly and historically be held the Centennial Exhibition. It 
was naturally formed for the purpose, and was accessible by rail- 
roads. The value of international exhibitions is very great. No 
nation can afford to stay away from one. 

" We find from the opinion of foreign master mechanics, that we 
make very good silk in this country, very good machinery, iron 
and wood-working, very good sewing machines, very good arms- 
making machinery, America having had to furnish 2,000,000 to 
the German government. What shall we say of the Corliss engine 
— that power of the Exhibition — beside which the little delicate 
watch-making machines worked unshaken and unharmed ? Print- 
ing-presses were shown, the like of which were never seen before. 
In printing-presses America leads the way. As makers of paper, 
scales, etc., America also stands at the head. In Agricultural Hall 
America again stood at the head. The forestry exhibits of many 
countries were very fine, as well as those of tobacco, of which every 
nation exhibiting brought samples. Coffee, too, was shown by 
countries which we would never suppose capable of producing it. 
The machinery in Agricultural Hall was interesting, Canada being 
the only country which came near rivaling America in excellence 
of labor-saving machines. American cheese was shown to be so 
good that it is now being imported into this country and sold and 
relished as English cheese, Stilton cheese, Sweitzer kase, etc. 
America was beaten in live stock exhibitions by Canada. The 
Netherlands made an excellent exhibit in public works — the back- 
bone of that country. Brazil made some very interesting exhibits. 
France was in some respects a disappointment, but in some things 
•was very fine — notably in ceramics. Educational exhibits were 



GEN. JOSEPH R, HAWLEY. 47 

finely sliown by Canada, Russia, and Austria. Sweden and Nor- 
way furnished very liberal contributions, the former surpassing in 
iron and steel, the latter in furs and woods. China gave an excel- 
lent exhibit. Spain, forgiving late unpleasantness, was very gen- 
erous in all departments. The German bronzes might have been 
better, but the pottery was superb. America is gaining ground in 
edge tools, as Sheffield has lately confessed. Our woolens, hard- 
wares, silks, marbles, and mantels were among the best. Our 
pianos were the best in the world. Horticulture brought some 
new views to the world. The "Woman's Pavilion furnishes 
an interesting field of discussion. One of the finest exhibits 
given was that of* the American people themselves. I have seen a 
large number of the 8,000,000 who came into these grounds, and 
I never saw an intoxicated man; I never saw a quarrel or excited 
scene among all that multitude." 



CHAPTER III. 



CONNECTICUT'S EARLY INTEREST IN THE EXHIBITION. 

Action of the General Assembly in 1875 — Philadelphia Vis- 
ited BY A Legislative Committee — State Board op Managers 
Created — Appropriation of $25,000 to Insure a Proper Rep- 

EESENTATION OF StATE INDUSTRIES ThE DeBATE IN THE HoUSE 

OF Representatives — Amusing Explanations of Votes — Text 
OF the Appropriation Bill — How the Money was Expended 
— The State's Return from its Investment — Special C(*mmit- 
TEES Appointed to Enlist the Cooperation of Manufacturers 
AND Others — Prompt and Cheerful Aid given. 

Tlie interest manifested by the people of Connectient in the 
Exhibition project, and tendered at a period in its history when the 
prospects of its success were far from encouraging, were alike cred- 
itable in the highest degree. The spirit of '76 was not dead in the 
Nutmeg State, and when the call came for aid for a project that 
was designed as a national commemoration of the independence of 
the country, it was received in a generous spirit. Subscriptions 
to the stock of the centennial fund were opened, and a considera- 
ble amount was realized. Early in 1875, in accordance with the 
request of the United States Centennial Commission, the Commis- 
sioners for Connecticut organized an "Advisory Board," the func- 
tions of which were to promote the success of the Centennial 
Exhibition by advice and disseminating information regarding 
it. This Board was composed of the Connecticut Commissioner, 
Gen. Hawley, and alternate "Wm. P. Blake of New Haven, also 
David A. Wells of Norwich, F. W. Cheney of Hartford, F. J. 
Kingsbury of Waterbury, Eli Whitney of New Haven, and Nathan- 
iel Wheeler of Bridgeport. 

Mr. Blake, as secretary of the Board, received inquiries at his 
office in New Haven, either in person or by letter. 

The General Assembly convened in May, 1875, and on the IStli 
of that month Hon, Lynde Harrison of Guilford, introduced in the 
House of Representatives a resolution providing for a Joint Select 

(48) 



Connecticut's early interest. 49 

« 

Committee on the Centennial Exhibition. The resolution was put 
to an immediate vote, and passed without opposition. On the next 
day the Speaker appointed as members of said committee on the 
part of the House the following named gentlemen : Elisha Johnson 
of Hartford, Rufus R. Dimock of Manchester, "William Brown of 
"Waterbury, Lynde Harrison of Guilford, Willis R. Austin of Nor- 
wich, Erastus F. Hewitt of Preston, David B. Lockwood of Bridge- 
port, Benjamin J. Daskam of Stamford, E. A. Buck of Ashtord, 
Jeremiah Olney of Thompson, Chas. Edwards of Kent, Henry Gay 
of Winchester, Isaac Arnold of Haddam, Milon Pratt of Saybrook, 
Myron P. Yeomans of Andover, and Francis L. Dickinson of Ver- 
non. The Senate concurred in the passage of the resolution, and 
Senators Lucius Briggs of Thompson, and Daniel Brewster of 
Palls Village, were appointed members of the committee on the 
part of that body. Several meetings of the committee were held, 
and soon after their appointment, the members, accompanied by 
Senator Bruggerhoff of Darien, and Representatives J. A. Wilson 
of Newtown, Charles Blair of Collinsville, E. S. Cleveland of Hamp- 
ton, John H, Hawkins of Naugatuck, G. W. Brush of Greenwich, 
and Geo. W. Bradley of Fairfield, went to Philadelphia, accompa- 
nied by Gen. Hawley. Calling at the headquarters of the commis- 
sioners the morning following their arrival, they were joined by 
Hon, John Jay, ex-minister to Austria, Director-Genei'al Goshorn, 
and others, and, in carriages, visited Independence Hall and the 
Exhibition grounds, where the buildings were then in progress of 
construction. A fine collation was subsequently served at Belmont, 
and the usual after-dinner speeches were made. One of the gen- 
tlemen of the party in subsequently giving a brief account of the 
trip, wrote: "The time for examination was brief, but it was suffi- 
cient to show that Connecticut, with her historic associations, her 
wealth, and the great variety of her productions, must not follow 
the example of New York.* We have no such rivalry with Phil- 
adelphia as to fear a success that may endanger our own greatness; 
but as we can successfully compete in the markets of the world with 
many of our principal products, the poor spirit of policy alone will 
teach us that our manufacturing and mechanic classes must be pro- 
tected by a proper advertisement there." 

On the 23d of June, 1875, Judge Johnson, the House Chairman, 

* The writer referred to the unfriendly spirit manifested toward the 
Exhibition at that time by New York, and the evident disposition not to 
contribute to its success, financially or otherwise. 



50 SOUVENIR OP THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

reported House Bill No. 246, creating a board of ten State man- 
agers, and appropriating from the State treasury the sum of $40,000, 
of which $15,000 was to be used to meet the expenses of the Board, 
and $25,000 to purchase stock from the Centennial Board of 
Finance. Gen. Hawley and Gov. Bigler of Penna. addressed 
the members of the legislature in behalf of the bill at an informal 
meeting, and on the 8th of July it came up for discussion, having 
been made the order of the day. An extended and vigorous debate 
ensued, in which the participants were Messrs. Isaac Arnold of Had- 
dam, E. Johnson and N. B. Stevens of Hartford, S. M. Pratt of 
Essex, J. H. McMahon of New Milford, W. A. Miles of Meriden, 
Willis R. Austin of Norwich, E. S. Cleveland of Hampton, Mr. 
Hopkins of New Fairfield, Lynde Harrison of Guilford, Thos. 
Elmes of Derby, and James Wilson of Newtown. Various amend- 
ments were offered, and considerable opposition to the whole meas- 
ure developed itself during the discussions, mainly by Messrs. Mc- 
Mahon, Miles, and Elmes. Finally, Mr. Arnold of Haddam, offered 
an amendment reducing the appropriation from the amount fixed 
in the original bill to $25,000 — $15,000 for the managers, and 
$10,000 for subscription to the stock. Apprehending the defeat 
of the measure unless some concession was made to their oppo- 
nents, the friends of the bill made no strong opposition to the 
reduction, the amendment prevailed, and the biU passed by a vote 
of 124 yeas to 100 nays — 20 members absent and not voting. An 
analysis of the ballot shows that a majority of the negative votes 
came from the farming sections of the State, but several friends of 
the bill voted against it on the ground that the amount fixed by the 
amendment was insufficient to secure a proper representation of 
the State at Philadelphia. Several of the members explained their 
votes, and their remarks were thus reported by the Hartford Cour 
ant: 

Me. Bigelow (New Haven). — I shall vote " No," because the 
appropriation should be larger. (Applause.) 

Mr. Thompson (East Haven). — I desire to preserve the respect of 
my constituents, who are composed of the most liberal freemen of 
the State. Instead of $25,000, I would give $100,000. (Ap- 
plause.) 

Mr. Harrison (Guilford). — I am in favor of doing right in this 
matter, and shall vote "No." I cannot consent to be a party to 
making a mean gift by voting " Yes." (Applause.) 

Mr. Blair (CoUinsville). — I quite agree with the gentleman from 
Guilford, and shall vote " No." (Applause.) 



Connecticut's early interest, 51 

Mr. Miles (Meriden). — I shall vote "No," not that I am op- 
posed to giving, but to the method. 

Mr. Peck (Woodb ridge). — I shall vote " No," because the sum 
is not half large enough. 

Mr. Green (Norwich). — As a farmer coming from a manufac- 
turing town, I believe that the appropriation is not to be com- 
pared with the advantages to be derived. (Applause.) It is not 
a reasonable appropriation. 

Mr. Main (Ledyard). — I shall vote "No," because we are giv- 
ing away too much already. (Great laughter.) 

Mr. Gillette (Lyme). — The amount is too small, and I shall 
vote " No." 

Mr. Lockwood (Bridgeport). — ^With a total grand list of over 
$400,000,000, and an actual list of over $600,000,000, Connecticut 
can afford to do better, and I shall not demean myself by voting 
for this appropriation. I shall vote "No." (Applause.) 

Mr. Hilton (Darien). — As I cannot see but this is the right 
sum, I shall make no apology for voting " Yes." (Laughter and 
applause.) 

Mr. Daskam (Stamford). — This centennial is a big thing (laugh- 
ter) — the biggest thing we ever had, and we ought not to give a 
little, small amount. I go for the original amount, $40,000; that 
is little enough. 

Mr. Olney (Thompson). — I regret that the amount is so small, 
but the vote shows there is no chance to defeat it, and I shall 
vote "Yes," under protest. 

Mr. Gallup (Voluntown). — It is not large enough, and I shall 
vote "No." 

Mr. Frisbie (Washington). — If it was ten thousand dollars, I 
should vote "Yes " (laughter); but shall vote "No." 

Mr. Pratt (Saybrook). — I shall vote <'No." The amount is 
too small. (Applause.) 

Mr. Percival (Somers). — It should be at least $35,000, but I 
shall vote for $25,000, under protest. 

Mr. Rockwell (Eastford).— I am in favor of $30,000 or $35,- 
000, and shah vote " No." (Applause.) 

On the 13th of July the bill was taken from the table in the 
Senate, was warmly advocated by Senator C. B. Bowers of New 
Haven, and after being amended by providing for ten instead of 
seven State managers, was passed. The House concurred in the 
Senate amendment the following day, and finally passed the bill. 



52 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

On the 15tli it received the approval of Gov. Ingersoll, and be- 
came a law. 

The following is the text of the bill as passed: 

An Act to secure the representation of Connecticut in the Centennial Cel- 
ebration aud International Exhibition at Philadelphia in 1876. 

Be it enacted by tJie Senate and House of Rejwesentatives in General As- 
sembly convened: Section 1. That a board of managers is hereby consti- 
tuted, to consist of ten persons, whose tluty it shall be to take such action 
as to them shall seem proper to secure a due representation at the inter- 
national exhibition in 187(5, of the arts, industries, and institutions of 
Connecticut, and to expend at their discretion for such purpose such 
sums as may be needed, not exceeding fifteen thousand dollars. And 
said money shall be paid out of the treasury, in such sums aud at such 
times as may be needed, upon the requisition of said board approved by 
the governor. 

Sec. 2. The governor, the member and alternate member from this 
State, of the United States Centennial Commission, shall he ea'-officio -menx- 
bers of said board, and the others shall be appointed by the governor. 

Sec 3. The sum of twenty-five thousand dollars is hereby appropri- 
ated from the treasury of the State, in aid of the purposes of this act: 
fifteen thousand dollars of which, or so much thereof as may be needed, 
to be expended by said board as hereinbefore provided for, and the 
remaining ten thousand dollars to be paid to the United States Centennial 
Board of Finance, under the direction of the governor, for the purposes 
of said board, as defined in the act of congress constituting the same. 

Approved July 15, 1875. 

At an early day, Gov. Ingersoll made the appointments of the 
members whose selection was delegated to him by the bill. At a 
meeting of the gentlemen chosen, an organization was effected, 
and the "Connecticut Board of Centennial Managers," as it was 
officially termed, was formed as follows: 

Ex-officio members — Hon. Charles R. Ingersoll of New Haven, Gov- 
ernor of Connecticut, Gen. Joseph R. Hawley, President of the United 
States Centennial Commission, and Commissioner from Connecticut; 
Prof. William P. Blake of New Haven, alternate member of the United 
States Centennial Commission for Connecticut. 

President — Hon. Charles R. Ingersoll. 

Vice-Presidents — Hon. Nathaniel Wheeler of Bridgeport, and Burdett 
Loomis of Hartford. 

Treasurer — John E. Earle of New Haven. 

Secretary — Prof. William P. Blake of New Haven. 

Members — Frederick J. Kingsbury of Waterbury; Ebenezer Learned 
of NorAvich; Thomas S. Marlor of Brooklyn; Lyman W. Coe of Wol- 
cottville; also the several officers. 

Resident Agent of the Board on the Exhibition Grounds— Thomas R. 
Pickering of Portland. 

The details of the work of securing a proper exhibit of Con- 
necticut's products devolved mainly upon the Advisory Commit- 
tee previously mentioned, and to insure more thorough work sub- 
committees were appointed, composed of gentlemen residing in 



Connecticut's early interest. 53 

different sections of the State, and interested in the several indus- 
tries. The plan pursued was to appoint a chairman for each sub- 
committee, and leave to him the selection of his associates. The 
following were the principal committees and their chairmen, as 
originally appointed: 

Minerals, Ores, Mining, etc. — James D. Dana, New Haven. Chemistry 
and Chemical Manufactures — Prof. B. Silliman, New Haven. House- 
hold aud Office Furniture — Alfred Walker, New Haven. Apparatus tor 
Lighting, Gas Fixtures, Lamps, etc. — Edward S. Miller, Meriden. Pot- 
tery, Porcelaiii, and Glass — Wm. P. Blake, New Haven. Industry of Sil- 
ver Plate, Silver Ware, etc. — Horace C. Wilcox, West Meriden. Yarns 
and Woven Goods of Vegetable Material, Cotton Industry, etc. — Lorenzo 
Blackstone, Norwich. Silk Industry — F. W. Cheney, Hartford. Blank- 
books, Ruling and Binding, Book Binding — The Case, Lockwood & Brain- 
ard Co., Hartford. The Industry of Fire- Arms and Ammunition — Eli 
Whitney, New Haven. Axes and Edge Tools generally — Maj. W. J. 
Wood, Hartford. Cutlery — Hon. Geo. M. Landers, New Britain. India 
Rubber Goods and Manufactures — Henry L. Hotchkiss, Ncav Haven. 
Carriages — Wm. H. Bradley, New Haven. Education — Prof. B. G. 
Northrop, New Haven. Electrical Apparatus, etc. — William Wallace, 
Ansonia. Musical Instruments — C. M. Loomis, New Haven. Civil 
Engineering — Theodore G. Ellis, Hartford. Dynamical Engineering — 
Prof. W. P. Trowbridge, New Haven. Botanical and other Maps — Gen. 
F. A. Walker, New Haven. Banks and Banking— F. J. Kingsbury, 
Waterbury. Savings and Trust Institutions — N. B. Stevens, Hartford. 
Hospital and Hospital Systems — Dr. Geo. B. Hawley, Hartford. Sun- 
day-schools, Methods and Apparatus — H. Clay Trumbull, Hartford. 
Plastic and Graphic Art — Prof. John F. Weir, New Haven. Steam and 
Mining Pumps — Samuel Woodruff, Hartford. Metal and Wood-working 
Machinery — Thom.xs R. Pickering, Portland. Stone Sawing and Plan- 
ing Machines, etc. — J. G. Batterson, Hartford. Machines, Apparatus, 
and Implements used in sewing and making Clothing and Ornamental 
Objects — Nathaniel Wheeler, Bridgeport. Machines for the manufacture 
of Paper, Felt, etc. — Smith & Winchester, South Windham. Boilers and 
Steam Engines — Pitkin Bros. , Hartford. Leather Belting — George Aspin- 
wall, Hartford. Pumps and H3'draulic Rams — Benjamin Douglas, Mid- 
dletown. Stop-Cocks, Valves, etc., and Plumbers' fittings — Peck Broth- 
ers, New Haven. Railway Plans, Rolling Stock and Apparatus — E. M. 
Reed, New Haven. Forestry and Arboriculture — Prof. Wm. H. Brewer, 
New Haven. Bells and Sleigh Bells — Abner G. Bevin. Musical Instru- 
ments and Acoustic Apparatus — C. M. Loomis, New Haven. 

With such thoroughly organized committees to arrange for the 
display of every branch of Connecticut industry, the interests 
of the Centennial Exhibition in the State were materially aided. 
The gentlemen of the committee, many of thein large manufac- 
turers or dealers, made personal arrangements and convinced their 
friends that the Exhibition was destined to be successful, and that 
Connecticut could not afford to act an indifferent part. At this 
time, the newspapers had created opinions in many quarters unfa- 
vorable to the Exhibition, and the prevaihng business depression, 
especially in the manufacturing districts, was calculated to deter 



54 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

manufacturers from incurring the expenses of preparing special 
exhibits and sending them to Philadelphia. Yet all the large 
firms of the State responded to the call upon them in a generous 
spirit, and many of the smaller manufacturers followed their 
example. Space was secured in the Exhibition buildings, and 
many firms, including the Meriden Britannia Co., the Willimantic 
Linen Co., the Cheney Bros., and others, constructed handsome 
pavilions in which to display their products. The railroad com- 
panies of the State made favorable terms to exhibitors, and in 
short, the Httle State of Connecticut entered upon the work with 
such enthusiasm, and prosecuted it with such energy, that she 
became sixth in the list of exhibitors — estimated by the number 
of exhibits. 

The amount appropriated by the State was drawn from the 
Treasury soon after the Board had perfected its organization, and 
$10,000 was used for the purchase of the stock of the Centennial 
Fund, the remaining $15,000 being devoted to the erection and 
furnishing of the Connecticut Cottage, in defraying the expenses 
of the managers in arranging for placing the Connecticut exhibits 
in the Exhibition buildings, and other necessary matters — a work 
upon which they entered with earnest zeal. 

The State was even more fortunate than had been anticipated, 
in the matter of its investment in the Centennial stock. The 
$10,000 appropriated for this object was regarded by every one, 
excepting the most sanguine friends of the Exhibition project, as 
a direct loss. However, such was the success of the enterprise 
that something was realized on the return, and of the $10,000 
invested by Connecticut, nearly $2,000 found its way back into the 
State treasury. On the 10th of September, 1877, the State Treasurer 
received from the Treasurer of the Centennial Board of Finance, a 
check for $1,941.67. Of this sum, $1,750 represents the distribu- 
tion of $1.75 per share on the 1,000 shares of stock (par value $10 
each) subscribed for by the State, and $191.67, the interest on the 
money from the time it was paid to the Centennial Board, to the 1st 
of January, 1876. In addition to this, an unexpended balance of 
nearly $1,500 remained from the $15,000 appropriated to the 
State Board of Managers, making a total of $3,500 in cash received 
back from Connecticut's appropriation in aid of the Exhibition. 
This is a small sima, it is true, but for the amount expended, the 
State had the satisfaction of having contributed its due propor- 
tion to the enterprise, and the State exhibitors were likewise 



Connecticut's eaely interest. 55 

benefited to a large amount by the advertisement of their pro- 
ducts. The question of the disposal of this unexpended balance 
was considered by the General Assembly of January, 1877, and 
it was decided to appropriate it toward the display of Connecti- 
cut's manufactures, etc., at the great International Exhibition to be 
held in Paris in 1878. An Act was passed during the Session of 
1877, creating a Board of eight managers, with the Governor, 
Gen. J. R. Hawley of Hartford, and Prof. W. P. Blake of New 
Haven, as ex-officio members, and providing that the appropriation 
for the use of the Board should be limited to the balance remain- 
ing from the "Centennial" appropriation, and that no member 
should receive any salary, and no expenses other than necessary 
expenses for travel, etc., within the State limits. 



CHAPTER IT. 



CENTENNIAL WORK BY CONNECTICUT LADIES. 

Organization of the "Centennial Association of Connecticut 
"Women," and its Several Local Branches — Various Enter- 
prises FOR Securing Funds for the Women's Pavilion at Phil- 
adelphia — Martha "Washington Tea-Parties in New Haven 
AND Greenwich — Loan Exhibitions of Art and Eevolution- 
ARY Eelics in Hartford, etc. — The Lady Washington Recep- 
tion AT Stamford — Centennial Stock Purchased and Con- 
tributions Obtained for the Women's Department — Aid to the 
Exhibition of Historical Relics at Philadelphia. 

The Centennial Exhibition project had no warmer friends in its 
early days than the ladies of Connecticut. And, best of all, they 
gave it aid of a practical character. They worked and raised funds 
for it — for a single department it is true, the department devoted 
to the display of the products of women's skill. Yet in this they 
gave aid to the enterprise as a whole, and contributed largely to 
making the department devoted to their sex one of the standard 
attractions of the exhibition. Faithful, conscientious work was 
done, and few other than the ladies who assumed offices of an execu- 
tive character in the general and the several branch organizations 
throughout the State can have any conception of the extent of the 
task. 

The movement which resulted so creditably, was inaugurated in 
New Haven. Mrs. Gillespie, president of the Executive Commit- 
tee of the women's department of the exhibition, met a number of 
ladies at the house of a friend in New Haven, early in 1875, and 
described in earnest terms the practical interest in the exhibition 
that had already manifested itself among the ladies of several of 
the States. In this informal gathering was born the Connecticut 
movement. Mrs. Gillespie appointed one of the ladies present, 
Mrs. Worthington Hooker, as a member of the Executive Commit- 
tee for Connecticut. By virtue of this appointment, Mrs. Hooker 
"became chairman of the Connecticut association ; Miss E. M. Daven- 

(5G) 



CENTENNIAL WCKX EY CONNECTICUT LADIES. 57 

port was appointed treasurer, and Mrs. Chester S. Lyman, secretary. 
The local appointments for New Haven were: Mrs. Yv^. A. Nor. 
ton, Mrs. C. M. Ingersoil, Mrs. D. Cady Eaton, Mrs. H. P. Hoad- 
ley, and Mrs. J. S. Beach. A few days afterward, April 26, 1875, 
the New Haven Association was organized. Early measures were 
taken for raising funds. At a public meeting held in the court- 
house, addresses were delivered by Prof. Wm. P. Blake, alternate 
Centennial Commissioner for Connecticut, Mayor Lewis, and Rev.* 
Leonard Bacon, and the friendly spirit manifested encouraged the 
ladies to arrange for a Martha Washington Tea-Party and exhibi- 
tion of relics on the 10th and 11th of June. During that month, 
Mrs. Gillespie, Gen. Hawley, and Judge Shipman addressed a meet- 
ing of Hartford ladies at Seminary Hall, in behalf of the project of 
a "Women's Pavilion on the exhibition grounds, to be devoted 
exclusively to the display of the products of women's skill and 
enterprise, and this meeting resulted in the formation of the 
" Women's Centennial Association of Hartford." Two meetings 
were held, and a permanent organization was effected by the 
appointment of oflBcers and a committee, viz. : Chairman, Mrs. S. J. 
Cov/en; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Charles E. Fellowes; Corre- 
sponding Secretary, Mrs. Mary H. Burton; Treasurer, Mrs. 0. H. 
"Whitmore; Committee of Thirteen, Mrs. Samuel Colt, Mrs. Henry 
A, Perkins, Mrs. Frank W. Cheney, Mrs. W. H. Post, Mrs. T. O. 
Enders, Miss Antoinette R. Phelps, Miss S. C. Co wen, Mrs. Henry 
C. Robinson, Mrs. A. C. Corson, Mrs. E. G. Howe, Mrs. Geo. F. 
Hawley, Mrs. Charles A. Jewell, and Mrs. Henry Whitman. 

The Centennial Society for Waterbury was also organized in 
June, with Miss Kendrick as chairman, Miss C. B. Merriman as 
treasurer, and Miss M. C. Piatt as secretary, and organizations were 
formed in several of the smaller towns during the same month* 
including Woodbury, Mrs. Emily L. Smith, Chairman; Old Lyme, 
Mrs. Daniel Chad wick. Chairman; Saybrook Point, Mrs. M. B. 
Burger, Chairman. 

In the meantime, the New Haven Association had made rapid 
progress, and June witnessed two signal triumphs. The first was 
the establishment of a handsome and ably edited little sheet, The 
Spirit of Seventy-six, issued "to disseminate information upon the 
work and aims of the Centennial organization, to awaken interest 
at home, and to aid in securing a creditable representation of our 
State in the coming International Exhibition." This was widely 
circulated, and with excellent effect. The second triumph was the 



58 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Martha "Washington Tea-Party, held in Music Hall on the evenings 
of June 10th and 11th. A contributor to The Spirit of Seventy -six 
gave an excellent description of the affair, from -which are taken 
the following extracts: 

" The curtain rose upon a well filled gallery and floor, . . . 
After a few moments, which were allowed the audience for observ- 
ing the novel tableau, the queen of the evening, led by the gentle- 
man who represented President Washington, advanced, and took 
her place upon the dais followed by the members of her suite. She 
was elegantly attired in a robe of white satin, with a train of lavender 
brocade, her hair surmounted by a tasteful cap. The President 
withdrew to a respectful distance, leaving to her the honors of the 
evening. The pleasing scene of tlie presentation then took place, 
the ladies being led in by the tips of their fingers. Each made her 
obeisance with the formality of the ancient school, and retired into 
the background. The deep ' curtseying ' was occasionally and 
pleasantly varied by an amusing prim dip on the part of some 
ancient guest, very suggestive of the precise manners of the older 
regime. The beauty of the tout ensemble — the elegance and appro- 
priateness of the dresses, and the taste displayed during the pre- 
sentation, called forth the applause of the audience. After the 
dancing of the stately minuet, which occurred upon the conclusion 
of the presentation, and to which the showy and becoming cos- 
tumes of the gentlemen added so much, the stage was given up to 
the amusing exercises of the ' Sizer drill,' which was performed by 
a company of the ' Grays ' under the command of Captain Hendrick. 
Lastly, on the part of the entertainers, came the singing of the 
'Star Spangled Banner ' by Mrs. George H. Blinn, whose magnifi- 
cent voice filled every cranny of the hall, and stirred the patriotism 
of all. Dancing to a moderate degree now commenced, and the 
numerous and becomingly attired flower-girls and waitresses began 
to flit among the crowd, amid the distractions of the music, proffer- 
ing their tempting wares to eye and palate. Many from the gal- 
leries came down upon the floor to obtain a nearer view of the cos- 
tumes, or to participate in the pleasures of the dance, and the even- 
ing ended in mutual satisfaction and congratulation." 

The President was personated by Prof. Norton, Mrs. "Washington 
by Mrs. Henry Trowbridge, and their suite and guests by over 
fifty ladies and gentlemen, all appearing in the costumes of a cen- 
tury ago. Some of these were of historical interest. Mr. Alfred 
T. Bacon wore a suit descended from Col. Wadsworth, which was 



CENTENNIAL WORK BY CONNECTICUT LADIES. '59 

made in France, in 1784, to be worn on the occasion of liis presenta- 
tion at the Court of Louis XVI, and was afterwards worn at the 
Court of George III. A dress worn by Miss Wheeler once belonged 
to Madam Wadsworth, and Miss Hadley wore a dress embroidered 
by Miss Nabby Wadsworth before the Revolutionary war— coarse 
cotton cloth (then very expensive), elaborately embroidered in silk, 
with gorgeously variegated flowers, and quaint-looking birds and 
animals. Miss Minnie Mitchell wore portions of a dress of her 
great-great-grandmother, Mrs. Rebecca Mott, of Revolutionary 
fame; Miss Robinson of Hartford, the wedding dress (150 years 
old) of Mrs. Jonathan Trumbull ; Miss Russell a gold-colored bro- 
cade with large flowers, originally worn by Miss Hall, sister of Gov. 
Hall of Georgia, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independ- 
ence; Miss Jocelyn and Miss Hayes, dresses belonging to Mrs. Gen. 
Hand, and worn at the receptions of Mrs. President Washington; 
and Mr. Hayes, part of a suit once worn by Gen. Hand. 

The following is a complete list of the ladies and gentlemen 
who participated in the affair, with the characters personated 
respectively: 

The President and Mrs. "Washington, Prof. Norton and Mrs. Henry 
Trowbridge. Their suite — Mrs. Betty Washington, Miss Jocelyn; Mrs. 
Martha Custis Williams, Mrs. H. L. Hotchkiss; Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Morris, Mr. H. Curtis and Miss Beach ; Mrs. John Adams, Miss Daven- 
port; Miss Nellie Custis, Miss Leila Ingersoll; Master G. W. P. Custis, 
Master Paul Fenn; Col. and Mrs. Col. Humphreys, Prof. J. Niemeyer 
and Miss Delia Lyman. Guests — Mr. and Mrs. John Jay, Mr. John 
Wurtz and Miss DuBois; Mr. Thomas Jefferson, Mr. B. Carrington; the 
Misses Jefferson, the Misses Carrington; Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hamil- 
ton, Mr. H. L. Farnam and Miss French; Governor and Mrs. Gov. Liv- 
ingston, Mr. William Gale and Miss Ingersoll; the Misses Livingston, the 
Misses Stoeckel; General and Mrs. General Hancock, Mr. Wm. J. Mills 
and Miss Chapman; Louis Philippe, Mr. L. P. Gale; the Misses Chew, 
Miss Jewett and Miss Flagg; Governor and Mrs. Gov. Huntington, 1st, 
Mr. A. Howe, 2d, Mr. Russell and Miss Russell; Betsy Devotion, Miss de 
Karajon; General Lafayette, Mr. Baldwin; Mrs. Abram Davenport, Miss 
Wheeler; Mrs. Judge Huntington, Miss H. Whitney; M. Otto, Mr. J. 
Hoppin, Jr.; Mrs. Governor Matthew Griswold, Miss Griswold; Colonel 
John Trumbull, Mr. Nathan H. Sandford; Rebecca Mott, Miss Mitchell; 
Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Gray Otis, Mr. and Mrs. George H. Ford; Mrs. 
Cushing, Miss Southworth; Count and Countess de Moustier, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. K. Townsend; General and Mrs. Gen. Clinton, Mr. Newhall and 
Miss Atwater; Captain Jas. Hillhouse, Mr. J. Hillhouse; Miss Van Zant, 
Miss Anna Graves; Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Wadsworth, Mr. Alfred Bacon 
and Miss Bacon; General and Mrs. Gen. Knox, Mr. andlNIrs. Lewis Hotch- 
kiss; Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Ellsworth, Mr. William Ellsworth and Miss 
LjTQan; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Carroll, Mr. T. R. Bacon and Miss Put- 
nam ; Mr. and Mrs. William Bingham, Mr. C. T. IMorse and Miss Morse ; 
Mrs. Jonathan Trumbull, Miss Robinson ; Don Diego Gardoque, Mr. John 
Chapman; Madam Genet, Miss Barrett; Mr. and Mrs. Caesar Rodney, Mr, 
J. K. Beach and Miss King; Mr. and Mrs. Chauncey Goodrich, Mr. C. P. 
Sandford and Miss N. Trowbridge; Mrs. Colonel Robinson, Miss Helen 



60 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Kellogg; Roger Slierman, Mr. Oliver White; Miss Van Berkel, Miss Katie 
Trowbridge; Lady Temple, Mrs. Judge Theaker; General Hand and Mrs. 
Gen. Hand, Mr. and Miss Hayes; Governor and Madam Wintlirop, Mr. 
Howard Sherman, Jr., and Miss Woodbridge ; Marquis de Chastellux, Mr. 
H. L. Hotchkiss ; Miss de Peyster, Miss Lucy Trowijridge ; Mrs. Cutler, 
Miss Graves; Ethan Allen, Mr. Fulton; Miss Saltonstall, Miss M. Daggett; 
Captain John Paul Jones, Captain Townsend; Mrs. Ralph Izard, Miss 
Goodsell; Mrs. Van Ness, Miss Wilcox: and other distinguished guests. 
Ushers — Prof. Niemeyer, J. W. Brooks. 

The Loan Exhibition of relics, held in " the new insurance huild- 
ing," in connection with the tea-party, included the model of the 
original cotton-gin, Indian relics, coins, ancient silver- ware, family 
portraits, fire-arms, and several articles of dress, autographs, let- 
ters, all of historical value. It continued from the 1 0th of June 
until the early part of July, and was encouraged by liberal 
patronage, less, however, than its great attractions warranted. 
The executive committee was composed of Mrs. "Worthington 
Hooker, president; Mrs. W. A. Norton, vice-president; Miss 
Davenport, treasurer; secretaries, Mrs. D. Cady Eaton, Mrs. C. M, 
IngersoU, Mrs. H. P. Hoadley, and Mrs. J. S. Beach; secretary on 
relics, Mrs. Chester S. Lyman; local committee on rehcs, Mrs. 
"William Hillhouse, Miss Olivia Hotchkiss, Miss Elizabeth Hotch- 
kiss, Mr. and Mrs. George F. Newcomb, John "Wurtz, Mrs. Henry 
Champion, Mrs. Charles A. White, and Miss Harriett E. Peck. 
Contributions were freely made, and the relics and art treasures 
owned by the New Haven ladies and their friends interested in 
the affair, insured the success of the affair from the first. A com- 
plete account of the exhibition is not regarded as essential, but 
many of the articles shown are worthy of mention. Among the 
paintings were portraits of Roger Sherman, Elbridge Gerry, Oliver 
"Wolcott, Oliver Ellsworth, General Hand, Jonathan Trumbull 
(Brother Jonathan), Mary Hooker, Colonel Wadsworth, and Rev. 
Cotton Mather Smith. Many of the engravings were a century 
old, quaint and interesting. The display of ancient silver- ware 
was excellent, and well illustrated the character of plate used by 
the wealthy families of Connecticut in its early days. The exhibi- 
tion was especially rich in antique books and manuscripts, auto- 
graphs, and weapons of the Revolutionary War, the New Haven 
Colony Historical Society contributing generously to this depart- 
ment. Dresses, jewelry, and household furniture illustrated the 
luxurious tastes of our ancestors. The exhibition of china was so 
large and valuable that it became a separate department, and was 
minutely described by Prof. Wm. P. Blake, who made it illustra- 



CENTENNIAL WORK BY CONNECTICUT LADIES. 61 

tive of the History of the Ceramic Art. On this subject he deliv- 
ered a highly interesting and instructive lecture. A catalogue of 
tlie exhibition showed a total of 811 articles, and over 100 exhibit- 
ors. Among those enabled to contribute most liberally, were Prof. 
B. Silliman, Eli Whitney, Mrs. C. S. Lyman, Mrs. E. E. Salisbury, 
Mrs. J. M. Hoppin, the Misses Gerry, Mrs. Worthington Hooker, 
Mrs. D. C. Porter, J. W. Bennett, James Birge, Mrs. T. W. Curtis, 
Mrs. Edward Reilly, Mrs. General Russell, Mrs. Henry Champion, 
Mrs. Henry Hotchkiss, Mrs. C. M. Ingersoll, Mrs. W. D. Whitney, 
Mrs. Steven Wheeler, Miss Isaphene Hillhouse, the Misses Foster, 
Mrs. W. P. Blake, Mrs. W. A. Norton, Miss Harriett E. Peck, 
Mrs. E. E. Barber, and Mrs. Joseph E. Sheffield. Contributions 
from other places were received from Judge Smith of Woodbury, 
(a large donation,) Dennis Thorpe of Middletown, Judge Mc- 
Curdy of Lyme, J. K. Hall of WaUingford, Mrs. Corson of Hart- 
ford, and several from towns in the vicinity of New Haven. The 
gross receipts of the tea-party and reception, and the exhibition, 
were $4,121.85, and net proceeds $2,270.50. 

On the 5th of July a centennial celebration was held in Farm- 
ington, and Miss Sarah Porter, who was prominently identified 
with the affair, forwarded to the State association, as its results, 
$93. Of this, $75 was appropriated by her request to the 
Women's Pavilion fund, and a promise to increase the contribution 
to $100 was subsequently made good. 

During the warm period, the ladies throughout the State who 
were expected to continue their work in aid of the project, were 
at the watering-places or elsewhere, and in September, when Mrs. 
Gillespie met with the New Haven ladies in that city, Mrs. Cowen 
of Hartford also being present, rather a gloomy view of affairs 
was taken. However, the principals in the movement determined 
to continue their efforts, and the triumphant success they finally 
achieved proved that they were right, and that their faith in the 
promises they had received was not misplaced. 

The next enterprise toward raising funds was the exhibition of 
revolutionary relics and works of art in Hartford, the ladies of 
that city having pledged themselves to raise $1,000 toward the 
Women's Pavilion at Philadelphia. The Women's Centennial 
Association of Hartford had the exclusive management of the 
affair, and the efforts of its members were ably seconded by the 
ladies of the Loan Committee, Mrs. Daniel Goodwin, Mrs. T. G. 
Talcott, Mrs. H. E. Taintor, Mrs. A. N. Le Roy, Mrs. E. L. Ken- 



62 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

yon, Miss Mary Clark, and Miss Ellen Case. The exhibition 
opened on the 8th of November, 1875, in the Phoenix bank build- 
ing on Main street. "The artistic decorations, the beauty of the 
exhibits, and the social element that made it a delightful resort 
for seven weeks, insured a success in pecuniary results," remarks 
a writer in "The Spirit of Seventy-Six," and this was eminently 
true of the affair. The entire second floor of the building was 
devoted to the exhibition. The " relic room " was beautifully 
decorated with the national colors, and contained a large and 
varied assortment of treasures of the past. Glass cases down the 
sides of the room and the center, were filled with the more valuable 
and fragile articles, and grouped here and there were lay-figures in 
ancient costumes, antique furniture, portraits, and pictures. A mong 
the articles of the collection were many of historic interest: a sword 
presented by General Washington to Captain Blanque, a musket 
captured at Lexington, a magnificent ewer and basin of Sevres 
china presented by Louis XIV to Madame Montespan, Charter 
Oak ornaments, a specimen of Gobelin tapestry presented by Napo- 
leon I to Oliver Ellsworth, minister to Prance ; tea-cup once used 
by Catherine II of Russia; the New York and Quebec mail-bag of 
1752, Benjamin Franklin's compass, loaned by Prof. G. 0. Hol- 
brook; visiting card of Lady Washington, handkerchief of King 
Charles X of Sweden; rare coins, loaned by Mr. D. C. Pond; a 
coin of the reign of Tiberius, 800 years before Christ; a box 
taken from a French privateer, upon the shding panel of which 
was the famous prophecy of Hezekiah Wyllis in 1766, " America's 
fate is fixed in 1866;" decanters and wine-glasses that were 
brought to America in the Mayflower, flint-lock muskets and 
equipments datmg back to Revolutionary days, tankards and por- 
ringers of solid silver, and wedding and other dresses in quaint 
styles. Of these there were many specimens, generally of silk or 
satin, and often richly hand-embroidered. Mrs. T. G. Talcott con- 
tributed a silver set used by her ancestors from 1637 to 1800, and 
other interesting relics; Mrs. W. R. Cone exhibited a Bavarian 
head-dress, pieces of the trousseau of the Princess of Wales, spoons, 
and other small silver articles dating back a century or more ; Dr. 
Bowen, punch-ladles of the time of George I; Charles J. Hoadly, 
a package of one shilling bills, ready for issue in 1776, but never 
signed nor even untied ; J. W. Eldredge, a string of gold beads 
250 years old; silver porringers and antique jewelry by Mrs. Elisha 
Colt; J. S. Buell, a copper plate of Thomas Jefferson by a cele- 



CENTENNIAL WORK BY CONNECTICUT LADIES. 63 

brated artist, and differing widely from the familiar portraits of 
the statesman; Mrs. S. J. Cowen, spinning-wheel a century old, 
and \he facsimile of a spoon brought from Holland 200 years ago; 
Dr. George C. Jarvis, a gold medal presented to George 0. Jarvis 
by Prince Albert in 1845, and a cross from the wood of a chest 
brought to St. Augustine in 1556 ; J. Aspinwall Hodge, two leaves 
from the sacred book of the Siamese, and a copy of the very rare 
" Breeches Bible," printed in 1602, and which takes its name from 
the translation of Genesis iii, 7, which reads, " Then the eyes of 
both were opened, and they knew that they were naked, and they 
sewed figge leaves together and made themselves breeches." The 
autograph collection was excellent. Passing to the art rooms, the 
visitor was attracted by a large and costly collection of oil and 
water color paintings, statuary and models. Among the latter 
was the model of the group for the Connecticut panel of the Pil- 
grim monument at Plymouth, designed by C. Conrads of Hartford, 
and representing the little band of pilgrims embarking for the New 
World. The paintings embraced specimens of the skill of some 
of the best foreign artists, including De Buel, Bouchard, Henis- 
kirk. Van Sevadonck, Achenbach, and copies of works of Mur- 
illo, Rubens, and others. American art was represented by 
the paintings of Bierstadt, Richards, "Wyant, Ken sett. Sully and 
others. Prof. Niemeyer of New Haven, had two water-colors; 
Trumbull of Hartford, a trout just taken ; T. Sedgwick Steele, 
several admirable trout pieces; D. W. Tryon, a foggy morning ; 
"Wheeler, a portrait of a child; Stancliff, marine views; Miss Ellen 
Case, two landscapes; Prof. Gilbert, several water-colors; Mrs. H. 
B. Stowe, two charming water-colors, a yellow jasmine, and a mag- 
nolia; Mrs. H. E. Burton, fringed gentian and golden rod ; Mrs. 
Dr. Olmstead, phlox from nature; Mrs. G. H. "Warner, daisies. 
Other works in oil and water-colors by resident artists were alike 
commendable and real attractions to the exhibition. The patrons 
of the enterprise contributed liberally from their walls, and among 
the large contributors were J. G. Batterson, H. "W. Conklin, Mrs. 
Lucius Barbour, Mrs. "W. R. Cone, Stephen Terry, Mrs. Charles 
A. Jewell, Judge Shipman, Dr. E. K. Hunt, Mrs. George C. 
Perkins, Mrs. Elisha Colt, G. Wells Root, Miss B. Pomeroy, Miss 
A. R. Phelps, F. W. Russell, Ebenezer Roberts, and Professor Gil- 
bert. The account of the exhibition would be incomplete without 
some reference to the cozy reception-room fitted up for the com- 
mittee. This was prettily carpeted, and furnished with desks, 



64 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

old-fasliioned cliairs, an antique clock, contributed by Judge Elisha 
Carpenter, and tables upon which were placed an array of medals, 
with canes and bells made from the wood of Independence Hall, 
for sale as souvenirs. The exhibition continued seven weeks, 
and was in every respect successful ; its net receipts equaling the 
anticipations of these who had so generously given their time and 
labor to it. 

The ladies of the State prosecuted their Centennial work 
through the fall and winter, and those of the town of Greenwich, 
in February, 1876, responded with the greatest spii'it to the sug- 
gestion that they should do something in aid of the Women's 
Pavilion. It was finally decided that a tea-party and concert 
should be given for this object, and a committee, of which Mrs. 
T. S. Pinneo was chairman and Mr. Edward Brush treasurer, 
set to work to canvass the town. Liberal encouragement was 
offered, and the entertainment, which was given on Tuesday even- 
ing, March '21st, was a gratifying success. The attendance was 
very large, everybody was inspired by the patriotic nature of the 
occasion, and ate, drank, and were merry ever the achievements 
of their ancestors. Many of the costumes of the olden time were 
faithfully reproduced, causing much amusement. The original 
thirteen States were each represented by tables displaying the 
State emblems, and attended as follows : 

KeiD Jersey— Mrs. C. R. Treat and Miss Lizzie ChurchilU Misses Emma 
and Jane Mead, and Emma Brush, waitresses. 

Fenuf<ylm7iia— Misses E. A. Nichols and L. B. Chamberlain; Misses 
Julia ancl Libby Mead. 

3Ias.mch'n^eiis— Mrs. J. C. West and Miss Sallie Carroll ; Misses IMinnie 
Reynolds and Lizzie A. Ritch. 

Neic York — Mrs. Dr. Edw. H. Brinley and Miss Jennie McComb ; IMisses 
Kate Lyon, Maggie Topham, L.Buxton, and Lulu Iloyt. 

Maryland— Misses Amelia Mead and Amelia Knapp; Misses Sophie 
Bendeiari, Mead, and Ella Knapp. 

Virginufr— Misses L. Button and Kate M. Mead; Misses Mary Ball, 
Esther Waterliury, Ida F. Mead, and M. T. Hubbard. 

Georgi<t— Mrs. Dr. Brush and Mrs. A. M. Brush; Misses Lucy M. 
White and Grace Minor. 

Connecticut— Mrs. Frank Shepard and Mrs. H. M. Fitzgerald; Misses 
Nancy Carpenter, Carrie Ferris, Maggie Funston, and IVIary Miller. 

South Carolina (The Flower Table)— Misses Nettie L. Pinneo, Lizzie 
Merrett, Ida Schwackofer, and Sadie Mead. 

North Carolina (Candy Table)— John T. Hubbard and J. Arthur 
Pinneo. 

Mew Hampsldre— Mrs. E. Bennet and Mrs. T. S. Pinneo. 

DeMmre— Mrs. S. G. White, Mrs. J. II. Ray, and Mrs. Geo. Mills. 

Rlwde Idand (Ice Cream Table)— Zophar and AVhitman S. IMead. 

The net proceeds amounted to more than two hundred dollars. 
The Old Folks' Concert, for the same object, occurred March 28th. 



CENTENNIAL WORK BY CONNECTICUT LADIES. 65 

The stage was beautifully decorated with tri-colored Centennial 
cotton, the gift of Mr. E. A. Knapp. . Noticeable among the 
quaint costumes was that of Mr. Stephen G. White, upon whom 
fell much of the work of this concert. He personated Brother 
Jonathan, and his song, "Cousin Jedediah," was loudly ap- 
plauded. Professor Browne of Port Chester, received merited 
praise as the leader. The music of 1776 was represented by 
thirty voices, selected with care from among the best singers in 
Greenwich, while the music of 1876 was represented by Miss 
Maggie Parker of New York, a fine soprano, and Professor Ed. 
Von Ette, violinist leader of the Mozart Society of New York. 
Miss Nettie L. Pinneo (Polly Hopkins) sang " Within a Mile of 
Edinboro' Town," and responded to a hearty encore by giving "I 
Love My Love." Miss Clara Georgi, a young lady of very great 
ability as a pianist, delighted everybody with her remarkable 
execution. The costumes were arranged with faithfulness to old 
times, and were very eifective when contrasted with the modern 
costumes of the artists from New York, who represented the 
music of 1876. The programme of the concert, which is ap- 
pended, was prepared by Mrs. T. S. Pinneo, and the names were 
those of persons Kving a century ago: 

CONCEKT. 

Head Singers — Mr. Moses Harlackinder, a great, high, Dutch singer, 
from Holland, and Deacon Zecariah Symes. Bass-Viol — Mr. John Hig- 
ginson. Flute — Mr. John Davenport. Women Singers — Jemima Wig- 
gleson. Faith Stoddard, Martha Saltonstall, Nancy Pinchon, Betsey 
Hutchinson, Sally Muggins, Polly Hopkins. Men Singers — Simon Wlier- 
comb, Thomas Wiggan, Miles Standish, Increase Nowel, Daniel Gookin, 
Mathew Cradock. And some other men and women folks. 

Part I. 1. " Auld Lang Syne," by all ye Singing People. 2. "Invi- 
tation," ditto. 3. Violin solo, by Professor Ed. Von Ette. 4. Quartette. 
5. "New Jerusalem," by all ye Singing People. 7. Song (music and 
costume of 1876), by Miss Parker. 8. Piano solo (music of 1876), by 
Miss Georgi. 9. Solo, by Polly Hopkins. 10. "Sons of Zion," by all 
ye Singing People. 

Part II. 1. "Hail Us ye Free," by all ye Singing People. 2. Violin 
solo. Professor Von Ette. 3. Trio. 4. "Majesty," by all ye Singing 
People. 5. "Cousin Jedediah," by Deacon Zech. Symmes. 6. Solo, 
by Miss Parker. 7. " Strike ye Cymbal," by all ye Singing People. 
8. " Coronation," ditto, joined by the audience, or such as were "blessed 
with good lungs and religious training. " 

The enterprise selected by the Stamford ladies in aid of the 
Women's Pavilion was a " Lady Washington Reception," which 
was held at the new Town Hall on the evening of the 28th of 
April, 1876. The hall was elaborately decorated, and the stage 
was brilliant with flags and floral displays. Around the apart- 



66 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

ment were ranged thirteen supper tables, which were bountifully 
supplied, and were in charge of Mrs. Skelding, assisted by Mrs. 
Payne, Mrs. Loshe, Miss G. Hoyt, Miss Barclay, Miss K. Brown, 
Miss Viennot, and others. The principal feature of the evening 
was the reception — a triumphant success, with its "brilliant flood 
of light, the rich, elaborate, and picturesque costumes, the waves 
of melody from Grafulla's Band and from the splendidly drilled 
choruses floating out upon the perfumed atmosphere," as an en- 
thusiastic Stamford writer expressed it. At eight o'clock the 
exercises began with the singing of the " Star Spangled Banner" 
by a chorus of fifty trained voices. Then the curtain rose, dis- 
closing General Washington (Hon. M. F. Merritt) and Lady 
Washington (Mrs. W. C. Barclay). The introductions next 
occurred, Colonel Humphreys (Mr. Alfred White) presenting the 
distinguished personages, who were received with all the stately 
formality of our ancestors. After presentation the couples retired 
to a group at the rear of the stage, a group noticeable for its 
elegant costumes, so different from the plainer apparel of to-day. 
Lady Washington's costume was a heavy gray silk ; Mrs. John 
Adams (Mrs. Dr. Payne), who stood to her right, wore a silk of 
white and blue stripes, embroidered with bouquets in alternate 
white and red, and Mrs. Charles Burdett, standing to her left, was 
attired in rich black velvet. The following is a nearly complete 
list of the characters personated: 

John Jay and Mrs. Jay— Mr. and Mrs. Calvin G. Child. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hamilton — Mr. W. C. Barclay and Mrs. B. Schuyler. Lafayette and 
Mrs. Madison— Mr. F. N. Fleming and Mrs. M. F. Merritt. Colonel 
Trumbull and Mrs. King — Mr. and Mrs. Edward Leeds. General Mont- 
gomery and Mrs. Morris— General G. H. Wallen and Mrs. Charles P. 
Burdett. John Hancock and Mrs. Hancock— Mr. Wm. L. and Mrs. Hor- 
ance Brooks. Fisher Ames and Mrs. Wadsworth — C. P. Burdett and 
Miss Julia Merritt. S. Delancy and Mrs. Delancy— Dr. Delancy Barclay 
and Miss Fannie Hoyt. Charles Carroll and Mrs. Carroll — Mr. Walton 
Ferguson and Miss Nellie White — Commodore Decatur and Mrs. EUs- 
worlh— Mr. James D. Smith and Miss Catherine Aiken. Robert Win- 
throp and Mrs. Winthrop— Mr. E. C. Parkinson and Mrs. K. K. Ander- 
son. John Randolph and Mrs. Randolph— Mr. J. H. Swartwout and Miss 
M. Wallen. Governor John Trumbull and Miss Hall— Mr. John Trum- 
bull and Miss Alice Child. Governor Woolsey and Mrs. Woolsey— Mr. 
H. H. Holly and Miss Bennett. Baron Steuben and Madame Genet— Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Meyer. Chauncey Goodrich and Miss Ross— Mr. Rob- 
ert Pitt and Miss Jessie Wallen. William Livingston and Mrs. Van 
Rensselaer— Mr. H. W. King and Miss Mary Dickinson. A. Middleton 
and Mrs. R. Izard— Mr. Nicola Altrochi and Miss Grace Barclay. Gen- 
eral and Mrs. Putnam— Mr. John P. Clark and Miss Louise Coit. Charles 
Carroll and Mrs. Otis— Mr. Ferguson and Mrs. F. Weed. Bishop White 
and Mrs. Edgar- Mr. Frank Wardwell and Miss — Williams. Joel Barlow 
and Mrs. Barlow— Mr. William F. Daniels and Miss Mary L. Linn. Gen 



CENTENNIAL WOKK BY CONNECTICCT LADIES. 67 

eral Gates and Miss Goodrich — Mr. John Godfrey and Miss Abbie Allen, 
Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins — Mr. G. A. Carter, Jr., and Miss Katie Ketchum. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dwight — Mr. Arthur Dodge and Miss Lida Lockwood. 
Governor Wolcott and Lady Duer — Mr. Isaac Roe and Miss Leonora 
Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Langdon — Mr. Samuel Godfrey and Miss Maria 
Smith. Colonel Humphreys and Miss Phillips — Mr. Alfred White and 
Miss Belle Brooks. The Misses Livingstone — Miss A. Smith and Miss J. 
Fleming. The Misses Chew — Miss Mamie Dewing and Miss J. Burkett. 
Hon. TJriah Tracy and Miss Buit — Mr. E. Carter and Miss F. Weed. 

The address of the evening was delivered by Hon. Calvin G. 
Child, and a Centennial poem, full of wit and pleasant local allu- 
sions, was read by its author, Miss C. Aiken. A feature of rare at- 
traction was the dancing by ten couples of the " Minuet de la 
Cour," a stately yet pleasing movement. After the supper had 
been served dances of a modern order continued tmtil long after 
midnight, gracefully terminating one of the most delightful even- 
ings of social life that Stamford had ever witnessed. Independ- 
ent of the success in this way, the projectors of the enterprise had 
reason to congratulate themselves on a financial triumph, the treas- 
urer being enabled to contribute several hundred dollars to the 
Centennial fund. 

In June, 1875, the ladies of Woodbury took an active part in 
a Centennial celebration of the marching of one hundred and 
sixty -five men from that ancient town to garrison Forts Ticon. 
deroga and Crown Point, June 15, 1775. Early in the evening 
there was a parade through the principal streets of the village, of 
eighteen sons and grandsons of the revolutionary heroes. The 
former were Phineas S. Bradley (aged 80), Edward Nichols (aged 
84), Elijah Atwood, James Thompson, George Lathrop, and 
James Tyler, and the grandsons were Ira Thomas, William Coth- 
ren, Reuben B. Martin, Horace Church, Marcus D. Smith, Enos 
Benham, Frederick A. Smith, Edward S. Lemmon, Daniel S. 
Lemmon, William Dawson, Roderick Atwood, and Daniel B. Gal- 
pin. Reaching the hall, the ladies, attired in the costumes of one 
hundred years ago, received them and provided a banquet. The 
ceremonies of the evening included a welcoming speech by Wil- 
liam Cothren, ancient music by a choir, a poem by Rev. William 
T. Bacon, and speeches by Rev. John Churchill and Rev. Gurdon 
W. Noyes. 

Early in 1876, Mrs. Chester S. Lyman of New Haven, was 
appointed by the board of managers of the National Museum of 
Independence Hall, Phila., as corresponding-secretary for Connec- 
ticut, the purpose being to obtain for exhibition during the Centen- 



68 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

nial year some of the numerous Revolutionary and other historical 
relics in which households of the old Connecticut f amihes are rich. 
Many persons owning valuable and interesting articles were unwil- 
ling to permit them to go out of their possession, even temporarily, 
but a large number were obtained and sent to Philadelphia, viz. : 

From Norwich: Gold watch and pistols which belonged to Colonel John 
Trumbull, by Jonathan Trumbull; chair which belonged to the first Gov- 
ernor Trumbull, Mrs. Wm. A. Aiken; punch bowl of Uncas, Mrs. Knight 
and Mrs. Carlisle; a silver watch, seal and key worn byWm. Williams at 
the time of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, David T. Lan- 
man; two pictures embroidered by Faith Robinson, Mrs. Edward B. 
Huntington. 

From Hartford : La Fayette's camp bed, enclosed in a trunk, Mrs. H. R. 
Phelps; first mail-bag used between New York and Quebec, by Erastus 
Smith; piece of Charter Oak containing the cavity in which the original 
charter was concealed, Mrs. Wm. I?. Cone; Benjamin Franklin's candle- 
stick, Mrs. John Cheney; letter of Mr. Madison, Mi-s. W. B. Franklin; 
powder-horn used at Lexington and Bunker Hill, Fred. W. Robbins. 

From New Haven: Chest of English oak, 220 years old, Mrs. Dewey; 
carved English oak chair once owned by Governor Treat, Atwater Treat ; 
portrait, sword and sash of General Wooster, Yale College ; engraving of 
W. V. S. Murray, associate of Oliver Ellsworth and Mr. Davis in negoti- 
ating the treaty with France in 1800, C. L. Chaplain; wedding shoe of 
Mrs. Gen. Wooster, Mrs. Eli Whitney; piece of the wedding dress of 
Mrs. Baldwin, painted by the first Mrs. President Day, both daughters 
of Roger Sherman; piece of Lady Washington's dress worn at the second 
inaugural reception, Mrs. Walter Osborne; christening robe and mantle 
of Ruth Saltonstall, 1740, Mrs. E. H. Mitchell; fan of Mrs. Faith R. 
Trumbull, Mrs. Prof. B. Silliman; gold-colored silk skirt, quilted and 
stitched with heraldic devices, Mrs. Prof. Hoppin ; medal of honor of the 
capture of Louisburg, Mrs. Stephen Wheeler; medal issued at the time of 
Washington's death, Mrs. Dr. Thompson; portrait of Vice-President 
Gerry, by Vanderlyn, 1797, pistol given Eldridge Gerry by an English 
officer, wedding fan of the mother of Mrs. Gerry, ebony snuff-box given 
by the great-grandmother of Mrs. Gerry, snuff-box of Eldridge Gerry, all 
by Miss Gerry; note-book in the handwriting of Roger Sherman, contain- 
ing the roster of the Connecticut regiments, Mrs. Prof. Thatcher ; water- 
color painting of the Capitol and White House as they appeared after 
being burned by the British in 1812, Mrs. Washburn, East River; piece of 
crimson velvet from a cmtain in the old Adams house, Mass. , Mrs. Marsden. 
New Haven's contribution also included the following named articles loaned 
by non-residents: Sash of La Fayette, presented by him to Mrs. H. L. Ells- 
worth, Mrs. Roswell Smith, N. Y. ; epaulettes of La Fayette, Mrs. George 
L. Brown, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; portrait of Chief-Justice Ellsworth, Mrs. 
Waldo Hutchins, N. Y. Mr. Turner also contributed from his collection 
of relics: Miles Standish's table; musket used by the members of a single 
family in the French and Indian and Revolutionary wars, and the war of 
1812; trading license granted by Sir Edmund Andros; Indian relics; samp 
mortar 200 years old, used for pounding corn before grain mills were intro- 
duced ; wooden bowl 200 years old. 

The contributions of exhibits to the Women's PaviUon are 
described in another chapter. The main-spring of this work was, 
of course, the funds secured through the various enterprises 
above described, this money being contributed alike to the general 



CENTENNIAL "WORK BY CONNECTICUT LADIES. 69 

Exliibition by stock subscriptions, to tbe Women's Department, 
and toward creating in various ways an interest in tbe Exhibition, 
and the forwarding of articles illustrating the skill of women. A 
number of Centennial medals were sold, and subscriptions to stock 
were given by residents of Hartford and New Haven, and by a 
patriotic lady of New Milford. Ninety shares of stock were taken 
in the names of the New Haven Orphan Asylum, the Society of 
United Workers, and the Home for the Friendless, all of New 
Haven, and the subscriptions were paid from a part of the avails 
of the reception and loan exhibition in June. 

A report of the contributions from various sources to the Exhi- 
bition fund shows the following, and in the order named: New 
Haven, $1,000; Farmington, $100; Hartford, $1,000; Woodbury, 
$5.00; Greenwich, $250; Stamford, $628.78. Total, $2,983.78. 
The subscriptions to the Centennial stock, through the efforts of 
the ladies, were: Hartford, 16 shares; New Milford, 5; New Haven, 
104. Total, 125, or $1,250. 

The " Spirit of Seventy-Six," published in New Haven, was a val- 
uable agent in promoting the interests of the Centennial Exhibition 
in this State. It was edited and printed under the auspices of the 
ladies of the New Haven Association, and articles were contributed 
by many able writers. Twelve numbers appeared, the last in 
March, 1877, when the editress abandoned journalism, and as she 
announces in her graceful valedictory, "crept once more into the 
reins and stays of a woman's appropriate sphere." The receipts 
from 289 subscribers were $579; from advertisers, $608.50; sale 
of papers, $2.45; total, $1,189.95. The cost of publishing eleven 
numbers was $896.13, leaving a balance of $293.82, from which 
the cost of the last number was paid, and the remainder was 
devoted to meeting the expenses of packing and care of Connecti- 
cut exhibits at Philadelphia. 
5 



CHAPTER Y. 



THE CONNECTICUT COTTAGE. 

Description of the Building, its Cost, etc. — Valuable Relics 
Loaned for Decorating its Interior — Arrangements fob 
THE Convenience of Connecticut Visitors — The Old Well — 
Sale of the Cottage, and Removal from the Grounds — Its 
Present Location — Recollections, Humorous and Otherwise, 
OF Incidents at the Cottage — Queer Sayings and Doings 
OF Visitors— The Connecticut Brown Stone Portals. 

TTie Connecticut Board of Centennial Managers were among 
the first to approve the proposition that each of the States should 
place a State building on the Exhibition grounds, and at an early 
date after the organization of the Board, arrangements were made 
for the erection of what was subsequently known by the unpre- 
tending name, "The Connecticut Cottage." The limited amount 
appropriated by the General Assembly for the expenses of the 
Board was an obstacle to the erection of such an edifice as the 
members would have preferred, yet they devoted nearly one-third 
of the entire sum to this purpose. Visitors who criticised the 
simple character of the structure, as contrasted with the grander 
edifices erected by other States in its immediate vicinity, did so 
with little or no knowledge of the financial obstacles with which 
the Board had contended. Had they been better advised, they 
must have admitted that, for the amount available, the Board 
secured a building that was comfortable, sufficiently large, and at 
the same time of a design pecuHarly appropriate. Messrs. Earle 
and Loomis, of the Board, acted as building committee. D. R. 
Brown, of New Haven, elaborated and prepared the plans from 
water-color designs made by Donald G. Mitchell of that city, and 
the construction was awarded to Alonzo Easton, of Hartford. 
The total cost of building and furnishing was over $4,000. 

A description of the Cottage, prepared by the resident agent of 
the Board, states that it was the first State building completed on 
the Exhibition grounds. The design, as will be seen by the accom- 

(70) 



THE CONNECTICUT COTTAGE. 



n 



panying engraving, was of the charactar of American houses 
a century ago, and was in full accord with the desires of the 
Board. The middle portion of the exterior was covered with, 
scallop-fashioned shingles, the upper part lathed and plastered, and 
the lower part weather-boarded. The dimensions of the huilding 
were thirty feet front hy forty feet deep, with a wing or exten- 



fht. - 










THE CONNECTICUT COTTAGE AT PHILADELPHIA, 1876. 

sion ten feet by twelve, a piazza ten feet by twenty, and a good 
old-fashioned porch leading into the main or reception-room, which 
was twenty-two by thirty feet in size, with, ceiling seventeen feet 
high; on three sides a gallery extended. Leading from this re- 
ception room, was a ladies' parlor and toilet-room, a gentlemen's 
toilet-room, a cloak, coat, hat, and parcel room, and a private 
room for business or social meetings of the Board of Managers. 
The interior wood-work of the building consisted mainly of smoke- 
stained wood, and in the reception-room was a peculiar antique 
fire-place and mantel. Above was a shelf eighteen inches wide, 
and about two feet above that, a second and narrower one. 
Between the fire-place and the wood-work were side pieces and a 
head piece of Portland brown stone. This stone-work was sur- 
rounded by glazed earthenware tiles decorated by hand with char- 



72 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

acteristic flowers of Connecticut, scenes from the life of Putnam, 
the ancient and modern State seals, Charter Oak views, etc. Every 
article used in furnishing the interior, with a few exceptions, came 
from Connecticut, and nearly all were of historical interest. A 
plated ware tea-set was a copy of Elder Brewster's "May-Flower" 
set, an eight-day clock and spinning-wheel reminded the visitor of 
a century before, as he rested his tired limbs on a heavy wooden 
settle, made in 1769. A small table near the fire-place was of 
Charter Oak wood, and, together with several other articles of the 
kind, was loaned by Mr. John H. Most of Old Saybrook. A 
large banner, suspended from the ceiling, had upon it the names 
of the C/onnecticut governors in letters of the same wood, and its 
tough fibers also furnished the material for a historical wooden 
ham hanging over the table, and a quantity of wooden nutmegs. 
The latter found a ready sale, as curious proofs of the truth of 
the old story that wooden nutmegs were really produced in Con- 
necticut. "Old Put.," Connecticut's military hero during the 
Eevolution, was brought to memory in various ways. Over the 
fire-place was hung a fine oil portrait of the hero, and upon hooks 
over the mantel, in antique style, was the " Old Queen's Arm " 
musket with which he killed the wolf • in the famous den in 
Pomfret. A silver-mounted cane, formerly owned by the general, 
was loaned to the cottage by his great grandson. Major Lewis 
T. P. Putnam, of "Washington County, Ohio, and another great- 
grandson, Israel "Waldo Putnam, loaned a pair of pistols and hol- 
sters, powder-horn, bullet-mould, and a magnet, all of historical 
interest. An object that attracted much attention was the " Royal 
Arms," which was probably painted about 1724, and, prior to the 
Declaration of Independence, was suspended above the chair of 
tha speaker in the Connecticut House of Representatives. This 
was loaned by the Connecticut Historical Society, at the request 
of Governor Ingersoll. 

One of the largest and handsomest water-coolers ever manufac- 
tured, was loaned to the Cottage by the Simpson, Hall & Miller 
Co., of Wallingford. The cooler was of britannia, silver-plated, 
formed of three parts ; the circumference of the base seven feet, 
of the body four and a-half feet, and height five feet. Its capacity 
was twenty gallons. On the top edge of the body, around the 
outside, were eight columns and two faucets, also four gilded fig- 
ures representing "Harvest," and the whole was surmounted by 
a richly-gilded statue of Christopher Columbus. The cooler, 




THE COLUMBUS WATER COOLER. 'Tl,e Simiam, Uall & Miller Co. \V:illiDgfor.l. 



THE CONNECTICUT COTTAGE. V5 

wliich cost $1,000, is to be presented to the State of Connecticut, 
and will be placed in the new State Capitol at Hartford. 

The Cottage was a favorite resort of Connecticut people, and 
those in charge spared no efforts to meet the thousand and one 
requirements of visitors to the Exhibition, many of them at a 
distance from home for the first time in their lives, confused by 
the rush and bustle, and feeUng strangely lonesome amid the 
throngs of imf amiliar faces. To this class, the Cottage was a haven 
of refuge, a place where rest could be had, where letters from 
home might be expected, where information was cheerfully given, 
and more welcome than all, where faces from home often met the 
eye. In the reception-room was a large book, three being used 
during the Exhibition, where every visitor was requested to regis- 
ter his or her name. Nearly every one from Connecticut did so, 
and a singular use of the book was for the making of appoint- 
ments to meet friends, the writer placing after his name, a place 
and hour for meeting, and feehng assured that his friends would 
see it. The Cottage also became popular as a meeting-place for 
friends visiting the Exhibition in a party. A, for instance, pre- 
ferred to spend the day in Machinery Hall, and B, among the 
treasures of the Art Gallery. Yet both wished to meet and go 
to their hotel together. Nothing easier, for it was only necessary 
to fix an hour for meeting in the reception-room of the Cottage, 
for A to have sought B among the thousands on the grounds 
would have been like searching for some particular drop of water 
in the great depths of the ocean. Another feature appreciated by 
visitors was the very complete file of Connecticut newspapers, the 
proprietors of the principal journals of the State sending their 
papers free of charge during the Exhibition. A " Bulletin of 
Information " proved to be of practical value, containing, as it 
did, daily items of interest to visitors or exhibitors. A place for 
the safe keeping of parcels or superfluous clothing, and to which 
purchases on the grounds might be sent, was also provided. The 
establishment of a branch post-ofiice in the Cottage proved to be 
one of the most acceptable of all its conveniences. Nearly all 
Connecticut visitors and exhibitors depended upon it for their 
letters, and the number handled for the five daily deliveries was 
very large. All unclaimed letters were returned to the towns in 
which the persons addressed resided, if known; otherwise, to the 
writers. 



76 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

The following is a list of the articles loaned or provided, free 
of charge, for use in the Cottage: 

Carpet for Ladies' Room, - - - Hartford Carpet Co. , Hartford. 
Sofa-Bedstead and lleclining Chair, - - Seidler & May, Hartford. 
Dressing-Case for Ladies' Room, The Furniture M'f 'g Co. , Bridgeport, 
Gas Fixtures, Bradley & Hubbard Manufacturing Co. , West Meriden, 
Water Cooler for Ladies' Room, Middletown Plate Co. , Middletovvn. 

Plated Ware, copy of Elder Brewster's " May Flower" Tea Set, 

Meriden Britannia Co., West Meriden. 
Plate Table Ware, . - - - Hall, Elton & Co., Wallingford. 
Brass Fender, Andirons, Shovel and Tongs, and Mahogany Side-Board, 

Mrs. Alfred Hall, Portland. 
Reading Table, Card and Bouquet Holder, Work Table, Glass and China, 

Mrs. T. R. Pickering, Portland. 
Oil Painting of General Putnam, - H. I. Thompson, New Haven. 
Game Birds of Connecticut, mounted expressly for the Cottage, 

John H. Sage, Portland. 

A Connecticut Eagle, W. W. Coe, Portland. 

The " Queen's Arm " with which Gen. Putnam shot the Wolf, 

George F. Tyler. 
The great " Columbus" Water Cooler, 

Simpson, Hall & Miller Co., Wallingford. 
Eight-Day Clock and Spinning Wheel, - Mrs. S. J. Cowen, Hartford. 
Settle, made in 1769, - - - Mrs. O. H. Whitmore, Hartford. 
Lounge and Rocker for Ladies' Room, - - Ladies of New Haven. 
Piano, - - - Mathushek Piano Manufacturing Co., New Haven. 
"CjTiibella" Cabinet Organ, - Shoninger Organ Co., New Haven. 
Connecticut Register, for use of Connecticut visitors and friends, 
made expressly for the Cottage, 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co. , Hartford. 
Water Cooler for Main Room, - Joseph Scheider tfc Co. , Portland. 
Bird Cages, . . . . Hendryx & Bartholomew, Ansonia. 

Paper and Envelopes, printed with cut of Cottage, 

Plimpton Manufacturing Co. , Hartford. 
Nickel Plated Coffee Urn, - Manning, Bowman & Co. , Yf . Meriden. 
Lawn Mower, - - Hill's Archimedean Lawn Mower Co. , Hartford. 
Bronze Ornaments, - - - - Ed. Miller & Co. , W. Meriden. 
Well Sweep and " Old Oaken Bucket," - ^ Harley Case, Portland. 

Table, Ham, and sundry other articles made of the wood of the 

'1 Charter Oak" Tree, - - John H. Most, Old Saybrook. 

Gen. Putnam's Buckskin Knee-Brceches, Silver Buckles, and Piece 
of a Birch-Bark Torch reputed to have been used by Putnam 
in the Wolf's Den Affair, - - Mrs. H. Goodwin, Boston. 

Silver Mounted Cane once owned by Gen. Putnam, 

Major Lewis I. P. Putnam, Washington County, Ohio. 
Ancient Pistols and Holsters, Powder Horn, Bullet Mold and Magnet, 

Israel Waldo Putnam. 
"Royal Arms" used in the Connecticut House of Representatives 

prior to 177G, - - - - Connecticut Historical Society. 

Mr. Thomas R. Pickering, resident agent of the Board, who 
remained at the Cottage throughout the Exhibition, received a 
salary of $3,000 as compensation for his services, which were of 
a widely varied character, and of great value to both exhibitors 
and visitors. He had large experience, acquired at both the Paris 
and Vienna exhibitions, and was especially well informed on the 



THE CONNECTICUT COTTAGE. 11 

subjects of manufacturing and machinery. In Vienna, Mr. Pick- 
ering was superintendent of the American machine department, 
and contributed largely to its success by his explanations to visit- 
ors. For his management of the department he received the 
Order of the Cross of Francis Joseph, and at Paris he was 
awarded a medal in recognition of his ability. Mrs. Pickering 
was in general charge of the Cottage, and thousands of lady vis- 
itors were made to feel at home by her unfailing courtesy and 
kindly attention to their needs. In addition to her duties at the 
Cottage, she also rendered valuable aid to the lady exhibitors of 
Connecticut in arranging for the placing of many of their ex- 
hibits in the Women's Pavilion and elsewhere. Wholly unex- 
pected, but highly appreciated by her, were the testimonials she 
received from Connecticut ladies at the close of the Exhibition: 
From the ladies of New Haven, that gem of art publications, 
"Picturesque America," in two elegantly bound volumes; and 
from the ladies of Hartford, a present no less valued as an evi- 
dence of their esteem. The Connecticut Board of Managers also 
added a deserved tribute of their appreciation. 

The closing history of the Cottage is a peculiar one. Some time 
after the Exhibition had ended it was purchased by a Miss 
McCready, to be taken to her home on the Hudson and reerected. 
It was removed from the grounds shortly afterward, and the re- 
port was current for some time that its purchaser had carried out 
her intentions; but a later report is that the Cottage was seen in 
the summer of 1877 at or near Long Branch, erected as it stood 
at Philadelphia, and bearing no evidence of the hardships to which 
its demolition and removal must have subjected it. 

Before leaving the subject of the Cottage, mention should be 
made of the venerable well-box, sweep, and old oaken bucket, 
which were placed just to the right of the front entrance. These 
were loaned by Captain Harley Case of Portland, Connecticut, 
and were objects of interest not only to Connecticut visitors, but 
to thousands of others, who stopped to examine the quaint old 
rehc of a century ago, to peer into its box, and to try the swing 
of the weather-worn sweep. The box and sweep were on the 
farm of Captain Case for over seventy-five years, and the old 
bucket dated back more than a century. The latter was taken 
back to Connecticut by its owner when the Exhibition closed, but 
the box and sweep went to the purchaser of the Cottage, and was 
removed with it. Another object of interest on the Cottage 



78 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENKIAL EXHIBITION, 

grounds was the grand portal or gateway of Portland stone, of 
massive yet graceful design, and elaborately cut. This was one 
of the finest finished works that was ever made of this stone, and 
illustrated the many excellent qualities which have made the 
material a favorite with builders throughout the entire country, 
not only for its texture and handsome color, but its durability. 
The gateway yet remains upon the Exhibition grounds (January, 
1878). 

A hundred interesting incidents occurring at the Cottage dur- 
ing the Exhibition might be related, some pathetic, more of them 
amusing. There was an evident inclination to regard the building 
as a sort of Connecticut hotel located on the grounds, but differ- 
ing from ordinary hotels in that everything possible to furnish 
must be furnished without cost. It was often difficult to prevent 
some of the visitors from forcing their way into Mr, Pickering's 
private quarters, and probably a few of those who became indig- 
nant when refused admission have not yet comprehended that 
even in public buildings there are some places where visitors 
should not intrude. The inquisitive disposition of others was 
manifested by the prying into the drawers and compartments of 
the old sideboard and dressing-case; but the trouble was poorly 
repaid, for they contained nothing. 

The piano and organ placed on exhibition in "the reception-room 
by New Haven manufacturers had their durability pretty thor- 
oughly tested. One or the other, and frequently both at the same 
time, were played upon from morning until night, largely by per- 
sons wholly ignorant of music, or only beginners. The effect of 
two of the latter, seated at the respective instruments, and re- 
hearsing their latest exercises, can better be imagined than 
described. Nervous visitors were almost distracted by the dis- 
cord, and even the regular occupants of the Cottage were occa- 
sionally compelled to stop the noise in pure self-defense. 

The Putnam rehcs were objects of general attention, and some 
of the comments upon their nature and their authenticity were 
rather amusing. Early one morning a pleasant-looking old lady, 
who had visited the Cottage before, came in with several friends, 
and halting them before Old Put.'s portrait, exclaimed, "There, 
dew look at that there splendid picter of Gineral Washington ! " 
Bystanders state that the face in the canvas actually grinned at 
this. Some parties were inclined to doubt that Putnam ever 
used the lengthy, old-style gun, that hung over the mantel, in the 



THE CONNECTICUT COTTAGE, V9 

affair with the v/olf, and one chap nonplussed a crowd with the 
remark, " Confound it 1 I've been to the cave, and he couldn't 
get that gun-barrel into it, to say nothing of the stock!" The 
Putnam magnet was an object of great curiosity. Hundreds 
rubbed the blades of their pocket knives upon it, so as to give 
them some of its magnetic power, and one old lady from some- 
where in the Western States adopted a rather more systematic 
course. She brought a full package of needles, and spent an hour 
or more in rubbing them on the magnet. This attracted notice, 
and she frankly explained that she intended to take them home 
and distribute them among her friends as Putnam relics. 

Visitors were inclined to be rather quizzical on the subject of 
the authenticity of the Charter Oak rehcs, yet, as a general thing, 
they purchased specimens freely enough. The imitation nutmegs 
made from Charter Oak wood sold rapidly, and at times Mr. Most 
was unable to supply the demand, at fifty cents each. As imita- 
tions of real nutmegs they were excellent, and at the distance of 
a yard the difference could not be distinguished. At one time, 
when the supply was nearly exhausted, a waggish member of the 
Board of Managers played a curious trick upon several of the 
visitors. Procuring two or three dozen genuine nutmegs, he 
mixed them with the wooden ones; many were sold, yet it ap- 
pears that no purchaser detected the deception, for in no instance 
did any one return and demand an exchange. The parties who 
were skeptical as to the authenticity of the Charter Oak articles 
generally had no delicacy about expressing their opinions, and one 
of them remarked with a grim smile, " 'Pears to me that the oak 
woods of Connecticut are goin' to be cleaned out pretty soon if 
this Charter Oak fever don't let up." Late in the fall the cool 
weather prompted the keeping of a wood-fire on the hearth in the 
reception room. One morning a tall chap, evidently from the 
extreme backwoods, dropped in at the Cottage, and at once sought 
the genial fire-side. Settling his hands under his coat-tails, he 
backed up to the fire, stretched his legs apart, and soon made 
himself comfortable. Finally, as his gaze wandered around the 
room, he caught the eye of one of the attendants, and asked, " Is 
this a Charter Oak wood-fire? " The attendant laughingly re- 
sponded that it was possible that it was. The chap pondered for 
a moment, and then, his face brightening up, remarked, "Thought 
it was; thought I sort 'er re-co^'-nized the smell." 

The confidence with which visitors relied upon the knowledge 



80 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

of Mr. Pickering and his assistants was surprising, and at times 
somewliat entertaining. Perfect strangers would inquire, '' Have 
you seen my brother John in here this morning? " or would re- 
quest, " If you see Bill Jones of B, to-day or to-morrow, tell him 
I'm stopping at No. 000 Blank street." By the time the agent 
had stored his memory with a score of these directions (espe- 
cially if not knowing any of the parties), the chances were that 
the directions he would be able to give the expected friends would 
make the finding of the others rather doubtful work. One day a 
lady came in and inquired of Mr. Pickering, "Have Mr. B and 
Mrs. L, his sister, been here yesterday or to-day? " Both names 
being unfamiliar, Mr. Pickering replied that he could not state, 
and advised the lady to consult the pages of the register, where 
she might possibly find their names recorded. In a snappish 
tone the lady replied, "Indeed, I won't go to that trouble. You 
ought to have somebody here who knows everybody in Connecti- 
cut, and who can recollect when they see them." Mr. P. was so 
amazed by this starthng proposition that he made no reply. If 
he had collected his thoughts quick enough, he might have sug- 
gested that such men are comparatively scarce, but before he had 
this chance the lady had dexterously kicked the train of her 
dress up into her left hand with her right foot, and swept out of 
the room. 

One of the most humorous demands upon the agent was made 
by a verdant-looking young man, who wished to purchase photo- 
graphic views of the Cottage, of which a quantity, exteriors and 
interiors, were kept on sale. After looking them over with 
much deliberation, the young man produced his wallet and 
"guessed he'd take an interior and an outlerior both." A fruitful 
source of amusement to persons who were advised of the fun, was 
found in watching visitors who encountered the " old well " for the 
first time. From a little distance there was no reason to suppose 
that there was only a well-box resting on the ground. Thirsty 
parties would rush forward to get a drink from the old oaken 
bucket; but before drawing the water they generally wanted a 
peep down the cool, mossy depths of the weU. The joke came in 
when one of them, firmly holding on his hat with one hand, 
braced his hand securely against the well-box, and gazed down — 
just three feet. One individual who was fooled in this way, and 
detected a group enjoying his discomfiture, ejaculated, "Mighty 
partic'ler about their thundering old well! S'pose they take the 
hole in-doors, af eared somebody would steal it." 



CHAPTER YI. 



CONNECTICUT'S EXHIBITS. 

PART I. 

The Display of Manufactueed Goods and Mechanical Tki- 

^ UMPHS IN THE MaIN BuILDING AND MACHINERY HaLL ThE 

Leadinq Firms of the State Represented — Exhibits of 
Arms, Silver Ware, Machinery, Sewing Machines, Textile 
Fabrics, Bronze, Brass, Iron, and other Manufactures — 
Evidences of the Ingenuity of Connecticut's Inventors, and 
Skill op her Workmen — Notes on some of the most Im- 
portant Exhibits. 

Connecticut's contribution to the several departments was so va- 
ried and so extensive that her people felt in it a justifiable pride. 
It was larger in proportion to her area and population than that of 
any other State in the Union; it gave full evidence of the variety 
and standard character of her productions ; and the percentage of 
awards to Connecticut exhibitors was greater than for any other 
State. In certain classes of articles, such as silver and plated ware, 
brass, goods, cutlery, arms, etc., the exhibits were of marked superi- 
ority, and evidence of this is found in the awards and written decis- 
ions of the judges, many of the latter speaking in decided terms of 
the merits of Connecticut's productions. The entries in the several 
departments numbered nearly four hundred, thus distributed : In the 
Main Building, 163; in the Machinery Hall, 74; in the Agricultural 
Department, 21; in the Art Department, 4; in the Government 
Building, 43 ; in the Women's Department, 66; in the Annexes and 
Grounds, 23. By this excellent showing the state fully supple- 
mented her record at the Vienna exhibition, in 1873, where the 
exhibits were of such a character that her exhibitors received a 
larger number of awards in proportion to the number of exhibits 
than any other state or nation. 

The character of the industries of the state was indicated by 
the articles shown, all of which, with comparatively few ex- 

(81) 



82 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



ceptions, were produced by manufacture, or the results of manu- 
facturing processes. It is true that some entries gave suggestions 
of the agricultural and mineral resources of the State, but com- 
pared with the products of her work-shops they were few in num- 
ber and of slight importance. To give an extended description 
of each of the four hundred exhibits would require an entire 
volume, and in the restricted space which must be allotted to the 
subject of the exhibits in this volume, only those of marked prom- 
inence can be referred to other than in general terms. Yet exhib- 
its deserving of liberal notice were shown in nearly every depart- 
ment, forming no inconsiderable portion of the elegant attractions 
of the Main Building, the mechanical triumphs of Machinery 
Hall contributing to the interest of the Government exhibit, and 
in short enlivening and assisting to the completeness of the entire 
exhibition. 




B— Barrel. T— Trigger. 

C -Cylinder. lU-Ramrod. 

H— Hammer. L— Lever. 

G— HoUow p-oove for Capping. 
ORIGINAL COLT S REVOLVER. 



One feature of the Connecticut exhibits at Philadelphia was par- 
ticularly noticeable, that a large part of the productive skill of the 
State was directed to weapons, and other appliances of war. 




LATEST DESIGN COLt's REVOLVER (SELr-COCKING). 



Connecticut's exhibits — part i. 83 

The Colt's Fire-Arms Company of Hartford made an extensive 
display of pistols in a large ornamental case in the Main Building. 
The front was a plate of glass ten by twelve feet, behind which 
was a circle of pistols of all the different calibers manufactured by 
the company, and including specimens of the old-style revolvers 
first introduced by Colonel Samuel Colt. Prussian needle-guns of 
the company's make occupied spaces in the angles of the case. The 
engravings on the preceding page represent the improvements in 
the company's products. First is the original revolver, an effective 
weapon, but muzzle-loading, and discarded in the present day for 
the more convenient style. The second engraving represents the 
new double-action, self-cocking, central fire revolver, combining 
all the latest improvements and devices. Such a weapon as this is 
of inestimable value to its possessor, who can deliver his fire with 
the greatest celerity and effect, for its ease of action, accuracy, and 
penetrative powers are unsurpassed. 

Colt's first patent was obtained in the United States in 1835, 
and the establishment, under the name of the Patent Arms Com- 
pany, was started in Paterson, N. J., in 1836. From 1848 to 
December 3], 1855, it was conducted under the supervision of 
Colonel Samuel Colt, and since that period the style has been as 
at present. The buildings of the factories proper at Hartford, 
Conn., cover an area of 500 feet square, or 250,000 square feet of 
ground. The annual sales vary greatly. In some years they have 
exceeded $1,500,000. During the American Civil War, this com- 
pany furnished the United States government with 100,000 army 
and navy pistols, and 100,000 Springfield muskets. Since then 
they have suppHed Russia with 30,000 breech -loading muskets, 
and France with 6,000. The company ranks high in arms man- 
ufacturing, and can now produce 100,000 arms of an entirely new 
pattern quicker than any other manufacturing company in the 
world. 

The celebrated Gathng gun, manufactured at the Colt's Yf orks, 
was shown both in the Main and United States buildings, the speci- 
mens representing pieces of the different calibers, from the one- 
inch, with a range of two and a half miles, to the little pieces 
weighing entire only ninety pounds, but with a capacity of firing 
one thousand balls per minute. The Gatling gun was invented by 
Dr. Richard J. Gatling of Indiana, in 1861, and the next year he 
made the first complete weapon in Indianapolis. Within a few 
years official tests were made by the artillery officers of all the 



84 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



principal nations, and resulted in numerous orders for a weapon 
which was found to exceed in destructive qualities any previously 
invented. In 1866 the United States adopted it for field use; in 
1867 it was adopted by Russia, in 1871 by Turkey and Eg}l)t, in 
1872 by the United States for both shore and ship service, and in 
1874 the United States Chief of Ordnance recommended the pur- 
chase of 209 guns for use on fortifications, at a cost of $292,600- 
Other nations have purchased Gatlings, including China, for which 
a large order was filled. The gun consists of a number of rifled 
barrels arranged and revolving around a shaft to which they are 
parallel. These barrels are loaded and fired while revolving, the 
metallic cartridge shells being ejected in continuous succession. 




GATLING GUN. 
[Showing arrangement of barrels.] 

Each barrel is fired once in a revolution, but as many shots are deliv- 
ered during that time as there are barrels, and the revolution being 
rapid, they follow in quick succession, sounding not unlike a stick 
drawn rapidly along a picket fence. The action is simple. A 
man places one end of a feed-case of cartridges into a hopper at 
the top of the gun, while another turns a crank, by which the gun 
is revolved; fresh feed-cases can be substituted without interrupt- 
ing the succession of shots. 

Another weapon of similar character exhibited, was the Gardner 
battery gun, the invention of Y7"illiam Gardner of Hartford. This 



Connecticut's exhibits— pakt i. 85 

was shown in two forms, one with two and the other with four 
barrels. Its object — that of hurhng a large number of projectiles 
in quick successive order — is the same as the Gatling, but is reached 




THE GARDNER GUN. 

by a wholly different method, the Gardner gun having a simple 
reciprocating lock-motion. The chief resemblance in the two 
guns is that both are worked by cranks. This weapon is also an 
effective one, and the trial tests have given excellent results. 
Although a recent invention, many orders for the gun have been 
received, including a large one from the Chinese government. 

The "Whitney's Arms Co., of Whitneyville, New Haven, made a 
fine exhibit of pistols and rifles. There were two upright stands, 
connected by counter cases, the whole in wood imitating ebony. 
In the upright cases were sporting and field rifles, the latter 
furnished complete with bayonets of the angular and the sabre 
style, and in the counter cases were specimens of the "Whitney and 
Monitor styles of pistols, all sizes and calibers, elegantly mounted 
and inlaid. The company showed complete lines of breech-loaders 
for infantry, cavalry, and sporting purposes, and claimed as the 
merits of their system: that the firing-pin is withdrawn by positive 
motion; that the cartridge-shell is ejected clear from the chamber; 
that the weapon may be loaded on the half-cock ; that the breech- 
block is securely locked the instant it is closed; simplicity of con- 
struction, fewness of parts, and rapidity of firing. At a test 



86 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

by United States officers, it was fired twenty-three times in one 
minute. The Whitneyville Armory was established in 1798 by 
Eli Whitney, father of the gentleman now president of the com- 
pany, and was the first complete factory for the manufacture of 
arms established in this country. The United States Government, 
by liberal advances on his contract, aided Mr. Whitney so materi- 
ally that he was enabled to construct more perfect machinery than 
had ever been used in America or Europe, and which accom- 
plished that great desideratum — duplicating the parts accurately, so 
that they were interchangeable. Mr. Whitney achieved a world- 
wide reputation as the inventor of the cotton-gin, the original 
model of which was exhibited by the Whitney Arms Company at 
Philadelphia. This gin has been virtually unimproved upon, 
although it has passed through the most inventive age that ever 
existed, and if the revolving toothed cylinder and ths revolving 
brush were removed from use as Mr. Whitney combined them, 
there would be no efficient cotton-gin at the present day, and cotton 
would advance from 50c. to $1.00 per pound on account of the 
expense of cleaning it of its seed. This invention has been worth 
more than five thousand millions of dollars to the United States. 
It has made the prosperity of the Southern States; it has made 
England rich, and changed the commerce of the world. Lord 
Macaulay said: " What Peter the Great had done for Eussia, the 
inventor of the cotton-gin has equalled and more to advance the 
power and progress of the United States." But for all this the 
inventor realized no remuneration. What he received in one 
Southern State he spent in another in law-suits to sustain his 
patented rights. He had sixty law-suits in Georgia before the 
courts even affirmed and confirmed his rights — and the State paid 
him nothing. Taking cold on his last journey to the South, he 
contracted a complaint which proved fatal, and his suffering during 
the last months of his life was marked by paroxysms of intense pain. 
Hence he died a martyr to the benefaction which he conferred 
upon his country and the world. His family, if dependent upon 
what he realized from the invention of the cotton gin, would be 
among the poorest in America. While monuments to military 
and civic celebrities are numerous through that section, no South- 
ern city or State has ever yet erected a monument to the memory 
of the author of an invention to which their prosperity is so 
largely due. Such tribute as this would be eminently proper. 



WHITNEY CAEBINE. 



g7 




88 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

In fact, it would be even more appropriate if the monument was 
erected by the nation, for to no other inventor does the nation 
owe a greater debt. 

The Winchester Repeating Arms Company of New Haven had 
a rich and extensive display of weapons, consisting of magazine 
rifles, field, sporting, and target models, there being more than 
one hundred specimens in the collection. The cases containing 
them were upright, forming three, sides of a square, with project- 
ing counter cases, and in the center an upright, octagonal case. 
In the angles of the square were cases containing collections of all 
the styles and sizes of metallic cartridges (about seventy-five in 
number) made by the company, on shelves of plate-glass. In one 
of the counter cases was a rifle with barrel and magazine sawed in 
longitudinal sections. Another case contained a rifle exquisitely 
inlaid in gold tracery on blued steel, the floor of the case being 
a mirror, reflecting the reverse side, and thus exhibiting the whole 
piece. The exhibit included a total of nearly two hundred guns, 
representing about fifty different styles. The cost of the cases 
alone was $3,000, and this represents but a fraction of the value 
of the exhibit. The theory upon which the "Winchester repeating 
rifle is constructed is, " to produce an arm effective and accurate 
at all practicable ranges up to 500 or 600 yards, with the least 
weight of ammimition, and possessing unparalleled rapidity of 
firing. This feature of rapidity is obtained by the use of a maga- 
zine holding from eight to twenty shots, which can be fired at the 
rate of two .in one second, or eight times as fast as the single 
breech-loading gun, and is its distinguishing characteristic; never- 
theless, it can be used as a single breech-loader with all the ease 
and rapidity of any gun of that class." At the Exhibition the 
company received an award on their magazine sporting rifle, the 
report of the judges characterizing it as "the best magazine rifle 
for sporting purposes yet produced." The company also received 
an award for the perfection of their metallic ammunition for mih- 
tary purposes. Their cartridge factory is claimed to be the largest 
in the country. 

The Sharps Rifle Company of Bridgeport exhibited their famous 
sporting and target rifles and carbines in an elegant case, appro- 
priately surmomited by a pair of stag's horns. Every style of 
weapon manufactured by the Company was exhibited, and many 
of the pieces were covered with elaborate ornamentation. The 
merits claimed for this weapon were its strength, simplicity of 



90 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



meclianism, and good action, combined with remarkable accuracy; 
this has been demonstrated at Creedmoor and elsewhere, and 
places the Sharps high among the best target and sporting rifles 
of the world. A British sportsman has scored sixteen consecu- 
tive bulls-eyes with this rifle, at one thousand yards. Christian 
Sharps, the inventor, began the manufacture of the rifles at Hart- 
ford in 1851, and was located there until 1876, when a new 




SHAKPES' RIFLE. 



and extensive factory in Bridgeport was taken. This rifle has 
been in use for over twenty-five years, and although hundreds of 
thousands of them have been sold to governments, hunters, 
sportsmen, rifle clubs, and others, yet no instance has occurred of 
injury inflicted through any defect of system, workmanship, or 
material. Soldiers, hunters, and marksmen have, as their esti- 
mate of its excellent qualities, long given the name of "Old 
Eeliable" to the Sharps rifle, and the Company have adopted 
that as their trade-mark. 

The Union Metallic Cartridge Company of Bridgeport had a 
very interesting exhibition, in cases finished in French walnut 
and plate glass, including cartridge shells and percussion caps in 
every stage of manufacture, and a box of cartridges which had 
been recovered from a submerged wreck, where they had been 
three months under water. On a trial of several thousand of 
these cartridges not one failed to explode. The brass from which 
these cartridge cases were made was from the Coe Manufacturing 
Company, Wolcottville, and the works of AYallace & Son, Ansonia. 

One of the most interesting exhibits in the Main Building was 
that of the "Willimantic Linen Company. Columns on two sides 
of their enclosed space supported entablatures bearing in hand- 
some black letters the device, " Willimantic Spool Cotton," the 
first and the last two words being displayed intermittently. The 




EXIIIBI r 01- THE U'lLLIMANTIC LINEN COMPANY. 



CONNECTICUT'S EXHIBITS PART I. 93 

pavilion (see engraving) enclosed a long, wide show-case contain- 
ing 2,520 spools of cotton, comprising no less than 120 different 
shades of color, making a spectacle not only of exceeding beauty 
but strikingly illustrative of the taste and progress evinced by the 
manufactures of the company. The central object in this minia- 
ture spool cotton mill was a revolving pyramid twelve feet high, 
surmounted by a figure of Victory, holding a wreath above her 
head. This was constructed of spools of six-cord cotton of all 
conceivable colors, but showing prominently in black and white 
the word " "Willimantic." Next, resting against a pillar of the 
building was a frame six feet square, within which were 8,464 
spools, so arranged in colors as to represent an immense eagle, 
with the figures "177G" above and the word " Centennial " be- 
neath. Finally, another large show-case contained an extensive 
display of samples of work done with Willimantic cotton, com- 
prising the greatest variety of articles — hats, shoes, shirts, collars 
and cuffs, ladies' underwear and other garments — all showing the 
fineness of the work which is attainable with this cotton, and 
evincing much taste and skill in the execution of it.- The entire 
process of manufacture was also shown in actual and active oper- 
ation, attaining the most instructive results. The cotton was first 
shown as it came from the boll; next was presented perfectly 
ginned, as it exists in the bale; and so on through the various 
stages of manufacture, until the completed delicate threads, of all 
shades and colors, were exhibited. These different conditions or 
stages were placed side by side, in the gradation of their develop- 
ment. Also in operation was a spinning frame, its spindles re- 
volving 8,500 times a minute, and making No. 150 yarn, a delicate 
fiber, so fine and sensitive that even the slightest breath affected 
it. Near by was a spooling machine, which wound any prescribed 
number of yards of cotton on a spool, at the rate of two hundred 
and thirty yards in thirty seconds, stopped when the number was 
filled, and also if by any accident the thread should break. The 
ticketing or labeling machine, a wonderful apparatus, was busily 
at work placing the labels upon the end of the spools. "All that 
this machine required was to be supplied with the filled spools and 
sheets of paper on which the tickets or labels are printed. It 
then cut the tickets; pasted one on each end of the spool; having 
finished that, took up another, and so on, at the rate of eighty- 
five a minute " 

The silk industries of the State were mainly represented by 



94 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXniBITION. 

the splendid exhibit contributed by the Cheney Brothers of Hart- 
ford and South Manchester. The display case, in the Main Build- 
ing, was a pavilion of black walnut and plate glass, eighteen feet 
long, nine feet wide, and fourteen feet in height, the roof sup- 
ported by symmetrical columns. It was located in the silk de- 
partment, adjoining those of other leading manufacturers of the 
country, and was an object of interest, especially to the lady vis- 
itors, with whom the Cheney silks are universally popular. En 
passant, it may be remarked that the ladies are not usually in- 
fluenced by any patriotic desire to help American manufactures 
when they set out to have a silk dress, but their prejudice in 
favor of the Cheney silk is based rather more upon their knowl- 
edge of its durability of color and of material. The aggregate 
value of the exhibits was nearly $15,000. Black, gros grains, 
colored silks of every hue, were shown, in rolls, as prepared for 
the market, or falling in rich combinations from the roof, present- 
ing their splendid shades to the best advantage. Full lines of 
Marcelines and Florentines were displayed, parasol silks in all 
shades and widths demanded by the prevalent fashions, and 
foulards, all colors and grades, for hat or fur linings and millinery 
purposes. The ribbon branch was charming in its richness of 
mingled hues, from the standard shades to all the strange tints, 
with stranger names, which emanate from the dictators of fashion 
in Paris or New York. The varying widths and myriad colors 
of these ribbons gave opportunities for producing good effects, 
and their arrangement showed an artistic hand. The Centennial 
year rage for silk goods in national designs was manifest in the 
numerous styles of handkerchiefs, ties, etc., red, white, and blue, 
and the Centennial decorative rage by silk flags, hundreds of 
thousands of which were manufactured and sold by the Cheney 
Brothers during the year. Machine twist and sewing silk, to- 
gether with patent spun silks for a variety of purposes in the 
trades, were shown, the exhibit, as a whole, fully representing the 
productive capacity of the great silk manufactory of Connecticut. 
The award made by the judges was of a tenor most compli- 
mentary to the exhibit of Cheney Brothers, yet its terms are no 
stronger than deserved. 

The silk twist industry was represented by exhibits from the 
establishments of J. H. Hayden & Son, Atwood & Richmond, Hol- 
land Manufacturing Company, and others, the last named firm 
showing, in addition to twist, ingenious machines for winding. 



Connecticut's exhibits — part i. 95 

testing, etc.; and Belding Brothers & Co. of Rockville, cocoons 
and raw silk. Tobias Kolm, Hartford, showed near the Cheneys' 
collection a fine assortment of his embroidery, star and serpentine 
braids, of three hundred varieties, with several wound on spools 
ready for sewing-machine embroidery. He exhibited also a selec- 
tion of sewing silk and twist, finished by his patented process in 
a very even and perfect manner. 

Fine, fancy cotton warp cassimeres, diagonals, flannels, and 
similar goods were shown in great variety by the New England 
Company, the Rock Manufacturing Company, and the Hockanum 
Company of Rockville, the Meriden Woolen Company, the Clin- 
ton Mills Company, Norwich, and other exhibitors, the former 
showing a neat cassimere design for summer wear, in which the 
figures '76 formed a delicate and tasteful pattern. Many of the 
goods were of superior style and finish, especially diagonals, etc., 
which quite equaled the best European cloths, and are frequently 
sold by dealers as imported goods, without detection of the mis- 
representation, either by primary inspection or subsequent expe- 
rience with their wearing qualities. 

The Hartford Carpet Company of Thompsonville, and the Read 
Carpet Company of Bridgeport, were the sole exhibitors of this 
class of goods. The Thompsonville Company occupied two 
enclosed spaces in the Main Building, representing apartments, 
with the carpets properly arranged on the floors. The tinting of 
the walls and the management of the Hghts were considered so 
as to afford complements or foils to the textures and colors. 

The Company displayed full lines of body Brussels, ingrains, 
and three-plys, in neat and pleasing patterns, one, a fern-leaf 
design, being charmingly appropriate for chamber furnishing. 
Their specialty was a Persian carpet, of modest design, with rich 
effects, yet of neutral colors that would harmonize with almost 
any style of furnishing, a decided departure from the old styles, 
for which it was necessary to select the furniture so as to avoid 
disagreeable contrasts with the carpet's gaudy pattern and colors. 
Several of the patterns exhibited at Philadelphia were generally 
admired, and thousands of yards were manufactured to fill orders 
from visitors. The texture and colors of the Company's produc- 
tions won for them general commendation, and no European car- 
pets of the same classes surpassed them in any essential features. 
The manufactory at Thompsonville, of which State Senator 
J. L. Houston is superintendent, is one of the largest in the 



96 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



country, with a productive capacity of 8,000 yards per day. Un- 
like many other firms, the Company spins all the yarns used, 
over half a ton daily, and this, with other features independent 
















CARPET HARTFORD CARPET COMPANY. 

of the actual process of carpet making, greatly facilitates opera- 
tions, and makes the estahlishment complete in every respect. 
The exhibit of the famous Collins Company of Hartford and 



CONNECTICUTS EXHIBITS PART I. 97 

Collinsville, in the Main Building, was an attractive one, altliough 
the first thought would be that no arrangement of axes, hatchets, 
picks, shovels, etc., could be made that would be pleasing to the 
eye. But the company proved otherwise, and their spacious 
show-cases, radiant with plate-glass, held glittering designs formed 
with polished axes, hatchets, machetes, knives, etc., arranged in 
circles or otherwise ornamentally. These articles are known and 
used the world over; in every section of North America the Col- 
lins Company's trade-mark is the only guarantee required by a 
purchaser; the settler of Australia swings a Collins Company axe, 
and the Brazilian clears a path through his native jungles with 
one of its heavy machetes. As an illustration of the extent of 
their manufactures, it may be stated that nearly five hundred 
styles of machetes are made. Such is also the case with axes, 
plows, and other implements, for a design that will sell in one 
section or to one nation would not be accorded even the compli- 
ment of a trial test in another if its shape was unsatisfactory. 
Hence the great variety of articles manufactured, the exhibit of 
which at Philadelphia gave a good idea of the capacity and exten- 
sive trade of the firm. 

The department of locks was extensive; locks of all descrip- 
tions, from the tiniest padlock for the ornamentation of a poodle's 
collar to the most elaborate time-lock. Mallory, Wheeler & Co., 
New Haven; the Norwalk Lock Company, South Norwalk; the 
Branford Lock Works, the New Britain Bank-Lock Company, 
and the Yale Lock Company, Stamford, all made large displays 
of these safeguards and their appurtenances. The Yale Company 
exhibited a completely fitted up post-ofiice, lacking only post- 
master, clerks, and the calling public to have it at work. The 
design was to show door, drawer, box, and mail-locks. A beauti- 
ful time-lock, with all its works exposed and running, was a 
unique feature in this display. 

The Seth Thomas Clock Company of Thomaston, the largest in 
the State, whose products tick in every section of the civilized 
world, made an extensive exhibit in the Main Building, ranging 
from the common kitchen time-piece to the most elaborate and 
costly ornament for the parlor mantel-clocks, in fact, designed to 
meet all tastes and the financial means of every purchaser. While 
American manufacturers had for years supplied the home demand 
for clocks for ordinary uses, tower clocks were imported from 
Europe until within a few years, when several American firms 



98 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

essayed their manufacture, and with good success. The Seth 
Thomas Company was one of these, and at Philadelphia exhibited 
one of their finest works of this class, — the "great clock" over 
the east door of Machinery Hall. The works were of bronze, 
the main frame ten feet long, three and one-half wide, and seven 
high; weight, three and one-half tons. The pendulum, fourteen 
feet long, weighed, rod and pendulum-bob, seven hundred pounds, 
and beat once in two seconds. That mysterious power, elec- 
tricity, was employed in connection with this mechanical triumph, 
wires connecting the great clock with numerous electrical clocks 
in the Main and Machinery buildings, communicating every 
twenty seconds. The award received by the Company for "tower 
clocks and clocks of commerce" was as follows: "For a large 
tower clock, with Dennison's double three-legged gravity escape- 
ment. The pendulum has a zinc and steel compensation. The 
weight of pendulum-ball is five hundred pounds, of the rod two 
hundred pounds. There is provision against accident from the 
breaking of the pendulum springs. The driving weight of this 
clock is two hundred pounds. The whole construction of the 
train is good, and the action of the escapement is all that can be 
desired, since an increase in the power applied to the train does 
not appear to disturb sensibly the arc of vibration of the pendu- 
lum. Also for the manufacture of brass clocks in great variety 
for general use, and of good quality in relation to their prices, 
and for ornamental clocks." The Ansonia Brass and Copper 
Company made also a good showing of clocks, mainly in spun 
metal cases. The Waterbury Clock Company, the New Haven 
Clock Company, the Terry Clock Company, and the E. N. Welch 
Manufacturing Company all made extensive exhibits, that of the 
last named company being particularly noticeable for variety of 
specimens. As might have been supposed from her reputation, 
Connecticut was not equaled in this line. The Ansonia Company 
showed a working model of O'Neill's nickel-copper movement, 
and handsome clocks fitted with it. 

In brass plate and wire goods, also, the exhibition made by 
Connecticut manufacturers was unapproachable. The Scovill 
Manufacturing Company, Benedict & Burnham, Holmes, Booth 
& Hayden, the Waterbury Brass Company, and other firms of 
that great brass manufacturing center — Waterbury — the Ansonia 
Brass and Copper Company, and the Stanley Works, New Britain, 
all made rich displays of materials and manufactures of sheet 



##/>% 





THE "FOREST AND STREAM" CUP. 



ireridcn Britannia Co. 




• -^^l 



REPOUSSE SET. 



Meridea Britauuia Co. 




PUNCH BOWL AND CUPS. 



Mcriden Britanuia C" 



Connecticut's exhibits — part i. 105 

metal and wire, consisting, in part, of "buttons, military emblems, 
lamps, reflectors, hinges, printers' rules, rivets, shot-pouches, pow- 
der flasks, chargers, tubing, chains, pipe-railing, stair-rods, etc. The 
similarity of the exhibits of the brass goods industry, and the 
general use of these goods, renders unnecessary any extended 
description. 

The handsomest show-case in the Main Building was the pavil- 
ion of the Meriden Britannia Company, situated near the music 
stand. It was quadrangular in shape, and walled in by four hand- 
some cases in black varnished wood, ornamented with gold, and 
set with large plate-glass. The base was formed of Tennessee 
marble slabs, and the roof was a dome, painted in blue and gold. 
The structure cost $7,500, and the exhibits were valued at $60,000 
more. The arrangement of the cases was such that the visitor 
could first inspect them from the outside, and then, entering the 
pavihon, continue further inspection, and receive information from 
a representative of the firm. . One case contained salvers, dinner 
and tea-sets, including a dinner-set finished with figures of 
children serving dishes. Several toilet-sets were of interest to 
the fair sex. "The Buffalo Hunt," a statuette representing a 
mounted Indian pursuing the horned monarch of the plains, was 
placed on a pedestal fronting the nave, its design, execution, and 
finish being artistic in the highest degree, compelling attention 
from the multitude, and admiration from all who are skilled in 
such matters. In the same case was a handsome punch-bowl set, 
of graceful style, with bowl, salver, ladle, and twelve goblets, 
plated on nickel, and pronounced one of the finest specimens of 
modern art. A fac-simile, with a dozen extra goblets, was ordered 
by Governor Stanford of California, who was enthusiastic in his 
praise of the specimen exhibited. A yacht under full sail, the 
Forest and Stream cup, and "Indian" epergne were other in- 
stances of elegant design and exquisite workmanship. The 
" Neptune " epergne was an important feature of the show-case 
on the other side, and an interesting Centennial novelty was 
foimd in the " Elder Brewster " tea-set, manufactured after an 
original design brought over in the Mayflower. There were also 
a number of porcelain-lined baking and table-service dishes, ice- 
pitchers, and other specialties of this house, and a full line of the 
well known "1847, Rogers Bros. XII.," spoons and forks, plated 
by the sectional process, by which the wearing parts of spoons 
and forks are coated with an extra thickness of silver, a specialty 



106 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

of the Meriden Britannia Company. Specimens were also exliib- 
ited of Silliman's new patent white metal, whish has the ring of 
genuine silver. 

The Simpson, Hall & Miller Co., of Wallingford, confined their 
exhibit to the Columbus water-cooler (elsewhere described), which 
was not only one of the finest specimens of art shown by State 
manufacturers, but was the largest water-cooler ever manufactured. 
Other exhibitors of silver-plated ware, etc., included C. Rogers & 
Bros, of Meriden, the Meriden Silver-Plate Company; Manning 
Bowman & Co., Meriden; Hall, Elton & Co., Wallingford; the 
Derby Silver Company (plate), and the Middletown Plate Com- 
pany. All of these firms presented exliibits fully illustrating the 
importance and progress of the industry in Connecticut. Any 
general description of their goods is not regarded as necessary. 
However, a good illustration of the best class of work is given by 
the engraving on another page, of a punch-bowl set made by the 
Middletown Plate Company, which was one of the gems of the 
Exhibition. Another beautiful work of art exhibited by the same 
company was a silver ornamental piece representing swans draw- 
ing upon a sea of glassy silver a sea-shell. This work attracted 
general attention, and was a subject for illustration in many of 
the art publications. 

Happily combining practical use and artistic tastes were the 
exhibits of the Bradley & Hubbard Manufacturing Company of 
West Meriden, including bronzes, gas and lamp chandeliers, and 
other fixtures in an endless variety of designs; bronze and other 
styles of jewel-cases, inkstands, match-safes, paper-weights, jardin. 
ieres, stand with elegantly painted vases, thermometers, and card- 
tables in gold, silver, and other bronzes, all equally admirable 
goods. It is to be presumed that the bronzes proved most attrac- 
tive to those who saw the company's exhibit, and among the finer 
works was a large statuette of Flora and its mate, a nymph, both 
of exquisite and life-like beauty. A gem of its kind was a bronze 
urn of Roman design, the handles formed by two dogs, with fore- 
paws upon the rim, and baying at a bird perched on the summit 
of the cover. The center of the urn was decorated with a medal- 
lion with female heads, and its base was of black marble and bronze, 
supported upon lions' feet. Groups of bronze horses, birds, deer, 
etc., were accurate reproductions of their living counterparts, and 
were surpassed by no works of their kind shown at Philadelphia. 
Card-receivers were shown, with medallion centers decorated with 




BRONZE VASE AND Lf 



liradley & Huljl.ard Cii., fl'est Meriden. 




GAS CHANDELIER. 



Bradley & Hubbard Co., West Meriden, 



Connecticut's exhibits — part i. Ill 

copies, in bronze, of works of the old masters, or with historical 
or mythological scenes, in relief. In gold and silver bronzes the 
prevailing style was Grecian, with decorations In repousse, gold 
or silver ground, or vice versa ; some elegant jewel-caskets of this 
kind were displayed, and a costly clock represented Raphael paint- 
ing his masterpiece, the Madonna and Child. Suspended from 
the ceiling of the company's space was a complete assortment of 
chandehers for gas or lamps, of every design and available mate- 
rial; uniformly Hght and elegant in appearance, and in silver, gilt, 
bronze, and Eastlake or other popular styles to match furniture. 
In the representation of lamp goods, evidences of artistic tastes 
were ever apparent, the supporting metal- work taking the forms 
of statuettes, vases, and other pleasing objects at variance with the 
dull " straight-back " uniformity of the products of many manu- 
facturers, serving their purpose, it is true, but faihng to add in 
the slightest degree any attraction to an apartment. It may be 
that this departure has contributed to the triumphant success of 
the company, not only in this country, but in the markets of the 
world; certain it is that their Centennial exhibit was highly credit- 
able to their establishment, and one to commend the admu'ation of 
every visitor who inspected it. 

In American history no name is more prominently identified 
with the arts and sciences than that of Elias Howe, Jr., whose 
claim as the inventor of the first machine that would accomplish 
sewing, is very generally accepted by the public, although rivals 
of the Howe Company present other names as entitled to the 
credit of the greatest labor-saving invention of the age. All 
accord him, however, the credit of having invented the first auto- 
matic machine using two threads. This was invented in 1846, 
and Mr. Howe, then a journeyman machinist, found great diffi- 
culty in placing his invention before the public and in protecting 
his rights. Finally succeeding, a bitter warfare with rival manu- 
facturers sprung up, and continued until 1856, when a compromise 
was effected. Mr. Howe then reaped the benefits of his toil, and 
amassing a large fortune, established in 1865 the Howe Sewing 
machine factory at Bridgeport, capable of producing 1,000 
machines per day. At the French exposition, two years later, his 
machine was awarded a gold medal, and Howe was decorated by 
Napoleon III with the Cross of the Legion of Honor. Returning 
to his native land, he died a few months later, passing away at the 



112 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

zenitli of his triumph as one of the most successful inventors of 
the age. 

The opposite engraving represents the working parts of the first 
complete sewing-machine constructed by Mr. Howe, in April, 1845, 




ELIAS HOWE, JK., INVENTOR OF THE SEWING MACHINE. 

and which it is claimed sewed the first seam ever made by 
machinery. This was, at the time of its construction, a marvel of 
mechanism, and prominently placed in the company's pavihon in 
Machinery Hall at Philadelphia, attracted very general attention. 
It is claimed by the company that it contains every radical element 
of the first-class machine of to-day, and without which there could 
be no machines, viz. : the grooved and eye-pointed needle at the 
end of a vibrating arm, the reciprocating shuttle and bobbin, the 
tension upon the thread variable at will, the reaction of the needle 



Connecticut's exhibits — part i. 



113 



to form a loop for the shuttle to pass through, the thread-controller 
the clamping of the shuttle-thread, and the automatic feeding 
device. The pavlHon erected by the company was a beautiful 
structure, covering an area of 630 square feet, enclosed with a 
black walnut railing, ornamented with jetties of French wahiut. 




THE ORIGINAL HOWE MACHINE. 



The roof was supported by four elaborately carved and orna- 
mented pillars, and surmounted by a beautiful figure of Mercury. 
"Within the pavilion were shown the several varieties of machines 
made by the Howe Company, in use by lady operators, also numer- 
ous specimens from plain to applique and embroidery needle- 
work on both light and heavy materials. In the Shoe and Leather 
Building the company exhibited a case of shoes from velvet and 
satin to calf-skin, the stitching done by the Howe machine, and 
varying from the plainest to the most elaborate embroidery and 
imitation of lace. The company has an immense business, employ- 
ing factories in Bridgeport, Conn., Peru, Ind., and Glasgow, Scot- 
land. At the Peru factory were made many of the ornamental 
cases for the machines exliibited at Philadelphia, uniformly eleo-ant 
in design. One excellent article was a combined writing-desk 
and sewing-machine, furnished at less cost than the two articles 
could be purchased separately. 



114 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

In 1849 Mr. Allen B. Wilson invented a sewing-macliine, and, 
it is said, without ever having seen any sewing mechanism, and 
disregarding what he had heard of other inventions, attacked in his 
own way the problem of sewing by machinery. He achieved a 
•practical machine, making a lock-stitch, and combining all the 
necessary elements — the double-pointed shuttle, a needle worked 




MR. ALLEN B. WILSON, 

The inventor of the original Wheeler & Wilson Sewing-Machine. 

by a vibrating arm, and a practical feeding device, with wliich 
seams of any curvature or angle could be sewed. He also in- 
vented the rotary hook and stationary bobbin, one of the most 
ingenious inventions in the whole range of mechanics, by the use 
of which, with an eye-pointed needle, could be accomplished the 
successive interlocking of two threads with the greatest rapidity 
and minimum expenditure of power. These inventions were of 
marked importance in sewing-machine progress. In Mr. Nathaniel 
Wheeler, a thorough mechanic, and a gentleman of fine executive 
talents, Mr. Wilson found an energetic business man to introduce 



CONNECTICUT S EXHIBITS PART I. 



115 



tiie improved machine to the public, a work requiring quite as 
much skill and perseverance as the invention itself. Mr. Wheeler 
devoted his best energies to the work as early as 1850, and after the 
oi'ganization of the Wheeler & Wilson Mfg. Company of Bridge- 
port, discharged the manifold duties of president of that corpo- 
ration, with its extensive factory and thousands of employes and 
agents. His services were especially recognized in 18V3, at the 
Vienna Exposition, where he received from the Emperor of Aus- 
tria the Knight's Cross of the Imperial Order of Francis Joseph. 
The Wheeler & Wilson display at the Centennial Exhibition 




WHEELER & Wilson's new no. 8 sewing-machine (wokking- part) 



was one of the richest in Machinery Hall, occupying a large space 
near the center of the hall, with passages upon three sides, and 
the fourth backed by an elegant screen. The central panel dis- 
played a large picture of the factory at Bridgeport; the other 
panels were filled by long mirrors, and between the panels were 
black walnut show-cases, filled with samples of work. These 
ranged from the heaviest leather and cloth to the filmiest gossa- 
mer, the extremes being six layers of tin, to satin stitched with 
threads of human hair. The center of the company's space 
iras occupied by six rich, full cabinet-cased machines, upon a 



116 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

slightly raised dais; two of Chinese pattern, one in ebony, with 
golden hinges, lined with oak and figured ash, and furnished 
with a machine in black and gold; the other in richly-figured Cali- 
fornia redwood, trimmed with ebony and Kned with oak. Two 
other cases were in rich, Gothic style — one of oak, paneled with 
finely-figured amboyne, wreathed with oak, and lined with figoi-ed 
mahogany; the other of black walnut, paneled with figured 
walnut, festooned with an oaken wreath, and lined with birdseye 
maple, and had a machine in black and gold. The two other 
cases were in rich. Queen Anne style — one of holly wood, pan- 
eled with tulip, and trimmed with mahogany, the machine in 
black and gold; the other of birch, trimmed with thaja, paneled 
with rich, figured mahogany, and lined with satin wood, and the 
machine of jet and silver, with gold lines. The superior polish 
of the wood-work was due to a recent process invented by Mr. 
Wheeler; the grain of the wood is filled with a patented pre- 
paration which preserves the natural color, and receives a per- 
fect and durable polish. As a whole, the exhibit was one of the 
finest made by any firm in the entire Exhibition, not only as a 
display of the triumphs of mechanical genius, but of artistic taste 
in their workmanship. The reasons of the judges' awards on the 
" New Wheeler & Wilson Sewing Machine," were: 1. " A lock- 
stitch sewing machine unsurpassed in the fine workmanship of its 
parts, and possessing great originality, great adaptability to differ- 
ent classes of work, both on cloth and leather, beauty of stitch, 
ease and rapidity of motion, and completeness of display." 2. " For 
superior quality of work in leather stitching." 3. Award for 
needle-work : " A superb display of needle-work executed npon 
the Wheeler & Wilson sewing machines, exquisite in design and 
finish, from the lightest gauze to the hea\T.est leather. One of the 
English judges reported: " Of all the machines we tested, the 
Wheeler & Wilson new machine was the most completely success- 
ful, faihng in nothing that was given it." 

The Weed Sewing-Machine Company of Hartford, had in 
Machinery Hall a handsome and tasteful pavilion for the display 
of their products, a good illustration of which is given on the 
opposite page. Instead of attempting any display of rich work- 
manship, polished wood, and ornamentation, the Weed Company 
gave most attention to illustrating the utility and household excel- 
lences of their machines. Like other exhibitors, however, they 
gave a full showing of the varied kinds of work that their ma- 
chines could execute, and some of the garments, etc., of fine tex 



Connecticut's exhibits — part i. 119 

ture and elaborately worked, were in the highest degree credit- 
ahle to the abilities of the Weed and the skill and taste of the 
operators. A striking specimen was an immense picture of the 
battle of Bunker Hill, copied from Trumbull's original painting. 
This was one of the largest and finest pieces of work ever exe- 
cuted on a sewing-machine, embracing, as it did, all the different 
kinds of work that any sewing-machine will do. On the ma- 
chines exhibited the company made the following claims of excel- 
lence: A link device, bringing the needle and shuttle to their 
respective extreme points at the same instant of time, thus insur- 
ing perfection in each stitch, and this being done without a cam, 
insures great speed, with small friction. 2. The large quantity 
of thread carried. 3. Perfect arrangement of tensions, thus 
avoiding halts and stoppages. 4. A simple and convenient 
spooler. 5. Durability of the working parts. 6. Positive feed, 
without the aid of springs. All these excellences were the results 
of years of thought and experiment, and have made the " Family 
Favorite " just what its name indicates m. thousands and hundreds 
of thousands of households throughout the land. The Committee 
of Judges in the Centennial Exhibition awarded to the "Weed a 
medal of honor and diploma of merit, and reported upon the 
machine: "An excellent shuttle-machine, po'ssessing originality 
and simplicity of constructive detail, fine quality of workman- 
ship and materials, and great adaptability to both cloth and 
leather stitching." Such a report as this was an exceedingly 
strong indorsement, and but expressed the views of every lady 
who is the possessor of a machine of this make. 

Connecticut's display of musical instruments was limited to 
exhibits of the B. Shoninger's (New Haven) Combination Cym- 
bella organs, and pianos manufactured by the Mathushek Piano 
Company of the same city, and a piano by A. Moeller of Hart- 
ford. The latter instruments were full-toned and of excellent 
style and workmanship. The Cymbella organs, however, pos- 
sessed some strong attractions which drew the attention of vis- 
itors, notably the chime of bells added to the ordinary organ 
features, and which gave charming effects. This chime consists 
of two and a half octaves of bells, and can be used either alone 
or with one or more sets of reeds, the interior containing six sets, 
composed of two and a half octaves of large and small reeds, also 
a powerful sub-bass. The organ shown at Philadelphia (with 
the chime attachment) contained fourteen stops — melodia, cym- 



120 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

bella, trombonet, flute, full organ, celeste, piccolo, octave-coupler, 
forte, viola, vox-humana, sub-bass, dulciana, and forzato, forming 
a complete instrument, and enabling the performer to produce the 
loudest as well as the softest music at will. Another indirect 
Advantage of the instrument was that when closed, and the writ- 



B. SHONINGER S COMBINATION CYMBELLA ORGAN. 

ing-desk attachment turned down, it afforded a convenient and 
ornamental secretary. The judges in the department of musical 
instruments reported on this exhibit: "The company manufac- 
tures instruments at a price rendering them possible to a large 
class of purchasers. The instruments, having a combination of 
reeds and bells, produce novel and pleasing effects; containing 
many desirable improvements; will stand long in dry or damp 
climates; little liable to get out of order, all the boards being 
made three-ply, and put together so it is impossible for them to 
either shrink, swell, or split." 

In the Main Building, C. E. Fowler of New Haven exhibited a 
plan of the sewerage system of that city, and Gen. T. G. Ellis of 
Hartford, chairman of the Centennial Committee of the American 
Society of Civil Engineering, drawings and models of engineering 
work. The latter also had several plans of river and harbor 
improvements on exhibition in the United States Building, a class 



Connecticut's exhibits — part i. 121 

of work to wTiich lie has devoted many years of study and also 
practice, having long controlled the operations for the improve- 
ment of the Connecticut river for purposes of navigation. 

Among various interesting exhibits in Main and Machinery build- 
ings, may be briefly noted a collection of Stephens' Parallel Vises 
for metals and wood ; one with sectional circling jaw to hold taper- 
ing objects, one with a swiveling attachment to secure change of 
position, and some of exceeding delicacy, for the use of jewelers; 
E. Horton & Sons, Windsor Locks, a display of their widely-known 
lathe chucks; the Parker vises, made by Charles Parker, Meriden, 
exhibited in more than twenty forms; the Star Tool Company of 
Middletown, cases of fine steel rules, gauges, squares, bevels, cal- 
ipers, and wooden and brass rules ; ingenious mechanical toys, 
exhibited by Ives, Blakeslee & Co., Bridgeport, and W. C. Good- 
win, New Haven ; solid steel shears, shown by the United States 
Steel Shear Company, Meriden, the only makers of solid steel 
shears in the country, or the world ; Hotchkiss & Sons, Bridgeport, 
exhibit of their patent curry-combs, spokeshaves, breast-drills, steel 
traps, and similar articles ; an extensive exhibition of pocket cut. 
lery, by Miller Brothers, Meriden, over three hundred and fifty 
varieties in size and style being shown; the American Hosiery 
Company, New Britain, a full and excellent display of machine- 
knit undergarments, merino and cotton, white and colored, superior 
to any foreign exhibit. 

Brass work in cast metal was exhibited by Peck Bros. & Co., 
New Haven; the Eaton, Cole & Burnham Co., Bridgeport; the 
Bevin Bros. Manufacturing Co., and other bell manufacturers of 
East Hampton; C. Rodgers & Co., Birmingham; the Blake Bros., 
New Haven, and others. 

W. & B. Douglas, Middletown, had in Machinery Hall and the 
Pump Annex, the most complete assortment of pumps in the entire 
Exhibition, consisting of more than seven hundred different arti- 
cles, with none of them duplicates. Pumps for the house, store, 
farm, garden, for the factory, the ship, and the mine; with barrels 
of iron, brass, and glass, of iron, porcelain-lined, of copper, and of 
galvanized iron; pumps for all sorts of liquids, and for air, and 
adapted to every requirement. The Union Manufacturing Com- 
pany of New Britain also made an excellent exhibit of like 
articles. Matthewson & Johnson, New Haven, had some excellent 
pumps for use in docks, vaults, breweries, distilleries, tanneries, 
paper mills, etc., which cannot be choked by mud, sand, or gravel. 



s 



122 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

The Hartford Pump Company exhibited pumps run by steam, 
water, or wind, and which raised water by the use of com- 
pressed air. 

The Pratt & Whitney Company, Hartford, made in Machinery 
Hall one of the finest displays of tools for machinists, gun, and 
sewing-machine makers in the entire exhibition, comprising 
planers, lathes, upright-drills, gang-drills, pillar-shapers, cutting-oS 
lathes, grinding lathes, bolt-cutters, die-sinkers, profiling machines, 
rifling machines, and cartridge varnishing machines. All these were 
of exquisite finish and of the finest workmanship. The company 
exhibited, also, a system of gearing, the teeth of which were formed 
on the epicycloidal curve, by means of machines of the company's 
patents, which produce perfect work on pinions a;nd on miter and 
bevel gears, as well as on wheels, nothing being left to the uncer- 
tainty of hand manipulation, the formers being made by machinery. 
The company's exhibit occupied a space 35 X 62 feet; it was 
valued at $25,000, and was in charge of Mr. Worcester R. War- 
ner. The award secured by the company was exceedingly compli- 
mentary in its terms. The following synopsis gives the leading 
findings of the judges, and a comprehensive description of the 
exhibit as a whole: 

" The company exhibits forty-nine machine tools for working 
metals. These tools are to be commended for the durable charac- 
ter of their general design, which shows the result of large 
experience and careful §tudy applied to the determination of the 
proportions and union of parts, in the several tools with a view to 
the elimination of unnecessary details, thus at once cheapening their 
construction and improving their quality as working machines. 
In fact, the simple methods adopted for attaining the desired end 
is one of the conspicuous merits of this magnificent collection of 
machine tools." The report also commended the feature of sim- 
plicity especially manifest in the device for taper-turning, which can 
be attached to all lathes; the ingenious methods of shifting the belts 
of the planers ; also the simple and effective power-feed of the upright 
drill; the convenience of the gang drill; the general excellence and 
accuracy of the machines for making parts of fire-arms, sewing- 
machines, etc. ; the simplicity and originality of design of the mill- 
ing machines; the good construction and operation of the bolt- 
cutters; the ingenuity and great productive capacity of the screw 
machines; excellence of the horizontal boring mill ; the strength 
and effective action of the press for striking medals or other raised 



CONNECTICUT S EXHIBITS PART I. 



123 



ornamental work ; the accuracy and finish of the series of cylinder 
and plug gauges; the perfection of the machinery for rifling gun 
barrels; the multiphed remarkable devices of the horizontal revolv- 
ing head-drilHng or chucking machine, and the ingenuity and 
mechanical execution of a machine for varnishing the interior of 
metallic cartridges. In conclusion, the report reads: "As the 
result of a prolonged and very careful series of tests, the mechani- 
cal accuracy of this exhibit was found to be of a high and very 
satisfactory character, and the exhibitors are entitled to great com- 
mendation for the zeal and enthusiasm manifested by them in sub- 
mitting their machines to an examination which has resulted in 
estabhshing the remarkable perfection of their construction." 

The Benedict & Burnham Manufacturing Company, Waterbury 
exhibited in Machinery Hall some elegantly-finished chilled rolls 
for gold, silver, and steel. One set weighed nine thousand pounds, 
without a flaw in the casting or a blemish in the finishing. 




AWARD MEDAL. 



The Stiles & Parker Company, Middletown, made a good dis- 
play of power-presses, adapted to punching, trimming, and finish- 
ing, and worked by hand, foot, or power. Their collection 
comprised a number of forms: a double press with one frame, a 
reciprocating press with die and punch, both active, a press with 
die block inclined at an angle, single and double-geared presses, 
and other styles. 

Another attractive display in the same building was that of the 
Pyramid Pin Company, New Haven, an attendant working a little 
machine that stuck pins into paper in the form of a pyramidal 



124 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

cushion, at ihe rate of three hundred per minute. Exhibitions in 
iron and steel were made by the BiUings & Spencer Company, 
Hartford, drop-forgings; Henry Hammond & Co., Hartford, ham- 
mers; the Barnum Richardson Company, Salisbury, ore, blooms, 
car wheels and axles; and the Washburn Car Wheel Company, 
Hartford, steel-tired car wheels. 

The foregoing includes notices of only the more prominent 
exhibits. The following is a complete list of the exhibits by Con- 
necticut manufacturers and others in both the Main Building and 
Machinery Hall, with awards, indicated by asterisks, so far as 
known, the complete official lists not yet having been published: 

EXHIBITS IN THE MAIN BUILDING. 

Artillery— Catling Gun Company, Hartford,* battery gnn. William Gardner, Hart- 
ford, breech-loading cannon, battery gun. 

Atomizeu— Dr. 1. P. Leet, Suffiekl. 

Automatic Electkic Gas-Valve— Edward Coe. New Haven.* 

Billiard Tables— U. W. Colleuder, Stamford,* billiard tables, cue-stands, and marker, 
pool-boards, and bullet. 

Brass Goods— Ansonia Brass and Copper Company, Ansonia, clocks, sheet metal, wire, 
brass and copper goods, and kettles. Brown & Bros., Waterbury, brass goods. Lane 
Manufacturing Company, Waterbury, metal goods, buttons, buckles, curtain-racks, etc. 
Scovill Manufacturing Company, Waterbury,* sheet and roll brass, German silver, gold 
and silver plate metal, gilt, lasting, and covered buttons, lamp trimmings, thimbles, and 
photographic materials. Benedict & Burnliam Manufacturing Company, Waterbury,* 
sheet ^brass, German silver, brass tubing, wire, and rods, lamp-burners, etc. Holmes, 
Booth & Haydens Waterbury,* brass and German silver wire, tubing, rivets, and lamp 
trimmings, and silver-plated ware. Plume & Atvvood Manufacturing Company, Water- 
bury * brass goods Wallace & Sons, Answnia,* brass and copper metal and goods, mag- 
neto-electric machines lor deposition and light. Waterbury Button Company, Water- 
bury, metallic buttons. „ . . ^, , , , 

Bank-Locks— New Britain Bank-Lock Company, New Bntam,* bank-locks, key, regis- 
ter, dial, safe and time-locks. 

Bayonets— The Collins Company, Collinsville.* ^^ , 

Bells— W. E. Barton, East Hampton,* sleigh, etc. BevinBros., East Hampton,* hand, 
table, sleigh, etc. Bradley & Hubbard Manufacturing Company,* West INIcrulen, call- 
bells Ed. Miller & Co., West Meriden,* call-bells. East Hampton Bell Company, 
East Hampton, hand and sleigh-bells. Gong-Bell ManufacturiLg Company, East Uamp- 
ton,* gong-bells. 

Birds (Mechanical SingingI— J. B. Secor, Bridgeport.* 

Blankets— The Clinton Mills Company, Norwich. , ,. , 

Bronzes— ISlerideu Britannia Company, West Meriden,* bronzes and articles of vertu. 
Bradley & Hubbard Manufacturing Company, West Meriden,* bronzes. Ed. Miller & 
Co., West Meriden,* bronzes, card-receivers, etc. , . . m, t,^ 

Bronze Goods— P. & F. Co'bin, New Britain.* bronze house trimmings. The Stan- 
lev Works, New Britain, japanned, bronzed and plated fittings for builders 

Braids— The Novelty Braid Works (Tobias Kohn), Hartford, embroidery and star 

Buttons— The Waterburv Button Companv, Waterbury, metallic buttons. Scovill 
Manufacturing Company, Waterbury,* gilt, lasting, and, covered buttons. The Plait 
Bros. & Co.. Waterburv, buttons. j, v • • 

Button-Hooks— J. A. Smith, Deep River,* button-hooks, crochet-needles, hair-cnmp- 
Grs etc 

Britannia and Tin Ware— G. I. Mis, Yalesvillc, tin, britannia, and plated ware, 
TVtitGr-coolcr'^ etc 

Cassimeres— Broad Brook Company, Broad Brook, fancy. Hockanum Company, Rock- 
ville, fancy cassimeres and worsteds. Meriden Woolen Company, \\cst Menclen tai^si- 
meres. New England Company, Rockville, fancy cassimeres, "1(5" design. Kock Man- 
ufacturing Companv. Rockviile, cassimeres. Niantic Woolen Mills, cassimeres. Union 
Manufacturing Co.,"WolcottvilIe, cassimeres and black doeskins. 

Cuarter Oak Furniture and Novelties.— John H. Most, Old fcaybrook. 

Canopies— Canopy Frame Company, Willimantic, adjustable canopies. Palmer & 
Kendall, Middlctown, mosquito netting and canopies, machine teutered wide labncs, 
window and picture cords, etc. ^, .„ , t. i 

Carpets— Hartford Carpet Companv. Hartford (factory at Thompsonyille\ Brussels, 
and three and two-ply ingrain carpeting. Read Carpet Company, Bridgeport, two-ply 
carpets. 



Connecticut's exhibits — part r. 125 

Cartridges— Winchester Repeatinc Arms Company, New Haven,* metallic cartridires. 
Union Metallic Cartridi^e Compare, Brid£!;eport,* cartridges. 

Chandeliers— Bradley & Hubbard Manufacturing Company, West Meriden,* bronzes, 
call-bells, kerosene chandeliers, brackets, lamp and^gas fixtures. 

Clocks — Seth Thomas Clock Company, Thomaston,* specimens of clocks. New Haven 
Clock Company, E. N. Welch Manufacturing Company, Forestville, Terry Clock Com- 
pany, Waterbury. and Waterbury Clock Company, Waterbury, variety of clocks. 

Corsets— Foy & Harmon, New Haven, corsets for supporting skirts. Brewster Bros. 
& Co., corsets, corset and skirt-supporters, corset-clasps. 

Cotton Goods— Ponemah Mills, Taftville (Norwich), plain and fancy goods. Waure- 
gan Mills, Wauregan, cotton goods. Pocahontas Manufacturing Company, Putnam,* cot- 
ton fabrics. 

CtJTLERT— Miller Bros. Cutlery Company, West Meriden,* pocket cutlery. Holley Man- 
ufacturing Company, Lakeville,* varieties of cutlery. Meriden Cutlery Company, Meri- 
den, table cutlery. Northfield Knife Company, Northfield,* pocket cutlery. 

Curtain-Fixtures — Meriden Curtain-Fixture Company, West Meriden, variety of 
fixtures. 

Civil E;^gineering — General T. G. Ellis of Hartford, exhibit of sewerage system of 
New Haven. 

Carpenters' Tools— The Collins Company, Hartford,* cast-steel tools. Hart, Bliven 
& Mead, Kensington (Berlin),* variety of tools. Leonard Bailey & Co., Hartford,* planes 
and bench tools. Stanley Rule and Level Company, New Britain,* boxwood and ivory 
rules, plumbs and levels, try-sqiiares, bevels, gauges, adjustable planes, spoke-shaves, 
etc. Middletown Tool Company,* plane makers' hardware, harness-snaps, washer- 
cutters, etc. W. A. Ives & Co., New Haven,* wood-boring tools, bit-braces, etc. Star 
Tool Co., Middletown,* bench tools, squares, levels, gauges, and flexible steel rules. 
Douglass Manufacturing Company, Seymour,* chisels aid augers. 

Cord— Palmer & Kendall, Middletown, window and picture cord. Neptnne Twine 
Mills, East Haddam, cotton seine twines, welting cord, carpet warp, and knitting cotton. 
John Turner, DTorwich, picture cord. 

Directories— Blihii Geer, Hartford, thirty-eight annual directories of that city. 

Edge Tools— The Collins Company, Hartford,* axes, machetes, swords, bayonets, etc. 
Douglass Miiiutacturing Company, Seymour,* machine edge tools. 

Bducatio.v— State of Connecticut, by B. G. Northrop of New Haven, Secretary of the 
State Educational Department, works by pupils of the Connecticut public schools, by 
Chinese students, photographs of school buildings in different sections of the State, and 
literary work by former members of Yale College.* State Normal School, New Britain,* 
work of pupils. State Board of Education,* work of pupils, and collection in natural 
history. Hartford Board of Education,* work of pupils, etc. 

Pire-Arms — Colt's Patent Fire-Arms Manufacturing Company, Hartford,* breech-load- 
in j military and sporting small arms, revolvers, etc. The Billings & Spencer Com- 
pany, Hartford.* breech-loading fire-arms. Sharps' Rifle Company, Bridgeport,* Sharps' 
patent rifle. Winchester Repeating Arms Company, New Haven,* repeating fire-arms 
for sporting or military purposes • metallic cartridges. William Gardner, Hartford, 
breech-loading canuon, battery guns, and magazine guns. Charles Parker, 'iVest Meri- 
den,* double-barrel, breech-loading shot-guns. Gatling Gnn Company,* Galling guns. 
Whitney Arms Company, Whitney ville (New Haven,)* breech-loading military and sport- 
ing shot-guns, revoh'ers, etc. 

Flannels — B. Lucas & Co., Poquetannock. 

Furniture— Seidler & May, Hartford, patent sofa-bed and reclining chair. New 
Haven Folding Chair Company, chairs. 

Puses— Toy, Bickford & Co , Simsbury,* safety fuses. 

Games and Tots— W. C. Goodwin, New Haven. Ives, Blakeslee & Co, Bridgeport, 
mechanical toys. 

Garters and Elastics— F. Armstrong, Bridgeport, metallic ventilated garters and 
elastics. 

Hardw.vre— Blake Bros. Hardware Company, New Haven,* builders', cabinet makers', 
and carriage makers' hirdware. Stanley Works, New Britain,* japanned, bronzed, and 
plated fittings for builders. Hart, Bliven & Mead Manufacturing Company, Kensington,* 
cirriage and saddlers' hardware. Norwalk Lock Company, South Norwalk,* locks, 
knobs, builders' hardware, and padlocks. Hotchkiss Sons, Bridgeport,* hand drills, 
saw sets, currycombs, pruning shears, harness snaps, etc. H. L. Jndd, New Haven, 
upholsterers' and fancy hardware. Branford Lock Works. Branford,* door-locks and 
latches, keys, door-knobs, and lock furniture. H. J. P. Whipple, West Meriden, door- 
knob, with improved method of attaching to spindle, and adaptation to varying thick- 
ness of doors. 

Harness and Whips— J. Lyman Wilder, Hartford,* harness and whips, bridle 
front, etc. 

Hats— A. Solmans, South Norwalk, felt hats. 

IvoRr Goods- Pratt, Read & Co., Deep River,* ivory combs, piano and organ keys, 
ivory veneers, etc. 

Japanese Paper Goods — Jennings Bros., paper ware. 

Knit Goods- American Hosiery Company, New Britain, knit goods of wool, merino, 
and cotton. 

Locks— Branford Lock Company, Branford,* door-locks. Mallory, Wheeler & Co., New 
Haven,* door-locks and padlocks. Norwalk Lock Works, South Norwalk. Yale Lock 
Company, Stamford,* post-office and other locks. Eagle Lock Company, Terryville,* 
trunk and cabinet locks. New Britain Bank-Lock Company,* bank-locks, key, register, 
dial, safe, and time-locks. Smith & Etrge, Bridgeport,* government padlocks. William 
Wilcox Manufacturing Company, Middletown, padlocks. Dlate-locks, etc. P. & F. Cor- 
bin, New Britain,* rim and mortise-locks. 



126 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Lamps — Bradley & Iluljbartl Manufacturing Company, West Mcridcn,* variety of 
lamps. Edward Aliller & Co.,* Went ]\Ieriden, "variety of lamps. 

Nickel-Plate Ware — Manning, Bowman & Co., Wes» Meriden. 

Netting — Palmer & Kendall, Middletown, mosquito netting. 

Metric Rules— A. & T. W. Stanley, New Britain. 

Musical Instruments — Shoninger Organ Company, New Haven,* cjonbella cabinet 
organs. New Haven Organ Company, cabinet organs. Mathusliek Piano Jlanufacturinar 
Company, New Haven, pianos. A. Moeller, Hartford, upright piano, witti patented 
improvement. 

Paints — Albert Thomson, Bridgeport, variety of paints. 

Paper— Case Bros., South Manchester, pai)er boards. Joseph Parker, Son & Co., New 
Haven, blotting papers. Seymour Paper Company, Windsor Locks, papers. 

Pins — Oakvifle Compans% Waterbury, needle-pointed shawl and bankers' pins, and 
toilet-pin rolls. Blake & Johnson, Waterbury, satin finish hair-pins. 

Plated Goods — Meriden Britannia Company, West Meriden,* silver-plated ware. 
Middletown Plate Company,* silver-plated ware. C. Rogers & Bros., West Meriden, gold 
and silver-plated coflin and casket trimmings. Derby Silver Company, silver-plated table 
ware. Hall, Elton & Co., electro-plated table ware, spoons, forks, ladles, knives, etc. 
Manning, Bowman & Co., nickel-plated ware. Meriden Silver-Plate Company, West 
Meriden, silver-plated vvare. William M. Smith, plated coffin and casket trimmings. 

Powder — Hazard Powder Company, Hazardville, blasting and sporting gunpowder. 

Revolvers— Colt's Patent Fire-Arms Manufacturing Company, Hartford,* Colt's re- 
volvers, various calibers. AVhitney Arms Company, New Haven.* 

Scissors and Suears— United States Steel Shear Company, West Meriden,* shears 
and scissors. Hotchkiss Sous, Bridgeport,* pruning shears. 

Shirts and Drawers— American Hosiery Company, New Britain, knit goods of wool, 
merino, and cotton. 

Silk Goods, Etc.— Cheney Bros., Hartford,* spun silk and fabrics, twist, dress goods, 
Berges, Florentines, Foulards, organziiie, tram, handkerchiefs, and ribbons. Atwood & 
Eiclimond, Brooklyn, silk machine-twist, all colors. J. II. Hayden & Son, Windsor 
Locks, sewing-silk, machine and button-hoie twists. Bclding Bros. & Co.. Rockville, 
cocoons, raw silk, silk twist, sewing, embroidery, and saddlers' twist. Holland Manu- 
facturing Company, Willimantic, machine-twist and sewing-silks. M. Hemingway & 
Sons Silk Company,* Watertown, spool, embroidery, aiid saddlers' silk, machine- 
twist, etc. 

Skates — Union Hardware Company, Wolcottville. 

Soaps— J. B. Williams & Co., Glastonbury.* 

Suspenders — American Suspender Co., Waterbury, suspenders and webbing. 

Swords— Collins Company, Hartford,* swords and cutlasses. 

TuiMBLES— Scovill Manufacturing Company, Waterbury. 

Toys — (See Games and Toys.) 

Twines— (See Cords.) 

Tinware— Joseph Scheider & Co., Portland, deep-stamped tinware, plain, planished, 
and japanned tinware, and self-righting cuspidores. Manning, Bowman & Co., West 
Meriden, planished tinware. 

Upholstery Goods— Turner & Seymour Manufacturing Company, Wolcottville, metal- 
lic upholstery goods, notions, and hardwares. 

Violins— L. P. Wildman, Daubury, violins. 

Wire Mattresses- National Wire Mattress Company, New Britain. Woven Wire 
Mattress Company, Hartlbrd. 

Wood-borino Tools — W. A. Ives & Co., New Haven,* to»ls, bit-braces, etc. 

Worsted Yarns — Tunxis Worsted Mills. 

EXHIBITS IN THE MACHINERY BUILDING. 

Belting— New York Belting and Packing Company, Sandy Hook (Newtown),* rubber 
belting. P. Jewell's Sons, Hartford,* leather and leather belting, metallic-tipped lacing. 
N. Palmer & Co., Hartford, leather belting. 

Bolts and Screws— Clark Bros. & Co., Milldale (Southington), carriage, tire, and 
machine bolts, and lag screws. 

Book-Binders' Machinery— Standard Machine Works, Mystic River. 

Book-Sewing Machine— Automatic Book-Sewing Machine Company, Milford,* book 
and pamphlet wire-stitching and magnetic-lasting machine. 

Card-Grinding Machine— Rockville Traverse Card-Grinding Machine Company, 
Rockville, traverse grinder for woolen and cotton-cards and shears. 

Chucks— E. Horton & Son, Windsor Locks. D. E. Whiton, West Stafford, lathe 
chucks. 

Clocks — Seth Thomas Clock Company, Thomaston,* tower-clock in front of Machinery 
Hall, with twenty dials in various sections, connected by electricity. 

Car-Springs— Union Car Spring Company.* 

Car-Wheels— Washburn Car-Wheel Company, Hartford,* cast-iron wheels, with cast- 
eteel tires, welded on. Bamura Richardson Co., Lime Rock (Salisbury),* chilled iron 
car-wheels. 

Drop-Forgings— The Billings & Spencer Company, Hartford.* Hull & Belden, 
Danbury. 

Drop-Hammers— The Pratt & Whitney Company, Hartford,* and Stiles & Parker Press 
Company, Middletown.* 

Electric Light and Machine— Wallace & Sons, Ansonia,* magnetic-electro macbines 
for deposition and light. 



Connecticut's exhibits — part i. 127 

Ejiekt Whbels— New York Belting and Packing Company, Sandy Hook,* Vulcanite 
emery wheels. 

Feed- Water Heater— I. B. Da^is, Hartford,* heater and purifyer. 

FiRE-EscAPE— Thomas McClunie, Hartford. 

Forge-Hammers— The Hull & Belden Cooipany, Danbiiry,* power hammer. 

Gas-Machine— Excelsior Gas-Machine Company, South Norwalk,* machines for dwell- 
ings and factories. 

Grist-Mills— E, Harrison, New Haven, vertical burr-stone mills for grain or minerals. 

Governors — T. R. Pickering, Portland,* govemore for steam engines, exhibited on 
various engines in this buildinir, and others. 

Hoisting Machinery- Copeland & Bacon, Bridgeport, hoisting engines. Yale Lock 
Company, Stamford,* frictional hoisting machinery. 

Hammers — H. Hammond, Hartford,* steel hammers. 

Hat Machinery— The Hull & Belden Company, Danbury, machine for forming fur 
hats. 

Horse-Shoes— W. E. Quisrley, Waterbury.* 

Hydraulic Machines— W. & B. Douglas, Middletown,* hydraulic rams, piston, 
plunger, and chain-pumps, garden engine, etc. 

Hose— New York Belting and Packing Company, Sandy Hook,* rubber hose and 
tubing. 

India-Rubber Goods— New York Belting and Packing Company, Sandy Hook,* belt- 
ing, packing, hose, etc. 

Iron and Ores- Barnum Richardson Co., Lime Rock,* charcoal pig-iron and iron 
ores. 

Iron Fittings— Malleable Iron Fittings Company, Branford, malleable iron steam and 
gas-fittings, castings, etc. 

M.vcHiNE Tools— The Pratt & Whitney Company, Hartford,* special tools. The Hen- 
dey Machine Company, Wolcottville, iron planers and shapers. 

Mills— (.See Grist-Mills.) 

Needles— Dyson Needle Company, spring needles and points for knitting-machines, 

Pin-Machines— Pyramid Pin Company, New Haven,* machines for sticking pins in 
paper in pyramidal form. 

Plumbers' Brass Fittings — Peck Bros. & Co., New Haven,* hose nozzles. Eaton, 
Cole & Burnham Co., Bridgeport,* brass goods for plumbers' use. 

Presses— A. H. Merriman, West Meriden,* metal-punching press. Stiles & Parker 
Press Company, Middletown,* Stiles & Fowler presses. C. Potter, Jr., & Co., Norwich,* 
book, job, and newspaper printing presses, and stop-cylinder press. W. A. Kelsey & 
Co., Meriden, amateur printing presses. Jonathan Miller,* coflee, tea, and starch press. 

Pu.mps— W. & B. Douglas, Middletown,* piston, plunger, and chain pumps. Norwalk 
Iron Works, South Norwalk,* the Earle steam-pump. Hartford Pump Companv, Hart- 
ford,* compressed-air pump. Union Manufacturing Company, New Britain,* pumps and 
rams. Mathewman & Johnson Pump Company, New Haven,* pumps. Nichols, Harris 
& Walker, New London,* acid pump and siphon. 

Railroad Progs- Mansfield Elastic Frog Company, New Haven. 

Scales— I. S. Spencer's Sons, Guilford, spring, counter, or table scales, dial indicators. 

Sewing-Machines— Wheeler & Wilson Sewiiig-Machine Company, Bridgeport.* Howe 
Sewing-Machine Company, Bridgeport.* Weed Sewing-Machine Company, Hartford.* 
Victor Sewing-Machine Company, Middletown. 

SiLK-TwisT Machinery— Holland Manufacturing Company, Willimantic, machines for 
winding, measuring, and testing sewing-silk and other threads. 

Spinning-Framb— Thames River Worsted Company, Norwich. 

Spool-Cotton Machinery— Willimantic Linen Company,* machinery for winding 
spool-cotton and linen thread. 

Stone-Crusher— The Blake Crusher Company, New Haven, stone and ore-crusher. 

Steam Boiler Exhibits- Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company, 
Hartford,* specimens of incrustation scale, defective iron from steam boilers, and frag- 
ments of exploded boilers, showing cause and eftect. 

Steam Boiler— Lowe & Watson, Bridgeport,* Lowe's patent boiler (of American 
steel) tifty horse power. 

Steam Engines— Baxter Steam Engine Company, Hartford,* Baxter patent portable 
engine. Hartford Foundry and Machine Company,* steam engine of fifty horse-power, 
with automatic variable cut-oS'. N. W. Twiss, New Haven,* small engines. H. B. Bige- 
low & Co., New Haven, portable and stationary engines. Norwalk Iron Works, South 
Norwalk, steam enaines. twelve and twenty-four-inch horizontal. 

Steam Engine Governors— Thomas R. Pickering, Portland. 

Shipbuilding— S. Gildersleeve & Sons, Gildersleeve's Landing (Portland), model of 
three-masted schooner, and other vessels of their build. 

Tentering and Finishing Machine— Palmer's Patent Tentering and Finishing 
Machine Company, Norwich, machine for stretching, tentering, and drying woven fabrics, 
laces, etc. 

Vises— Elmore Penfield, Middletown, double vises. Stevens Patent Vise Company, 
West Meriden,* parallel vises, with taper attachment, also planer vises. Charles Parker, 
West Meriden.* Thomas Hall, West Meriden, vises. 

Water and Gas-Pipes — A. O'Neil, Ansonia.* 

Water-Meter— Swazey & Warner, Hartford, meters. 

Water- Wheels — National Water-Wheel Company, Bristol.* 

Wood-Working Machinery— C. B. Rogers & Co., Norwich,* boring and mortising 
machines. 

Wood Type— William H. Page, Greenville. 



CHAPTER TIL 



CONNECTICUT'S EXHIBITS. 
PART II. 

The Women's Department — Exhibition op Evidences op the 
Skill and Industry of the Ladies of Connecticut — Arti- 
cles BOTH Useful and Ornamental — Art, Literature, 
Household Industries, and the Trades Represented — The 
United States Building — A Variety of Interesting Exhib- 
its FROM the State — The Centennial Envelope Machine — 
Iron and Steel Manufacturing — Representation op the 
Fishing Industries — Products of Connecticut Mines and 
Quarries, etc., etc. 

Next to the exhibits in the Main Building and Machinery Hall, 
Connecticut was most largely represented in the Women's Pavil- 
ion, where the ladies of the State gave an extensive and widely 
varied showing of their ingenuity and industry. The ladies of 
the Connecticut Association report that in making the collection 
they were met by a diflBculty, " which proved almost insuperable, 
of presenting women's work as a separate exhibit. Women were 
found engaged in manufactures of almost every description ; but 
in numerous instances their work was so interwoven with the 
work of the men that it was difBcult to procure articles that could 
be rightfully classed as distinct work. This difficulty presented 
itself in every department of the Exhibition ; and in the fields of 
art, in particular, many ladies preferred to exhibit their produc- 
tions in competition with those of men, without permitting sex to 
come in as a factor in the consideration of the merits of their 
work. As a whole, in the Women's Pavilion, as elsewhere, 
women's work gave many indications of originality, excellence of 
execution, mechanical ingenuity, and inventive power." Mrs. 
GiUespie, president of the Women's Centennial Executive Com- 
mittee, is reported as commen,ting on the exhibits by the women 

(128) 



Connecticut's exhibits — part ii. 129 

of the country: "The Exhibition has done an immense good in 
showing women how many avenues of work are open to them, 
and in stimulating many to follow where now a few are leading^ 
This is, doubtless, one of its best results ; for, although there were 
melancholy failures in every department, notably in that of pic- 
tures, still, even there, there was enough decided ability, even 
marked success, shown, to prove that women need not be afraid 
to take hold of any work, and, working with the persistence of 
men, compete successfully with men." However, Mrs. S. J. 
Cowen, president of the "Women's Centennial Association of Hart- 
ford, who had large experience in obtaining and preparing the ex- 
hibits from that section of the State, takes a somewhat different 
view in her final report of the Centennial work of the association. 
She writes: " So far as the members of this society have expressed 
an opinion, it is unfavorable to this unnatural and necessarily in- 
complete division of the products of labor. . . . They unan- 
imously agree that hereafter work should be judged without refer- 
ence to the sex of the ivorker, and hope that by the next Centen- 
nial women will be able to exhibit the products of their industry 
side by side with those of men, asking no favors, and fairly earn- 
ing any praise they may receive. The tendency of women to 
painful and elaborate work upon useless objects, which had not 
even the merit of artistic beauty to recommend them, must have 
received a check from some of the exhibits in the Pavilion, which 
were fairly pathetic in their toilfully wrought ugliness." 

Among the Connecticut exhibits, art work and literary produc- 
tions were noticeably prominent. In the number of books writ- 
ten by women Connecticut was second only to Massachusetts. 
Unfortunately for the authors, the literary section was placed 
where the visitor might pass it unnoticed, or, if especially sought, 
it could not be inspected with any degree of satisfaction. In 
the number of exhibitors of literary works Hartford took prece- 
dence, and Mrs. H. B. Stowe contributed a large number of the 
books whose popularity has won for her so brilliant a reputation 
in the world of literature. Prominent among these books was 
her "Uncle Tom's Cabin," a work of years ago, familiar in every 
household of to-day, honored by translations into European lan- 
guages, and still further, by the important part it played in edu- 
cating the North to an appreciation of the evils of slavery. A 
really remarkable work shown, and one which largely attracted 
tlie attention of visitors, was the Uteral translation of the Bible 



130 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

made by Miss Julia E. Smitli of Glastonbury. Miss Smith stud- 
ied Latin and Greek at school, and years afterward, when study- 
ing the Scriptures, she translated the Greek New Testament so as 
to get the literal meaning of every word. By using the same 
English word for the same Greek word Miss Smith was satisfied 
that she obtained a clearer understanding of the text. She next 
wrote out the Septuagint (which is older than any Hebrew copy 
extant), and afterward studied Hebrew, with the sole object of 
rendering the Bible into English from that original tongue. She 
enjoyed her work, and at intervals made five translations, two each 
from the Greek and Hebrew, and one from the Vulgate, the Vat- 
ican Bible. The translation that was finally printed was issued 
from the press of the American Publishing Company of Hart- 
ford, the Misses Smith paying the entire expense of $4,000 for 
1,000 copies. To the surprise of the translator, the work received 
praise from quarters where it was least expected, and many copies 
were sold throughout the country. She has been identified with 
the women's rights movement for some years, and a peculiarity of 
her Bible is that the text gives credit to women for acting in 
many instances where men only are distinctively mentioned in 
the ordinary version. 

That Connecticut authoresses have produced other works requir. 
ing patient research, and an exactness in writing not demanded 
in novels or poetry, was evidenced by a " History of Windham 
County," written by Ellen D. Earned of Hartford, and histories 
of Norwich and New London, by Frances Manning Caulkins of 
the last-named city. Mrs. E. G. Barrett of New Haven, Rose 
Terry and Lucy C. Bull of Hartford, contributed volumes of 
poems, the latter sending a book of poetry for the little folks, 
Mrs. Julie P. Smith of Hartford, whose novels are yearly grow- 
ing in popularity, exhibited nine volumes; and Mrs. W. L. Gage 
of Hartford, a charmingly written work, " Helen on Her Trav- 
els." The largest contributor in the department of literature was 
Mrs. Sigourney of Hartford, whose thirty- four volumes gave proof 
of the versatility and earnest work of the authoress, rewarded, it 
it gratifying to note, not only by the praises of her hosts of read- 
ers, but by fair remuneration for her labor. The above are men- 
tioned without any purpose of discrimination, but merely as illus- 
trations of the varied character of the works. The full list of 
authors and their books will be found at the close of this 
chapter. 



CONNECTICUT'S EXHIBITS — PART II. ]31 

Art was represented by numerous paintings and water- colors, a 
few by professional painters, but tbe majority by amateurs. The 
art section included two fine oils, the " German "Wedding " and 
the "Valley Farm," both by Hartford amateurs. Mrs. James 
H. Brush of Greenwich, exhibited two good landscapes in oil; Mrs. 
Farnliam of Hartford, the "Camp;" Miss L. P. Graves of New 
Haven, two excellent flower pieces — pond-h'lies and fuchsias ; Miss 
A. Pomeroy of Hartford, pond-lilies ; Miss Rebecca T. Porter of 
New Haven, a well executed interior, in oil; and Mrs. Henry 
"Webster of Hartford, a study of game. The display of water- 
colors was larger than that of oil-paintings, the artists exhibiting, 
as a general thing, studies of fruits and flowers. Mrs. C. M. 
Badger of Madison, exhibited two pretty works, apple blossoms 
and night-blooming cereus ; Mrs. "W. C. Badger of New Haven, 
a volume of wild flowers, drawn and colored from nature ; Mrs. 
Mary H. Burton of Hartford, a charming grouping of autumn 
field flowers; Mrs. H. B. Washburn of East River, a study of 
apples; Mrs. S. E. Barney, New Haven, hollyhocks and fieur de 
lis; Mrs. "Warner of Hartford, a charming bunch of daisies, 
while Mrs. H. B. Stowe established her ability with the brush as 
well as the pen, by a study of yellow jessamines. Others essayed 
a different class of subjects: Mrs. Corson of Hartford, a street 
scene in Belgium (a charming bit of coloring) ; Mrs, L. B, NeW' 
comb of New Haven, illuminations in water-colors ; Mrs. G. "W 
Hooker of that city, an illuminated design ; and Miss Minnie G, 
Lockwood, text, illuminated border. The decorative furore pre 
vailing during the Centennial year was manifested in the exhibi 
tion of several beautifully decorated vases, fans, tiles, shells, etc. 
by Miss H. D. Andrews, Miss Hodge, and Miss Terry of Hart 
ford, Miss A. H. Bradford of New Haven, Miss Dunning of 
Canaan, and others, the last-named exhibiting a prettily painted 
glove-box. Colored photographs were shown by Miss F. M. Grif. 
fin, a young lady who achieved a high reputation in Hartford for 
that dehcate artistic work. Mrs. 0, H. "Whitmore of Hartford, 
exhibited a finely ornamented glass screen, which was given a 
prominent place in the art section. In addition to water-colors. 
Miss Tuthill of Hartford, had on exhibition two excellent pencil 
sketches, "Venus de Milo " and "Marble Madonna of Milan;" 
and Miss C. Collins, a fine pen-and-ink etching, in which the 
effects were capital. A belle of '76 and portrait of a boy were 
the subjects of two well-executed crayons by Miss Peck of Hart- 
ford. 



132 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Classed with the pictures were photographs of the Russell Library 
at Middletown, and Memorial Chapel at Indian Hill, contributed 
by Mrs. Samuel Russell of Middletown, and three colored photo- 
graphs, two exterior, and one interior, of the Church of the Good 
Shepherd at Hartford, the latter showing the Easter decorations. 
These were contributed by Mrs. Samuel Colt. The Memorial 
Chapel, Berkeley Divinity School at Middletown, was also repre- 
sented by photographs, presented by Mrs. Dr. Mutter of that city. 
A large photograph of the New Haven Orphan Asylum was sup- 
plemented by a chart which gave a short history of the institution, 
in three languages. 

Embroideries, and work of a similar nature, were represented 
by a beautiful specimen of ecclesiastical embroidery, an altar cloth, 
by the ladies of St. John's Guild, New Haven (this received an 
award); a rich specimen of tapestry-work, a worsted rug, by Mrs. 
T. R. Pickering of Portland; a child's creeping rug, by Edith 
Beach of Hartford, and a mat of pansies in wool, by Mrs. Candee 
of New Haven. 

In the Pavilion the illustrations of women's handiwork in the 
trades was meager, being limited to some very creditable speci- 
mens of printing, by Miss Addie Pickering of Portland, and a 
number of brass bird-cages made by the women in the employ of 
Hendryx & Bartholomew of Ansonia. In other branches of the 
exhibition, however, it was represented by specimens of etching 
and engraving, from the Meriden Britannia Company; plain and 
ornamental stationery from the Plimpton Manufacturing Company 
of Hartford; two hundred specimens of braid from the Novelty 
Works, Hartford, and metallic elastics and armlets from F. Arm- 
strong, Bridgeport. Carpets, woolen cloths, silks, clocks, and many 
other articles shown by Connecticut exhibitors, were in part the 
results of women's labor, but so intermingled was their work v/ith 
that of the men, that in seeking to give credit it would be difficult 
to establish the division line. 

The charitable associations of the State conducted by ladies were 
represented by reports from Hartford, New Haven, Middletown, 
Bridgeport, and Stamford, showing the origin of the several socie- 
ties, their progress, and their systems of operation. However, 
these were of slight practical benefit, for amid the attractions of 
the Pavilion, and of the great Exhibition itself, few visitors would 
have had an opportunity to examine the reports with the care 
merited, even if they had desired to. 



Connecticut's exhibits — part ii, 133 

The Connecticut exhibits in the Pavilion were the subject of 
earnest care by Mrs. T, R. Pickering of Portland, who gave her 
best services to their proper display in the space allotted to Con- 
necticut. Each article was readily distinguished by a blue card 
placed upon it, bearing the name of the State, the miscellaneous 
articles being shown in the Connecticut case, the paintings and 
drawings in the art section, and the books in the Kbrary. Upon 
the close of the Exhibition, the articles were carefully packed and 
returned to their owners, and it is worthy of remark that in no 
instance was there occasion for complaint of injuries sustained in 
the shipment to and fro, or during the many weeks that the arti- 
cles remained in the Pavilion. 

The following is a list of the exhibits by the ladies of Con- 
necticut: 

Amateurs, Hartford: Miniature on porcelain ; two painted fans ; two painted door- 
Ptones ; Turin, a wator-color; German Wedding, an oil painting; Valley Farm, an oil 
painting ; Italian Peasants, two water-colors. 

Miss H. D. Andrews, Hartford: Chocolate pitcher, painted; four earthen tiles, 
painted. 
Mis.'? Carrie Atwater, New Haven : Paper cut ornamentally with scissors. 
Delia Bacon, New Haven : Volume— Tales of the Puritans. 

Mrs. C. M. Badger, Madison : Apple-blossoms and Night-Blooming Cereus, water- 
color. 

Mrs. W. C. Badger, New Haven : Volume, Wild Flowers, drawn and colored from 
Nature. 

Mr'H. E. G. B. Barrett, New Haven: Volume of poems. 

Mrs. S. E. Barney, New Haven: Hollyhocks, water-color; Fleur-de-Lis, water-color. 

Editu Beach, Hartford: Child's creeping rug. 

Mrs. J. S. Beach, New Haven : Nine numbers of "Spirit of Seventy-Six." 

Miss Catherine E. Beecheu: Nine volumes: The Housekeeper's Manual, Housekeeper 
and Health-keeper, Physiology and Calisthenics, Educational Reminiscences and Sug- 
gestions, Letters to the People, Principles of Domestic Science, Religious Training of 
Children, The Bible and the People, An Appeal to the People. 

Miss C. Collins, Hartford ; Pen-and-ink Etching. 

Mrs. Samuel Colt, Hartford : The Church of the Good Shepherd at Hartford, repre- 
sented by three colored photographs, two exteriors and one interior, the latter showing the 
Easter decorations. 

Miss H. M. Cooke, Hartford : Valume, " Gold Threads." 

Rose Terry Cookb and Annie T. Slosson, Hartford: Compilation entitled "Easter 
Lilies." 

Mrs. a. C. Corson, Hartford : Street Scene in Belgium, water-color. 

Martha Day, New Haven: " Literary Remains." 

Miss DaNNiMo, Canaan : Glove-box, painted; Tiles, painted. 

Miss E. W. Davenport, New Haven: Heliotropes, water-color, on silk; Clematis and 
Cardinal Flowers, water-cohir ; Tile, painted. Silhouette. 

Mrs. Farnham, Hartford: " Camp," oil-painting. 

Mrs. W. L. Gage, Hartford: Volume, "Helen on Her Travels." 

Miss F. M. Gsippin, Hartforl : Colored Photographs. 

Miss L. P. Graves, New Haven: Pond Lilies, oil painting; Fuchsias, oil painting; 
Candles, painted. 

Miss Goodwin, TIartfor.l : Specimen Autumn Leaves. 

Mrs. Hawes, Hartford: Two Volumes, Memoir of Mrs. Van Lennep, Memoir of 
Erskine •!. Hawes. 

Miss Mary Hillhouse, Now Haven : Two Volumes. ' 

Lydia Huntley, Hartford : Two Volumes. 

Mas. G. VV. Hooker, Now Haven : Illuminated design, water-color. 

Mrs. Hodge. Hartford : Shell, painted. 

Mrs. B. E. Hooker. Hartford : Two Volumes. 

Miss Mary Keep, Hartford : Ear of Com, water-color. 

Ellen D. Larned, Hartford : History of Windham County, 1 vol. 

Miss A. P. Lloyd, Hartford: Receipt for "'Lection" Cake, 1 vol. 

Miss Minnie G. Lockwood, New Haven: Text, illuminated border, water-color ; Grasses 
and Lobelia, water-color. 

Mrs. Dr. Mutter, Middletown : Memorial Chapel, Berkeley Divinity School at Mid- 
dletown, represented by two photographs. 



134 SOtJVENIK OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Mrs. L. B. Newcome, New Haven : Three Illuminations, water-colors. 

Mrs. H. K. Olmsted, Hartford: Three water-colorti. 

Mis3 Teck, llartCord: Belle of " '76," crayon ; Portrait of boy, crayon. 

Miss AuBiE Pickering, Portland: Specimens of Priming. 

Mrs. T.K. Pickering, Portland: Worsted Kug, tapestry-work. 

Miss Anna Plato, Hartford : 1 vol. Prose and Poetry. 

Miss Ellen PoMEROY, Hartford: Pond Lilies, oil painting. 

Mrs. Porter, Hartford: Portrait of Italian woman. 

Miss Kebecca T. Porter, New Haven: Interior, oil painting. 

Miss Rose Porter, New Haven : Five Volumes. 

Mrs. Samukl Kussell, Middletowu : The Eussell Library at Middletown, and Memo- 
rial Chapel at Indian Hill Cemetery, represented by photographs. 

Miss F. M. SSuerjian, New Haven : Madonna and Child, lithograph. 

Mrs. Sigoukney, Hartford: :37 Vols.— Huntley & Hyde, Connecticut Forty Years Since, 
Poems, Sigourney's Poetical Works, Gleanings, Daily Counsellor, Man of Uz, Western 
Homes, Post Meridian. Letters of Life, Zinzendorf, Letters to Mothers, Letters to Young 
Ladies, Selections from Various Sources, Poems, Poems for the Sea, WaterDrops, Pleas- 
ant Memories, Scenes in My Native Land, Poems, Pocahontas, Letters to My Pupils, 
Examples of Life and' Death, Memoir of Mrs. H. M. Cook, Faded Hope, Myrtles, Select 
Poems, Whisper to a Bride, Olive Buds, Lovely Sisters, Transplanted Daisy, Poems, 
Weeping Willow, Biography, Boys' Reading Book, Girls' Reading Book. 

Mrs. Julie P. Smith, Hartford : 7 V'ols., The Widow Goldsmith's Daughter, Chris and 
Otho, Shiftless Folks, The Widower, Ten Old Maids, Courting and Farming, the Married 
Belle. 

Miss Julia E. Smith, Glastonbury: New translation of the Bible, literal. 

Mrs. Stevens, New Haven: C'ecropiaMoth, painted 70 years ago, water-color. 

Ladies op St. John's Guild, New Haven: Ecclesiastical Embroidery (altar cloth). 

Mrs. H. B. Stowe, Hartford: 20 Vols, in uniform binding, and special case, viz. : The 
May Flower, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Pearl of Orr's Island, Acnes of Sorrento, Dred, a tale of 
the Dismal Swamp, Minister's Wooinir, Queer Little People, Pussy Willow, Old Town 
Folks, Old Town Fireside Stories, Pink and White Tyranny, Little Foxes, Household 
Papers, Lady Byron Vindicated, My Wife and I, We and Our Neighbors, Palmetto Leaves, 
Betty's Bright Idea. Mrs. Stowe also exhibited a water-color (jessamine). 

Miss Jennie Terry, Hartford: Painted Fan. 

Rose Terry, Hartford : Poems, 1 vol. 

Miss Tutiiill, Hartford: Wreck, water-color; Sketches, water-color ; Venus de MUo, 
pencil sketch : Marble Madonna of Milan, pencil sketch. 

Mrs. Mary' Spring Walker, Hartford : Five Volumes. 

Mrs. Geo. Warner, Hartford : Daisies, water-color. 

Mrs. H. B. Washburn, East River: Study of Apples, water-color. 

Mrs. Henry Webster, Hartford : Game, oil painting. 

Mrs. O. H. WuiT MORE, Hartford: Glass Screen. 

THE UNITED STATES BUILDING. 

Connecticut made several valuable additions to the attractions of 
the Government Building, and perhaps the most interesting was 
the envelope machine, contributed by the PHmpton Manufacturing 
Company, used for making and printing envelopes for the postal 
service, embossed with the special " Centennial stamp." In Janu- 
ary, 1876, Postmaster-General Jewell adopted a design for a stamp 
for the stamped envelopes, to be used during the great Exhildtion. 
This was in the shape of a shield, bearing at the top, in a scroll, 
the words "U. S. Postage," beneath which was a representation of 
a moimted post-boy on a groundwork of telegraph poles and 
wires ; beneath these an engine and postal-car, and at the bottom 
of the shield, within a scroll, the words "three cents." The dates 
1776 and 1876 appeared at the top and bottom of the shield 
respectively. The colors were green or red, with the device in 
white, and the envelopes were of uniform size and quahty — of only 
a single denomination, three cents. The ingenious machine by which 
the envelopes were made, was set in operation in Hartford about th.e 



Connecticut's exhibits — part ii. 



135 



1st of May, 1876, and was placed in the United States Building on 
the Centennial grounds when the Exhibition opened. A total of 
nearly 9,000,000 of these envelopes were manufactured, and for 
some time after their first appearance, they were highly valued 

as curiosities. One ^ ^ jss-ss^^j k. ^°^^ P^^*^® °^ mech- 

hundred thousand ^^^ ^^^^M Bk anism, which cut, 
remaining on hand ^^^^^sS^^^S^ folded, stamped, 
when the Exhihi- l ^^^^^ l^ te imr gummed the edges, 
tion closed were sent |pB^SMMiK6|| and counted the on- 
to the New York I^SIBS^SBBl velopes, taking the 
post-ofEce, by order Jtt^^^VHB^"^ paper from a roll 
of the department J^^'»s:i^^3Lrr^^m^^m)^ at one end and turn- 
at Washington. The ^ ^jg^^S B ^^S^ ^E^ ing it out at the 
machine which pro- ^^^^BHW^M^Pb^^ other in packs 
duced them was a ^'^^^^r (twenty-five each) 

wonderfully i^g^^. c^^-^^^^^^^ ^ostxgk btj.mb. ^^ complete and 
stamped envelopes, ready for packing and shipment. When in 
operation, the machine was constantly surrounded by spectators, 
and the young lady who had charge of it was literally besieged 
with questions by curious people, who found it difficult to compre- 
hend the ingenious principles upon which it was constructed. 

No less remarkable as a curiosity was a large refrigerator exhib- 
ited by the Allegretti Eefrigerator Company of Bridgeport. This 
had thick plate-glass sides, giving a perfect view of the action of 
intense cold upon the articles placed therein. A large sturgeon was 
shown frozen solid, fruits and flowers encased in ice, and pitchers 
and goblets cracked and fallen away from the solid ice into which 
their contents had congealed. Other refrigerators were shown in 
the Exhibition, but this, owing to its arrangement of glass 
sides, served best to illustrate the actual freezing powers of the 
invention. 

In this building, in addition to similar exhibits in Machinery 
Hall, the Women's Pavilion, and elsewhere, the Baxter Steam 
Engine Company of Hartford, showed one of their ingenious porta- 
ble engines, in operation. These machines attracted attention 
because of their compactness and their power, which appeared to 
be whoUy out of proportion to their size. Their interior mechan- 
ism, illustrated by the engraving (sectional view), is of an exceed- 
ingly simple character, and this has led to their general use by 
small manufacturers and others who cannot afford the services of 
,an experienced engineer, and wish to have the least possible care 



136 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



upon their own shoulders. The engines are made at Colt's Armory 
in Hartford — and their manufacture is an important feature of the 
various enterprises conducted under the roof of that extensive 
establishment. 

The Scovill Manufacturing Company of "Waterbury, exhibited 
an interesting series of specimens illustrating the alloys of copper 




[Sectional view.] 



[General view.] 



BAXTER ENGINE. 



and zinc, and of nickel, zinc, and copper, and the quarrymen of the 
State showed a series of twelve-inch cubes from the principal 
granite quarries, illustrating the colors and textures of the several 
varieties of this valuable building stone found in Connecticut. 
The rare verde antique, found in Milford, was represented by a 
table-top contributed by S. M. Stone of New Haven ; marbles, quartz, 
and limestone from Canaan and East Canaan, including a sample 
of pure white quartz from the farm of J. S. Adams, in the first- 
named place. Cubes of the red sandstone of Portland, so largely 
employed in building operations throughout the entire Atlantic 
slope, and in many parts of the interior, were exhibited by the 
Shailer & Hall Quarry Company. The display of minerals did not 
fully illustrate the mineral resources of the State. Gold, copper, 



CONNECTICUT S EXHIBITS PART- 11. 137 

and others were not represented at all, possibly because the depos- 
its are not now regarded as valuable. The improved methods of 
the future, hov/ever, will undoubtedly make the working of these 
deposits remunerative. The best representation of minerals was 
of iron ore by the Barnum Richardson Co. of Salisbury, and the 
Shepaug Iron Company, the former showing specimens of pig iron, 
limonite iron ores, and limestone flux, and the latter spathic iron 
ore. Targite and limonite from the Porter ore-bed were also 
shown. Cheshire exhibitors made an interesting display of speci- 
mens of sulphate of baryta, illustrating the formation of this mineral 
in red sandstone. The fishing industries of the State were repre- 
sented by various models, which wiU be found enumerated in the 
list of exhibits. The success that has been achieved in the manu- 
facture of steel in Connecticut, v/as witnessed in an exhibit of bar 
and bhster steel, with specimens of axes and picks made therefrom 
by the Collins Company of CoUinsville. In their immense opera- 
tions the company for years used only imported steel. Eventually, 
the President visited Europe, and the result of his observations 
was the commencement of steel manufacturing on a limited scale. 
Gradually, axes and other articles requiring the best material, 
were forged from steel of the company's make, and placed upon 
the market to stand the test of experience in comparison with goods 
of imported steel. The results proving satisfactory, the proportion 
of articles manufactured from home-made steel was increased, 
until finally such excellence v/as attained that imported steel passed 
out of the list of the company's purchases. The exhibit at Phila. 
delphia well illustrated the success of a feature in their operations 
which was regarded at one time as an experiment of very doubtful 
results. To-day the goods are in demand in the markets of the 
world without question as to the origin of the material from which 
they are shaped. 

The following is a list of the Connecticut exhibits in the Govern- 
ment Building (exhibitors marked * are among those who received 
awards): 

Allegretti Refrigerator, with plate-glass sides, showing interior in which articles 
were shown frozen, AlleRretti Refrigerator Co.. Bridgeport. 

Blake's Rock Breaker— Working model, Blake Crusher Co., New Haven. 

Cubes op Red Sandstone— Shaller & Hall Quarry Co., Portland. 

Copper and German-Silver Alloys— Series of specimens illustrating the alloys of 
copper and zmc, and of nickel, zinc, and copper, Scovill Manuftvctnring Co., Waterbury. 

Envelope Machine, makinir. embossine. and printing Government envelopes with the 
special "Centennial" stamp, Plimpton Manufacturing Co., Hartford. 

Baxter Steam Engine (made at Colt's Works, Hartford), operating the Plimpton 
envelope machine. 

Granite— Twelve-inch cubes, from the principal quarries of the State, as follows : .John 
beattK!, Leet's Island, N. H. Co. ; Connecticut Granite Co., Stony Creek: Warren Gates' 
bons. Millstone Point: B. N. Green & Son. New Haven: E. Mower, Roxbury Station, 
bhepaugR. R ; J. B. Palmer & Co., Niantic; Plj'mouth Granits Co., Reynold's Bridge ; 



138 SOUVEKIR' OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Spring & Wilcox, Ansonia ; Charles Stanton, Mystic Bridge ; Umpewaug Quarries, 
Norwalk. 

Galvanized Iron Work, for ships' nee, Wilcox, Crittenden & Co.,Middletown. 

Polished Column op Granite— Beattie & Dresser, Leet's Island, New Haven Co. 

Hearth Stone, for blast furnaces, J. N. Bartram, Sharon. 

Kaoline— Taft & Co., Sheffield. 

Limestone— Barnes & Sons. Canaan ; Pierce, Lawrence & Co., Canaan. 

Marbles— White, mottled-white, and water-blue, from the Alexander Maxwell Bed, East 
Canaan. 

Models of different patterns of the Wheeler & Wilson sewing-machine in U. S. Patent- 
Office Section. 

Quartz, pure white, J. S. Adam, Canaan. 

Red Brick— Ancient and Modem with clay, from the Charles Adam Bed, Canaan. 

Spathic Iron Ore— Shepaug Iron Co. 

Specimens of Pig-Iron, Limonite Iron Ores, and Limestone Flux — Bamum Rich- 
ardson Co., Salisbury. 

Steel and its Manufacture— Specimens of bar and blister steel, and the iron from 
which it is made. Also specimens of axes and picks iUustrating their manufacture from 
the steel made by The Collms Co., CoUinsville and Hartford. 

Sulphate of Baryta— Showing formation of the mineral in red sandstone, from 
Cheshire 

Targitb and Limonite— From the Porter Ore Bed, Salisbury. 

Verde Antique— Table-top from Milford, S. M.Stone, New Haven. 

The following exhibits represented the fishing industries of the State: Noank fishing- 
smack, with well for keeping fish alive; lobster boat, with "box well;" Connecticut 
sharpy, used in harbors for fishing and attending to fish pounds ; floating-car for lobsters ; 
Menhaden purse seine, by Captain C. H. Chester of Noank. Models of lobster-pots, N. G. 
Smith, Stonington, and G. L. Green, Noank ; model of basket eel-pot, Jas. H. Latham, 
Noank; model of trap for taking sea-bass, Charles T. Potter, Noank ; improved whaling 
gun, C. C. Brands, Norwich ; samples of whale oil, also whale boat after three voyages to 
Davis Straits, Havens, Williams & Co., New London ; samples of ammoniated bone, super- 
phosphate, George W. Miles, Milford ; oysters from Long Island Sound, near South Nor- 
walk, the shells, etc., showing the annual progress of the oyster to its sixth year, Jamea 
Richardson, South Norwalk. ^ 



OHAPTEE YIIL 



CONNECTICUT EXHIBITS. 



PART III. 



The Display in Agricultural Hall and Annexes — Creditable 
Exhibits of Farming Implements and Products of the Soil — 
The Pomological Showing — Paintings in the Art Gallery — 
Miscellaneous Exhibits in the various Annexes and on the 
Grounds — The State's Educational System Illustrated — 
Various Exhibits in the Carriage Annex — The Antietam 
Soldier Statue — Granite Statuary and Monuments, etc. 

This chapter concludes the description of Connecticut's display at 
Philadelphia — a description, as a whole, too brief to do full justice 
to every exhibitor's contribution, yet in which an effort has been 
made to sketch the salient features of every exhibit of more than 
ordinary importance. To have gone into details in all instances 
would have required such space in this volume as to have defeated 
the plan upon which it was projected — that of giving due promi- 
nence to every feature of a ''Centennial" character in the State's 
record. To condense the essential facts of one portion so as to 
avoid infringing upon the space rightfully due another, has been 
one of the greatest difficulties of this work. 

In the agricultural department the representation was slight in 
comparison with the exhibits in other branches, yet the articles 
placed in the Connecticut section, and scattered throughout the 
building, were of considerable interest. The State contributed a 
collection of cereals, seeds, grains, fruits, tobacco, etc., representing 
the principal products of Connecticut soil. In March and April, 
1876, P. M. Augur of Middlefield, pomologist of the State Board 
of Agriculture, made a tour through the State, and, with the coop- 
eration of Secretary Gold, and various members of the Board, 
secured such a collection of products as were obtainable at that 
season of the year. The task was discouraging, as the fruit, vege- 

(139) 



140 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

tables, corn, and other products of the farms had mainly "been 
consumed or sold; yet a collection was obtained, not altogether 
discreditable as a representation of the agricultural resources of 
the State. The allotted area in the Agricultural Building 
embraced 480 square feet, and this space was surmounted by a low 
pyramid of shelving, the upper leaf, or apex, being even with the 
line of vision, thus making every inch of space available for exhi- 
bition purposes. The exhibit in the earher days of the Exhibition 
consisted mainly of sample packages of corn, etc., but during the 
summer other products were forwarded to Philadelphia, increasing 
the exhibits as follows: Packages of corn, 84; varieties of pota- 
toes, 25; do. of beans, 80; garden and field seeds, 213; late-keep- 
ing apples, 15; cereals, 17. To these were added eighteen 
packages of miscellaneous articles, five of minerals, and sixty-five 
specimens of analyses by the Experimental Station at Middletown, 
making a total of 522 exhibits. Later in the year, in October, in 
the Pomological Annex, the State exhibited 1,043 dishes, embrac- 
ing 143 varieties of fruits, and 1G4 parcels of vegetables, or 1,207 
in all, making a grand total of 1,729 exhibits of the products of the 
soil of Connecticut — believed to be a larger contribution than by 
any other State of its area. Some of the articles shov.m repre- 
sented a maximum jdeld to the acre as follows: Apples, 1,200 
bushels; beets, 25 tons; rye, 35 bushels; wheat, 40 bushels; buck- 
wheat, 28 bushels; grapes, 5 tons. The complete list of exhibits, 
and names of exhibitors, will be found elsewhere. 

As a manufacturing State, Connecticut's characteristic was shown 
in this, as in other departments, by manufactured articles. The 
exhibit of agricultural machines was an excellent one. The Hig- 
ganum Manufacturing Company led off with a contribution of one 
or more specimens of the innumerable articles produced at their 
works, showing not only the styles and workmanship popular in 
this country, but others required to meet the demands of patrons 
in foreign lands. Their arrangement was novel and attractive. 
Four immense arches, one rising from each side of a twenty- foot 
square platform, were constructed of plows, embracing several 
hundred varieties and styles, each interlocked with the other, 
rising up into the air twenty -five feet. At each corner were har- 
rows and cultivators, forming a complete net-work of implements 
and a perfect rustic bower, or, as some termed it, a "pagoda." 
Around the platform was a rustic-style fence made of jacks, 
ox-bows, and yokes, meat-cutters and stuffers, neat and unique in 



HIQGANUM MANUF. Co's EXHIBITS. 



141 




TRAYIS POTATO DIGGER AND CULTIVATOR COMBINED. 



142 



HIGGANUM MANDF. CO's EXHIBITS. 




THE "sJUPERIOR" HAT SPREADER. 



Connecticut's exhibits — part hi. 143' 

appearance. In the center of the platform was a large counter 
containing many of the small tools made by the company, and 
surmounting all was a patriarchal plow 120 years old, which 
attracted general attention. It had a wood mold, with wrought- 
iron nose, made in England. A rude, serviceable implement, it 
performed its work thoroughly, but at the expense to man and 
beast of double the labor exacted by the improved implements of 
to-day, such as the popular Silver Eagle, the Charter Oak swivel, 
the Hurlbut, or dozens of other plows combining the latest 
improvements, and which the company exhibited in all their vary- 
ing styles as to cost and workmanship. An implement of striking 
ingenuity and originality of conception was Clark's patent tobacco 
ridger, which, by the removal of detachable parts, can be trans- 
formed, at the option of the farmer, into a hilling-plow, horse-hoe, 
or double mold-board plow. A wide variety of harrows was dis- 
played, including Friedeman's patent, the greatest merit of which 
is its peculiar construction, which prevents clogging. Horse-hoes 
were of the Shares' patent, invented by D. W. Shares of Hamden, 
Conn., the Knox, etc., while of cultivators there were shown the 
Clement & Nealy, the fine-tooth reversible, the Rodger's steel-tooth, 
the Allen's new, the French (for market-garden work), and several 
others, each possessing peculiarities of distinctive meiit. Rollers, 
clod crushers, seed-sowers, seed-drills, road-scrapers, cider and wine 
mills, hay, vegetable, and meat-cutters, sausage-fillers, corn-shellers 
(including the popular Eagle and Silver Eagle), the " Favorite " 
lawn-mower, smut-machines, ox-yokes and bows, churns, plow- 
handles, wagon-jacks, whiffletrees, and hand-carts, represent but a 
fraction of the list of implements and aids to the farmer which the 
company included in its immense exhibit. An ingenious contri- 
vance was Yaggy's bag-holder and truck, a simple little labor- 
saving machine for bagging grain, potatoes, etc., and moving 
them wherever desired. 

The largest machines exhibited were mowers and hay-spreaders. 
The latter were of the "Superior" patent, in both light and 
heavy styles. They are deservedly popular throughout New Eng- 
land, where they have taken first premiums at numerous agricul- 
taral fairs. The specimens of the " Superior " shown were of 
handsome design, excellent workmanship, and their durability 
was guaranteed. The "Meadow King" mower, manufactured 
by the company, is a substantial machine, composed wholly of 
wrought-iron, cast-iron, and steel of the best qualities, except- 



144 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

ing whiffletrees, etc., and the knife has a quick motion and short 
stroke, enabling the machine to do good work when it moves as 
slowly as horses or oxen usually walk. The foregoing sketches 
rather than describes the extent and details of the exhibit of the 
Higganum Company, which was alike creditable to the enterprise 
of the firm in their manufacture of the great variety of articles 
to meet every demand, as well as to the inventive genius of those 
•who designed and brought to perfection so many appliances for 
the benefit of the farmer. The company reaped substantial 
results from its exhibit through large orders received from South 
Africa, Germany, Russia, England, New South Wales, New Zea- 
land, Brazil, and the Sandwich Islands. Nothing in the exhibi- 
tion better illustrated the benefits above referred to, than a picture of 
several mowers working under a blazing sun, which was suspended 
over one of the latest style mowing-machines. That the old-time 
scythe, however, holds its own, and must continue to do so for 
years among the farmers, was evidenced by the exhibits of those 
implements by the Beardsley Scythe Company of AVest "Win- 
sted, and the Eagle Company of Riverton, both firms showing 
articles for which perfection is claimed, and very generally admit- 
ted. 

The Colhns Company of Hartford, exhibited superior styles of 
plows and gang-plows of cast-steel, implements which are too 
well and favorably known in Connecticut to require any extended 
description. Of these a notable implement was the " double- 
refined cast-steel " plow, every part of the mold-board, share, and 
land slide being thoroughly refined by repeated hammering and 
rolling, and guaranteed to scour in the worst or stickiest soil. 
The gang-plows included the "Eclipse" prairie and plantation 
model, and a light, graceful implement, with wrought-iron frame 
and iron wheels, lightly built, but capable of good work in heavy 
soils. For their plow exhibit the company received awards and a 
report highly complimentary to their products. 

The Hills Lawn-Mower Company's (Hartford) machines, and 
another style manufactured by the Norwalk Lawn-Mower Com- 
pany, spoke of the ornamental feature which is gaining favor in 
country as well as city homesteads — the substitution of handsome 
lawns and grass-plats for the old-time garden-beds of our fore- 
fathers, laid out with ugly straight-hned precision, and beauti- 
fied (?) with hollyhocks, sunflowers, and such commonplace plants, 
intermingled with herbs for the use of the housewife. Brown's 



Connecticut's exhibits — paet hi. 145 

improved cotton-gin, made in New London, a cotton-gin feeder, 
etc., transported the thoughts from the products of New England 
to those of warmer climes, and it was rather a pleasant reflec- 
tion that although the South controlled the production of cotton, 
she yet had to call upon the North for machinery to prepare it for 
market. Portable engines, designed for use on extensive farms, 
were exhibited by Bigelow & Co. of New Haven, and chain and 
other pumps for farm use by W. & B. Douglas of Middletown, 
the most extensive pump manufacturers in the country. Con- 
trasting one of these pumps with the old well-sweep and bucket 
at the Connecticut Cottage, gave as happy an illustration of the 
improvements of modern times as the mowing-machines and line 
of mowers before referred to. 

The various exhibits, both of implements and products, were 
commended as highly creditable to the State, and received their 
full share of awards. For convenience of reference, the spring 
and summer exhibits, both in Agricultural Hall, and the autumn 
exhibits, are given in the same list, as follows: 

CONNECTICUT'S AGRICULTURAL EXHIBITS. 

[Exhibitors marked * were anionsj tiiose who received awards. The complete official 
list has not yet been issued.] 

Agricultural Implements— American Shovel Company,* Birmingham, steel shovels. 
Higjaniim Manufacturing Company, Higganum,* implements of every description. Eagle 
Company, Riverton, scythes. Brown Cotton-Gin Company, New London,* improved cot- 
ton-gin. Jillson & Palmer, Willimantic,* cotton-opener. C. Pierpont & Co., New 
Haven,* fodder-cutter. Beardsley Scythe Company, West Wiusted,* scythes. The Col- 
lins Company, Hartford and CoUinsvillc,* plows, etc. S. Z. Hall, New London,* cotton- 
gin feeder and condenser. Hills' Archimedean Lawn Mower Company, Hartford,* lawn- 
mowers. Norwalk Lawn-Mower Company, Norwalk, lawn-mowers. C. C. & F. Good- 
rich, Portland, tobacco wilting frame. 

Apples— S. F. West, Coluinbia; E. H. Beckwith, Norwich; E. H. Bowditch, exhibits 
for Putnam, Pomfret, and Brooklyn ; P. A. Capen, Norwich ; W. H. Starr, New London ; 
Calvin Allen, Montville; S. D. Bradford, Norwich; T. S. Gold and Nathan Hart, West 
Cornwall; S. Hoyt & Sons, New Canaan; P. M. Augur, Middlefield ; M. W. Terrill, Mid- 
dleford; E. B. Clark, Milford ; C. P. Augur, New Haven ; Brvant H. Atwater, Berlin ; T. 
C. Austin, Suffiell; G. A. Spanldinsr. South Woodstock; Mr. Piatt, Cheshire; Dr. J. J. 
Howe, Birmingham ; P. H. .\shton, Middletown ; E. Manchester, J. R. Alvord, and J. T. 
Rockwell, West Winsted; Tho nas Stacks, E. B. Birge, and J. W. Garawell, Torrington; 
E. H. Barbour, E. Carrington. Miss Sophia Rockwell, and W. A. Smith, Colebrook ; E. B. 
Clark, Milford; W. A. Grant, Burrville; and Allen Roberts, Winsted. 

Beans— Williams & Latham, New London ; Johnson, Bobbins & Co., T. Griswold & 
Co., and Comstock, Ferre & Co., Wethersfleld; R. Veitch & Son, New Haven; E. B. 
Clark, Milford ; and P. M. Augur, Middlefield. 

Beets- T. S. Gold, Weft Cornwall ; E. B. Clark. Milford ; N. S. Baldwin, Meriden ; 
George Fair^hild. Middletown ; A. Plant. Branford ; and J. J. Webb, Hamden. 

Cor.n: {SpHn.g aai, Snmmer £^t/«WO— Colonel George Foote. Guilford, pvramid of six- 
teen varieties ; H. T. Childs, Dr. G. A. Bowen, and E. P Hosmer, Woodstock; Cyrua 
Davenport, North Wood-^tock, C. Perry and H. Perry, South Woodstock ; T. S. G'old, 
West Cornwall ; Abner Roberts, Mr. Pease, and P.Bacon, Middletown; William Miller 
and Charles Hubbard, Middlefield ; Williams & Latham, New London ; Comstock & 
Ferre, Griswold & Co., and Johnson, Bobbins & Co., Wethersfleld; Charles A. Dudley, 
Guilford; Sam-iel Hull, Wallingford ; J.ames A. Cook, Preston; John Babcock. Lebanon ; 
Julius Yale, Meriden ; Henry Merwin, Durham ; Colonel Mead, Greenwich : Reuben 
Pelton, Portland : R. Little, Salisbury ; Merrit Cornwall, Westfield ; and E. B. Clark. Mil- 
ford. Autumn Exhibit (corn and grain) — A. Plant, Branford, E. B. Clark, Milford; IMeri- 
den Agricultural Society; T. S. Gold, West Cornwall: Waterbury Fair, and Guilford 
Fair. 

Engestes for Agricultural Purposes— H. B. Bigelow & Co., New Haven, portable 
engine for farm use. W. & B. Douglas, Middletown, garden engines. 

Experimental Station Exhibit of Analyses— Six:ty five packages in glass jars ; 



146 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

also mineral exliibite, viz. : Bloclvs of granite from Leete's Island, Guilford, and freestone 
from Shailer & Uail's quarry, Portlauu. 

Fkktilizeks— Pijck lirotliurs, ]Sortlifleld, and Quinnipiac Fertilizer Company, New 
Haven. 

1' liUiT Dbter— James L. Lockwood & Co., Stamford. 

(jiitAiN— C. T. Lyou, Woodstock -J. P. liarstow, Norwich; P. M. Augur, Charles Hub- 
bard, O. Foster, aud James O. Ross, Middlefleld; William Yale, Meriden ; Captain 
Worthington, Portland ; K. Little, Salisbury • F. Iteed, West Cornwall. 

GuAPEs— W. N. Baruett, West Haven ; C. E. B. Hatch, Cornwall Bridge. 

Miscellaneous — Agricultural exhibit, prepared under the direction of Burdett Loomis 
of Hartford, by P. M. Augur of Middlelield, for State Board of Managers ; ft.rm buildings, 
N. Hart and B. Loomis ; maple syrup, M. Williams, Hartland ; wool, B. Loomis (Cotswold 
fleece), aud sample of California wool scoured in Connecticut, E. N. Kellogg, Hartford; 
painting, basket of strawberries, by Thomas Atkins, a Middlelield farmer, aged eighty ; 
bird-cages, Ileudryx & Bartholomew, Ansonia ; petrifactions, F. W. Smith, Bridgeport. 
Town exhibits contributed by residents were made as follows : East Hartford and Wind- 
sor, tobacco in cases; Middlefield, nuts; Guilford, onions; New London, three dishes 
grapes; Middletown, Stafford, Middlefield, Salisbury, Branford, Durham, Guilford. West 
Cornwall, twenty-five varieties spring and thirteen of laU potatoes; Meriden, radishes ; 
Waterbury and Guilford, turnips. 

Onions— E. B. Clark, Milford ; S. B. Wakeman, Saugatuck ; also the entire exhibite at 
the Middlesex County Fair in 1S7(J. 

Peaches — James Manning, Norwich. 

Pears— E. II. Bowditch (for the towns of Putnam, Pomfret, and Brooklyn) ; P. A. 
Capen, C. Billings, Dr. E. C. Kead, James Allen, James Jennings, James Manning, P. 
Mahoney, James Gilmore, D. T. Meech, Elias Cottrell, John L. Deiiisou, S. D. Bradford, 
and John Turner, all of Norwich ; W. H. Starr, New London ; P. M. Augur, Middlefield ; 
T. S. Gold, West Comwall; C. P. Augur, New Haven; General Nolile, Bridgeport; T. C. 
Austin, Suffield; C. P. Webster, P. D. Stillman. and Dr. Russell, all of Hartford; Dr. J. 
J. Howe, Birmingham ; J. T. Rockwell and E. Manchester, West Wineted. 

Plums- P. M. Amrur, Middlefield; T. S. Gold, West Cornwall. 

Potatoes — Contributions of spring potatoes, twenty-five varieties, and fall potatoes, 
thirteen varieties. (See Miscellaneous.) 

Pumps for Farm Use— W. & B. Douglas, Middletown,* chain and other styles. 

Squashes— T. S. Gold, West Cornwall, and E. B. Clark, Milfdrd. 

Turnips— Meriden Agricultural Fair; H. L. Stewart & Son, Middle Haddam ; A. Plant, 
Branford; aud T. S. Gold, West Cornwall. 

In the cattle-show the exhibitors were S. M. & D. "Wells of 
Wethersfield (Ayrshires); 0. B. King of Watertown, draught 
cattle (Devons); F. EadclifEe Starr of Litchfield, Jerseys; and 
A. Hamilton of Watertown, three yokes of working oxen. It 
should be a matter of State pride that while there was no Con- 
necticut member of the Board of Judges, the State took first 
honors on cattle and thoroughbred stock (Ayrshires and Devons), 
and Mr. Starr (who receives one dollar a pound throughout the 
year for his butter) the award for best Jerseys. 

The poultry show, from October 27th to November 6th, was 
held in Pomological Hall, and Connecticut was represented by 
some of the best breeds of fowls raised in the State. Charles 
H. Crosby of Danbury, was a member of the Board of Judges. 
The following is a Hst of the exhibits : 

Asiatics— Light Brahmas, Alson B. Todd and D. C. Waterhouse, New Haven. Dark 
Brahmas, D. C. Waterhouse. Partridge Cochins, G. W. Bradley, Hamden, and D. C. 
Waterhouse. Pea-c(mib Partridge Cochins, G. W. Bradley. 

Spanish— White Leghorns, J. Boardman Smith, New Haven. 

French — Houdans, D. C. Waterhouse, New Haven. 

American— Plymouth Rocks, Gates, Tweedy & Co., Norwich, and D. C. Waterhouse. 
Dominiques, G. L. Fosket, Winsted. 

In Horticultural Hall the Connecticut exhibitors were Thomas 
McClunie of Hartford, who showed a hanging-basket attachment, 



CONNECTICUT S EXHIBITS PART III. 



147 



and George Hills of Plainville, who exhibited several excellent 
flower-stands. 

The Aet Gallery. 

Connecticut's artists made very light contributions to this de- 
partment of the Exhibition, representing only in a meager way 
the numerous and excellent productions of workers in art in 
Hartford, New Haven, and other large places in the State. The 
exhibits were limited to the following: J. H. Niemeyer, New 
Haven, "Gutenberg Inventing Movable Type;" Prof. John F. 
Weier of the Yale Art School, New Haven, '' The Gun Foundery 
at West Point," "Column of St. Mark, Venice," "The Confes- 
sional," " Lago Maggiore, Italy," and a portrait; J. W. Stan- 
cliff, Hartford, " New England Coast; " Harry I. Thompson, New 
Haven, two portraits (also a portrait of General Putnam, in the 
Connecticut Cottage). 

Exhibits in the Annexes, other Buildings, and on the 
Grounds. 

The principal Connecticut exhibits in the annexes were in Car- 
riage Annex No. 1, where the large carriage manufacturing in- 
dustries were well represented, mainly by New Haven firms. 
Each exhibitor was limited to five exhibits of workmanship, and 




falling-front coach — H, 



NEW HAVEN. 



this restriction was unfair in that the exhibitor was debarred 
from making a complete showing of his products, embracing, for 
the larger manufactories, a dozen or twenty distinct styles. H. 
Killam & Co's exhibit (New Haven) is referred to in the Judge's 
report as "An important exhibit of excellent workmanship, good 



148 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

in design, and well finished." The finest vehicle shown by this 
firm was a falling-front coach, valued at $1,500, which was sold 
to a Philadelphia gentleman during the Exhibition, 

B. Man\-ille & Co. of the same city, also made a fine exhibit, 
the choicest article being a French cabriolet ; also three rockaways 
of handsome design and finish, the firm devoting special attention 
to this class of vehicles. Their cabriolet, however, was a leading 
attraction, and "The Hub," a carriage trade journal, thus refers 
to the one exhibited: "The cabriolet, made after the French style, 
has all the air of a Paris-made carriage, without the wheels being 
made so heavy. It may be considered the gem of this collection, 
and the finest cabriolet in the Exhibition." 




CABRIOLET B. MANVILLE & CO., NEW HAVEN. 

The following articles were exhibited in No. 1 Annex to the 
Main Building: 

P^xhibltors marked tlms * were among those who received awards.] 

Bath-Tubs — M. A. Stevens, Hartford. 

Carriages— B. Manville & Co., New Haven :* II. Killam & Co., New Haven ;* and C. 
F. Dibbie & Co. and Wood Bros., Bridgeport,* complete carriages. Dann Bros., New 
Haven,* carriage bodies, showing woodwork. Charles T. Townsend, New Haven, car- 
riage bodies. Newgeou & Shelton, New Haven, baby carriages. William Youle, Nor- 
walk, hearses. 

Cauriage-Irons— H. D. Smith & Co., Plantsville.* 

Carriage Lamps— White Manufacturing Company, Bridgeport,* lamps for carriages. 

Carriage Trimmings— C. Cowles & Co., New Haven, trimmings and hardware. 

Carriage Wheels— New Haven Wheel Company, New Haven,* carriage, wagon, and 
truck wheels. 

CcspiDOREs, ETC.— Joseph Scheider & Co., Portland, self-righting cuspidores; also 
deep-stamned tin goods and japanned metal goods. 

Steam-IIeating Apparatus— New Haven Steam-Heating Company. 

Velocipede— Thomas R. Pickering, Portland, American velocipede, with tubular 
frame. 

WAsnrNG-MACHTNEs, Etc.— Georare P. Lamb, New Haven, washing-machines and 
wringers. Metropolitan Washing-Machine Company, Middlefield, washing-machines and 
wringers. 

In the Mineral Annex the exhibit from Connecticut was speci- 
mens of earthen tiles and drain pipes, by "Wood Bros, of- Elm- 
wood (West Hartford). 'William Lyman of Middlefield, ex- 
hibited on the lake, and received an award for, a bow-facing row* 



Connecticut's exhibits — part hi. 149 

ing-gear for boats, ingenious and practical; and on a steam 
pleasure yacht on the Schuykill river F. G. Fowler of Bridge- 
port exhibited the operations of a steering propeller. In the 
Photographic Annex R. S. Delamater of Hartford, showed some 
finely executed specimens of the photographic art, and Samuel 
Peck & Co., New Haven, photographic apparatus. In the Leather 
Building samples of leather were shown by John S. Way of 
Bridgeport, and others. A. G. Day of Seymour, exhibited, and 
received an award for specimens of paving blocks. 

The State of Connecticut made a very creditable exhibit in the 
Educational Department, prepared under the direction of Prof. 
B. G. Northrop of New Haven — an exhibit more comprehensive 
than could have been expected for the trifling outlay, only $800. 
An interesting feature was the specimens of pupils' work. These 
attracted the attention of the commissioner of the French gov- 
ernment, who employed copyists for many days in transcribing 
the examination papers and other work, for the benefit of educa- 
tional work among his own people. Hartford contributed more 
fully to the exhibit than any other town in the State, sending 
seventy finely bound volumes of scholars' work, and photographs 
of all the principal school-houses in the city, showing elevations 
and interiors, the character of the furniture, the general appear- 
ance of the room, and, in some instances, the pupils at their desks. 
It was noted that none of the plans of foreign school buildings 
presented any new or superior features. For this collection a 
special award was given the city, reading: "For pupils' work, 
and for the valuable and interesting exhibit of its school system." - 
Another award was given the State Normal School " for the gen- 
eral excellence of the pupils' work shown, evincing good instruc- 
tion and results; " and the State Board of Education received an 
award " for the valuable and interesting exhibit made of the rich 
results of education in the common schools and higher institu- 
tions of the State ; also for the successful efforts of the Board to 
afford practical instruction in the metric system of weights and 
measures in all the public schools." Yale College was represented 
by such a collection of the works written or edited by the former 
members of Yale College as the authors and pubHshers con- 
sented to furnish. This collection included over 1,100 volumes. 
Wesleyan University famished photographs of the buildings, and 
Trinity CoUege sent "studies" of the new buildings, as now 
planned. 

The educational exhibits were secured largely through the ex- 



150 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

ertions of a special educational committee for ttie State, consisting 
of Prof. Northrop (chairman) and Ariel Parish, New Haven; 
Charles Northend, New Britain; Dr. E. K. Hunt, Hartford; Geo. 
M. Woodruff, Litchfield; S. B. Frost, Danielsonville ; M. S. 
Crosby, Waterbury; C. H. S. Davis, Meriden; Henry E. Sawyer, 
Middletown; Hon. Henry P. Haven, New London; J. N. Stick- 
ney, Rockville, and John Day Ferguson, Stamford. 

The " Antietam Soldier" statue (shown on the grounds near the 
Main Building) was generally regarded as one of the finest col- 
ossal figures of ancient or modem times. It was cut from a single 
block of granite from the "Westerly, R. I., quarries of the New 
England Granite Company of Hartford, and was designed by Carl 
Conrads, a sculptor employed by the company in that city. It 
represents an American infantry soldier standing at parade rest 
dressed in the costume of the Union soldier of the late war. The 
overcoat gives, in its voluminous cape and drooping folds, a grace 
and dignity to the figure that offsets the rigidity of the military 
position, and adds to the repose and self-sustained power of the 
statue. The character of the face is admirable, denoting firmness, 
determination, a sense of responsibility without fear, and of confi- 
dence without assumption. The statue is twenty-one feet six 
inches high, and weighs thirty tons. It v/as cut from a block 
which weighed, when taken from the quarry, about sixty tons. 
When placed in its designated position on the Antietam battle- 
field, it will stand on a pedestal twenty-three feet six inches high, 
making the total height of the monument forty-five feet. The 
stone from which this statue is made is very superior in the quali- 
ties of homogeneousness, durabihty, growth in beauty by expos- 
ure, and fineness of texture. While the crushing resistance of other 
granites varies from 6,000 to 13,000 pounds per square inch — the 
celebrated Quincy granite reaching the latter figure — the Westerly 
granite sustains a pressure of 19,000 pounds per square inch. For 
an exhibit of monumental work and statuary on the grounds, the 
company received an award and report reading: "For the superi- 
ority of their exhibit, showing variety of design, excellence of 
material and workmanship." This exhibit was one of the real 
attractions of the Exhibition grounds, the monuments being of 
graceful design, and the workmanship models of artistic elegance. 
Included in the display was a figure of Memory — a striking and 
beautiful conception, which elicited the admiration of critics, and 
was the subject of description and illustration in some of the lead- 
ing journals of the country during the Exhibition. 




THEANTItTAM SOLDIER. 
jpw/sir£a. B y rue Nc w Cusl < na 'GSAii/rs C(t 



CHAPTER IX. 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE CONNECTICUT NATIONAL GUARD. 

The Origin of the Encampment Project — Description of Camp 
Israel Putnam — The Journey to Philadelphia — Record of 
Nine Days in Camp — The Parades, etc. — Recollections of 
the "Hash House"— The Parade in New York — List of Com- 
missioned AND Non-Commissioned Officers of the Brigade at 
Philadelphia. 

Not tlie least of Connecticut's exhibit at the Centennial was the 
display made by her brigade of citizen soldiery. The State had 
for several years been acknowledged by high military authority to 
possess the best military law, and the best organized, drilled, and 
disciplined brigade of National Guards in the country. This was 
not so much the result of what the State had done for its militia, 
as it was of the interest and pride of the officers and men in their 
respective organizations. The brigade was composed of a class of 
young men of intelHgence, officered by men well posted in their 
duties, and in many cases thorough tacticians and close students of 
military literature. Several of the officers and men had served in 
the United States volunteer army during the war of the rebelhon, 
and the experience there acquired was of great value in the militia 
service. With annual encampments, where a daily routine of camp 
duty was performed, and men instructed in the science of war by 
competent instructors ; with an improved modern breech-loading 
arm, and the necessary camp and garrison equipage which no 
other State possessed, except perhaps Massachusetts, Connecticut 
succeeded in placing her citizen soldiery on a high basis of perfec- 
tion as to drill, discipline, and rifle shooting. In view of this, as 
early as the year 1874, the project of an encampment of the brig- 
ade at Philadelphia was discussed and at the meeting of the 
General Assembly in May, 1875, the initiatory steps were taken, 
providing for the encampment of the entire brigade outside of the 
State limits in 1876. The National Guard had warm friends among 

(153) 



154 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

the members of the General Assembly, and to their efforts must be 
attributed the passage of the necessary laws allowing the encamp- 
ment to be held at Philadelphia. 

The first Act toward this was approved July 22, 1875, the text 
of which was as follows: 

Be it enacted, etc : Section 1. The commander-in-chief may at his dis- 
cretion, suspend the annual spring parade and fall encampment of the 
National Guard of this State, for the year 1876. 

Sec. 2. In case he shall so suspend said parade and encampment, he 
may permit the brigade, including the section of artillery, to attend for a 
period not exceeding six successive days, the national Centennial at Phil- 
adelphia, at such time as may be by him determined; and the quartermas- 
ter-general shall furnish camp equipage for the same; but the expense to 
the State of such transportation and encampment at Philadelphia shall 
not exceed the total amount which would be paid for the parades and 
encampment in this State in the year 187G. 

Sec 3. The pay for said transportation, encampment, and parade shall 
be the same as is now by law provided. 

In anticipation of the visit of the entire brigade to Philadelphia, 
and an encampment there, in accordance with the above Act, 
the following general order was issued Oct. 14, 1875, after the 
parades and encampments for that year had ended: 

The probability that the National Guard of this State will encamp at 
Philadelphia next year, makes it imperatively necessary that rigid economy 
should be observed in all expenses connected with the Guard, and com- 
mandants of companies are directed not to procure new uniforms for their 
commands without consultation with this office. 

It is earnestly desired that at the proposed Centennial Encampment, all 
the companies shall number as near as possible sixty men, and the large 
expense to be incurred at that time, makes it impracticable to have the 
companies number in any event over sixty-five men ; companies number- 
ing less than sixty efficient and reliable men should recruit immediately to 
that number, and care should be taken to enlist none but good and reliable 
men ; non-resident and other inefficient members should forthwith be rec- 
ommended for discharge. 

As it is desirable that none but well-drilled men should attend the 
encampment, recruiting will cease February 28, 1876, until after the Fall 
i:)arade. 

This being the first ofiicial announcement to the National Guard 
that the entire brigade would encamp at Philadelphia, recruiting 
began in earnest throughout the entire brigade, and a capable and 
reliable class of men were obtained to fill the places of those mem- 
bers who had become ineflficient from non-attendance at drills, or by 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE NATIONAL GUARD. 155 

reason of non-residence. The various companies commenced their 
series of weekly drills immediately after this order, and were 
actively preparing during the whole year previous to the encamp- 
ment, for this, the greatest event in the history of the Connecticut 
National Guard. The ranks of the companies were quickly filled, 
and none but active and well-drilled men composed the Connecti- 
cut National Guard after the 28th of February, 1876. Company 
and battalion drills were of weekly occurrence, and in some cases 
were held semi- weekly, such being the pride of the officers and 
men to be in the best possible condition. The number of days 
allowed by law for an encampment of the National Guard was but 
six, but in this event the members of the brigade were anxious to 
have the encampment continue for a longer period, and every com- 
pany so voted, and signed an agreement to do duty nine days and 
to receive pay for but six. The following letter to regimental com- 
mandants was sent out from brigade headquarters, July 13, 1876, 
calling for immediate action on the agreement, as above: 

Colonel : — Being informed that the members of the brigade generally 
wish the encampment to continue ten days this year, if held at Philadel- 
phia, I deem it advisable, in order to prevent misunderstanding, to obtain 
the formal agreement of the several companies to do duty from Sept. 1st 
to Sept. 9th, inclusive, if ordered to Philadelphia — having it clearly under- 
stood that the pay will be for six days, which is all that the law will 
permit. 

You will please obtain immediate action by the companies of your com- 
mand on this point, and inform me of the result. 
Yours truly, 
(Signed) Wm. Randel Smith, ; 

Brig. -Gen. Com. C. JST. G. 

The legislature during the May session, 1876, passed a bill 
authorizing payments for service at the encampment to be made 
on the groimds; also a bill permitting the Governor's Horse and 
Foot Guards to go to Philadelphia ; authorizing the quartermaster- 
general to furnish transportation, and allowing $15 pay for each 
member of the Horse Guards, and $10 for each member of the 
Foot Guards. However, but one company, the first company, 
Governor's Horse Guards of Hartford improved the opportunity 
afforded them. An account of the trip is given elsewhere. After 
the adjournment of the legislature orders regarding the encamp- 
ment were issued in quick succession from general headquarters. 
General order No. 7, dated July 10, 1876, directed Brig. -Gen, 
Wm. Randel Smith to assemble his entire command; the quarter- 



156 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

master -general to furnish transportation to Philadelphia, select a 
camp-ground, furnish camp equipage, arrange for subsisting the 
brigade, and for quartering the horses of the mounted officers 
and the artillery. General order No. 9, July 20th, announced 
that the regulations governing the National Guard in this State, 
would be enforced at Philadelphia; and limited the number of 
horses to be used. Circular order, Aug. 4th, limited company 
baggage to knapsacks and tv?o company trunks, and officers to a 
single trunk; announced that a contractor had arranged to feed 
the men at one dollar per day each, for three meals, " the pay for 
the same to be deducted from the pay-roll by the paymaster-gen- 
eral, and paid to the contractor — no deductions for meals not eaten. 
It may be remarked here, that the contractor developed wonderful 
foresight in incorporating this latter specification, well knowing 
that the men would soon become disgusted with his bill of fare, 
and seek their meals outside. The circular order also announced 
that officers would be provided with cot beds, mattresses, pillows, 
sheets and pillow-slips at 30 cents per night; without Hnen, at 20 
cents, or simple mattress and pillow for 12|- cents. General order 
No. 4, from brigade headquarters, Aug. 28th, announced that the 
encampment would be known as " Camp Israel Putnam;" that non- 
commissioned officers and privates would not be permitted to leave 
camp without passes, nor officers without leave from their colonel; 
that passes would be issued only in exceptional and necessary cases; 
announced the regulations for the provost guard, and urged upon 
the troops the necessity for neatness and cleanliness in the camp. 

Preparations for locating the camp were made by the quarter- 
master-general's department about the middle of August. On the 
20th the camp and garrison equipage was shipped from the State 
arsenal at Hartford. Quartermaster-general Green, Major Swan, 
assistant quartermaster-general, and a corps of assistants proceeded 
to Philadelphia at that time, and immediately commenced the lay- 
out of the camp, and to erect the tents, about 800 being required 
to accommodate the brigade. The site for the camp-ground which 
had been selected, was on the line of the Pennsylvania Central rail- 
road, fully a mile and a-half from the Centennial grounds, and 
known as " Camp Scott " station. The camp was pleasantly located 
on a rising plateau, overlooking a portion of the Centennial grounds, 
with the steeples of Philadelphia visible five miles distant. The 
close proximity of the location to the railroad facilitated the land- 
ing of troops and camp equipage. 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE NATIONAL GUARD. 157 

Orders from regimental headquarters quickly followed those 
from general and brigade headquarters announcing the date and 
hour of the departure of the respective regiments. Transportation 
had been arranged by Quartermaster-general Green, and regi- 
mental commandants notified, so that everything worked simulta- 
neously and in proper accord. The Third regiment, comprising the 
companies of New London and "Windham counties, assembled at 
New London on Thursday evening, Aug. 31st, and at 10 o'clock 
embarked for Jersey City by boat, arriving there in the morning. 
A train was in readiness, and the regiment was soon aboard, reach- 
ing camp " Israel Putnam " at noon, and being the first command 
to report to Brigadier-General Smith. The other regiments, and 
first section of artillery assembled on Friday morning, September 
1st, preparatory to the departure. The day was beautiful. The 
First regiment assembled at Hartford, leaving by special train at 
8.10 o'clock A. M. At New Haven the Second regiment boarded 
the same train, while at Bridgeport, Norwalk, Stamford, and Green- 
wich the companies of the Fourth regiment were taken on board. 
The train bearing these commands arrived at Harlem river station, 
New York, at 12 noon. From this point the three regiments 
were transferred by steamboat and a double-decked barge, the 
latter being lashed to the side of the boat. The regiments were 
crowded aboard these crafts like sheep, 1,200 men being on board 
the barge, and in that manner they were transported to Jersey 
City; the Second regiment being assigned quarters on the boat, 
while the First and Fourth filled the dangerous barge. It was 
afterwards learned that this mode of transporting the men was 
not in accordance with the contract made by General Green and 
the steamboat company, Down East river the boat and barge 
slowly sailed, tipping from one side to the other, and from the hour 
of departure at Harlem river, until the arrival at Jersey City, 
nearly four hours of precious time were occupied by these transports 
in making the trip. Arriving at Jersey City, three special trains were 
in readiness, and the regiments, after a short delay, left for Phila- 
delphia, the Second regiment being first, the Fourth next, and the 
First last. The train proceeded directly to " Camp Putnam," the 
First regiment arriving about midnight. The unwarrantable delay 
in transporting the three regiments around New York seriously in- 
terfered with the arrangements for the arrival of the troops at the 
camp-ground, and before the baggage and "supplies " of the First 
regiment could be transported from the station to the camp, the 



158 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

rain commenced falling steadily, wMch made the first night 
anything but pleasant. The late arrival at the camp of course upset 
the caterer's arrangements, and caused a great deal of trouble, which 
was not overcome until the middle of the week, and then not to 
the satisfaction of all. The first introduction to the sutler's shed, 
or " hash-foundry," as the boys were wont to call it (which was not 
only noted for its peculiar hash and rubber steaks, but its manner 
of serving up scrambled eggs), was slight that first night, as the boys 
were too tired to eat, but the next morning very full and complete 
introduction took place at breakfast, which was not a very pleas- 
ant one. A new method of serving boiled or scrambled eggs was 
here noticed. A barrel containing Western eggs of very uncertain 
age, all packed nicely in straw or cut hay, was rolled in. The head 
of the barrel was removed, then a gallon of boiling hot water was 
poured in upon the eggs, which, after " simmering " a few minutes, 
would be pronounced done, and with hay-seed, cut-feed, and all the 
barrel dirt — those boiled (?) eggs were then served up for break- 
fast to the National Guard of the Commonwealth. 

The routine of duty was commenced on Saturday morning, 
Sept. 2d, in accordance with the following order: 

SCHEDTTLE n. 

- 5.30 A. M. 

- 6.45 

- 7.00 

- 7.30 

- 8.30 

- 9.30 

- LOOP. M. 

- 2.30 

- 4.00 

- 5.00 

- 6.15 

- 9.30 

- 10.00 

II.— On Tuesday and Friday, the First and Fourtli regiments will follow 
the first schedule— the Second and Third regiments, the second. On 
all other days the Second and Third regiments will follow the first 
schedule — the First and Fourth regiments, the second. 
III.— The regiments will visit the Exposition as follows: the Second and 
Third, on Monday and Wednesday, the First and Fourth on Tues- 
day and Friday. On Thursday the brigade will be reviewed by his 
Excellency Governor Ingersoll, at the camp at 10 A. m. , and will give 
a dress parade in the Exposition grounds at 4.30 p. m. 







SCHEDULE I 


I. — Reveille, 


- 


- 5.30 A. M. 


Breakfast Call, 


- 


- 5.45 " 


Police Call, - 


- 


- 7.00 " 


Surgeon's Call, 


- 


- 7.15 " 


Guard Mounting, 


- 


- 7.30 " 


Drill Call, - 


- 


- 9.30 " 


Dinner Call, - 


- 


- 12.00 M. 


Drill Call, - 


- 


- 2.30 p.m. 


Police Call, - 


- 


- 4.00 " 


Brigade Dress Parade, 


- 5.00 " 


Supper Call, - 


- 


- 5.45 " 


Tattoo, 


- 


- 9.30 " 


Taps, 


- 


- 10.00 " 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE NATIONAL GUARD. 161 

IV. — The mess rooms will be opened at ten minutes aftei- the meal calls are 
sounded. Twenty minutes will be allowed for eating; at the expir- 
ation of which time the companies will be marched out. No delay 
will be permitted in this respect, and no officer or soldier will be 
allowed in the mess-room except during the time allotted to his reg- 
iment. 
V. — Visitors will be permitted in the camp without passes from 7.30 
A. M. until 6 p. M. During other hours they must be provided with 
passes. 
VI. — Vendors and peddlers will not be allowed in the camp without writ- 
ten permission from brigade headquarters. 

By order of Brigadier-General Wm. Randel Smith, 
Albert C. Hendrick, 

Lieutenant- Colonel and Brigade Adjutant. 

Saturday morning, September 2d, dawned clear, and the nien of 
the several regiments were ready to respond to reveille roll-call, 
and get a view of the country by daylight. " Business " had now 
begun in camp in accordance with the order quoted above, and the 
Connecticut Brigade, National Guard, were thoroughly ensconced in 
camp for an instruction of six successive days. The regiments 
were encamped in column of divisions (two companies occupying a 
street), the Third Regiment, Colonel Ames, occupying the right of 
the brigade, the Fourth Regiment, Colonel Hoyt, being next in line, 
followed by the First Regiment, Colonel Hudson, and the Second 
Regiment, Colonel Smith. The first section of artillery. Lieutenant 
Lee commanding, was encamped to the right and rear of the 
Third Regiment. The consolidated morning reports, Saturday 
morning, September 2d, showed the presence of 2,383 officers and 
men in the brigade. The first ceremony Saturday, in the regular 
routine, was guard- mounting, which, for the first one, was very 
creditably performed in the various regiments on their respective 
parade-grounds. Battalion drills followed at the designated hour, 
the lines being formed in each regiment promptly. The first drills 
were, as-might be expected, somewhat "rusty," but that was seen 
to wear off rapidly, and the men, improving under the com- 
mand of their instructors, were soon in good condition for the first 
brigade drill, which took place in the afternoon. General Smith 
assumed command at the drill, the regiments being formed 
promptly under Brigade- Adjutant, Colonel Hendrick. All were 
proficient in the brigade evolutions, and for the first, the drill was 
considered a successful one. The dress-parade was also commend- 
able, and those who witnessed it saw one of the prettiest of all 



162 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

military ceremonies, handsomely performed. The regiments 
assembled on their respective parade-grounds at the signal, and 
were at once formed in close columns of divisions. The brigade, 
in line of masses, was then turned over to General Smith, the 
whole ceremony being faultless. The regimental bands and drum- 
corps were massed on the right, making a corps of musicians 
numbering over two hundred, and at the " sound o3 " the entire 
field music passed down the line, the bands playing " Marching 
Through Georgia," with fine effect, and to the evident gratifica- 
tion of the spectators who had come from the city and Exhibition 
grounds to see the Connecticut troops — whose arrival had been duly 
chronicled in the Philadelphia papers. Said General James "W. 
Latta, adjutant-general on Governor Hartranft's staff, who was 
an interested witness of the display, ""What a grand mobilization! 
Splendid! splendid!! and what a handsomely uniformed brigade 
of men! " Only a few weeks previous the entire National Guard 
of Pennsylvania, some ten thousand men, had been encamped at 
the Centennial grounds, but did not present any uniformity of 
dress or condition as to organization to be compared with the appear- 
ance and drill of the Connecticut brigade. General Latta freely 
expressed his surprise at the unexpected excellence of Connecti- 
cut's National Guard. As a soldier, he quickly saw what consoli- 
dation had done for the Connecticut brigade, and acknowledged 
that, although a smaller force, it was more compact and efi"ective 
than the larger, yet improperly formed, organization of his own 
State. The manual of arms at the dress parade was prettily exe- 
cuted, and just as the sunset gun was fired, the colors were 
lowered at headquarters, and the parade dismissed. The first 
day's duties were performed in a manner in every respect satisfac- 
tory to the officers. The drills had been well attended, and 
everything, as far as the camp was concerned, was in good order. 
But the mess-halls were yet a subject of dissatisfaction. No 
marked improvement in the condition or manner of preparing and 
serving of the food was apparent, and to increase the evil, the 
waiters had organized a strike, which caused the contractor, Mr. 
Obermeyer, considerable trouble. It was expected that orders 
would be issued detailing some of the men for duty as waiters, but 
help was finally secured by the indefatigable brigade-commissary, 
Major Read, a squad of waiters being obtained from the city. 
Supper was served "after a fashion," and thus closed the first day 
of duty in camp. Saturday night was charming, the moon shin- 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE NATIONAL GUARD. 165 

iiig full and bright, but tlie men were too tired for their usual 
fun incident to the first night under canvas, and although some 
of them may have run the guard and taken a transfer coach (lim- 
ited) to the city, those who remained were glad enough to seek 
their quarters at the sound of taps. Those who did guard duty 
that night can vouch for the very quiet condition of the camp. 

Sunday morning the brigade awoke to find a delightful day, 
and with no duty to perform other than guard, and an inspection, 
which was conducted after the manner of Sunday morning inspec- 
tions in the army during the war. For breakfast the contractor 
provided his memorable Centennial "hoof" steaks, with "rubber 
attachment," and scrambled eggs, which, in respect to their age, 
the boys left severely alone. "Centennial eggs" they were 
dubbed by some wag, who averred that they were as old as the 
United States, and had an unquestionable right to hold an exhi- 
bition; but he objected to making that exhibition a poultry show 
for Connecticut troops. 

The order promulgated for the Sunday inspections fixed the 
hour for the Fourth Regiment at 8.30 a. m., the Third at 10 a. m., 
the First at 1.30 p. m., and the Second at 3 p. m. 

The regiments assembled on their respective parade-grounds at 
the hours named, and were formed for inspection in column of 
companies, at rear open order. Major Barnes, brigade inspector, 
made the inspection. The camp was crowded during the day 
with visitors, many of the members of the Philadelphia mihtary 
organizations calling at the different headquarters, where they 
were welcomed and enjoyed Nutmeg hospitality. "When the hour 
for dress parade arrived the camp and parade-ground were filled 
with spectators, including, with other distinguished officials of the 
Exhibition, General Hawley, President of the Centennial Com- 
mission, who was heartily welcomed by his Connecticut friends. 
He was accompanied by Major Merrill of the Seventh United 
States Cavalry, on duty at the Exhibition. General Bradley of 
the Ninth United States Infantry, and ex-Brigadier-General Crau- 
furd of the National Guard were also among the visitors. Dress 
parade was performed in the same faultless manner as on the 
evening previous, and many compliments were paid by the regu- 
lar army officers on the evolutions of the brigade. Major Merrill 
spoke in very decided terms, and General Hawley was heard to 
remark that he " wouldn't have missed the sight for a thousand 
dollars." 



166 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

At the regimental headquarters services were held in the fore- 
noon by the respective chaplains, the members generally attend- 
ing by companies. Remarks were made and sermons preached 
from texts appropriate to the occasion. This being the first time 
that the National Guard had been in camp on Sunday, divine 
service was held for the first time in its history, the chaplains 
performing their duties in keeping with the good name of the 
brigade. 

A detailed history of each day of the encampment will not be 
attempted, nor would it be possible in the space allotted to the 
military chapter. The record given of the first two days of mili- 
tary duty covers the principal features of those succeeding, except- 
ing the visits to the International Exhibition, which each regi- 
ment made in a body. On Monday, the 4th, the Second and 
Third regiments proceeded tinder arms, in command of their 
colonels, to the Exhibition grounds, the First and Fourth regi- 
ments remaining in camp to follow their prescribed duties. On 
arriving on the grounds the commands marched to the parade- 
ground at the foot of George's Hill, where arms were stacked, 
and the men dismissed until the hour in the afternoon assigned 
for the dress-parade. During the day the officers and men were 
given every facility to visit the various buildings, and the time 
was thoroughly enjoyed. This arrangement was followed on Tues- 
day by the First and Fourth regiments, which went through the 
same routine. Thus it alternated during the week, two regiments 
remaining in camp for instruction while the others were "doing" 
the Exhibition. 

Thursday, the Vth, was Connecticut Day at the Exhibition. 
A review of the brigade by His Excellency Governor Ingersoll, 
and dress-parade on the Exhibition grounds, were the contem- 
plated features of the occasion, but the programme of the review 
and parade, as issued in orders, was abandoned, owing to the rain 
which commenced to fall heavily during the night previous, and 
continued throughout the day. The unpleasant weather, though 
interfering with the ceremonies, was welcomed by the men of the 
brigade, who were beginning to show signs of fatigue — the result 
of hard work in doing triple duty, viz. : camp instruction, visiting 
the Centennial by day, and Philadelphia by night, which, with 
unsatisfactory rations served by the caterer, were enough to 
create feelings of dissolution. Orders were given verbally by 
General Smith to the colonels to dispense with guard-mounting 




Col. P. W. Hudson. 

Lt.-Col. H. A. Tyler. Maj. L. A. Barbour. 

Adjt. G. B. Fisher. Chap'n J. G. Griswold. 

Q'm'r H. C. Bullock. Paym'r R. Joslyn. 

Surg. J. N. Parker. Ass't Surg. G. L. Parmele. 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS 

FIRST REGIMENT C. N. G., 1876. 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE NATIONAL GUARD. 169 

and drills in view of the unpleasant state of the weather, and the 
brigade enjoyed a general "off duty" day. A rainy day in camp 
is generally a signal for something a little irregular, and the 
wagg of an organization have only to start off with their 
pranks and recruits are always ready to join and perform duty. 
The " hash foundry " was a subject that was still being ventilated 
by the men, and as any improvement was not visible to the mili- 
tary eye, a movement was finally planned for the demolition of 
the structure. At this time of the week not over one-half of the 
men were messing at this place. Some of the companies aban- 
doned it early in the week, and were having their dinners sent up 
from the restaurants near the Exhibition grounds, or were board- 
ing with the " Doctor from Michigan " over behind the hill, or 
at other of the farm-houses in the vicinity of the camp. In addi- 
tion to the dislike aroused by the poor quality of the food, the 
mess-house was further unpopular because of its uncleanliness, 
the atrocious odors sickening some of the men. The result of a 
discussion of the evil on that rainy day was the formation of a 
body of daring spirits for the express purpose of razing the 
structure to the ground. The boards did fly for a few moments, 
but several of the officers becoming apprized of the affair, rushed 
to the scene, and persuaded the men to return to their quarters. 
"While this was in progress the whole camp was enjoying a mock 
funeral, the obsequies, " very mournful and impressive," being 
conducted strictly d la militaire, with the addition of an oration 
on the parade-ground. The music, escort, and oration were im- 
promptu, but laughable in the extreme. The ceremonies closed 
with the march of the procession to the different regimental head- 
quarters, where remarks were made to the men by the colonels, 
closing with cheers for the different regiments. The remains 
were interred by the edge of the woods east of the camp. By 
this time the rain had ceased, but as the camp parade-ground 
was ia a slippery condition no drills were held. The Second 
Regiment closed the day with a dress-parade, which was witnessed 
by General Hawley, Governor Hartranft, Postmaster-General Mar- 
shall Jewell, and several officers of Governor Hartranft's staff, 
who were in camp. The visitors named were subsequently enter- 
tained at headquarters. And thus was Connecticut Day cele- 
brated in Camp Israel Putnam. 

Friday was a beautiful day, but the review postponed from 
Thursday did not occur, owing to the indisposition of Governor 



IVO SOUVENIB OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Ingersoll. It was decided, instead, to have a dress-parade on the 
Centennial grounds, and after dinner the regiments were formed, 
and, marching by different routes, met on Fifty-second street. 
There forming into brigade line, they wheeled into columns of 
companies, and marched via, Elm avenue to the grounds, passing 
in at the main entrance. The march along Belmont avenue 
within the grounds was a splendid ovation. Proceeding to the 
parade-ground, foot of George's Hill, the brigade halted, stacked 
arms, and was dismissed (for a farewell visit to the different 
departments) until five o'clock, when the assembly sounded for 
dress-parade, and the line was formed. By this time the parade- 
ground was encircled by a vast assemblage of people, estimated 
at forty thousand. Line of masses was formed, with the Third 
Regiment on the right, the Fourth Regiment second. First Regi- 
ment third, and the Second Regiment fourth in line, and occupy- 
ing the left. The formation was prompt, and the ceremony hand- 
somely performed, the large assembly vociferously applauding 
the perfection of the various details. The "sound off" of the 
field music which was massed on the right, the bands playing 
"Marching Through Georgia," wrought the assemblage to the 
highest point of enthusiasm. It was a grand sight, and one 
never to be forgotten by those who witnessed or participated in 
it. Following the dress-parade, each regiment gave a highly 
creditable exhibition in the manual of arms. The ceremony was 
witnessed by many distinguished gentlemen high in rank in both 
the mihtary and civil service of this country and the world, who 
had nothing but words of commendation for the brigade of citi- 
zen soldiery. The ofiicers and men, although greatly fatigued 
after an eight days' campaign, were, nevertheless, spurred by the 
enthusiasm displayed to do their best in this, the climax of the 
encampment, and handsomely did they perform their work. 
After the parade was dismissed the regiments were marched off 
the parade-ground in column of divisions at full distance, the 
alignment and marching being heartily applauded. Breaking 
into column of fours, the march was continued through the Cen- 
tennial grounds and out of the main gateway to Elm avenue; up 
that wide and well-paved street to Fifty-second street; thence 
out the pike to Camp Israel Putnam. 

The last night in camp was devoted largely to the interchange 
of calls between the regiments, the various headquarters being 
visited and cheers exchanged. The regimental bands serenaded the 




Col. S. R. Smith. 

Lt.-Col. J. N. Bacon. Maj. C. P. Graham. 

Adjt. R. Thompson. Chap'n A. N. Lewis. 

Q'm'r S. P. Brown. Paym'r F. A. Spencer. 

Surg. E. L. BissELL. Ass't Surg. E. H. Riley. 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS 

SECOND REGIMENT C. N. G., 1876. 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE NATIONAL GUAED. 173 

commanding oflScers, and speeches and general jollification followed. 
The prescribed routine was somewhat relaxed, taps not being 
sounded until midnight. The usual processions perambulated the 
camp, and the " cellars " were emptied of their contents. Visitors 
from the city were entertained, and left camp at midnight with 
nothing but pleasant recollections of Camp Putnam and the 
Yankee boys from the " Land of steady habits." General order 
No. 7, for the breaking of camp, was issued in the evening and 
sent to the regimental headquarters. It read as follows: 

To-morrow morning the gun will be fired and reveille sounded at 4 A. M. 
The First and Fourth regiments, and also the guard detail of the Second 
and Third regiments, will be at the mess barracks for breakfast at 5 a. m., 
and the guard details of the First and Fourth regiments, with the Second 
and Third regiments, at 6 a. m. All baggage will be at the railroad track, 
with a detail from each regiment for loading it on the cars, at 6.30 a. m. 
A ration of two sandwiches and two boiled eggs per man, packed in boxes 
for each company, will be issued at the east mess tent immediately after 
breakfast. The Colonels will send details to receive the same. 

The tents will be struck at 6.45 A. m. The Colonels will see that all pre- 
parations are made so that the tents may fall at the signal at the above 
hour. The Colonels will then immediately cause the tents to be rolled 
and carried to the brow of the hill, near the railroad crossing. The regi- 
ments will form line at 7.15 o'clock, ready to march through the culvert 
and take the cars on the north side of the crossing. 

Shortly after midnight the camp v/as quiet, and the men of the 
brigade, tired with the week's duties and excitement, were soon 
sleeping their last sleep in camp Israel Putnam, with the exception 
of a few " night ov/ls " who were not content to go to sleep 
without first having a little harmless fun, from which discipline 
had restrained them during the encampment. Bands of prowlers, 
unwilling to let their comrades rest, would drop a tent on their 
heads, introduce a cold water bath, or indulge in a little "rang- 
ing." It was these same "owls" who probably hoisted a chair, 
illuminated with candles, to the top of the headquarters flag-staff, 
where it remained until the reveille sounded at 4 a. m. 

Promptly at seven o'clock Saturday morning, the tents were 
down, and the camp in an instant exhibited only a large field, strewn 
with canvas, baggage, and debris. The tents were folded and 
taken to the brow of the hill near the railroad crossing, and Camp 
Israel Putnam in a few short moments ceased to exist. At eight 
o'clock the First Regiment embarked on the train for New York, 
closely followed by the others. For rations, each company had a 
box of sandwiches and boiled eggs; the latter being quickly recog- 
nized as having been through the patent boiling process before 



174 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

described. Two sandwiches and two eggs were allowed as a 
ration, but the Second's men were deprived of a part of this feast, 
the First Eegiment men confiscating their boxes (inadvertently, of 
course), and carrying them off on the first train. There is an old 
saying about stolen goods being the sweetest, but it was in nowise 
applicable to the " hen fruit " stolen by the First. The losers of 
the rations were really gainers in the end, for they telegraphed to 
Trenton, and found an excellent collation ready upon their arrival. 
The First Regiment arrived in Jersey City at 11.15 o'clock a. m., 
and immediately proceeded over the ferry and halted in Desbros- 
ses street. New York, where they stacked arms to await the 
arrival of the other regiments. The Third arrived at 12.10, closely 
followed by the Second and Fourth, and Artillery, after which 
the brigade formed line along Canal street. The First Brigade of 
National Guards, S. N. Y., had, during the week, been tendered 
as escort by its commandant. General "William G. Ward, which 
General Smith accepted, tlie details having been previously 
arranged. General Green, the indefatigable quartermaster-gen- 
eral, had made the transportation arrangements of the brigade on 
its homeward trip so that it could pass through New York and 
take transportation at foot of Twenty-third street, East River, for 
Harlem. The New York Brigade performing the escort was com- 
posed of the Fifth, Colonel Spencer, Twelfth, Colonel Ward, 
Twenty-second, Colonel Porter, and Ninth, ' Colonel Hitchcock. 
The First New Jersey, Colonel Allen, and Ninth New Jersey, 
Colonel Hart, also participated in the escort. Forming on Canal 
street, the brigade moved to Broadway, where the ceremony of 
reception occurred, after which the line of march was taken up. 
The Third Regiment was equalized so as to parade eight companies 
of eighteen files, the Fourth Regiment ten companies of twenty- 
two files. First Regiment eight companies of twenty-two files, and 
Second Regiment eleven companies of twenty files. In columns 
of companies the brigade moved up Broadway with alignments, dis- 
tances, and general appearance superb. Along that grand thorough- 
fare the sidewalks were packed with spectators, who cheered 
each regiment enthusiastically, and the windows and balconies 
were filled with ladies, waving their handkerchiefs in welcome to 
the soldiery. Reaching Union Square, the head of the column 
entered from the west side, and marched in review before Mayor 
Samuel Lewis, Governor Bedell and stafi of New Jersey, heads of 
city departments, and many officers of the National Guard. The 




Col. N. H. Ames. 

Lt.-Col. W. H. Tubes. Maj. W. E. F. Landers. 
Adjt. H. B. Smith. * Chap'u Jno. Davies. 

Q'm'r F. W. Short. Paym'r J. W. Gilbert. 

Surg. F. N. Bramajs". Ass't Surg. W. B. Young. 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS 

THIRD REGIMENT C. N. G., 1876. 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE NATIONAL GUABD. 177 

passage in review was finely executed, and there was a continual 
fusilade of applause — praise happily supplemented by the compli- 
mentary reports in the New York and Philadelphia papers of the 
following day, extracts from which are now prized portions of 
company scrap-books throughout the State. 

Passing the reviewing point in Union Square, the column pro- 
ceeded up Fourth avenue to Twenty-third street, and thence to the 
dock, where the steamer WiUiam Cook was in readiness to 
transport the First, Second, and Fourth to Harlem. The Third 
embarked on a steamer from this point direct to New London, 
arriving Sunday morning. The other regiments reached Harlem 
at six o'clock, and in a few minutes the trains were speeding home- 
ward. The men being both fatigued and hungry, soon fell asleep, 
and there was a notable absence of the frolicking usual when off 
duty. Nothing occurred to disturb the silence that pervaded each 
car until one of the officers of the First Regiment, with white 
trousers, sat down on a squash pie which a brother officer had pur- 
chased at Stamford and placed in his seat beside him. Otherwise 
the ride from New York was peaceful and quiet. 

The brigade may well remember the encampment with pride. 
On duty or o£E duty, the men conducted themselves handsomely, 
and the officers were fully repaid for the time and energy devoted 
to bringing them to a high state of discipline. The single draw- 
back was the catering, but for this the officers in charge were not 
to blame; the caterer had underestimated the demands upon his 
resources, and he alone was at fault. In a report to Governor 
Ingersoll, Adjutant-General Trowbridge referred in most compli- 
mentary terms to the conduct of the brigade at Philadelphia. 
The following extracts are from the report: 

I desire in this connection to pay the just tribute to the ofScers and men 
which they deserve, for the exhibition throughout this Centennial Encamp- 
ment ; for the most elevated standard of military dignity and propriety, for 
their scrupulous attention to all orders, and for their constant efforts to 

make this encampment creditable to the State of Connecticut 

While in camp, strict order and military discipline were enforced by Gen- 
eral Smith, and the regular drills and camp duties were attended to with 
promptness and precision. Of the military proficiency of our active 
militia I have had occasion to speak in my former reports. It is hardly 
to be expected that a body of citizen soldiers who are able to meet for mil- 
itary exercises only at infrequent intervals should show in all details the 
precision of veterans; but I think that the brigade which General Smith 
took to Philadelphia may almost be considered an exception to such a 
rule. With the able and efficient co-operation of Colonels Ames, Hoyt, 
Hudson, and Smith, and the other field-officers of the various regiments, 
and I may also add the General and Regimental staff officers. General 
Smith had brought his command to a high state of efficiency before their 



X78 SOUVENIR OP THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

departure to Philadelphia, and while in camp there wa3 no cessation in 
the efforts of these otflcers to improve their commands in all the routine 
duties, drills, and tactical manoeuvers required of a body of troops in the 
field. 

"When not on duty, the men of the brigade were everywhere 
honored with attentions. Squads and companies were entertained 
"by the Philadelphia National Guardsmen and citizens, but any 
formal reception by parade or escort would have been inconve- 
nient, owing to the distance of the camp from the city. However, 
many company and individual receptions were given and recipro- 
cated. Company F of the First Connecticut fraternized with 
Company K of the First Pennsylvania, and Company I of the 
Second with Company E of the Pennsylvania regiment. Com- 
pany F of the Second and the State Fencibles also held pleasant 
relations during the encampment. Invitations from distinguished 
Philadelphians flowed in upon the officers of the brigade, and the 
Union League Club sent "ten day " cards to each. In conclusion, 
the Centennial encampment, with its attractions of camp life, of 
visits to the Exhibition by day, and the theaters and receptions in 
the evening, formed a kaleidoscope of pleasant incidents long to 
be remembered by every officer and private of the brigade. 



ROSTER 



The following is the roster of commissioned and non-commis- 
sioned officers who took part in the Encampment, as shown by 
the muster pay-roll on file at the Adjutant-General's office at 
Hartford: 

COMMAKDER-IN-CHIEF AND STAFF. 

Commander-in-Chief — Charles R. Ingersoll, New Haven. Adjutant- 
General — William P. Trowbridge, New Haven. Quartermaster-General — 
William H. Green, Hartford. Surgeon-General— Frank S. Burgess, Plain- 
field. Paymaster-General— William S. Charnley, New Haven. Commis- 
sary-General—Andrew S. Jarvis, Weston. Aides to the Commander-in- 
Chief— A. Heaton Robertson, New Haven ; Milo B. Richardson, Salis- 
bury; Charles W. Shelton, New Haven, and DeWitt J. Peek, Hartford. 
Asst. Adjutant-General- Simeon J. Fox, New Haven. Asst. Quarter- 
master-General — Theron C. Swan, Hartford. 




Col. H. W. R. HoYT. 

Lt.-Col. R. B. Fairchild. Maj. G. S. Crofut. 

Adjt. D. T. HiiBBELL. Chap'n S. Howland. 

Q'm'r C. Olmstead. Paym'r J. C. Randle, 

Surg. G. F. Lewis. Ass't Surg. C. P. Uhle. 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS 

FOURTH REGIMENT C. N. G., 1876. 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE NATIONAL GUARD. 181 



BRIGADIER-GENERAL AND STAFE. 

Brigadier-General — William Randel Smith, Norwalk. Brigade Adju- 
tant — Albert C. Hendrick, New Haven. Brigade Inspector — T. Attwater 
Barnes, New Haven. Brigade Quartermaster — Charles E. Dotj^ Nor- 
walk. Brigade Commissary — David M. Read, Bridgeport. Aides-de-Camp 
— George D. Goodrich, Vernon, and Stiles T. Stanton, Norwich. 

LIGHT ARTILLERY. 

First Section (Guilford Light Battery). — Lieutenants— 1st, "William 
H. Lee, Guilford; 2d, William T. Foote, Guilford. Sergeants— 1st, Rich- 
ard W. Starr; 2d, Charles H. Davis; 3d, Joel C. Page, all of Guilford. 
Corporals — 1st, Watson D. Kelsey; 2d, Jas. D. Goldsmith; 3d, Lorraine 
M. Thrall; 4th, Edw. M. Gillette, all of Guilford. Twenty-three privates. 
"Total, 30. 

INEANTRT. 

FIRST REGIMENT. 

Field and Staff. — Colonel — Philip W. Hudson, North Manchester. 
Lieutenant-Colonel — Heman A. Tyler, East Hartford. Major — Lucius A. 
Barbour, Hartford. Adjutant — George B. Fisher, Hartford. Quarter- 
master — Henry C. Bullock, Hartford. Paymaster — Richard Joslyn, South 
Manchester. Surgeon — Julian N. Parker, South Manchester. Assistant 
Surgeon — George L. Parmele, Hartford. Inspector of Target Practice — 
John 0. Kinney, Hartford. Chaplain — Rev. Johnson G. Griswold, 
Hartford. 

Non-commissioned Staff. — Sergeant-Ma j or — Arthur L. Goodrich, 
Hartfoi'd. Quartermaster-Sergeant — J. Weston Fuller, Hartford. Com- 
missary-Sergeant — Clayton H. Case, Hartford. Hospital Steward — Philo 
W. Newton, Hartford. Drum-Major— Wm. C. Steele, Hartford. Fife- 
Major — Thomas G. Adkins, Hartford. [The First Regiment paraded its 
own regimental band, better known as Colt's Band of Hartford, number- 
ing twenty pieces. Captain Thomas G. Adkins, leader.] 

Company A (Hartford Germania Guard). — Captain — John A. Miller, 
Hartford. Lieutenants — 1st, Edward Schulze, do. ; 2d, Otto Riedell, do. 
Sergeants — 1st, John Feldhensen; 2d, John Roth; 3d, Hilary Slabos- 
zewski; 4th, Emil Schmidt. Corporals — 1st, Cuno A. Helfricht; 2d, Ed- 
ward Kuhney; 3d, Albert Oelkuch; 4th, Reinold Lotze; 5th, David 
Rothschild; 6th, Richard Mathes; 7th, Charles Zillhardt; 8th, Heniy 
Gundlach, all of Hartford. Forty-six musicians and privates. Total, 61. 

Company B (Hillyer Guard). —Captain— James T. Sherman, Hartford. 
Lieutenants — 1st, John Dundon, do. ; 2d, Patrick J. Moran, do. Sergeants 
— 1st, Benjamin F. Leonard; 2d, John J. Ahem; 3d, August Benning; 4th, 
John Buckley ; 5th, Dennis B. Cummings. Corporals — Andrew Newman ; 
2d, Jacob Barchfield; 3d, B. H. Smith; 4th, Jas. W. Norris; 5th, William 
Haspey; 6th, James Langdon; 7th, Charles H. Smitton; 8th, James J. 
Dillon, all of Hartford. Forty-five musicians and privates. Total, 61. 

Company C (Ingersoll Guard).— Captain— Ernest C. Colby, Rockville. 
Lieutenants — 1st, Amasa P. Dickinson, do. ; 2d, Fred'k H. Fitch, do. Ser- 
geants — 1st, Thomas Rigny; 2d, Cornelius Buckley ; 3d, Bethune J. Bart- 
lett; 4th, Jno. Abbey; 5th, Joseph G. Carroll. Corporals — 1st, Frank R. 
Williams; 2d, Lucien F. Burpee; 3d, Thomas McDonald; 4th, Thomas 
Bush; 5th, Michael Costello; 6th, John Gough; 7th, Wm. J. Annear; 
8th, Randolph Schulz, all of Rockville. Forty-eight musicians and pri- 
vates. Total, 64. 



182 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENOTAL EXHIBITION. 

Company D (New Britain City Guard). — Captain — Reuben W. Hadley, 
New Britain. Lieutenants — 1st, John C. Bingliam, do. ; 2d, Augustus N. 
Bennett. Sergeants — 1st, Josliua H. Yates; 2d, John Sloan; 3d, Gordon 
Cary; 4th, A. J. Leonard; 5th, Louis Mingle. Corporals — 1st, George E. 
Stone; 2d, W. E. Alleh; 3d, Edward Burns; 4th, Moses Austin; 5th, John 
Costigan; 6th, C. H. Faulkner; 7th, Robert Carswell ; 8th, Henry Scheuy, 
all of New Britain. Forty -seven musicians and privates. Total, 63. 

Company E (Jewell Guard). — Captain — Charles B. Erichson, New 
Britain. Lieutenants — 1st, Samuel L. Whaples, do. ; 2d, Fred. M. Hem- 
enway, do. Sergeants — 1st, H. W. Tenney; 2d, E. S. Adkins; 3d, E. 
W. Dowd; 4th, W. T. Steele; 5th, G. M. Adkins. Coi-porals— 1st, S. H. 
Stearns; 2d, F. L. Norton; 3d, J. H. Ellsworth; 4th, C. E. Lee; 5th, D. 
M. Hull; 6th, W. L. Weld; 7th, C. I. Scripture; 8th, W. H. Thornton, 
all of New Britain. Forty-seven musicians and privates. Total, 63. 

Company F (Hartford City Guard). — Captain — John L. White, Hart- 
ford. Lieutenants — 1st, Levi H. Hotchkiss, do. ; 2d, Daniel S. Camp, do. 
Sergeants — 1st, Geo. F. Whitney; 2d, Louis Krug; 3d, Benjamin S. Wood- 
ward; 4th, Chas. A. Wheeler; 5th, George Q. Whitney. Corporals — 1st, 
George D. Bates; 2d, Wm. H. Robertson; 3d, Jno. D. Worthington; 4th 
(excused by Captain); 5th, Erving H. Rood; 6th, George E. Lee; 7th, 
Thos. T. Welles; 8th, Will H. Morgan, all of Hartford. Forty-eight 
musicians and privates. Total, 63. 

Company G (Manchester Rifles). — Captain — John S. Cheney, S. Man- 
chester. Lieutenants — 1st, Walter W. Cowles, N. Manchester; 2d, Amos 
Lay, S. Manchester. Sergeants— 1st, Arthur P. House; 2d, Henry C. Forbes; 
3d, Chas. A. Day; 4th, Jas. L. Loomis; 5th, A. J. Wetherill. Corporals — 
1st, Geo. L. Forbes; 2d, Thos. H. Dunn; 3d, Jas. M. Frost; 4th, Arthur 
B. Keeney; 5th, Thos. Montgomery; 6th, Edward J. Sisson; 7th, Henry 
P. Gray; 8th, Frederick W. Robbins, all of South Manchester. Forty- 
nine musicians and privates. Total, 65. 

Company H (Hartford Light Guard). — Captain, Benjamin F. Welles, 
Hartford. Lieutenants — 1st, Edgar L. Pope, do. ; 2d, Wm. M. Clark, do. 
Sergeants — 1st, Cassius Mowry; 2d, Wm. D. Hastings; 3d, George A. 
Cornell; 4th, Joseph L. Chapman; 5th, Charles B. Bartlett. Corporals — 
1st, Robert A. Callahan; 2d, Edward C. Stone; 3d, Henry Simon, Jr.; 
4th, Wm. E. Marshall; 5th, Charles H. Parker; 6th, Wallace B. Lindsley; 
7th, Clarence H. Cleveland ; 8th, Everett A. Burnham, all of Hartford. 
Forty-six musicians and privates. Total, 62. 

SECOND REGDIENT. 

Field and Staff.— Colonel — Stephen R. Smith, New Haven. Lieut. - 
Colonel — Josiah N. Bacon, New Haven. Major — Charles P. Graham, 
Middletown. Adjutant — Russell Thompson, New Haven. Quarter- 
master — Samuel P. Brown, New Haven. Paymaster — Frederick A. Spen- 
cer, Waterbury. Surgeon — Evelyn L. Bissell, New Haven. Assistant 
Surgeon — Edward H. Riley, New Haven. Inspector of Target Practice — 
James E. Stetson, New Haven. Chaplain — Rev. Alonzo N. Lewis, New 
Haven. 

Non-commissioned Staff. — Sergeant-Major — Eugene C. Hill, New 
Haven. Quartermaster-Sergeant — Clayton H. Redfield, New Haven. 
Commissary-Sergeant — Alex. H. Buckingham, New Haven. Hospital 
Steward— Edw. D. Hendee, New Haven. Drum-Major, Edw. L. Weld, 
New Haven. Fife-Major— Frank M. Byxbee, Meriden. [The Second 
Regiment paraded the American Band of Providence, R. I., D. M. Reeves 
leader, and nineteen men.] 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE NATIONAL GUARD. 183 

CoirPANY A (Chatfleld Guard). — Captain — Augustus I. Goodrich, 
Waterbury. Lieutenants — 1st, Francis H. Smith, do. ; 2d, Franlc R. 
White, do. Sergeants — 1st, Albert Munson; 2d, W. R. Harrison; 3d, 
Wm. W. Munson; 4th, L. P. Hinchcliff; 5th, Chas. S. Crampton. Cor- 
porals— 1st, John B. Doherty; 2d, Wm. B. Manville; 3d (absent without 
leave); 4th, Wm. E. Booth; 5th, Wm. Wilson, Jr. ; 6th, Frank H. Miller; 
7th, Edgar W. Upson ; 8th, Robert B. Kirk, all of Waterbury. Forty- 
three musicians and privates. Total, 58. 

Company B (New Haven City Guard).— Captain— Carl G. Engel, New- 
Haven. Lieutenants — 1st, Henry Phillipe, do. ; 2d, Henry Buchter, 
do. Sergeants — 1st, Gustav Hirsch; 2d, Fred Klein; 3d, Jacob Gut- 
brodt; 4th, Carl Hamm; 5th, Gus. V. Engel. Corporals — 1st, Geo. 
Youn^erman; 2d, Wm. Satorius; 3d, Chas. Mann; 4th, Joseph Gutt; 
5th, Albert Possner; 6th, Henry Speigel; 7th, Chas. Blum; 8th, John 
Gutt, all of New Haven. Fifty musicians and privates. Total, 66. 

Company C (Sarsfield Guard). — Captain — Maurice F. Brennan, New 
Haven. Lieutenants — 1st, John Carberry, do. ; 2d, Edward Lynn, do. ; 
Sergeants — 1st, Timothy F. Callahan; 2d, John Shaunahan; 3d, John 
Garrity; 4th, Richard W. Miller; 5th, Francis J. Duflfy. Corporals — 1st, 
James F. Bradley; 2d (excused by Captain); 3d, John Roche; 4th, Thos. 
R. Miller; 5th, John Tiernan; 6th, Michael F. Keegan; 7th, John F, 
Moore; 8th, Dennis Nolan, all of New Haven. Forty-nine musicians and 
privates. Total, 64. 

Company D (National Blues). — Captain — Henry D. Phillips, New 
Haven. Lieutenants — 1st, John Shuster, do. ; 2d, Luzerne I. Thomas, do. 
Sergeants— 1st, Chas. A. Stokes; 2d, Edw. R. Smith; 3d, Geo. H. Lan- 
sing; 4th, Louis P. Korn; 5th, Wm. W. Kennedy. Corporals — 1st, 
Frank E. Austin; 2d, Wm. S. Bacon; 3d, Wm. E. Doolittle; 4th, Henry 
C. Hooghkirk; 5th, Charles M. Linsley; 6th, Frank S. Starkey; 7th, Wal- 
lace M. Strong ; 8th, James A. Thorpe, all of New Haven. Forty-seven 
musicians and privates. Total, 63. 

Company E (New Haven Light Guard).— Captain— Chas. A. Buttricks, 
New Haven. Lieutenants — 1st, Samuel A. Downes, do. ; 2d, Henry R. 
Loomis, do. Sergeants— 1st, Edson S. Beach ; 2d, Leverett B. Fairchild ; 
3d, Frank D. Brett; 4th, Charles W. Bogue; 5th, John Coombs. Cor- 
porals— 1st, Jerry Bradley; 2d, Robert M. Walker; 3d, Geo. H. Schiller, 
Jr.; 4th, Chas. A. Sperry; 5th, Thos. W. Newhall; 6th, Albert H. Ben- 
nett ; 7th, Wm. S. Wood ; 8th, Andrew S. Dickinson, all of New Haven. 
Fifty-one privates. Total, 67. 

Company F (New Haven Grays). —Captain— Emil A. Gessner, New 
Haven. Lieutenants — 1st, Lewis L. Morgan, do. ;' 2d, Singleton Car- 
rington, do. Sergeants— 1st, Chas. E. Rounds; 2d, Edw. P. Sperry; 
3d, John T. Dyas; 4th, John B. McQueen; 5th, Winstar H. Sanford. 
Corporals— 1st, Charles E. Grannis; 2d, Wm. G. Hooker; 3d, Arthur M. 
Howarth; 4th, William F. Jennings; 5th, Berkeley R. Merwin; 6th, 
Smith G. Weed; 7th, Sylvester J. Ingham; 8th, John W. Wood, all of 
New Haven. Forty-nine musicians and privates. Total, 65. 

Company G (Sedgwick Guard). — Captain— Charles R. Bannon, Water- 
bury. Lieutenants — 1st, Dennis A. Magraw, do. ; 2d, Michael Maher, do. 
Sergeants— 1st, Dennis J. Casey; 2d, Patrick F. Ryan; 3d, John F. 
McCormack; 4th, Maurice Culhane; 5th, Wm. Kelly. Corporals — 1st, 
Matthew Burns; 2d, Daniel P. Noonan; 3d, Michael Mitchell; 4th, James 
Tobin; 5th, Thomas White; 6th, Thomas O'Donnell; 7th, Wm. Noonan; 
8th (excused by Captain), all of Waterbury. Fifty musicians and pri- 
vates. Total, 65. 



184 SOUVENIR OP THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Company H (Mansfield Guard). — Captain — Frederick E. Camp, Middle- 
town. Lieutenants — 1st, Henry J. Bacon, do. ; 2d, Frank E. Nourse, 
do. Sergeants — 1st, John Wilson, Jr. ; 2d, Arthur B. Miller; 3d, Charles 
J. Osborn; 4th, Phil. H. Fielding; 5th, Charles G. Atkins. Corporals — 
1st and 2d (excused by Captain); 3d, Wm. Jamieson, Jr. ; 4th, David R. 
Craig; 5th, Thos. H. Duflfee; 6th, Daniel McDonald; 7th and 8th (ex- 
cused by Captain), all of Middletown. Forty-eight musicians and pri- 
vates. Total, 60. 

Company I (Eaton Guard). — Captain — Theodore Byxbee, Meriden. 
Lieutenants — 1st, Henry B. Wood, do.; 2d, John R. Mackay, Jr., do. 
Sergeants — 1st, John N. Lane; 2d, Geo. A. McLean; 3d, Alfred Smith; 
4th, Ralph A. Palmer; 5th, Frank D. Smith. Corporals — 1st, William 
O. Butler; 2d, John M. Harman; 3d, S. Maynard Camp; 4th, Theodore S. 
Rust; 5th, Henry M. Mather; 6th, Frank S. Nichols; 7th, Edgar H. Til- 
ley; 8th, Edw. G. Miller, all of Meriden. Forty-six musicians and pri- 
vates. Total, 62. 

Company K (Wallingford Light Guard). — Captain — W. J. Leavenworth, 
Wallingford. Lieutenants — 1st, William N. Mix, do. ; 2d, David Ross, 
do. Sergeants — 1st, JohnB. Mix; 2d, Robert B. Wallace; 3d, George E. 
Bullock, Jr.; 4th, Elijah F. Steele; 5th, David C. Dudley. Corporals— 
1st, Elliot S. Morse; 2d, Henry C. Morse; 3d, Chas. O. Norton; 4th, 
Zcrah P. Beach; 5th, Stephen A. Smith; 6th, Geo. La Barnes; 7th, Chas. 
A. Barker; 8th, Marshall K. Thomas, all of Wallingford (except Corporal 
Smith, North Haven). Forty -five privates. Total, 61. 

THIRD REGIMENT. 

Field and Staff. — Colonel — Nathaniel H. Ames, New London. 
Lieutenant-Colonel— William H. Tubbs, New London. Major — Wm. E. 
F. Landers, Mystic Bridge. Adjutant — Hezekiah B. Smith, New Lon- 
don. Quartermaster — Frederick W. Short, New London. Paymaster — 
Joseph W. Gilbert, Norwich. Surgeon — Francis N. Braman, New Lon- 
don. Assistant Surgeon — William B. Young, Norwich. Inspector of 
Target Practice — William H. Hovey, Norwich. Chaplain — Rev. John 
Davies, Norwich. 

Non-Commissioned Staff. — Sergeant-Major — R. G. Philpott, Mystic. 
Quartermaster-Sergeant— Geo. W. Phillips, Willimantic. Hospital Stew- 
ard — Chas. W. Walker, New London. Drum-Major — A. W. Sholes, 
New London. Fife-Major — J. H. Scranton, Willimantic. Commissary- 
Sergeant — Chas. D. Holmes, Putnam. 

[The Third Regiment paraded its own regimental band, known as the 
Third Regiment Band of New London. Twenty pieces; F. D. Morgan, 
leader.] 

Company A (Mystic Rifles). — Captain — John H. Hoxie, Mystic Bridge. 
Lieutenants — 1st, Denison Burrows, do. ; 2d, John R. Lyon, Mystic 
River. Sergeants— 1st, Ben. E. Mallory; 2d, Van R. Saunders; 3d, Geo. 
C. Clark; 4th, Joseph Wilbur; 5th, Otto Graff. Corporals— 1st (ex- 
cused by Captain); 2d, E. Newman; 3d, Hampton H. Young; 4th, R. L. 
Williams; 5th, Geo. C. Stinson; 6th, Wm. C. Jones; 7th, James D. 
Latham; 8th, Silas Maxon, all of Mystic. Thirty -seven musicians and 
privates. Total, 52. 

Company B (Sheridan Guard). — Captain — Dennis Geary, Pawcatuck. 
Lieutenants — 1st, Michael Twomey, do. ; 2d, William Taylor, do. Ser- 
geants — 1st, John McGann; 2d (excused by Captain); 3d, James O'SuUi- 
van; 4th, Timothy P. Sheehan; 5th, John Flaherty. Corporals — 1st, 
Michael Buckley ; 2d, John Morris; 3d, Patrick O'Neil; 4th, Thomas 
Crowley; 5th, William Holliday; 6th, John Joyce; 7th, John Mahoney, 
all of the town of Stonington. Forty-one musicians and privates. 
Total, 53. 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE NATION A~^ GUARD. 185 

Company C (Norwicli City Guard). — Captain — James J. McCord, Nor- 
wich. Lieutenants — 1st, James F. Borzang, do. ; 2d, Frederick N. Saun- 
ders, do. Sergeants — 1st, John A. Caryl; 2d, Edw. Caryl; 3d, William 
Burton; 4th, John F. Filson; 5th, Thomas Atchison. Corporals — 1st, 
Henry S. Manning; 3d, Horace N. Saunders; 3d, Geo. H. Hart; 4th, 
Chas. S. Ebberts; 5th, Geo. L. Roath; 6th, Chas. E. Briggs; 7th, John 
Gorman; 8th, James Farrell, all of Norwich. Forty-thi-ee musicians and 
privates. Total, 59. 

Company D (New London Rifles). — Captain — "Wm. H. Bentley, New- 
London. Lieutenants — 1st, J. Emerson Harris, do. ; 2d, Franklin Goss, 
do. Sergeants— 1st, F. E. St. Clare; 2d, John C. Goddard; 3d, Frank P. 
GofE; 4th, W. L. Roe; 5th, M. J. Roach. Corporals— 1st, Coleby C. Jef- 
frey; 2d, Jacob L. Bragaw; 3d, Joseph Smith; 4th, Theo. E. Beach; 5th, 
Wm. M. Mason; 6th, Edv/ard A. Tinker; 7th, Frank Starr; 8th (excused 
by Captain), all of ISTew London. Thirty-nine musicians and privates. 
Total, 54. 

Company E (No local name). — Captain — Herbert R. Chappell, Willi- 
mantic. Lieutenants— 1st, Frank S. Fowler, do. ; 2d, Alexander L. Ful- 
ler, do. Sergeants — 1st, H. A. Beebe; 2d (absent, sick); 3d, H. Voget; 
4th, Ira T. Hoxie; 5th, J. H. Sharp. Corporals— 1st, H. E. Bosworth; 
2d, J. Harris, Jr.; 3d, J. H. Hill; 4th, C. E. Leonard; 5th, C. E. Clark; 
6th, Geo. Taft; 7th, J. B. Elliott; 8th, Wm. Magee, all of Willimantic. 
Thirty-seven musicians and privates. Total, 52. 

Company F (Sayles Rifles). — Captain — Henry W. Johnson, Putnam, 
Lieutenants— 1st, Walter F. Day, Killingly; 2d, Daniel F. X. McEvoy, 
Putnam. Sergeants — 1st, Henry E. Leach, Putnam; 2d, Geo. E. King, 
Killingly; 3d, Wm. H. Moore, Woodstock; 4th, Anson A. Buchanan, 
Putnam; 5th, Wm. H. Withey, Killingly. Corporals — 1st, Peter Rey- 
nolds, Killingly; 2d, Matthew W. Chase, do.; 3d, Daniel McDougall, 
do.; 4th, Geo. R. Darby, Putnam; 5th, Edw. Cochrane, do. ;.6th, Chas. 
S. Sheldon, Woodstock; 7th, Alanson Pratt, Putnam; 8th, Eben W. 
Tourtellotte, do. Forty-seven musicians and privates. Total, 63. 

Company G (Wilson Rifles). — Captain — Edward P. King, Putnam. 
Lieutenants — 1st, William H. Anderson, do. ; 2d, Clinton A. Winslow, do. 
Sergeants — 1st, Otis Fisher, Putnam; 2d, George L. Geer, do.; 3d, Geo. 
E. Arnold, Woodstock; 4th, Chas. H. Kelly, Putnam; 5th, Albert H. 
Winslow, do. Corporals — 1st, Ingoldsbee, Pomfret; W. Trowbridge, 
Woodstock; 2d, Wm. H. Harris, Putnam; 3d, Francis N. Harris, do.; 
4th, John H. Anderson, do. ; 5th, Myron P. Herrendeen, do. ; 6th, Patrick 
Hayes, do. ; 7th, Wm. S. Whitney, do. ; 8th, Geo. E. Shaw, do. Forty- 
six musicians and privates. Total, 62. 

Company H (No local name). — Captain — William I. Hyde, Plainfield. 
Lieutenants — 1st, Seth C. Spaulding, S. Killingly; 2d, Lucian R. Bur- 
leigh, Plainfield. Sergeants — 1st, H. C. Kilpatrick, Plainfield; 2d, Caleb 
W. Wheaton, Killingly; 3d, John W. Fuller, Plainfield; 4th, Henry A. 
Tennant, Killingly; 5th, James Scott, Plainfield. Corporals — 1st, P. E. 
Thompson, Plainfield; 2d, A. C. Brooks, Killingly; 3d, Frank E. Pop- 
ple, Plainfield; 4th, Chas. F. Titus, Killingly; 5th, Thomas S. Croughen, 
Brooklyn; 6th, Eugene A. Harris, Plainfield; 7th, Charles H. Arnold, 
Plainfield; 8th, Charles H. Humes, Canterbury. Forty musicians and 
privates. Total, 56. 

FOURTH REGIMENT. 

Field and Staff. — Colonel — Heusted W. R. Hoyt, Greenwich. Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel — Robert B. Fairchild, Bridgeport. Major — George S. 
Crofut, Bethel. Adjutant — David T. Hubbell, Bethel. Quartermaster — 
Charles Olmstead, Norwalk. Paymaster — Joseph C. Randle, Norwalk. 
Surgeon — George F. Lewis, Bridgeport. Assistant Surgeon — Charles P. 
Uhle, Norwalk. Inspector of Target Practice — Samuel C. Kingman, 
Bridgeport. Chaplain — Rev, Seneca Howland, Greenwich. 



186 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

NoN- Commissioned Staff — Sergeant-Ma j or — Frank A. King, Bridge- 
port. Quartermaster-Sergeant — Joseph F. Foot, Norwalk. Commissary- 
Sergeant — Wm. P. Brush, Greenwich. Hospital Steward — George E. 
Scotield, Greenwich. Drum-Major — Isaac L. Mead, Bridgeport. Fife- 
Major — John Cogan, Bridgeport. 

[The Fourth Regiment paraded its regular enlisted band, known as 
Wheeler & Wilson's Band of Bridgeport. Twenty pieces; S. C. Rosen- 
berg, leader.] 

Company A (No local name). — Captain — Henry A. Gilbert, Bethel. 
Lieutenants — 1st, Frederick Cole, Redding; 2d, William F. H(wt, Bethel. 
Sergeants — 1st, Geo. S. Ferry, Bethel; 2d, Frederick E. Bassett, do. ; 3d, 
Theodore A. Carter, Danbury; 4th, Daniel Berry, Bethel; 5th, William 
R. Bennett, Georgetown. Corporals — 1st, Arthur S. Woodman, Bethel; 
2d, Hiram H. Brotherton, do. ; 3d, Geo. W. Wheeler, do. ; 4th, Wm. E. 
Daley, Danbury; 5th, Wm. A. Kyle, do. ; 6th, Wm. E. Crofut, Redding; 
7th, Asa J. Wheeler, Bethel; 8th, Lodowick Sherman, do. Forty-four 
musicians and privates. Total, 60. 

Company B (Sedgwick Guard). — Captain — Henrj^ North, Bridgeport. 
Lieutenants — 1st, Chas. A. Blakeman, do. ; 2d, Geo. W. Cornell, do. 
Sergeants— 1st, Geo. E. Derrick; 2d, Chas. E. Buckley; 3d, Henry C. 
Zehner; 4th, Samuel Powell; 5th, Edw. Ward. Corporals — 1st, John S. 
Mclntvre; 2d, Charles E. Killingbeck; 3d, Christopher Schread; 4th, 
Geo. P. Rand; 5th, Chas. H. Burt; 6th, Chas. Powell; 7th, Fred H. 
Seward ; 8th, Chas. E. Beers, all of Bridgeport. Forty-six musicians and 
privates. Total, 62. 

Company C (Minor Guard). — Captain — Philip B. Lever, Stamford. 
Lieutenants — 1st, Edward L. Studwell, do. ; 2d, William W. Studwell, 
do. Sergeants— 1st, Summerville Taff; 2d, Joseph H. Knapp; 3d, Ste- 
phen Waterbury; 4th, Alfred C. Arnold; 5th, EliasE. Palmer. Corpo- 
rals — 1st, Alex. De Camp; 2d, George L. Waterbury; 3d, Abraham M. 
Horton; 4th, Wm. U. Mitchell; 5th, Thomas E. Bowen; 6th, George R. 
Faucett; 7th, Mortimer Daskam; 8th, Chas. E. Blake, all of Stamford. 
Forty-two musicians and privates. Total, 58. 

CoMP.'i^NY D (Burnside Guard).— Captain— James C. Crowe, South Nor- 
walk. Lieutenants— 1st, Addison A. Betts, do. ; 2d, Louis J. Blake, do. 
Sergeants— 1st, Wm. F. Wardwell; 2d (absent); 3d, John H. Kidney; 4th, 
Jno. W. Martin; 5th, Otto G. Hauschildt. Corporals— 1st, Alvin A. 
Hauschildt; 2d, Clarence W. Raymond; 3d, John H. Kenny; 4th, Thos. 
F. Wilson; 5th, Charles S. Dauchy; 6th, Jno. E. Evenden; 7th, Erastus 
S. Crissey; 8th, Wm. H. Waterbury, all of the town of Norwalk. Forty- 
six musicians and privates. Total, 61. 

Company E (No local name).— Captain— Edward N. Goodwin, Bridge- 
port. Lieutenants- 1st, James Sheriden, do. ; 2d, James Donnelly, do. 
Sergeants— 1st, Edward Darigan; 2d, Edward Lehman ; 3d, Wm. T. Mul- 
ligan; 4th, Bernard Lynch; 5th, Daniel Fitzgerald. Corporals — 1st, Jos, 
Bartar; 2d, John Begley; 3d, Patrick Coffleld; 4th, Thomas Cleary; 5th, 
Edward Bushel; 6th, Patrick Branagan; 7th, Edward O'Brien; 8th, David 
O'Donnell, all of Bridgeport. Forty-seven musicians and privates. 
Total, 63. 

Company F (Greenwich Light Guard).— Captain— Joseph G. Mead, Jr., 
Greenwich. Lieutenants — 1st, Ephraim Morrill, do. ; 2d, John Powers, 
do. Sersreants— 1st, Fred. D. Knapp; 2d, Jno. Horton; 3d, Wm. Talbot; 
4th, David Lyon; 5th. Geo. W. La Forge. Corporals— 1st, Barney Daly; 
2d, Wm. H. Mead; 3d, Chas. E. Merritt; 4th, Wm. Donovan; 5th, Amos 
Avery; 6th, Chas. Ritch, all of Greenwich. Forty-eight musicians and 
privates. Total, 62. 



ENCAMPMENT OF THE NATIONAL GUARD. 187 

Company G (Wooster Guard). — Captain — Andrew Knox, Danbury. 
Lieuteniints — 1st, George C. Comes, do. ; 2d, Theodore Raymond, do. 
Sergeants — 1st, William H. Bates; 2d, William E. Doane; 8d, Edward 
McPhileny; 4tli, Nathan Benedict; 5th, James Hyatt. Corporals — 1st, 
Cornelius Deloughy; 2d, Fred D. Fry; 3d, George S. Purdy; 4th (absent 
— sick); 5th, Charles S. Morgan; 6th, James Rooney; 7th, Robt. Patrick; 
8th, Jno. Moore, all of Danbury. Forty-five musicians and privates. 
Total, Gl. 

Company H (Litchfield Light Guard). — Captain — Alexander B. Shum- 
way, Litchfield. Lieutenants — 1st, Wilber F. Webster, do. ; 2d, Walter 
K. Peck, do. Sergeants — 1st, Charles W. Hinsdale; 2d, Charles N. Lan- 
don; 3d, Edward Dwyer; 4th, Truman Catlin; 5th, Charles W. Barber. 
Corporals — 1st, Frederick L. Coe; 2d, Charles D. Kilbourn; 3d, Wallace 
D. Fisher; 4th, Walter E. Cable; 5th, Eugene K. Loomis; 6th, William T. 
Marsh; 7th, Patrick Murphy ; 8th, Jno. Sepples, all of Litchfield. Forty- 
two musicians and privates. Total, 58. 

Company I (Steele Guard). — Captain — Henry Skinner, Winsted. Lieu- 
tenants — 1st, Jos. H. C. Bachelder, do. ; 2d, Wilbur F. Coe, do. Sergeants 
— 1st, Jno. H. Slocum; 2d, Harry L. Roberts; 3d, Edward Finn; 4th, 
Charles D. Hewitt; 5th, George W. Ramsey. Corporals — 1st, W. H. 
Roraback; 2d, Jno. H. Renouff; 3d, Geo. S. Rowe; 4th, Edwin C. Dear- 
born; 5th, Alonzo Bates; 6th, Spencer G. Pierce; 7th, Hiram D. Willi- 
man ; 8th, Jos. Keegan, all of Winsted. Forty-six musicians and privates. 
Total, 62. 

Company K (No local name). — Captain — Alonzo Gray, Stratford. Lieu- 
tenants — 1st, Henry M. Blakeslee, do. ; 2d, Charles Wilcoxson, do. Ser- 
geants — 1st, Henry Booth; 2d, E. Allen Powers; 3d, Melville J. Curtis; 
4th, James Scofield; 5th, Edwin J. Spall. Corporals — 1st, Geo. H. Allen; 
2d, Chas. F. Booth; 3d, Burr W. Cosier; 4th, Chas. Clark; 5th, Eugene 
Morehouse; 6th, Jno. J. Park; 7th, Chas. E. Stagg; 8th, Nathan F. Wil- 
coxson, all of Stratford. Forty-seven musicians and privates. Total, 63. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Commander-in-Chief and Staff, - - - - 8 

General and Staff, -..-.. 7_15 

First Section Artillery, - .... 30 

First Regiment Infantry, ..... 533 

Second Regiment Infantry, - . . . . 667 

Third Regiment Infantry, - . . . . 487 

Fourth Regiment Infantry, - - - - . 646 



Aggregate oflScers and men at Philadelphia, - . 2,383 



CHAPTER X. 



VISIT OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. ' 

Legislative Work Abandoned for a Trip to Philadelphia — 
A Large and a Jolly Party — Incidents En Route — The 
Midnight Rush for Hotel Accommodations — A Day on the 
Grounds — Visit to the Connecticut Cottage — Reception bt 
General Hawley — The Return to the Land of Steady 
Habits — List of the Excursionists. 

The largest excursion from Connecticut during tlie Centennial 
Exhibition (unless the visit of the militia may be so classed) was 
that of the members of the General Assembly, in June. The ses- 
sion of 1876 began early in May, a few days prior to the open- 
ing ceremonies at Philadelphia, and to the credit of the members 
the fact should be recorded that but few of them abandoned their 
desks to attend that grand occasion. Those who did, however, 
returned with such glowing accounts of the attractions of the 
Exhibition that within a week afterward others slipped away, one 
by one; and there became apparent among the whole body of 
members a desire for an adjournment of the session, for a few 
days at least, to enable them to see for themselves the wonders 
they had heard described. Under a sense of legislative honor 
and of duty to their constituents, many of the members firmly 
opposed a proposition that was eventually made for an adjourn- 
ment for a week or ten days; but the advocates of the scheme 
finally became so persistent that a compromise was deemed expe- 
dient. Every one familiar with the customs of Connecticut 
Legislatures is aware that sessions are not held on Saturdays, and 
that on Fridays a light attendance is the rule. It is not custom- 
ary, therefore, to bring important matters to a vote on that day, 
and as a general thing the Friday session is of no practical im- 
portance in the work of the session, other than, under the rules, 
advancing business one day on the calendar. In view of this, it 

(188) 



VISIT OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. ] 89 

was decided to have no session on Friday, tke 9 th of June, and 
that the members, as a body, spend that day on the Exhibition 
grounds. An effort to place the visit in the light of an ofiBcial 
one was resisted, and all the arrangements were not only made 
independent of the regular legislative proceedings, but it was 
decided that the excursionists should regard themselves only as 
members of a private excursion party. 

A committee, of which Hon. Mr. Fagan of Middletown, was 
chairman, was authorized to arrange for transportation, and re- 
ported two routes: one by boat to New York, and thence by rail, 
and the other all rail. The latter was chosen, and through the 
courtesy of President Bishop of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad Company, a special train to New York was 
obtained, and tickets were secured at the merely nominal rate of 
four dollars for the round trip — the usual round trip price between 
New York and Philadelphia. At 5 p. m., Thursday, June 8th, 
the members left Hartford, President Bishop accompanying them, 
and also Superintendent Davidson. The latter, an experienced 
ex-engineer, controlled the locomotive, and whirled the party over 
the road to New Haven in the fastest time that had ever been 
made on that part of the line. Meriden, eighteen miles, was 
reached in twenty-three and one-half minutes; Wallingford, 
twenty -four miles, in thirty minutes; and in exactly forty-two 
minutes the train halted at the New Haven depot, thirty-six miles 
from the starting point. A brief stop, and the party was of£ 
again, making the run to Harlem River by 8 p. m., where the 
steamer Maryland was in waiting to convey the excursionists 
around New York City to the Jersey City terminus of the Penn- 
sylvania road. During the hour on board a substantial supper 
was served, and by ten o'clock the boat had reached her wharf, 
and the party was speeding away behind the iron horse. En 
route the excursionists had a jolly time, and like boys just 
escaped from the restraints of school, enjoyed this rehef from 
the dull routine of legislative work. Stories were related ; songs 
rose above the rumble of the rushing train, and unwary members 
fell victims to the practical jokes of their colleagues. Accom- 
panying the excursion party, and adding to its social attractions, 
were several State officials, members of previous Legislatures, 
residents of Hartford, and others, including Lieutenant-Governor 
Sill, Hon. Marvin H. Sanger, Secretary of State; Judge David B. 
Lockwood of Bridgeport, H. A. Doming of Wethersfield, ex-Rep- 



190 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

resentatives J. H. McMahon of New Milford, and James Wilson 
of Newtown; and from Hartford, Sheriff O. D. Seymour, Colo- 
nel D. A. Rood, proprietor of the legislative headquarters — the 
United States Hotel; L. B. Merriam, H. T. Sperry, President of 
the Evening Post Association; F. S. Brown, Fred. Eberle, H. H. 
Hurlburt, Drs. Storrs and Fuller, and others. The press was rep- 
resented by three of the reporters of the proceedings of the 
House of Representatives — A. S. Hotchkiss of the Hartford Cour- 
ant, G. D. Curtis of the Hartford Evening Post, and William Rod- 
man of the New Haven Register. 

At midnight tlie train landed at the Centennial depot three 
hundred weary and dust-begrimed travelers, few of whom had 
made any arrangements whatever as to accommodations. A hun- 
dred or more sought the nearest hotels, the Globe and Trans- 
Continental, but a larger party followed the cheering shouts of a 
Hartford gentleman, "This way to the Atlas House," and struck 
a bee-line for that much advertised and greatly over-rated cara- 
vansary. The accommodations in its wilderness of narrow pas- 
sages and board-partitioned apartments were execrable, and, re- 
gardless of the solemn asseverations of the proprietor that his 
house that night sheltered several United States Senators and a 
score of foreign noblemen, some of the Connecticut legislators 
were so thoroughly disgusted with the surroundings that they 
either sought other quarters or went off on excursions down into 
the city portion of Philadelphia, " to see the old State-house at 
sunrise," as they subsequently explained it to their comrades. 

Friday was devoted by the party to visiting the grounds. No 
effort was made to keep together, but the members wandered 
around in small squads, making a hurried tour of the Exhibition, 
and glancing merely at such attractions as came most prominently 
to notice. The futility of attempting any systemized inspection 
was apparent, and was not attempted. The best that the visitors 
could d9 in the brief hours allotted them was to search out some 
of the attractions they had read about in the newspapers, and 
which promised to repay the trouble of seeking them in the 
numerous buildings scattered through the grounds. The mem- 
bers from the manufacturing districts naturally sought the won- 
ders of Machinery Hall, where the great Corliss engine and the 
myriad machines to which it gave life afforded sight-seeing most 
to their tastes, unless, perhaps, they found even greater attractions 
in the finished products in the Main Building. The farmers 



VISIT OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 191 

found the display in Agricultural Hall of rather an inferior order 
at that early period of the Exhibition, as compared with the ex- 
hibition toward the close, when the season's triumphs were sent 
to Philadelphia from every section of the country. The Art Gal- 
lery claimed general attention from all classes, even the staid and 
solemn gentlemen of the Judiciary Committee finding enjojrment 
in its sections and corridors, glowing with paintings, or dotted 
with snow-white statuary. The Committee on Fisheries gravely 
inspected the illustrations of whale fishing in the Government 
Building, and a committeeman from the backwoods of Litchfield 
County jocosely remarked that he would for ever after favor the 
abolition of the pounds at the mouth of the Connecticut, in order 
that the whales might ascend to Hartford and furnish sport for 
the members of the Legislature. A member from New London 
County suggested that the whales couldn't pass the bars in the 
river, whereupon the gentleman from Litchfield gravely replied 
that the Committee on Temperance would attend to that. Tv/o 
gentlemen from Windham County related their singular experi- 
ence at the French restaurant. Regarding a lunch at that popular 
resort as about the "correct thing," as they phrased it, they 
sought seats, and were handed bills of fare, wholly in French, as 
it happened. After scanning them with knitted brows for some 
minutes, their eyes met across the table, and one remarked : 
"Let's go! I don't see anything here that I dare eat. "Why 
don't they have some American victuals? " And they left, and 
ten minutes later were seated before plates of "American vic- 
tuals " at one of the dairy restaurants. These places, it may be 
remarked, were rather popular with the members, not so much on 
account of the winning ways of the lady attendants of course, as 
the real excellence of the lunches that were afforded. The Com- 
mittee on Railroads found in the plan of the passenger railway a 
solution of future cases of the Plantsville nature — trains stopping 
anywhere and everywhere. One of the members expressed his 
regret that a gentleman familiarly known to legislators as an 
investigator was absent, because, in admiring the road, he did so 
blindly, having no information as to its "watered stock," or 
"capital actually paid in." This sally upon a well-worn subject 
created a hearty laugh. The Department of Public Comfort was 
carefully inspected by two gentlemen of the Committee on 
Humane Institutions, who reported that whatever comforts were 
obtained by the public were pretty liberally paid for. One gen- 



192 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

tleman of the party was not seen on the grounds during the day; 
neither in the buildings, at the restaurants, nor at the Cottage, did 
he present himself, nor even at General Hawley's reception. The 
mystery was explained on the trip home. It appears that his wag- 
gish colleague told him that the legislators were to form in front 
of his hotel some time during the day, and march in procession 
to the Exhibition grounds, and that he had better wait in the 
reading-room until they appeared. Partaking of an early break- 
fast, he stationed himself in a chair in the reading-room, scanned 
the morning paper for awhile, and then, overcome by the effects 
of the railroad travel, and, to him, unusual late hours of the 
night previous, fell asleep in his chair. According to his state- 
ment, he awoke at intervals through the day, and seeing nothing 
of the procession, closed his eyes and dropped off into another 
doze. The last was an extended one, broken by the lighting of 
the gas, and then, for the first time, he appreciated that he was 
the victim of a practical joke. Yet he was a mild-mannered 
man, and bore his ill luck calmly. As he told the story: " I felt 
very much at home, even in that strange hotel, just as though I 
was in my old seat in the rear of the hall of the House. You 
know [apologetically] that we can't hear anything back there half 
the time, so some of us take a nap until you fellows get through 
wrangling up there in front and get ready to let us go home." 
At first this incident was regarded as an excellent joke, but, 
finally, upon reflecting upon it soberly, the conclusion was reached 
that the trick was rather an unfair one, and that the least said 
about it the better. Those who learned the facts generously kept* 
the name of the victim to themselves, and he shall be nameless 
in this record. 

The display made by Connecticut exhibitors in the several 
departments, so far as the members had opportunities to inspect 
them, were very generally commended, and had the Legislature 
of 1876, after its return from Philadelphia, been called upon for a 
further appropriation from the public treasury in aid of Connect! • 
cut's showing, it would unquestionably have been secured with 
nothing like the opposition manifested in the Legislature of the 
previous year. It was evident to every member that the money 
appropriated by the State had been economically and advantage- 
ously employed, and that a much larger sum could have been 
used for the benefit of the industries of the State. 

Pursuant to an understanding had prior to starting on the trip. 



VISIT OF THE GENEEAL ASSEMBLY. 193 

the members congregated at the Connecticut Cottage at noon, 
where they were hospitably received by State Commissioner Bur- 
dett Loomis, and the resident agent of the Commission, Mr. 
Pickering. After an examination of the building, and the relics 
there deposited, and partaking of a collation, the party dispersed 
for sight-seeing during the few hours allotted them before the 
closing of the Exhibition gates. At the Cottage, each member 
found awaiting him an invitation to attend a reception to be given 
by General Hawley in the evening, and a ticket enabling the 
holder to pass the gates free of charge. The card of invitation 
was in the following form: 






The occasion was an exceedingly pleasant one, and enabled the 
members to meet many of the gentlemen prominently connected 
with the Exhibition management, and also many of the foreign 
Commissioners. During the evening music was furnished by 
Gilmore's full band, and a fine collation was provided for the 
guests. 

At 8.30 A. M., Saturday, the excursionists started on their return 
trip, the special train reaching Hartford at 5.20 p. m., largely 
depleted, however, of its full complement of passengers, many of 
whom had disembarked at Stamford, Bridgeport, New Haven, 
and elsewhere, and gone direct to their homes. Those living 
along the roads extending from Hartford were also enabled to 
make connections; in fact, the whole programme of the trip had 
been closely adhered to, and there were none of those annoyances 
and delays which usually attend the movement of large parties. 
The trip, it may be said in conclusion, was a success in every 
feature, and this fortunate result was due in a great measure 
to the thorough arrangements made by the committee appointed 
for that purpose. The members, of course, had obtained only 
a glimpse of the wonders of the Exhibition, but it abated the 



194 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

" Centennial fever " which had previously raged, and fitted the 
members to await the opportunity for a more extended visit after 
the final adjournment of the session. 

The following is a complete list of the officers and members of 
the Senate and House of Eepresentatives who formed the legisla- 
tive excursion party: 

SENATE. 

President — lion. George G. Sill of Hartford. 

President pro tempore — Ephraim H. Hyde of Stafford. 

Clerk — Conrad G. Bacon of Middletown. 

Senators— Chester Johnson of Thompsonville, Timothy C. Coogan of 
Windsor Locks, Samuel E. Merwin, Jr., of New Haven, Benjamin 
Nichols of Oxford, Joel H. Guy of West Meriden, Alexander S. Palmer 
of Stoningtou, Willis R. Austin of Norwich, William T. Cutter. Jr., of 
East Lyme, Samuel G. Beardsley of Trumbull, Edward A. Brown of 
Danbury, Frederick W. Bruggerhoff of Noroton, Edwin A. Buck of Wil- 
limantic, Oscar Tourtellotte of Thompson, Heman B. Eastman of Rox- 
bury, Charles C. Hubbard of Middletown, Washington -F Willcox of 
Deep River, Jabez L. White of Bolton. 

Messengers — Edward S. Roberts of North Canaan, and John H. Piatt 
of Saybrook. 

DooRivEEPERS — David F. Cole of Southport, and Thos. F. Gogarty of 
Windsor liocks. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Speaker — Thomas M. Waller of New London. 

Assistant Clerk — Heman H. Barbour of Hartford. 

Hartford County — Hartford, Elisha Johnson, Nathaniel B. Ste- 
vens. Berlin, Andrew J. Warner. Bloomfield, Norman Hubbard. Bris- 
tol, Charles W. Brown. Burlington, Lucius B. Pond. East Granby, 
Virgil E. Viets. East Hartford, Elizur R. Ensign, Henry i^ Hayden. 
East Windsor, Elbridge R. Leonard, Hiram Smith. Entield, iNiies Pease. 
Farmington, John P. Lewis, Luther T. Parsons. Glastonbury, George 
S. Andrews, John Emely. Granby, George O. Beach, Henry J. Dewey. 
Hartland, Elliott W. Emmons, Wareham H. Williams. IMarlborough, 
Henry B. Haling. New Britain, Horace Roberts, Thomas H. Brady. 
Newington, John H. Boardman. Plainville, Edwin N. Lewis. Rocky 
Hill, Everett S. Warner. Simsbury, Noah W. Holcomb. Southington, 
Julius B. Savage, Orson W. Stow. South Windsor, Lewis Sperry. Suf- 
field, Benjamin Wood, Jarvis W. Case. West Hartford, Philip G. Par- 
sons. Wethersfield, Edward G. Woodhouse, Josiah G. Adams. Wind- 
sor, H. Tudor White, Thomas Duncan. 

New Haven County — Beacon Falls, Herbert C. Baldwin. Bethany, 
Samuel G. Davidson. Branford, Michael Harding. Cheshire, Titus B. 
Ives, Henry T. Holcomb. Derby, Chester A. Hawley. East Haven, Asa 
L. Fabrique. Hamden, Riley R. Palmiter. Madison, Samuel Griswold. 
Middleburv, RoswcU B. AYheaton. Milford, Ciiarlcs A. Tomlinson. 
North Br;inford, \Villiam D. Ford. North Haven, Stephen C. Gilbert. 
Orange, Charles F. Smith. Oxford, Gideon A. Johnson. Prospect, Wil- 
lis Ives. Seymour, Henry P. Day. Southbury, Reuben Pierce. Walling- 
ford, Gurdnn W. Hull, James N.'Pitrpont. Watcrbury, Greene Kendrick, 
Charles B. Merrill. 



VISIT OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 195 

New London County — New London, Thomas M. Waller, Albert T. 
Burgess. Colchester, Leander Chapman, Ira A. Dinsmore. East Lyme, 
James A. Way. Franklin, Henry Bellows. Grotou, George B. Crary, 
George M. Long. Lebanon, Jabez P. Manning, Samuel E. Haynes. 
Lyme, Henry B. Sisson, Oliver B. Sterling. North Stonington, Andrew 
Avery, Edgar H. Wheeler. Old Lyme, Lemuel A. Calkins. Salem, 
Frederick E. Chadwick. Sprague, Patrick Burns. Stonington, Joseph 
S. Williams, Jr. , George W. Bliven. Waterf ord, Nathaniel A. Chapman. 

Fairfield County — Bridgeport, George W. Bacon. Fairfield, Sam- 
uel Pike, Charles S. French. Bethel, John McCorkell. Darien, John 
Hilton. Danbury, Norman Hodge, Charles H. Crosby. Easton, Elihu 
N. Taylor. Greenwich, Benjamin Wright, Willis H. Wilcox. Hunting- 
ton, Horace Wheeler. Monroe, Henry C. Riker. New Canaan, Burling 

D. Purdy. New Fairfield, William J. Kellogg. Newtown, Bennett 
Blackman, John O'Dolohery. Norwalk, Wiufield S. Hanford, James 
W. Hyatt. Redding, Orrin Piatt. Ridgefield, Samuel J. Barlow, Simon 
Couch. Sherman, Daniel B. Malory. Stamford, Francis A. Marden. 
Stratford, Charles B. Curtiss. Trumbull, Charies N. Fairchild. West- 
port, William Burr Wright. Wilton, Elbert Olmsted. 

Litchfield County — Litchfield, Henry B. Graves. Bethlehem, David 
W. Thompson. Bridgewater, Marcus B. Mallett. Canaan, Jerry D. 
Clemens. Cornwall, Henry L. Beers, Ralph I. Scovill. Goshen, Freder- 
ick E. Hurlburt, Orion J. Hallock. Kent, Samuel R. Peet. New Hart- 
ford, Carlton Seymour, W. Heman Henderson. New Milford, Nicholas 
Staub. North Canaan, Wesley Trescott. Norfolk, Levi P. Phelps, 
Henry J. Holt. Plymouth, Walter H. Scott. Roxbury, Orlando Lewis. 
Salisbury, Orange Benjamin, Robert H. Ball. Sharon, Lsaac N. Bartram. 
Thomaston, Benjamin Piatt, John W. Gamwell. Warren, Austin R. 
Humphrey. Washington, Ezra B. Beebe, James D. Barton. Winches- 
ter, Henry Gay. Woodbury, Asahel W. Mitchell. 

Windham County — Canterbury, Julius Williams, Lester Smith. East- 
ford, Stephen O. Bowen. Hampton, Edward S. Cleveland. Killingly, 
Albert W. Greenslit, Ezra J. Mathewson. Pomfret, Thomas W. Wil- 
liams, Harvey Whitmore. Thompson, Vernon S. Bobbins. Voluntown, 

E. Byron Gallup. Windham, Elisha H. Holmes. 

Middlesex County — Middletown, Charles R. Fagan, Daniel Strong. 
Chatham, Clark O. Sears. Chester, Fisk Shailer. Clinton, William H. 
Kelsey. Durham, Isaac W. Hickox, Lucius H. Foote. East Haddam, 
Edwin A. Emmons, Salmon McCall. Essex, John I. Hutchinson. Kil- 
lingworth, Leverett W. Parmelee, Shermon E. Griswold. Old Saybrook, 
Robert B. Chalker. Saybrook, Frederick W. Williams, Gilbert Stevens. 

Tolland County — Tolland, William D. Holman. Andover, Eli H. 
Perkins. Bolton, Sherman P. Sumner. Columbia, Robert Brown. Cov- 
entry, Studley M. Sweet, Charles A. Brown. Ellington, Francis Pinney. 
Hebron, Charles H. Brown, James A. Way. Mansfield, John S. Hanks, 
George A. Hammond. Somers, Loren Griswold, Valoras Kibbe. Staf' 
ford, Chester Scripture. Union, Samuel W. Moore, George C. Marcy. 
Vernon, F. L. Dickinson, Cyrus Winchell. Willington, Seth C. Eaton, 
Charles W. Potter. 

Messengers — Thomas C. Cosgrove, Hartford; William P. Marcy, 
Union. 

Doorkeeper — John D. Botelle, Cromwell. 

II 



CHAPTER XL 



EXCURSIONS FROM CONNECTICUT. 

The New Haven Grays in the "Centennial Legion" — The 
Ceremonies dcjring their Visit to Philadelphia — Roster of 
THE Company — Visit of the Putnam Phalanx — Their Recep- 
tion, Parade, and Banquet — The Governor's Horse Guards' 
Trip — Voyage of the Steamer Frances from Bridgeport — 
The Piscatorius Club's Sail from Hartford to Philadelphia 
— Minor Excursion Parties. 

Several military organizations other than those regularly 
attached to the Connecticut Brigade visited Philadelphia at 
various times, and many parties of ladies and gentlemen organ- 
ized throughout the State for "Centennial trips," with the object 
of securing the pleasant social features of excursions and the addi- 
tional benefit of reduced expenses. One of the principal military 
trips was that of the ' ' New Haven Grays' Centennial Legion 
Company," in July, 1876. At a meeting of the Grays, held in 
December, 1875, a communication was received from the Boston 
Light Infantry, inviting the Grays to represent Connecticut in 
Philadelphia on the Fourth of July, in a corps known as the 
"Centennial Legion," to be formed of one company from each of 
the original thirteen States. The very high standing of the com- 
panies named to compose the Legion commended the invitation to 
favorable notice, and after several meetings had been held and 
offers of pecuniary assistance were received from a number of 
prominent citizens, it was voted to accept. The veterans took 
hold with a will to help the active company, and it was decided, 
as there were so many " vets.," to make a separate organization of 
this company. The oflScers selected were: Captain, Frank D. 
Sloat; First Lieutenant, E. A. Gessner; Second Lieutenant, Lewis 
L. Morgan; Third Lieutenant, J. D. Dewell; First Sergeant, Geo. 
Parker; Second Sergt., George T. Newhall, Jr.; Third Serg., Chas. 
E. Rounds; Fourth Sergt., B. R. English; Fifth Sergt., James B. 

(196) 



EXCURSIONS FROM CONNECTICUT. 197 

HooJ; and Color-Sergeant, H. C. Bowers. Captain Sloat com. 
manded the company in 1864-5, and was also captain of Company 
A, Twenty -seventh Reg. Conn. Vols., which was composed largely 
of Grays. First Lieutenant Gessner was captain of the active com- 
pany, and Second Lieutenant Morgan first lieutenant of the 
actives; Third Lieutenant Dewell was first lieutenant in 1865-7, 
under Captain, now Brigadier -General E. E. Bradley. Of the ser- 
geants, Rounds was first sergeant of the active company, and 
Enghsh, Hood, and Parker ali had been first sergeants. The 
drills were largely attended, and it was determined that the citi- 
zens of the State should have reason to feel proud of their repre- 
sentative company. Through the efforts of General S. E. Merwin, 
Jr. (State Senator), a beautiful flag was contributed to the Grays 
for this occasion, by the State of Connecticut. 

At 7.30 A. M., July 3, 1876, the company in full dress uniform 
assembled at the armory for departure for Philadelphia, and even 
at that early hour the hall was crowded with spectators. After 
the presentation to Captain Sloat of an elegant badge from the 
survivors of Company A, Twenty-seventh Regiment, the company 
marched to the depot, headed by the "Wheeler & Wilson Band of 
Bridgeport, which had been engaged for the week. The trip to 
Philadelphia was a pleasant one, the city being reached about 
7 p. M. After a march down Chestnut street, during which the 
soldiers received abundant applause from the throngs that lined 
the sidewalks, they arrived at the Merchants Hotel, where quar- 
ters had been engaged. In the evening many members witnessed 
the grand torchlight procession (which was said to be the largest 
ever held in this country), and in various other ways enjoyed 
themselves. On the morning of July 4th the company assembled 
at 7.30 o'clock, and immediately marched to Broad street, where 
the line was to be formed for the grand parade. This affair was 
a memorable one. Military organizations were present from 
nearly every State in the Union, and the " Centennial Legion " 
was the observed of all. It was commanded by General Heth of 
Richmond, Va., and was greeted with enthusiasm all along the 
route. "While halting in Broad street, each member of the Grays 
and other companies received a medal, suspended from a bar, 
and bearing the inscription, "Centennial Legion, July 4, 1776 — 
1876," and a device representing the coat-of arms of each of the 
thirteen original States. "What was thought of the Grays is best 
expressed by extracts from Philadelphia papers. The Press said: 



198 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

""We had heard of the proficiency in drill of the Connecticut 
militia, and we saw the same verified among us July 4 th by the 
New Haven Grays. Their perfect mastery of the manual, and 
their alignments on the march down Chestnut street, were the 
cause of spontaneous outbursts of applause. They were ably offi- 
cered by those who knew what it is to be a soldier." The Item 
said: "The marching of the New Haven Grays down Chestnut 
street was simply grand; their line was as straight as an arrow, 
and every eye was to the front. It is a pride to any State to have 
such soldiers, and we are glad Connecticut sends us a brigade to 
re\iew in September. In justice to this nobby-uniformed and per- 
fectly-drilled company we would inform the pubhc that those 
white-bloused soldiers that came the company front in such mag- 
nificent style down Broad street last evening were not the West 
Point Cadets, but the New Haven Grays, although, as they wore no 
badges they were taken for the Cadets." The company remained 
in Philadelphia all the week, the members visiting the Centennial 
buildings and enjoying themselves in various ways. On "Wednes- 
day evening, by invitation, they visited the Kiralfy Theater, and 
on Friday the Connecticut Cottage, where they were received by 
Mr. Pickering (State agent). Speeches were made by Mr. Pick- 
ering, Captain Sloat, General Hawley, General Cook of Ohio, and 
Prof. W. P. Blake, United States Centennial Commissioner from 
Connecticut. In the evening an invitation was accepted to attend 
a concert at the Offenbach Garden, and on Saturday morning the 
company started for New Haven, reaching home about eight 
o'clock. A grand welcome was awaiting them. The principal 
streets, crowded with people, were brilliant with fireworks, and 
all the city military organizations joined to give an escort to the 
armory. After dismissal, the company marched to the Tremont. 
House, where a fine dinner, tendered by the Veterans, was served. 
Numerous speeches were made, and the affair formed a worthy 
termination of the trip. The following is the roster of the Grays' 
Centennial Legion Company: 

Captain — Frank D. Sloat. Lieutenants — 1st, Emil A. Gessner; 2d, 
Lewis L. Morgan; 3d, James D. Dewell. Sergeants— George Parker, 
George T. Newhall, Jr. , Charles E. Rounds, B. R. English, and James B. 
Hood. Color-Sergeant — H. C. Bowers. Quartermaster — Henry W. 
Blakeslee. Corporals— B. E. Brown, C. E. Granniss, W. H. Sanford, E. 
D. Hendee, George H. Brown, S. G. Weed, J. H. Phillips, and John 
T. Dyas. Drum Corps — H. O. Thomas (corporal), A. Babcock, C. 
B. Hendrick, Jr., and A. T. Sawe. Privates— G. 8. Arnold, B. Arm- 
strong, A. R. Butler, R. F. Burwell, J. C. Barker, W. H. Coolidge, E. M. 



EXCURSIONS FROM CONNECTICUT. 



199 



Clark, Hugh Caldwell, W. B. Catlin, Jr., George L. Cooke, John Draine, 
George E. Edwards, S. F. Foote, G. W. Goodsell, W. G. Hooker, E. M. 
Hull, H. L. Hill, L. R. Hotchkiss, A. M. Howarth, H. B. Harrison, B. 
F. Humphrey, S. J. Ingham, G. H. Lowe, W. E. Mora;an, C. B. Mat- 
thewman, L. S. Mason, H. T. Mix, B. R Merwin, R. W. Meigs, J. F. 
Ronald, F. H. Russell, J. N. Sewall, B. J. Stone, E. P. Sperry, A. 
Thomas, Jr., J. M. Veader, Jr., H. N. Whittelsey, Jr., Samuel C. Wal 
dron, T. H. Wallace, A. Warren, T. B. Warren. 

Thursday, June 15, 1876, the famous Putnam Phalanx of 
Hartford, Major Brown commanding, and numbering about sixty- 
muskets, started by steamer from that city on a "Centennial" 



excursion, ac- 
companied by 
many honora- 
ry members, 
invited guests, 
and several 
ladies. The 
members wore 
the old Conti- 
n e n t a 1 uni- 
form, repre- 
sented in the 
accompanying 
engraving. 
Reaching Jer- 
sey City Fri- 
day morning, 
the party e ru- 
ing, and on 
the battle of 




barked in a 
special train 
for Philadel- 
phia. At 
West Phila- 
delphia the 
Phalanx was 
received with 
military hon- 
ors by the 
State Fenci- 
bles, and es- 
corted to the 
Bingham 
House. Fri- 
day afternoon 
was devoted 
to sight-see- 



PUTNAM PHALANX UNIFORM. 

[Officers of the original organization,] 

Saturday the company appropriately celebrated 
Bunker Hill by a visit to Independence Hall. 
Forming at 10 a. m., the Phalanx was escorted to the Hall by a 
delegation of the State Fencibles, and members of Company A, 
First Regiment. At the Hall, after remarks by Major Brown, and 
prayer by Chaplain Howard, General Wagner of the Common 
Council, in behalf of the city, extended to the company a hearty 
welcome. Major Brown replied in a neat speech, and then intro- 
duced the Judge Advocate of the Phalanx, Joseph L. Barbour, 
who delivered an able address, historical in its character, and 
glowing with eloquence and patriotic thought. After the speak- 
ing, the Museum was inspected, and later in the day, Wanamaker's 
clothing establishment — the largest in the country — the Zoologi- 
cal Gardens, etc., a few of the members making a trip to the Exhi- 



200 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

bition grounds. In the evening a minstrel entertainment was 
visited, under the escort of members of Company A, First Regi- 
ment. Simday morning the Phalanx attended divine service at 
the First Baptist church, the clergyman prefacing his sermon, 
vc^hich v/as prepared for this special occasion, with a graceful allu- 
sion to the visitors and their State. In the evening the company, 
on invitation of the State Fencibles, attended a sacred concert at 
Operti's Tropical Garden, and on Monday made an organized visit 
to the Exhibition grounds. Tuesday was passed in the same 
enjoyable way, and in the evening the Phalanx gave a reception 
to the ofGcers of the Fencibles at the Bingham House, including a 
collation. Addresses were delivered by Major Brown, Judge 
Advocate Barbour, General Dickinson, Rev. Mr. Howard, H. W. 
Simpson, and Dr. Grosvenor Swan of the Phalanx, Captain Ryan 
of the Fencibles, and Lieutenant Grimm of Co. A, and Robert 
Patterson of the same company, the latter paying a fine tribute to 
the memory of General Putnam. Wednesday evening, the 
Phalanx, escorted by the Fencibles, both in full uniform, attended 
Kiralfy's Alhambra Palace, and the following day the Phalanx 
started on their return to the "land of steady habits," by train to 
Jersey City, and steamer to Hartford, reaching the dock in the 
city last named early the next morning. Arriving at the armory, 
Major Brown expressed his entire satisfaction with the success of 
the trip; prayer was ofiered by the chaplain, the battalion was dis- 
missed, and the Centennial trip was at an end. It had been in 
every respect an enjoyable one, and the members of the Phalanx 
were particularly gratified with the courteous and overwhelming 
hospitality tendered them by their Philadelphia friends. The 
light expense of the trip was also gratifying, the assessment upon 
each member being but $33 for the eight days' trip. The follow- 
ing was the roster of the company on this excursion: 

]VIajor — F. M. Brown. Adjutant — L. A. Dickinson. Quartermaster — 
Alviu Squires. Commissary — H. W. Simpson. Judge- Advocate — J. L. 
Barbour. Chaplain — Amasa Howard. Surgeon — P. D. Peltier. Asst. 
Surgeon — Grosvenor Swan. Secretary — B. G. Baldwin. Asst. Engineer 
^Dudley Fo.x, all of Hartford. Asst. Quartermaster — J. W. A. Beers of 
New Britain. Officers of First Company: Captain — .J. S. Hussey, Hart- 
ford. Lieutenants— 1st, E. M. Roberts; 2d, F. G. Comstock, East Hart- 
ford. Ensign — Joseph Warner, Hartford. Officers of Second Company: 
Captain— Thomas Dowd, East Hartford. Lieutenants— 1st, W. F. Whit- 
telsey; 2d, S. Alexander, Hartford. Ensign— J. K. Hall, Hartford. Offi- 
cers of Third Company: Captain — A. H. North. Lieutenants — l.st, J. P. 
Moore; 2d, C. H. Hills. Ensign — R. W. Cornish, of New Britain. Also 
the following named sergeants, corporals, and privates of the battalion: 
J. M. Alpaugh, Willimantic; Royal Andrus, Farmiugton; W. H. Bar- 



EXCURSIONS FSOM CONNECTICUT. 201 

nard, Hartford; Austin Beebe, New Britain; Charles Benton, Hartford; 
F. H. Blisli, Willimantic; Ambrose Beatty, New Britain; A. Brewer, 
Hartford; M. Brewer, Huckanum; Norman S. Brewer, Hartford; H. M. 
Barnliam, Bristol; R. Cadwell (tife-major), Bloomlield; C. E. Carpenter, 
New Britain; Wm. Cliurcb, Hartford; H. S. Claris, do. ; Shelby Clark, 
Poquonnock; J. G. Cornwall, Hartford; Wm. A. Crosby, do.; Charles 
Powd, East Hartford; R. W. Cornish, New Britain; A. C. Dunham, 
Hartford; E. P. Ewius, New Britain; J. S. Farnsworth, Forestville; J. 
Ons. Fisher, Hartford; Q. B. Foster, do.; H. Goodrich, New Britain; L. 
Goodrich, do. ; E. O. Goodwin, East Hartford; JohnHanna, New Britain; 
T. H. Hardin j;, Hartford; T. H. Harris, New Britain; Andrew Heublein, 
Hartford; Burton Hills, do.; O. S. Hills, New Britain; N. L. Hope, 
Hartford; W. R. Hard, Forestville; Wm. Isham, Hartford; D. C. Judd, 
New Britain; A. 0. Kenney, do.; R. P. Kenyon, Hartford; W. H. Man- 
ning, do. ; A. P. Moore, East Hartford; G. S. Newell, New Britain; E. A. 
Perry, Hartford; P. C. Porter, New Britain; Joseph Pratt, Hartford; 
Heniy Prichard, New Britain; J. W. Richardson, Hartford; G. T. Scott, 
do. ; Lyman Smith, do. ; H. T, Stedman, do. ; H. P. Stedman, East Hart- 
ford; W. P. Swift, Hartford; Daniel L. Talcott, Glastonbury; Martin 
Taylor, Hartford; M. C. Thompson, East Hartford ; Dwight W. Thrall, 
Bloomtield; C. Treat, Nev/ Britain; A. Trumbull, Hartford; E. S. Tubbs, 
New Britain; Edwin P. Whitney, Hartford. 

An Act passed by tlie Legislature at its May session in 1876, 
gave permission to the companies of the Governor's Guard (Horse 
and Foot) to visit the Centennial Exhibition ; the sum of fifteen 
dollars being allowed each member of the Horse, and ten dollars 
to each of the Foot Guards towards defraying the cost of the trip. 
The First Company of Horse Guards of Hartford, Major Chauncey 
B. Board man commanding, was the only company of the four 
comprising the Governor's Guards that took advantage of the pro- 
visions of the act. The excursion occupied one week, and proved 
a very enjoyable occasion. The Guards, in full uniform, assem- 
bled at their armory Sunday, September 3d, and forming line, 
proceeded, dismounted, to the steamboat dock, foot of State street, 
accompanied by the Hartford City Band, and numerous invited 
guests, including many ladies. Proceeding to Middletown by 
small steamer, the large boat, the Granite State, was boarded at 
that point, and the party had a pleasant voyage to Jersey City. 
Thence to" Philadelphia the trip was made via the Bound Brook 
route, and upon reaching the depot at 11.30 a. m., the Guards 
formed and marched to the Belmont Hotel — the headquarters of 
the command during the visit, arranged in advance by Lieutenants 
"White and Wing of the stafE. The selection was an excellent 
one, the accommodations being of a superior order, and the loca- 
tion convenient. Unlike the Connecticut Brigade, the company 
did not visit Philadelphia for a week of drill and instruction, yet 
its members were subject to orders, and ready to perform escort, 



202 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTE^fOIIAL EXHIBITION. 

or other duty, for His Excellency Governor Ingersoll. The time 
was pleasantly passed in visiting the Exhibition and other places 
of interest in the city, while many members called on the soldiers 
of the brigade at Camp Israel Putnam. 

Thursday, the 7th, being designated as "Connecticut Day," the 
company tendered their services as an escort to Governor Inger- 
soll, from his quartei'S at the Trans-Continental Hotel to Camp 
Israel Putnam, where a review of the Connecticut Brigade was to 
have taken place at 10.30 a. m. Horses were secured by the 
members, and all necessary preparations v/ere made for observing 
at Philadelphia the time-honored home-custom of the Guards of 
furnishing an escort to the Executive on any public occasion, but 
the unpleasant weather necessitated the postponement of all the 
out-door ceremonies on the day's programme. The following day 
was then named, but this, too, proved unfavorable, and the whole 
affair was finally abandoned, much to the regret of the Guards* 
They had incurred heavy expenses, and although rewarded for 
their trouble by a letter of thanks from Governor Ingersoll for 
their tender of an escort, the deprivation of their anticipated pleas- 
tire of a parade was a real disappointment. 

On Saturday, September 9th, the company left Pliiladelphia on 
their return trip by the same route as the outward one, and reached 
Hartford at 10 o'clock the following morning. As a whole, the 
excursion had been one of the most enjoyable in the history of this 
ancient and honorable command. The following is a list of the 
ofiBcers, men, and invited guests forming the Centennial party: 

Major — Chauncey B. Boardman. Captain — William T. Piatt. Lieu- 
tenant — Frank A. White. Cornet — Thomas E. Moore. Quartermaster — 
Henry C. Hanmer. 

Staff Officers — Major James Waters, chief -of -staff. Surgeon — Dr. C. S. 
Cutler. Asst. Surgeon — Dr. Frank Cowles. Judge-Advocate — Monroe 
E. Merrill. Chaplain — Rev. Amasa Howard. 

Lieutenants — Samuel C. Cooper, Charles Baldwin, Byron L. Black, 
Samuel J. Mills, Dwight W. Clark, Homer T. Bissell, Freeman C. Sey- 
mour, Eliab Brewer, Oliver F. Wing. 

Sergeants — Henry W. Rowley, Edwin F. Griswold, W. H. McLean, 
and Dwight W. Thrall. Corporals — J. H. Stoddard, Heman D. Nearing, 
Charles H. Dillings. Privates— J. H. Alvord, A. F. Bremer, PatricTc 
Burke, J. H. Bostney, F. W. Belden, M. H. Barnard, L. D. Buck, H. E. 
Case, Seymour Case, W. F. Curtiss, Theodore S. Dart, R. B. Diniwiddie, 
John N. Denny, Henry L. French, J. K. Green, N. K. Green, Wm. N, 
Hall, Henry P. Hoskins, James E. Hubbard, Charles E. Hubbard, 
William G. Hubbard, Frank S. Kenyon, Frank N. Lane, Frank D. Mc- 
Lean, D. D. Monroe, Joseph C. McClure, Scott A. Porter, Henry Palmer, 
J. H. Phillips, J. Bobbins, Frank D. Rockwell, Joel B. Rockwell, John 
W. Spencer, Edward E. Sweetzer, J. H. Sanford, Fred. W. Shepard, By- 
ron J. Seymour, R. S. Sanford, Oscar J. Tobie, L. H, Whitehouse, 



EXCURSIONS FBOM CONNECTICUT. 203 

D wight W. Welles, A. E. Waterman, A. B. Waterman, James H. White. 
Total, 70 officers and men. Hartford City Band, 33 pieces. 

Guests of the Company — From Hartford: Mrs. Wm. N. Hall, Mrs. 
Edwin Johnson, Mrs. T. S. Dart and daughter, Mrs. Byron L. Black, 
INLrs. Oliver F. Wing, Mrs. Frank Cowles, Mrs. Henry Palmer and son, 
Mrs. Mary Westland, Mrs. Charles Baldwin, H. C. Moseley, Eddie E. 
Moseley, Mrs. G. W. Moseley, Miss Carrie Moseley, J. L. Remington and 
wife, J. W. Smith and wife, Mrs. Charles Boardman and son, Mrs. Cald- 
well Patterson and son, Mrs. Charles Lester, Minnie Lester, Misses Mattie 
and Mary Hickmott, Miss Josie Barnard, Miss Mary Sweetzer, Mrs. Jas. 
Waters and daughter, H. M. Jacobs and wife, Mrs. Chauncey B. Board- 
man, Miss Delia Case, and Messrs. Aner Sperry, Albert Keney, Philip 
Bolton, Wm. Toohy, J. H. Fitzgerald, and Ed. J. Lamb. From Bloom- 
fidd : Mrs. John W. Spencer, Mrs. J. H. Alvord, Mrs. Samuel J. Mills, 
Mrs. H. W. Rowley, Mrs. H. B. Moore, Mrs. Wm. B. Adams, Mrs. 
Frank S. Kenyon, Miss Emma Kenyon, Mrs. A. Collins, Miss E. A. 
Wyckoff, Mrs. Heman D. Nearing, Walter Wyckoff, Lawrence St. John, 
Joiin E. Cox, S. B. Pinney, wife and daughter, Miss Susie Kenyon, Mrs. 
Edward B. Case, and Cyrus Bidwell. From South Windsor: Miss Maria 
L. Bissell, Misses Lucy, Allie, and Ellen Ellsworth, J. O. Ellsworth, 
M. P. Ellsworth. From Wethersfield: Dwight M. Martin, the Misses Han- 
mer. From East Hartford : Miss Addie Risley. From Bristol : I. W. 
Beach. From Granby: A. F. Dewey. 

Several excursions were made on steamers and sailing vessels 
from the Sound ports of the State, and were decidedly popular 
for several reasons. They afforded the novelty of a sea- voyage, 
the tourists were fanned by cool breezes instead of sweltering in 
crowded cars, and the vessels furnished economical sleeping quar- 
ters, and, in fact, " a home," where the members of the party 
could meet in the evenings and relate their adventures on the 
Exhibition grounds. There were some discomforts, it is true. 
Sea-sickness was the general fate of all, and vessels whose holds 
were fitted up with rough and temporary berths, as in the case of 
the sailing craft, lacked many of the comforts of hotel life. Excur- 
sionists by steamer fared better, and one of the most enjoyable 
excursions of this character was that by the steamer Frances, which 
left Bridgeport May 15th. The Frances had rather an unpleasant 
run down the Jersey coast in heavy mist and rain, and passing up 
Delaware bay, landed her party at Camden, somewhat dissatisfied 
with the voyage. The attractions of the Centennial, however, 
restored the good-humor of the members, and the return voyage 
proving more pleasant than the outward trip, the excursion, as a 
whole, was fairly successful. Yet the patronage was so light (the 
" Centennial fever " not having fairly begun), that the project of 
additional trips by the Frances was abandoned. The passenger 
list, reported by the Bridgeport press, was as follows: 

From Bridgeport — Rev. Edwin Johnson and daughter, E. A. Mc- 
Lellan, Jas. Truelock, Mrs. C. H. Flint and three children, Mrs. Geo. 



204 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EZHIBITION. 

Lewis, Mr. C. K. Bishop, Mrs. Bunnell, Miss Ida Bronson, Miss 
E. C. Catlin, M. R. Leavenworth and wife, H. Cowd, H. C. Sher- 
wood, G. W. Benedict, Frank Hubbard, W. A. Harris and wife, 
Miss Alice Benedict, E. R. Ives, wife and son, H. M. Hoyt and 
wife. Victory Curtis, Dr. G. F. Lewis and wife, E. L. Gay lord, 
wife and son, Thomas Califf and daughter, Frank Taylor, L. S. 
CatHn, F. A. Brackett, Miss Leavenworth, Miss Smith, Wm. Bun- 
nell, J. H. Hill, John N. Bull, George Benedict, J. E. Beach, 
Floyd Tucker, Jr., Bridgeport Farmer, G. C. "Waldo, Standard, and 
T. Peck, Leader. From Danbury — Thomas McCorkell, H. N. Fan- 
ton, William A. Lyon, David W. Sharpe, T. Donovan, News, and 
Frank Page, Globe. From Norwalk — Mrs. J. B. Ells, Miss Wood- 
ward, Miss Hamilton, Miss Marion, Master Marion, J. R. Marion 
and wife, J. W. Wilson and son, S. H. Clark and wife. Rev. J. A. 
Hamilton and wife, C. H. Jones, Hour, C. B. Ells, Gazette. From 
North Stamford — Mrs. H. H. Golding and two sons. From Win- 
sted — F. H. Giddings, Herald. From Waterbury — R. H. Smith, 
American. From New Milford — Mr. Delevan, i2ay. From Sandy 
Hook — Wm. A. Sherman, Martin W. Lee, D. C. Gateley and son, 
Myron T. Cole, and C. C. Barlow. 

The Piscatorius Club of Hartford devoted their sixteenth annual 
cruise to a trip to the "Centennial," leaving Hartford August 9 th, 
on the schooner E. IT. Williams, commanded by Captain David 
Russell, of Haddam. John B. Corning of Hartford, was chosen 
commodore for the cruise. The vessel was towed to the mouth of 
the Connecticut, and instead of passing outside Montauk Point, the 
inside or Sound route to New York was chosen. Thursday found 
the party off Branford, and Friday off Glen Cove, the wind having 
been light and baffling. Finally a tug was chartered, and by 
evening the vessel had passed New York and Sandy Hook, and 
was running down the Jersey coast. Delaware bay was entered 
Sunday noon, and then, with a fair breeze, and sails wing and 
and wing, the vessel forged ahead with a ten knot breeze, reaching 
Philadelphia Monday noon. " Shore-clothes " were donned, and the 
excursionists hastened to the Exhibition grounds. Tuesday, Wed- 
nesday, and Thursday were devoted to sight-seeing, the evenings 
being spent at the theaters, or on board. A pleasant incident was 
the meeting of a Connecticut excursion party (the Nautilus Club) 
from Lakeville and vicinity, whose vessel, the Katie J. Hoyt, was 
moored at the Camden dock. At noon, Friday, the Piscatorius 
Club embarked for home. The sail down Delaware bay, with a 
fresh breeze, was dehghtful, and thence to off Barnegat light, 
Jersey coast, where the Club had an illustration of the unpleasant 
side of a seaman's life, A hard blow necessitated reefing down; 



EXCURSIONS FROM CONNECTICUT. 205 

taa sea rougliened, and the schooner rolled and pitched with aa 
e:npha3i3 decidedly unpleasant to landsmen. This continued 
through the night; all excepting the old salts were desperately 
sea-sick, and a narrow escape from collision with a large schooner 
was an incident that led many to wish themselves safe ashore. The 
following day the unpleasant features continued, the wind having 
died away, leaving the vessel rolling helpless in the trough of the 
sea, until afternoon, when a welcome breeze started her toward 
New York. She entered the harbor Tuesday morning, where a 
large part of the company voted that they had "got enough of it," 
and disembarking, proceeded home by rail. Those who remained 
aboard had a pleasant voyage via the Sound and river to Hart- 
ford, where they arrived Thursday afternoon, having been absent 
fifteen days. The members of the Club on the cruise were : John 

B. Corning, commodore; Wm. Thompson, treasurer and steward; 

C. T. Paine, chaplain; F. D. Hallet, logkeeper; Edward F. Tuller, 
W. F. Pettibone, Norman Hubbard, E. B. Squires, W. S. Dem- 
ing, W. P. WooUey, E. S. Gilbert, W. C. Boiles, A. D. Pellett, 
Charles T. Welles, J. Fred. Deming, E. N. Emmons, W. G. AUen, 
J. T. Porter, and Frank "W. Cole, all of Hartford (excepting the 
chaplain, who hailed from Rochester, New York); L. E. Thomp- 
son, and Fred. H. Thompson of Rockville; W. J. "Wright, Halsey 
J. Wright, Webster Burbank, Gilbert Spencer, Hannibal K. 
Wright, Charles H. Wright, Philip S. Lipps, and Oscar Jones of 
Suffield; W. J. Bulkley, W. T. Markley, A. W. Stanley, and J. N. 
Oviatt of New Britain ; and Harvey Goddard of North Granby. 
In addition to these Connecticut gentlemen, the Club included a 
number from Rochester, N. Y., who had joined the Club on its 
cruises for several years. 

The schooner Hattie Palmer, Captain Darius Palmer, sailed from 
Greenwich, August 4, 1876, with a party of Greenwich residents, 
who had a remarkably favorable voyage, avoiding on the outv/ard 
trip the delays and storms of the long outside passage around 
Cape May. Passing through the Sound to New York liarbor, the 
schooner dropped down to Staten Island, and thence to New 
Brunswick, where sails were furled, and the vessel found motive 
power in the patient mules, through the quiet waters of the Del- 
aware and Raritan canal to Bordentown. Reaching the Delaware 
river, she was towed to Philadelphia and moored to a dock, where 
she served as the hotel for the voyagers while " doing" the Exhi- 
bition. On Saturday, 12 th of August, the return voyage began, 



206 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

the vessel putting in at Cape May, where a couple of days were 
devoted to the surf -bathing, fishing, and other amusements of that 
popular resort. The home-run to Greenwich was made in remark- 
ably quick time, twenty-four hours, a brisk breeze favoring the 
voyagers. The party included Edward Brush, S. Augustus Mead, 
Joseph F. Knapp, Augustus Mead, Abram N. Mead, Charles D. 
Selleck, S. Augustus Brush, Willis N. Mead, Charles N. Mead, 
William L. Ferris, Drake C. Mead, George G. McNall, M. H. 
Wright, Willis Putney, Jno. T. Hubbard, Benjamin M. Wright, 
and John K. Mead, all of Greenwich. 

The schooner Katie J. Hoyt sailed from Bridgeport for Phila- 
delphia on the 7th of August, with the " Nautilus Club," com- 
posed of residents of Lakeville and vicinity, who were accompanied 
by friends from Winsted, and other places. The party, numbering 
about forty persons, had excellent accommodations, the vessel 
having been fitted up especially for the trip, and every needful 
arrangement made to insure the comfort of her passengers. The 
outward voyage was unmarked by any incident of special promi- 
nence, other than one ceremony of rather a solemn character. 
Arriving at Camden, the schooner was moored at the wharf of the 
West Jersey Ferry Company, and the excursionists devoted ten 
days to seeing the wonders of the Exhibition. During their stay 
they received many courtesies from residents of Camden, notably 
Mr. R. H. Morgan, a native of Canaan, Conn. The Club, which 
is distinguished for the musical talent it embraces, reciprocated his 
attentions by a serenade; but, unwilling to remain their debtor in 
the interchange of courtesies, he entertained the serenaders with 
a fine collation. Later in the evening the party had a dance on 
an unoccupied ferry-boat, where they were joined by a large dele- 
gation from the Piscatorius Club of Hartford. Any possible 
monotony of the return voyage of the Lakeville party was pre- 
vented by a heavy gale off the Jersey coast, which resulted in a 
double panorama of its scenery before Sandy Hook was passed. 
As a whole, the Centennial trip was an enjoyable one, the Club 
containing just such happy spirits as are calculated to insure, 
socially, its entire success. The roster of the party was as follows: 
Commodore, D. F. Stillman; purser, W. B. Fish; commissary, J. 
Brinton; surgeon, H. M. Knight; gunner, D, Owen. Members: 
Miss Phelps, Miss Cook, Mrs. D. F. Stillman, Mrs. T. L. Norton, 
Miss Bostwick, Miss Barnum, Miss Little, Miss Coe, Miss Goddard, 
Mrs. J. L. I'atro, Mrs. C. H. Briggs, Miss Emmons, Miss Wil- 



EXCURSIONS FROM CONNECTICUT. 207 

COX, Miss Hodges, Miss Parsons; Messrs. J. R. Harrison, G. H. 
Knight, R. P. Knight, H. S. Dewey, W. J. Landon, C. Wood, T. 
L. Norton, R. Little, L. Dunning, C. H. Briggs, J. H. Vaill, F. 
"Wilcox, W. H. Camp, F. K. Saunders, William Canfield, George 
Canfield. 

A party from New London visited Philadelphia in the latter 
part of August in the schooner Mary Etta Smith, and a party 
from Stonington, Mystic Bridge, Mystic River, and adjoining 
places, in the schooner W. H. Hopkins, in June. This was a large 
excursion, including about seventy persons. The Atlantic Y, Club 
of South Norwalk, made a voyage to Philadelphia in August, in 
their handsome yacht of that name, twenty-five feet keel, eleven 
beam, and a very fast sailer. The Club towed their craft through 
the Delaware and Raritan canal, and reaching Philadelphia, 
moored her at the mouth of the Wissahickon. Notification of the 
granting of their application for leave to anchor in the waters of 
the Exhibition grounds was delayed through some mischance, and 
did not reach the Club until after their return home. The return 
voyage was via Cape May, and the seaworthiness of the boat and 
seamanship of her crew were fully established in a heavy gale off 
Barnegat, a harbor being made with both boat and men in good 
condition. In the latter part of June the New Haven Yacht Club 
registered at the Cottage, viz. : Walter C. Roberts, S. H. Read, 
Burton Mansfield, George L. Goodsell, Thomas Bostwick, Thomas 
Rochefort, Walter S. Coe, Edward Roberts, Henry L. Gower, and 
Edward Gillette. 

Numerous parties went by rail, preferring the speed and pre- 
sumed greater safety than by water, and taking these points into 
consideration, it is fair to presume that their choice of route was 
preferable. In some instances special cars were chartered at 
club rates, and this plan afforded many conveniences that could 
not be otherwise enjoyed, notably those of abundant room and 
absolute safety of the impedimenta of the travelers, which, in the 
regular trains, would have to be carefully guarded. After the 
<' Centennial fever " had fairly set in, excursions were planned in 
every section of the State, and appreciating the futility of any 
effort to describe them all, this chapter has been devoted to 
sketches of those only that presented features of unusual interest. 



CHAPTER XTI. 



THE "CHARTER OAK'' 

Exhibition at Philadelphia of Articles made from its "Wood — 
Sketch of the Historic Tree — Origin of its Celebrity — The 
Action of a Connecticut Patriot — Its Long Life and Final 
Overthrow — Careful Preservation of its Parts for Rel- 
ics — The " Charter Oak Chair " in the State House. 

Prominent among the articles conti'ibuted by Connecticut to the 
Centennial Exhibition, and surpassing all others in their historical 
interest, were those made from the wood of the old Charter Oak. 
The famous tree is linked in history with the earhest indications 
of that spirit of independence among the American colonists that 
eventually freed them from the rule of the mother country, and 
the part it played on that memorable October night in 1687 has 
formed one of the brightest pages in the annals of our country. 
The subject of illustration and text in the school-books of every 
section of the country, and brought prominently before the adult 
population in lending its name to many of the great corporations 
of Connecticut, the Charter Oak and its history are as familiar to 
the nation as the tomb of the immortal Washington. The Con- 
necticut exhibits would have been sadly incomplete without some 
representation of the historic tree ; and these, with a brief history 
of the tree itself, may very properly be connected in this volume 
with the record of the State in the Centennial year. The State 
managers did not neglect their duty at Philadelphia, and a variety 
of interesting relics were shown, both in the State Cottage and the 
Main Building. These will be described in another portion of 
this article, but at this point a review of the history of this 
famous tree may appropriately be inserted. 

The age of the Charter Oak was never correctly ascertained. 
At the time of its fall, in 1856, good judges estimated it to be 
from eight hundred to a thousand years, but the decay of the 
interior prevented the counting of the "rings," which would have 

(208) 



THE "CHAETER OAK." 



209 



establislied its precise age. Tlie Indians informed the first English 
settlers that the tree had been known to them for many years, and 
such was their veneration of it, that it was spared from the axe 
at their earnest solicitation. Legend reports the red men as say- 
ing, '■' It has been the guide of our ancestors for centuries as to 
the time of planting our corn. "When the leaves are the size of 
a mouse's ear, then is the time to put the seed in the ground." 
In the year 1687, its historical distinction was achieved. Con- 
necticut, from her first settlement, had chosen her own rulers and 
magistrates, and had never had a royal governor or judge. In 
1662, Charles II granted to the colony a charter confirming the 
rights and privileges the people of the State had previously en- 
joyed, and which Cotton Mather termed "the freest charter under 
the cope of heaven." Upon the accession of James II to the 
throne of Eng- , 1 der of the Charter. 



land, the policy of 
the government 
changed, and Sir 
Edmund Andross, 
who was appointed 
the first governor- 
general of New 
England, was di- 
rected to proceed 
to Hartford and 
accept the surren- 




On "Wednesday, 
October 26, 1687, 
according to the 
diary of Judge 
Sewell, of Massa- 
chusetts, "His Ex- 
cellency, with sun- 
dry of y^ Council, 
Justices, and other 
gentlemen, four 
blew coats, two 



PIECE OF THE CHARTER OAK. 
trumpeters, Sam Bligh, fifteen or twenty red coats, with email 
guns and short lances in y^ tops of y", set out for "Woodcocks, in 
order to go to Connecticut to assume y® Government of y' place." 
The General Assembly was in session, and Andross demanded of 
that body that the Charter be delivered into his hands, under the 

*The following certificate is furnished, attesting that the pieces of 
Charter Oak wood inserted in the copies of this work are genuine : 

Old Saybrook, Conn., Nov. 1, 1877. 
I hereby certify that I have filled an order from George D. Curtis, pub- 
lisher, Hartford, Conn., for pieces of " Charter Oak " wood, to be inserted 
in copies of a work entitled " Souvenir of the Centennial; " also that the 
said pieces were made from parts of the historic tree, presented to me by 
the late Hon. I. W. Stuart, of Hartford, Conn., its owner, and that they 
are unquestionably genuine. 

(Signed,) John H. Most, 

formerly of Hartford, Conn. 



210 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

authority of the king. On the 3 1st of October, the subject was 
discussed in the Assembly, but that body was extremely reluctant 
to surrender the document, or even to entertain any motion to 
produce it. The Colonial records do not give the debates, but the 
tradition is that Governor Treat represented the great hardships 
and expenses of the colonists in settling the country, and the blood 
and treasure which they had expended in defending it, both 
against the savages and foreigners, to what hardships he had been 
personally exposed for that purpose, and that it was like giving up 
his life, then to surrender the patent and privileges so dearly 
bought and so long enjoyed. Hours passed, the evening came on, 
and still the Assembly could not agree to surrender the instrument. 
At nightfall the Charter, or a dupHcate (authorities differing on 
this point), was brought in and laid upon the table, and the news 
of the debate having spread, great numbers of people gathered in 
and about the hall, who were, according to a writer of Connecticut 
history, " sufficiently bold to do whatever might be necessary or 
expedient." At last Sir Edmund, impatient at the delay, came in 
person to take the Charter, but as he advanced to seize it, the 
lights were suddenly extinguished, and the precious document was 
secured by Captain Joseph Wadsworth of Hartford. The gallant 
captain bore it away in the darkness, and secreted it in the hollow of 
the Charter Oak, fronting the mansion of Hon. Samuel "Wyllys (one 
of the magistrates of the Colony), situated on an elevation in the 
south part of the city, now known as Charter Oak Hill. Accord- 
ing to the story, " the people all appeared peaceable and orderly; 
the candles were relighted, but no discovery could be made of the 
Charter, or of the person who carried it away." The document 
(claimed to be the original one), with parchment as firm, and 
quaint chirography as legible as it was more than two centuries 
ago, now hangs in the office of the Secretary of State in Hartford, 
enclosed in a frame of Charter Oak wood. A duplicate, poorly 
preserved, is in the Historical rooms at Hartford. The wooden 
case, about three feet long by six inches square, in which the 
original was forwarded from England, is also preserved. History 
does not inform us whether or not the document was enclosed in 
this case when Captain Wadsworth bore it away. It probably 
was, for the great cavity in the tree was sufficiently large to receive 
the case as well as the document only, which, according to general 
belief, was all that was taken. How long the Charter remained 
secreted is not definitely known, but when the revolution occurred 



THE "CHAETEB OAK." 211 

in England, the people of Connecticut resumed their government 
under its provisions, it never having been vacated by any judg- 
ment of the King's courts, nor nullified by its formal surrender by 
t'le State. Years afterward, the General Assembly voted Captain 
Wadsworth the sum of £1 for his bold act. Assaults were made 
upon the Charter in 1701 and 1715, yet it was preserved, and 
from the boundaries of the Colony which it gave, extending the 
domain of Connecticut westward to the Pacific, came the Western 
Reserve, the school-fund, and the blessings of public school educa- 
tion. It continued in force through the Indian and French wars, 
the Revolution, and the war of 1812, down to 1818, when it was 
replaced by the present State Constitution, whose provisions were 
better adapted to the changed condition of the times. 

About the year 1800, a local writer describes the tree as meas- 
uring twenty-one feet around the trunk, with a cavity large enough 
to contain a child, but the opening had a tendency to close, " as if 
it had fulfilled the divine purpose for which it was reared." Dur- 
ing succeeding years, the venerable tree began to yield to the 
ravages of time, and was preserved from destruction only through 
the unceasing care of Hon. I. W. Stuart, upon whose estate it 
stood. At one o'clock in the morning of Thursday, August 21, 
1856, it finally yielded to age and the elements, and fell to the 
ground. The occurrence was thus described in the Hartford 
Evening Press of that date: " At that hour there was a sudden 
and terrific gust of wind, and two policemen who saw the tree 
fall, say that when it struck the tree there was a shght crackling 
noise from the trunk, hardly as loud as the report of the explosion 
of a percussion cap, when the Charter Oak, the pride of the city 
and State, and the Mecca of Patriot Pilgrims from every part of 
the country, fell slowly to the ground with a crash which startled 
the sleepers in the neighborhood." The news spread throughout 
the city like wildfire, and throngs of people rushed to the scene. 
Asa manifestation of regret that the life of the venerable tree had 
departed, Colt's Band was summoned, and played the "Dead 
March in Saul," and other appropriate airs, and at sundown the 
bells of the city were tolled. Mr. Stuart was besieged with 
requests for relics for weeks afterward, and requests came from 
not only the northern States, but Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, 
California, and other distant sections to which electricity had 
flashed the news. Eulogies were printed in the leading newspa- 
pers of the country, one of the finest emanating from the pen of 



212 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

the lamented Prentice of ttie Louisville (Ky.) Journal, who had 
once been a resident of Hartford. The following beautiful lines 
deserved more prominent place than the columns of a daily paper: 
<' In New England, upon whose storied turf it now lies out- 
stretched, the Charter Oak has been a household word for more 
than a century and a half, and is buried, Hke a trilling bird in the 
bosom of its glorious foliage, deep in the earliest and sweetest 
recollections of every child of the Pilgrim Land. For nearly two 
hundred years the Charter Oak has been the sacred try sting-place 
of patriotism, and to the sons and daughters of New Englfftid, 
not the trysting-place of jjatriotism alone. Its fall has crushed, 
along with numerous lofty reminiscences, a thousand gentler 
memories that were hidden amidst its rich and silken leaves, hke 
the sunbeams." 

A proposition to erect a monument on the site of the tree was 
offered soon after its fall, but no action was taken, and the place 
where it stood is now marked only by a marble stone, level with 
the ground, and bearing a simple inscription on its surface. Mr. 
SbUart, owner of the tree, divided its ruins among his friends, and 
articles for relics were extensively made and sold in Hartford, 
sufficient in quantity, it is satirically claimed, to have equaled a 
dozen trees. Historical societies received presents of the genuine 
wood, and several fine specimens are in the rooms of the Connecti- 
cut Society in Hartford. 

Mr. Stuart presented a large part of the trunk to the State, and 
dui'ing the winter of 1856-7, it was hauled to the State House 
and placed in the Senate chamber. The General Assembly, at its 
next session, appointed a committee, consisting of Chas. J. Hoadly, 
Chief Justice Storrs, and 0. H. Piatt of Meriden, to decide 
what appropriate article should be made, and after deliberation, 
the committee agreed upon a chair to be used by the Lieutenant- 
Governor as presiding officer of the Senate. From a design made 
by Alex. L. Holley, the article was subsequently made by Bobbins 
& Winship of Hartford, at an expense of $500. In the construc- 
tion, the wood was nearly all used, the mterior of the trunk being 
badly decayed and necessitating great waste to secure sound mate- 
rial. The chair is of massive workmanship, and will comforta- 
bly seat two men of ordinary size. The style is antique, with 
straight back, surmounted by a carved eagle. In the center of 
the back is an oval panel, having carved upon it the State coat of- 
arms, and other excellent carving is noticeable in the oak leaves 



THE "cnAETER OAK." 213 

and acorns wliicli form the ornamentation of tlie different parts. 
The seat is formed of numerous small blocks glued together. 
Upon the back of the chair is a small silver plate bearing the 
inscription: "Made under the authority of a Resolution of the 
General Assembly, passed May, 1857, from a section of the Char- 
ter Oak, presented to the State by Isaac "W. Stuart. Designed by 
Alexander L. HoUey of Sahsbury. Executed by Robbing and 
Winship, Hartford." 

A considerable part of the tree was given by Mr. Stuart to Mr. 
John H. Most, then engaged in business in Hartford, but now a 
resident of Old Saybrook, Conn. Mr. Most manufactured many 
articles from the wood, at intervals, including a carved cradle 
ordered by a Hartford gentleman, who paid $400 for it. Mr. 
Stuart presented a large piece of the wood for the making of a 
chair to be occupied by the presiding officer of the Hartford City 
Council, but the cost to the city, $375, for the finished article, was 
regarded by the city authorities as excessive, and the chair was 
eventually purchased for $500 by the purchaser of the cradle 
above referred to. In 1857, Mr. Stuart having furnished the 
wood, Mr. Most made three pianos, one of which was given to Mr. 
Stuart. At the time of the great Sanitary Fair in New York, a 
party of Hartford gentlemen purchased another of the pianos 
from Mr. Most for $1,000, and donated it to the fair. This instru- 
ment passed into the hands of the late Governor Buckingham, and 
it is beheved that it is yet held by the family. The third piano, a 
seven octave, which is yet retained by Mr. Most, and valued by 
him at $2,500, was exhibited at the Centennial Exhibition, together 
with many other articles which he has made from the wood during 
leisure hours. Among other Charter Oak relics shown by Mr. 
Most at Philadelphia, were the following, the figures representing 
his valuation: a bureau, $1,200; center-table, $1,000; two large 
goblets, $50; two "miniature books," or albums, $50; five canes, 
$25 each; six napkin rings, $30 ; four card-cases, $10 each; four 
whist counters, $5 each. These were exhibited in the Main Build- 
ing. " In the Connecticut Cottage was exhibited a wooden ham, 
weight nine pounds, made by request, and a capital imitation; a 
rustic mantel ornament enclosing a representation of the old oak, 
a rustic chess-table with oak chessmen (valued at $300), and most 
interesting of all, a banner of navy blue cloth, upon which appeared, 
in letters formed of Charter Oak wood, the names of all the Gov- 
ernors of Connecticut from 1776 to 1876 — Jonathan Trumbull to 



214 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Charles R. Ingersoll. The dates of the election of each were also 
represented in figures of wood, and surrounding all were arranged 
thirty-seven stars. A happy suggestion that nutmegs made of 
Charter Oak would be esteemed, not only as rehcs, but as humor- 
ous proofs of the truth of the story that wooden nutmegs are really 
produced by the enterprising Yankees of Connecticut, was seconded 
by Mr. Most, who made a large number, and sold them readily at 
fifty and twenty-five cents each. 

It is presumed by many who have not given the subject much 
thought, that the wood of the Charter Oak must have been used 
up long ago, and the very great number of relics claimed to exist, 
arouse suspicions that many of them are not genuine. But it should 
be recollected that the tree was a very large one, and that few per- 
sons have other than small fragments of the wood, hundreds of 
which would not equal the bulk of a single limb. For instance, a 
thousand pieces of the wood such as presented on another page of 
this chapter, required material equal only to a rod an inch square, 
and less than four feet in length. An interesting fact in connec- 
tion with this general subject of the Charter Oak relics, is that a 
thrifty young tree from an acorn of the old oak now stands in the 
garden of a New Britain lady, sister of Mr. Elihu Burritt. 



CHAPTEE Xni 



CONNECTICUT'S CHIEF MAGISTRATES. 

The State's "Centennial Governor" — Sketch of Hon. Charles 
R. Ingersoll op New Haven — His Early Life, Political 
Triumphs, etc. — The People's Choice in the Centennial Year 
— Governor Richard D. Hubbard of Hartford, and Lieut.- 
Governor Francis B. Loomis of New London. 

Hon. Charles R. Ingersoll of New Haven, Connecticut's Chief 
Magistrate in 1876, had the honor of being classed among the 
" Centennial Governors " of the States. And the Commonwealth 
owes much of the distinction achieved in the International Exhi. 
bition to the earnest efforts of Governor Ingersoll to secure a fuU 
representation of its great manufacturing and other resources — 
great in proportion to its area and to its population. From the 
first, he perceived the benefits that would accrue directly or indi- 
rectly from such representation, and in his public capacity did what 
he could to further the project. Every measure of a public or 
private nature received his hearty approval, and where it was in 
his power to give assistance, he gave it with all the zeal of a pub- 
lic-spirited citizen, yet so quietly that few others than those who 
were brought in personal relations with him knew the extent of 
his labors. 

Charles Robert Ingersoll, LL. D., was successively Governor 
of Connecticut for the years 1873—4-5 and the eight months of 
1876, from May to December 31st, the amended Constitution then 
taking effect in changing the terih and period of the executive 
office from May to January, and from one year to two years. 
Governor Ingersoll comes of a remarkably noticeable family, whose 
history would cover much of the chronologic record of Connecticut 
in colonial as well as federal times. His father, the Hon. Ralph 
I. Ingersoll, was for many years one of the foremost lawyers of 
Connecticut, and took a prominent part in the public affairs of his 
city and State. He was United States Minister to Russia, mem- 

(215) 



216 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

ber of Congress, mayor of New Haven, and occupied other posi- 
tions of trust and responsibility in a less' public capacity. One of 
Mr. Ingersoll's uncles was Judge of the United States District 
Court of Connecticut, and another was an officer in the United 
States navy. A brother, General Colin M. Ingersoll, was for four 
years — from 1850 to 1854 — Representative to Congress from the 
New Haven district; another is a distinguished divine in the 
Episcopal church, and another served many years as an officer in 
the United States navy. So it will be seen that the subject of 
this sketch comes of a race of prominent men — politicians, lawyers, 
statesmen, and officials. 

Governor Ingersoll was born in New Haven, Conn., September 
16, 1821, was educated in that city, and graduated from Yale Col- 
lege in 1840, at the age of nineteen, having entered college v/hen 
fifteen years old. He then visited Europe as a member of the 
official family of his uncle, Captain Voorhees, commander of the 
United States frigate Preble. He remained abroad two years, 
and on his return entered the Yale Law School, and passed 
through the two years' course under the instruction of Judge 
Samuel J. Hitchcock, Chief Justice David Daggett, and Hon. 
Isaac H. Townsend. He was admitted to the bar in 1845, and 
entered the office of his father, the Hon. Ralph I. Ingersoll, with 
whom he was associated in business until his father's death, a 
period of nearly thirty years. During this time Governor Inger- 
soll was connected as counsellor, or advocate, with many import- 
ant litigations, and long ago estabhshed for himself an enviable 
reputation as an honest, conscientious, able, and successful law- 
yer. Being so long associated with his father, who was a man 
much interested in politics, it is but natural that the son should 
have his attention directed to the subject ; and, in fact, he became 
a politician in the higher sense of the term, as a student and an 
active man, but never as a seeker for position ; indeed, it may be 
truthfully said that he has declined more nominations than he has 
accepted, and refused more offices than he has filled. Still, he rep- 
resented the town of New Haven in the Legislatures of 1856-7-8, 
in 1866 and 1871, always taking a prominent place on committees, 
and an influential position on the floor. His thorougli knowledge 
of the liistory of legislation in the State, and his oratorical ability, 
with his unquestionable honor and personal integrity, always gave 
him a powerful influence. His dislike of public distinction 
induced him to refuse a nomination to the State Senate, the 




i^^^^^^t..^ /Z^ 



COXNECTICUT'S CHIEF MAGISTRATES. 219 

acceptance of which would have been equivalent to an election. 
In 1864 Governor IngersoU was a delegate to the National Dem- 
ocratic Convention at Chicago, which nominated General McClel- 
Ian for the Presidency, and was on the committee on resolutions. 
In 1872 he was a delegate to the National Convention at Balti- 
more, that nominated Greeley and Brown, and acted as chairman 
of the Connecticut delegation. He was first nominated by the 
Democratic party for the office of Governor m 1873, and v/as 
induced to accept only after much persuasion, as he did not wish 
the distinction nor desire the responsibility. His personal popu- 
larity may be judged from the fact that he ran far ahead of his 
ticket in his own town and county, where he is best and most inti- 
mately known. His judicious and sensible course while in office 
the first term, led to his nomination successively for a second, 
third, and fourth term. The general estimation in which Gover- 
nor Ingersoll was held cannot be better shown than by a quotation 
from a Hartford paper opposed to him politically: " His discharge 
of the duties of the office of Governor were so unexceptionable, 
and his whole bearing as the representative of the State was so 
dignified and commendable, that he at once grew stronger than his 
party, and his second reelection by the largest majority given to 
any man on his ticket, was brought about, not because he longer 
desired to hold the office, but because his continuance was insisted 
upon by his party. Very few men could be named for the office 
by that party in whose success the people of opposing views would 
so cheerfully acquiesce." 

Governor Ingersoll is as much a scholar a? a lawyer or a politi- 
cian — probably more. If left to himself he would preferably 
accept a life of calm retirement, un vexed by politics and untroubled 
by the uncertainties of legal contests. He never sought notoriety 
in political positions, but only accepted public place in accordance 
with a sense of civic duty. He is greatly popular, not alone for 
his power of appeal in ringing speeches, and his graceful and dig- 
nified manner on public occasions, but also for his affability, 
charming all who come in social contact with him with his genial 
bonhommie and courtesy. Although having moved largely in public 
life, his tastes are decidedly domestic, and he finds his pleasantest 
hours in his home, blessed by a family of interesting children, 
, whose mother was a daughter of the late Admiral Gregory. Gov- 
ernor Ingersoll retired from the gubernatorial chair esteemed by 
his fellow-citizens of both political parties as one of the best of 



220 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Governors, ranking high, among the many notable men that Con- 
necticut has honored in the past. 

A strange characteristic of the sentiment of the people during 
1876, was that many affairs of a public nature were considered 
with relation to their possible bearings upon the nation's record in 
the year of its centennial anniversary. The patriotic pride of the 
people had not been for years so thoroughly ai^oused, and this 
feeling, strange to say, cropped out in some degree in political 
contests. If the citizens could have found on earth any of those 
brave old statesmen of the Revolution, modern-day candidates 
would have had to stand aside; but as it was, the patriotic feeling 
in all parties prompted the nomination of men possessing the 
purest and best reputations. At a large political meeting in Hart- 
ford, in 1876, the writer remembers a remark by one of the 
speakers, wliich was of unusual significance: " Let us, fellow-citi- 
zens, select for our suffrages in this centennial year, men that we 
may feel pride in honoring in such a period of marked prominence 
in our nation's history." Whether actuated by any such spirit or 
not, it is fact worthy of note that both parties in Connecticut 
put forward their very best men for the chief offices — men betweer' 
whom the voters had Kttle choice other than of a purely politi 
cal nature. The distinction of a victory fell to the DemO' 
cratic candidates, Hon. Richard D. Hubbard of Hartford, candi- 
date for Governor, and Colonel Francis B. Loomis of New Lon- 
don, for Lieutenant-Governor — two gentlemen whose careers alike 
in public and private life eminently fitted them for the offices con- 
ferred upon them by their fellow-citizens. 

HON. RICHARD D. HUBBARD. 

Hon, Richard Dudley Hubbard was elected Governor of Con- 
necticut, Novembei', 1876, to serve from the beginning of 1877 to 
the end of 1878 — two years — he being the first Governor of the 
State to occupy the office since the amendment of the Constitution 
making the terms of the Governors biennial. Governor Hubbard 
was bom in Berlin, Conn., September 7, 1818, but passed his 
youth in East Hartford. He was graduated at Yale in 1839, at 
the age of twenty-one. Governor Hubbard may be called a " self- 
made man," if such a term is permissible, as most of his success 
in life has been achieved by his own exertions, only slightly aided, 
by outside influences. " After his graduation he entered the law 
office of Hungerford & Cone, Hartford, where he became grounded 



?i 



K 




^ 

^ 

? 




Connecticut's chief magistrates. 223 

in a knowledge of the common and statute law, and laid tlie foun- 
dation, by his close study, for subsequent triumphs at the bar. 
From 18 i6 to 1868 he was the Sta.te's Attorney for Hartford 
county, and as a representative of the town of East Hartford sat 
in the Legislature in 1842-3. He represented Hartford in tho 
years 1855 and 1858, and as a member of the Judiciary Commit- 
tee, and chairman of the Committee on the School Fund, exer- 
cised a powerful influence on the legislation of the State. In 1867 
lie was sent to Washington as representative of the First District 
in the Fortieth Congress, in which he acted as a member of the com- 
mittees on Claims and on Expenditures in the Post-office Depart- 
ment. He declined a renomination which was urged upon him, 
preferring the practice of his profession, but, in 1872, allowed him- 
self to be pei'suaded, despite his aversion to public life, to accept 
the nomination of the Democratic party for Governor. The ticket, 
however, was unsuccessful. He did not seek the nomination for 
that office in 1876, but accepted and was elected. Almost under 
protest he took part in the canvass by making a few public 
speeches, but all his tastes are averse to public notoriety. Few 
men surpass him in attractiveness as a public speaker ; his com- 
mand of language being wonderful, and his manner enchain- 
ing the attention of his auditors to the close. Yet, although his 
speeches in Congress were highly commended, and his public 
utterances at home have been enjoyed, his reputation has been 
made mainly in the court-room. During his twenty-two years' 
service as State's Attorney for Hartford county, he was engaged 
in some trials which, if not among the causes celehre oi future his- 
tory, were of great local interest, and served to build up his repu- 
tation for ability. It is as a lawyer rather than as a politician, 
partisan, or office-holder that Governor Hubbard is best known, 
and on his professional achievements and standing his fame will 
rest, if his management of the State's affairs does not overshadow 
his professional successes. Although thoroughly versed in the prin- 
ciples of his profession, and having a memory well stored with 
precedents and authorities on which he is able to draw at will, 
Governor Hubbard is not an attorney bound down to books 
and obsolete decisions. He advocates the broad principles of 
justice, and his rich vocabulary and readiness of illustration 
enable him to present the otherwise dry skeletons of law in an 
attractive form. His triumphs live in the memory of his cotem- 
porae:ies, who have heard him in memorable legal contests, and 



224 SOUVENIK O? TEE CEIiTENNIAL EXHIBITION, 

by many of them lie is to-day recognized as standing at the head 
of the State bar. Personally, Governor Hubbard has a dignified 
bearing, sometimes mistaken for hauteur, but those who know him 
well accord to him an unusual degree of kindliness of heart and 
suavity of manner. He is a man of strong convictions, unques- 
tioned integrity, and of great firmness of purpose ; but he is broad 
and humane in his views, and warm in his affections. 

Hon. Francis B. Loomis. 

Francis B. Loomis, elected Lieutenant-Governor of Connecti- 
cut in the Centennial year, was born in Lyme in 1816. His 
father, Joel Loomis, was a prominent citizen; repeatedly repre- 
sented the town in the General Assembly; held the office of judge 
of probate for many years; was for a time one of the associate 
judges of the County Court, and an intimate personal friend of 
the late Chief-Justice "Waite of the Supreme Court of this State, 
father of Chief-Justice Waite of the United States Supreme 
Court. The youth enjoyed the advantages of a good education, 
having been sent for five years to a private school, where he was 
carefully instructed in those branches of study which would prove 
valuable to him in the business career for which he was destined. 
Upon reaching his majority, he at once commenced woolen man- 
ufacturing in his native town, and proved successful from the 
start. Removing to New London in 1848, he has since made 
that city his home, and during the last twenty-five years has been 
prominently identified with its business and financial interests. 
After his removal from Lyme he built the woolen mills at Mont- 
ville, and subsequently became the proprietor of the Rockwell 
mills at Norwich, and of the mills now operated at that place by 
the well-known firm of Sturtevant Brothers. He also built and 
operated for a time the steam woolen mill at New London, the 
first mill ever erected in that city for the manufacture of fabrics, 
and the woolen mill in Coventry, Tolland County. Later, he 
became the proprietor of the extensive steam cotton mills at Sag 
Harbor, N. Y. All of these extensive business enterprises he 
conducted in person, and without any partner. His manufactur- 
ing operations during the war were probably on a larger scale 
than those of any individual in this State, his employes number- 
ing more than one thousand, and his numerous mills running day 
and night to fill government contracts. In his younger days he 
took an active interest in miHtary affair?, and at the age of twenty- 



Connecticut's chief magistrates. 225 

one was elected colonel of the Third Regiment of Connecticut 
militia. Always on the alert as a business man, Colonel Loomis 
was quick to take advantage of the privileges of the national 
banking act passed in the early years of the war, and promptly 
organized the First National Bank of New London, which was 
one of the first institutions of that kind in this State or the coun- 
try. Nearly the entire capital stock of this bank was owned by 
him, and he conducted its business in person from the day of its 
organization until its affairs were wound up early in 1877. It 
proved a handsome investment, paying for many years twelve per 
cent, dividends in gold, when gold was at a heavy premium, and 
accumulating a surplus more than equal to its capital. During 
the war this bank was the designated government depository for 
eastern Connecticut, and for a long time its average government 
deposits were over $4,000,000. It was also the authorized agency 
for the sale of government bonds, and disposed of over $20,000,- 
000 of the various issues. 

Soon after the close of the war Colonel Loomis retired from the 
manufacturing business, in which he had accumulated a hand- 
some fortune, and during the past ten years has been largely 
engaged in stock speculations and railroad enterprises. Some of 
his operations in Wall street have been on a gigantic scale. He 
was a member of the famous Milwaukee and St. Paul pool, which 
advanced the stock of that road to a fabulous price, but collapsed 
before the "millions in it" could be gathered in. His invest- 
ments in Southern and Western railroad enterprises have been on 
a large scale, and have included some daring and successful 
operations. 

In early life Colonel Loomis was a Whig, and he continued to 
act with that party until it ceased to exist, having been a candi- 
date for presidential elector on the last ticket which it put in the 
field. At the outbreak of the Rebellion he promptly became an 
enthusiastic supporter of the LTnion cause, and during the long 
struggle his patriotism never flagged. He presided over the 
memorable war meeting held in the old court-house at New Lon- 
don on the night of the day when the flag was fired on at Sum- 
ter, and contributed largely to the fund for raising the first com- 
pany of volunteers sent from that city. In the dark days of 
1864, just before the terrible battles of the Wilderness, he made 
an offer to the general government which will ever remain on 
record as one of the most notable instances of individual patriot- 



226 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

ism called forth by the war. He proposed to furnish and equip 
at his own expense one thousand men for sixty days, and to 
relieve the garrison at Fort Trumbull, in order that the regulars 
there stationed might be sent to the front. This generous offer 
was not accepted, but it is mentioned in Eaymond's "Life of 
Abraham Lincoln " as furnishing a remarkable instance of the 
generosity and patriotism which animated the loyal citizens of the 
North at the crisis of the great struggle, and it called forth the 
following autograph letter from President Lincoln, which may be 
found in Raymond's " Life," p. 524: 

Executive Mansion, "Washington, May 12, 1864. 
My Dear Sir: 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication 
of the 28th April, in which you offer to replace the present garrison at 
Fort Tnmibull with volunteers, which you propose to raise at your own 
expense. While it seems inexpedient at this time to accept this proposi- 
tion, on account of the special duties now devolving upon the garrison 
mentioned, I cannot pass unnoticed such a meritorious instance of indi- 
vidual patriotism. Permit me, for the government, to express my cor- 
dial thanks to you for this generous and public-spirited offer, which is 
worthy of note among the many called forth in these times of national 
trial. I am, very truly, your obedient servant, 

A. LINCOLN. 
F. B. LooMis, Esq. 

During the war, and until 1872, Colonel Loomis acted with the 
Republican party, but uniformly declined to become a candidate 
for any office. In 1872 he enlisted heartily in the Liberal Repub- 
lican movement, and was nominated as an elector at large upon 
the Greeley and Brown ticket. Since 1872 he has acted uni- 
formly with the Democratic party. He was elected a delegate at 
large to the St. Louis Democratic Convention that nominated Til- 
den and Hendricks, and was elected to the office of Lieutenant- 
Governor on the Democratic ticket in November, 1876. As the 
presiding officer of the Senate, Lieutenant-Governor Loomis, 
although without previous legislative experience, has discharged 
his duties with entire acceptance, and with a dignity and impar- 
tiality that have compelled the admiration even of his political 
opponents. 



CHAPTEE XIT. 



VISITING THE EXHIBITION. 

Moderate Interest During its Early Days — Gradual Spread 
OF THE " Centennial Fever " — The Throngs of September 
AND October — Extra Transportation Facilities Afforded — 
Searching for Quarters in Philadelphia — "Connecticut 
Day " — Gleanings from the Registers at the Cottage — 
Days of Notable Attendance of Visitors — Remarks on Pecu- 
liar Signatures, etc. 

In tliis chapter Connecticut's record in connection with, the 
great Exhibition draws to a close, and it will be devoted to 
sketching many matters of importance that could not properly be 
classified with the subjects covered l»y preceding chapters — odds- 
and-ends, perhaps, yet interesting in their relation to the general 
subject of the " Centennial." While Connecticut manufacturers, 
and others whose industries were represented, early awoke to the 
importance of the Exposition, and were among its earUest visitors, 
the masses of the people of the State exhibited the apathy com- 
mon throughout the country. But as time passed the interest 
increased, aroused by the published accounts of "Uncle Jona- 
than's great show," and by the reports of those who had been to 
Philadelphia. The latter returned with most enthusiastic stories; 
they failed to find language to describe the wonders that they had 
witnessed, and could only advise their neighbors to see for them- 
selves. Routes were explained, and the belief that the stranger 
would encounter endless difficulties in iinding accommodations 
was dispelled by the relation of actual experiences. Hotel rates 
were reported fairly reasonable, and no scarcity of boarding- 
houses for those whose circumstances or inclinations moved them 
to seek economical quarters. By this latter class the Grangers' 
Camp was favorably regarded, and many found in its plain yet 
comfortable accommodations and substantial fare, all that they 

(227) 



228 SOUVENIR OF THE CEXTEXXIAL EXHIBITION. 

desired, or could reasonably expect, for the assessment upon their 
funds. 

With thousands the question of expense was the all-important 
one. As a manufacturing State, Connecticut had severely felt the 
business depression of the three years preceding the Exhibition, 
and money for purposes of pleasure was paid out reluctantly by 
all classes. Yet, visiting the Centennial Exhibition was not to be 
numbered with ordinary pleasures, for it was but an aUair of a 
few months, never to recur in a life-time. Hence, when the peo- 
ple of the State had become fully impressed with its importance, 
they were prompt to go to Philadelphia, when no ordinary 
attractions would have induced them to spare the time and money 
required. Few, comparatively, went in May and June, but there 
was a noticeable increase in July and August, when many in 
business devoted their usual vacations to the trip. By September 
the "Centennial fever "had fairly commenced, and Connecticut 
contributed its thousands daily to swell the throng on the Exhibi- 
tion grounds. The railroad and steamboat lines began to sell 
round-trip tickets at exceedingly low rates, and the former to put 
on special Centennial trains, as they were termed. By some of 
these the trip could be made to Philadelphia and return, wholly 
by night-travel, giving the visitor all the hours of daylight upon 
the grounds. The managers of the Bound Brook railroad from 
New York sent agents through Connecticut, offering inducements 
in the way of cheap prices and quick connections that were very 
tempting, while the local roads heartily cooperated, and issued 
tickets at rates which left minimum margins of profit. The 
special Centennial trains, those traversing the State from its north- 
east corner to Hartford ; the trains of the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford, and the Shore Line routes, drained Connecticut of 
hosts of her people daily at the rate of ten to fifteen cars on each 
train, literally packed with passengers. All the short connecting 
roads acted as feeders, and cheerfully arranged for connections 
with the special through trains. Eventually the prices and the 
time of travel became such that for a ten-dollar bill it was possi- 
ble to attend the " Centennial " from any part of Connecticut, and 
enjoy one full day of sight-seeing, while those fortunately residing 
near the New York border could make the trip for a sum much 
less. These facilities combined to make Connecticut's representa- 
tion at Philadelphia of a very general character. Few felt too 
poor to go, and toward the close, a person who had not made the 



VISITIXG THE EXHIBITION, 2^9 

trip and did not propose to, was regarded as somewhat in the 
nature of a curiosity. For some of the visitors who had never 
been beyond the Umits of the State, and, perhaps, of their own 
counties, the trip form3d an event in their Hves of marVp 1 inter- 
est — something to furnish a subject for conversation for months, 
and even for years. And it was worth to them, and to every one, 
all the trouble and all the expense incurred ; few at this day regret 
either. Pleasant recollections of the trip and of the marvelous 
attractions of the Exhibition linger in the memory, and many a 
visitor has safely filed away the little book in which he has noted 
those things that most attracted his attention and that he wished 
to remember. Other visitors even exceeded this, and the writer 
has personal knowledge of some who made careful memoranda 
not only of the objects of interest, but of the incidents of the trip, 
the route, expenses of travel, etc., which has since been written out 
in connected form, and are highly valued by the possessors as 
souvenirs of the Exhibition. The blank leaves in this volume, 
with the heading " Personal Recollections," are deoigned to pro- 
vide an appropriate and convenient place for such records, and 
together with the photographs of the visitor and those of relatives 
or friends accompanying him, will form interesting features at 
this time, and of increasing interest as the years roll on. 

When Philadelphia began to be thronged with visitors in the 
closing months of the Exhibition, obtaining accommodations for a 
day or a week, became a matter of serious moment. Cautious 
persons engaged quarters by telegraph or letter, but the masses 
relied upon the faculty common to our people of adapting them- 
selves to circumstances. Many a Connecticut man can tell of 
nights passed with no better bed than a biUiard-table in a hotel, 
and many a Connecticut lady has stretched her weary form upon 
a mattress spread on a parlor floor. Looking upon the throngs 
upon the Centennial grounds, it seemed improbable or impossible 
that Philadelphia could shelter and feed such a multitude, but it 
did, and not only for days, but for weeks at a time, toward the close 
of the Exhibition. The better class of hotels could accommodate 
hundreds each, while rough wooden structures that had sprung up 
adjoining the grounds could pack away thousands in their cell- 
hke apartments, sometimes so limited in space that it was a ques- 
tion with the guest whether he or his trunk would have to spend 
the night out in the hall. Probably the largest representation 
from Connecticut on the ground at one time vv^as on " Connecticut 



230 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Day," Thursday, September 7tli, when the aggregate of the gate 
admission was 04,059, largely exceeding that of the days pre- 
ceding. Of these, it was estimated that fully 10,000 were resi- 
dents of Connecticut. The weather was far from pleasant, and in 
the afternoon was such as to compel the postponement of two of 
the leading attractions promised — the review of the Connecticut 
troops at Camp Putnam, and their dress parade on the Exhibition 
grounds. Governor Ingersoll's reception at the Cottage, however, 
v/as not affected by the weather. It began at 1 o'clock, and was 
of an entirely informal character. At the hour named, the Gov- 
ernor entered the Cottage, accompanied by Governor Hartranftof 
Pennsylvania, and Adjutant-General Trowbridge of New Haven, 
and took his position on the north side of the main room. The 
guests, on presenting themselves at the main entrance, were 
escorted by General Trowbridge, and introduced to both of the 
executives. The usual courtesies were exchanged, Governor Inger- 
BoU greeting every one in his well-known cordial way, and the 
guests then passed out of the door on the west side of the build- 
ing. The limited space of. the apartment, and the throng pressing 
in the rear, necessitated this hasty exit; yet the Governor's recep- 
tion was a pleasant incident of the day to the hundreds and thou- 
sands of the people of Connecticut who were present. Among 
some of the more prominent visitors were General Joseph R. Haw- 
ley, Postmaster- General Jewell, Prof. B. G. Northrop, Secretary 
of the State Board of Education, Professors Brewer and Norton 
of Yale, Mayor Lewis of New Haven, Brigadier-General W. Ran- 
del Smith, Colonel Hoyt of the Fourth Regt., C. N. G., Nathaniel 
Wheeler, John E. Earle, and other members of the Connecticut 
Board of Centennial Managers. 

In the Connecticut Cottage, one of the principal attractions to 
visitors was a large book for the registering of their names, placed 
upon a desk near the main entrance. Three of these books, donated 
at intervals during the Exhibition by The Case, Lockwood & Brain- 
ard Co. of Hartford, were specimens of first-class material and work- 
manship. The first made, which was estimated to be large enough to 
contain the names of all the Connecticut visitors who attended the 
Exhibition, was a massive volume of over 700 pages, about two 
feet long and fifteen inches wide, and nearly five inches thick. 
The binding was of the finest Russia leather, with covers finished 
in panels ; on the front was the State seal, and on the back cover 
a representation of the Charter Oak. This book was filled with 



VISITING THE EXHIBITION. 231 

signatures by the middle of September, and another of 400 
pages was furnished, and subsequently a third of equal size. Even 
these did not suffice, and the names of visitors during the last three 
or four days of the Exhibition were "written upon loose sheets of 
foolscap paper. The registers were brought to Connecticut when 
the Cottage was abandoned, and are now in the archives of the 
Connecticut Historical Society in Hartford. The pages of these 
volumes indicated with considerable accuracy the extent of the 
daily attendance. In May and June, fifty to one hundred names 
was about the daily average, while in September and October 
eight hundred names on a single day were often registered. The 
opening pages of the first volume contained many signatures of 
others than Connecticut visitors, for whose sole use the book was 
designed, and finally the State agent, Mr. Pickering, posted up a 
nolice: " Do not register here unless you are from Connecticut." 
This request was observed as a general rule, but many gave it no 
attention, and all throiigh the pages of the books are sandwiched 
in the signatures of visitors from every section of the country. 
This registering of their names was a mania v/ith some of the vis- 
itors, and instances are related of persons who, when visiting any 
of the buildings, sought the register and jotted down their signa- 
tures, before once glancing at the exhibits. To register in their 
respective State buildings was proper enough, but registering any- 
where and everywhere betrayed vanity of a very unusual kind. 
Some of the visitors conceived the strange idea that the privilege 
of registering was to be paid for. One of these innocents entered 
the Connecticut Cottage early one morning, and inquired of the 
gentleman in charge: "Is this the Connecticut Cottage ? " An 
aflBrmative reply being given, he continued: " What do you charge 

for registration ? I live in the town of ; I expect some 

friends here to-day, and if it don't cost too much I would hke to 
put my name down." Repressing his laughter, the gentleman in 
charge replied, that as his visitor had called so early in the morn- 
ing, and the book was not then in use, there would be no charge. 
In an instant he had grasped his pen and gratified his wish. A 
friend with him watched the proceeding with deep interest, but, 
possibly presuming that there had been an excess of generosity 
already, did not venture to ask the favor for himself. 

The chirography of some of the signatures was clear and beau- 
tiful; others equaled the writing of the late Horace Greeley in 
their violation of every rule for the formation of letters. Gener- 
13 



23'2 SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

ally, those most difficult to decipher were the rapidly dashed 
signatures of business men, or those of ladies, written in the fash- 
ionable Italian hand, regarded as styHsh, but certainly not easy to 
read. In preparing for this volume the list of Connecticut visitors 
to the Exhibition, many instances were noted where the husband 
and wife wrote (in the style described) so illegibly that even their 
siii'name could not be deciphered, and the mystery was solved only 
by the signature beneath — that of a little son or daughter, whose 
plain, round handwriting was as distinct as print. Other signa- 
tures were marked by peculiar characteristics, and facsimiles of 
several given on another page are excellent illustrations of both 
peculiarities and illegibility. Mr. Pond wrote a signature of rather 
a fanciful nature — one which he will greatly simplify in the future. 
Mr. Grant's is an exceedingly close imitation of the signature of 
the ex-President, and Mr. Oviatt shows a good specimen of writ- 
ing for a gentleman of his advanced years. The signature of 
Solon Robinson illustrates the crabbed -style of writing, yet is dis- 
tinct. The writer, now of Florida, is a native of Tolland, where 
ho was born in 1803, and is well known in Connecticut, and largely 
in the farming regions, through his contributions to the Albany 
Cultivator, the agricultural department of the New York Tribune, 
and as the author of several books. The signatures below Mr. 
Robinson's are goo.d specimens of illegibility; a careful copy of 
the sixth was sent to the town from which the gentleman regis- 
tered, and no one of a dozen of the same surname would acknowl- 
edge it as his own, or even admit that a person of his ancient and 
respected family would risk his reputation by writing such a scrawl. 
The second, third, and last signatures on the second column of the 
page of facsimiles, illustrate the illegibility of the signatures of 
business men. The second is of the class often characterized as 
" business-like," but it can be read by one unaccustomed to it, only 
after patient study. The last signature in the first column illus- 
trates the peculiar style of the writing of many ladies, a distinc- 
tive, well-formed hand, but difficult to decipher. These are a few 
specimens selected at random from hundreds of peculiar or illegi- 
ble signatures found all through the pages of the registers of Con- 
necticut visitors, yet they will serve to indicate the obstacles in 
the way of preparing therefrom a correct list of the names for this 
volume. To appreciate the difficulties of the task, let the reader 
essay the deciphering of these specimen names, bearing in mind 
that certainty should be the rule rather than mere guessing, based 



^^^h^^c^ 

















-^/^v 



ILLEGIBLEoR PECULIAR SIGNATURES 

From the Register at the Conn.Cottage,PhUciJ876'. 





VISITINa THE EXHIBITION. 235 

upon superficial examination. It will be found comparatively 
easy for a person to infer that he has correctly deciphered a sig- 
nature, but it is quite another thing to be satisfied of it, and espe- 
cially as to the initials. Before passing to another subject, it may 
be remarked that several gentlemen who spent much time on the 
Centennial grounds, and had opportunities for seeing registers 
in other buildings, agree that the signatures in the Cottage regis- 
ters were, as a rale, written with unusual neatness and precision. 
If such is the fact, then those in other registers must be classed 
with hieroglyphics. 

Specimens of incorrect spelling were rare. Yet one man wrote 
" Pomphret " for Pomfret, and in several cases New Haven was 
written *• New Heaven " — complimentary to that city, if inten- 
tional. One lonesome Woodbury gentleman expressed his feelings 
in a two-line appendix to his name, quoted on the specimen 
page. The political excitement of early November was manifest ' 
upon several pages. One enthusiastic gentleman added after his 
name: "I'm for Hayes." The next followed with, " Hurrah for 
Tilden," and at intervals on succeeding pages, the writers noted 
their political preference, with no thought at that time that the 
presidential contest was to be decided by an electoral commission. 
The descendants of General Israel Putnam were represented at the 
Cottage, two Brooklyn ladies registering as the great grand- 
daughter of the old hero, and a Massachusetts gentleman as his 
great grandson. 

The first register opened with the signature of Governor Inger- 
soU, May 10th, followed by those of other State officials, and when 
its pages filled in September, the signatures flowed over upon the- 
fly-leaves, Mr. S. Belden and wife of New London being the last 
to register. Many of the signatures on the fly-leaves are written 
in pencil, and so blurred that they cannot be deciphered. The 
space in the second book was exhausted before the third was 
received, and over one thousand signatures were written on sheets 
of paper. After being copied the sheets were destroyed. This 
third book also became exhausted on the 6tli of November, and 
from that date to the close, visitors again resorted to sheets of 
paper, which have been preserved, but in a dilapidated condition. 
The last entry appearing on these sheets is " John G. Palmer and 
wife, Middletown," but other names were entered in the volume 
later, the last page of the book having been reserved for the names 
of the Connecticut State officials. Upon this page is also written: 



236 SOUVENIR OP THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

" United States Centennial International Exhibition closed Novem- 
ber 10. Total number registered during the Exhibition, in the 
three volumes, 40,246." 

No signatures appear on Sunday, excepting on the 29th of Octo- 
ber, when eighteen persons, oflScials and others, with New York 
and Philadelphia friends, registered. In July an entry was made: 
"Attendance light, 18th, 19th, and 20th. Very hot ; 19th, 93° at 
noon, 20th, 99°." The largest number of names on any one day 
was September 6th, 924, and the next largest October 18th, about 
800. In transcribing from the registers the list of names printed 
in the next chapter, the careless and often illegible writing was a 
serious difficulty, and errors may occasionally be noticed. The 
true reading of hundreds of badly-written signatures has been 
ascertained through correspondence with town clerks, postmasters, 
and others in the towns from which the persons registered. Yet 
this course failed in some instances, and the names were omitted 
in preference to publishing them incorrectly. The non-appearance 
in the list of the names of some other visitors is due to the fact 
that they neglected to register; no record was available for the 
compilation of the list, other than the books at the Cottage. Some 
slight irregularities in the arrangement of the names by villages 
and towns are due to the lack of uniformity on the part of visitors 
in writing their place of residence. For instance, Mr. A., residing 
in Forestville (a part of Bristol), would register as from " Forest- 
ville," while his near neighbor, Mr. B., would register from 
" Bristol." Yet, in this class of cases, as all the villages, and 
the names of persons registering therefrom, appear under the 
heading of the toivns in which they are located, the variation from 
a strict arrangement is really immaterial. In some instances, a 
husband and wife would register from different places, as illus- 
trated above, and while this in itself was confusing, greater uncer- 
tainties in arranging the names in the list arose from a singular 
practice on the part of some ladies, of registering merely as " Mrs. 
A.," or Mrs. John H. Smith, for instance, registering as " Mrs. John 
Smith," wholly ignoring the middle initial. From these remarks, 
the impracticability of obtaining a Hst perfect in every respect 
will be apparent. Yet it is believed that the percentage of errors 
and omissions is small, and that, as a whole, the record may be 
regarded as nearly complete. 



CHAPTER XY. 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS. 

Oter forty thousand Names of Residents of the State who 

went to the centennial exhibition arranged by cities, 

towns, and villages. 

The letters and figures following the names in this list indicate 
the dates on which the \'isitor3 registered at the Connecticut 
Cottage. The months are thus represented- May, August, Sep- 
tember, October, and November, by the initial letter of each; 
June by "Je," and July by "Jy." For example, "0 6," which 
follows the second name on this page, signifies that the visitor 
registered on the 6th day of October; "A 21," on the 21st of 
August, etc. "Where the surname is represented by ditto marks, 
it indicates that the person accompanied that one whose name 
appears immediately above. The use of a hyphen between initials, 
thus, " Bartlett M H-C A" signifies that the surname of both 
were ahke, and that they were together. For the purpose of thus 
grouping members of the same family, or of the same family 
name, when visiting the " Cottage " together (as indicated by the 
register), a strictly alphabetical arrangement has occasionally been 
departed from. As a rule, names thus grouped are printed in the 
order in which they were registered. In a few cases, two dates 
will be observed in a single line: "Soule John (M 31) and wf. 
27." This indicates that Mr. S. registered on the 31st of May, and 
again when he visited the Centennial with his wife, October 27th. 
The abbreviations are: G. H. G. Governor's Horse Guards; P. P. 
or P. Pha. Putnam Phalanx; Ser. Sergeant, Cor. Corporal, and 
other ordinary abbreviations of military titles; Wf. wife, Dau. 
daughter, Fam. family. With the exception of the unimportant 
variations above explained, the list is arranged in the ordinary 
way. 

(237) 



238 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHrEITIOK". 



I3;.a.:e=i.t?:f'o 1=1.13 coTJi\rT'^. 



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DayCaiiosC&wf 

DayPK 

Gabriel Pliineas 

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Kellogg-Fraiilc 

MillerAugiistusO 

MillerCH-Truman o31 

Miller.TA ol3 

NorthLP olS 

PhelpsGN-MaryE ol7 

RipleyAugieB o7 

KipleyFred'k sl2 

SanfordEdmund s27 

SpcnyPranUliiiM ol3 

tjquiresMariiula o24 

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sl9 


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jy31 


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830 


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jyi2 


BinghamMT 


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BirgeJno&wf 


s22 


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Mil 


BlakelvMaryE 


024 


Boothil 


Sl9 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS HAKTFORD COUNTY. 



233 



BradlcyParali 


s2S 


" Archie 


•' 


BraiuardMrsWF 


s28 


Brewbtt'i'NL&wf 


n2 


BrockettAfahel 


A3 


" Mariett-CalistaV *' 


BrockcttMabelT 


m2(; 


Bi'OwuEmmaD 


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BuckCHitwf 


s(j 


BuellNB-Ruth-A 


n2 


BuellllatticA 


o20 


Buell Minnie A 


o21 


BullSD 


si!) 


BuunellEmilieJ 


o31 


BuinhanilIM[PP]jelO 


ButlerliO 


027 


ByiugtonSwift 


a29 


CampJuliaE 


S28 


CandeeWA&wf 


n2 


CarpenterH 


jy4 


CarrollJW&wf 


Je23 


CarterWmW 


oil 


ChafteeSJ-SM 


m25 


ChurchillJ-JB 


ol7 


CburchillMrsJno 


si 


CookHB 


OlS 


CoiizL'lmanC 


jy2l 


" yarah-Joseph 


" 


CoulterWmB 


018 


DamonWL&wf 


o20 


BarrowFE&wf 


je7 


DewolfRcvD je27ol2 


" MrsDelevan 


je27 


DowuesEllaA 


a22 


BowusFrauk 


jyi 


DowneFrankE 


A22 


DuubarEB&wf 


o4 


DinibarWmA 


a22 


GainesCA 


s21 


GarduerAlmira 


oil 


GoodenoughHB 


o5 


GoodenonghL«fcw 


folO 


" Hattie-Sadie-CK " 


GoodseinVmO 


jyio 


GoodwinEP&wf 


oO 


GowdyGeorgeA 


NlO 


" nclonG-MiUie 


" 


GrantGeoH 


s25 


Grayllenry 


Je24 


GridleySR 


n2 


GwillimTJ 


67 


HallldaR 


a2C 


HallRobertE 


o26 


HartSethR 


o24 


HawleyBFjr 


S13 


" MP 


" 


HawleyHelenE 


A17 


HawleyL^I 


sl9 


HoUisterES 


CIS 


HoltJerrvB 


o27 


HortouFA 


olil 


HubbellLaPorte 


Al8 


" MrsLaPorte 


" 


HullGeoS 


n3 


HiingerfordHVV 
HuidWR 


024 


je21 


EurlbutHH 


Jy4 


HntchinsonHenry oi2 


Hntchins^onWII 


o31 


IngraliamEda 


s30 


" Lilian 


" 


IngrahamlrvingE 


s28 


IntrrahamWS 


sl9 


IvesChasG 


olO 


IvesLizzieG 


olO 


Jerome A bbieC 


sl2 


JonesWS 


sl9 


Jnd.lWniH 


Jy20 


JudsonEP 


je2 



LaddJamesE ol4 

LaddWS s21 

LaneCE s21 

LeeJamcsN Nl 

LewisGeo All 

LockwoodT&wf ol8 
LoomisAC o23 

LowreyHP-EW ol8 
"MaryE 

Mac'kJnoCjr jy5 

" MissGcorgie *' 
ManrossEdwardA s9 
MatthewsByron olS 
MatthewsMrsMS 823 
MayFerdiuand Jel5 
MerrickLevG&wf o2fi 
MerrimanQeo o26 
"AP-TE-MA 
MerrimanGjr&wf ol2 
MerrimanTD olb 

MitchellAnnieJ je29 
MitchellGeoW s27 
" EvaL 

MitcliellJR&wf s4 
MitchellJuliaN Je27 
MonceSG Je20 

MooreJW o31 

MorrisChaeE o31 

MuueonAlbert&wfo27 
NettletonWH a26n10 
" HN-AR a2C 

NewellMrsEdwE Nl 
NewellSamuelD ol8 
NewollSP&wf s28 
" Lillie-Della-Mary" 
NorthMrs s5 

NorthJennieR Jy2(j 
NortonAlfredL ol9 
NortonAugiistine o26 
NortonGad&wf o24 
NortonGilbertE Jy3 
" LutberB 

NortonMarphallP oil 
NortonWalterE ol9 
NottChasE sl4 

NottJnliiis 018 

PardeeJNIrsAE s7 

Pardee.! iilinaH oil 
Parsons A Il&wf Jyl9 
ParsonsHS o31 

ParsonsThosD olS 
PeckED sii 

PeckllA m31o11 

Peck.TM sT 

PeckLucyA o2ti 

PeckLndellaL jyl7 
PeckMilesL-MarySon 
PeckTheB-JennieE s2 
PenfieklEO s4 

PerkinsMerwinH All 
PerkinsMrsMH ol8 
PierceNE s9 

PorterEO ol8 

PrattHenryS a2S 

RavniondCE s20 

RevnoldsCA-SE a23 
RicbardsWmC ol8 
RiggsCH ol8 

RobbinsE-M.J olG 
RobinsonRelleW o31 
" SophiaEW 
RobinsonTB oSO 

Robin PonLW o17 

RootSEm's'n&wfjelO 
RossJosE s22 

RopsiterMrsHR o4 
RovceLM 8l3 

SarifordLA a22 

SaxtonEdwardV Jy4 



SastonLindaE o4 

SessionsldaC-EL s21 
SessiouijJHjr&wf jyO 
•' WE 

SeymourGeoD s2 

SeymourGrate ol9 
SeymourllenryA i<'.) 
SeymonrLauraE k1 
ShcpardMisEB f'> 
SigourncyAM oil 
Si5;ourueyl' W sl'.i 
SkinnerE-SarahE a2-1 
SparksCH o31 

SpencerEW jy2r) 

SpringEdwS oil 

SpringE&wf ol9 

SpringSC&wf o2U 
" DoraM " 

StaatsIIeuryJ je7 

"ChasL 

SteeleThosB-Sarah n9 
Si!tliffSam'lM&w&el9 
TaylorSam'l aIO 

Terry Emerson G NlO 
TerryFranklinE nlO 
ThompsonAD&w-f ?1 
Thompson JIrsGWA22 
ThorpeElbertE s(i 

" WalterE " 

ThorpeWW 620 

TiffanyFB o25 

TuttleArthnrW NlO 
UpsonDellaB s28 

WardHenry o3 

WardJE&wf " 

" Maria-E " 

WardJII ol2 

WaruerCA&wf Nl 
WarnerCarrieM Jy26 
VVarnerHobartA s4 
WarncrMinnieA jylO 
WavJnoA jel4A31 
WebsterAD o2-l 

WfldonME s7 

WilcoxEA-lME jylO 
' Hiram-Algernonil " 
WilcoxJC-JE s22 

FannieL " 

WilliamsJW o3 

WillistonJF jeCo31 
WilsdonThosT ol9 
Woodford Addie ol2 
WoodwardEP o2fi 
WritrhtFM Je21 

WrightWX 017 

rORESrS'ILLE. 

BancroftMissJulia o5 
BeckleyRoseA o30 



BirdElsieC 
BirdNinaM o(i 

BradleyOB s4 

BrowerlliramB o23 
BrownGeoW&wf jel5 
BurdictMinnieA sl8 
ConklinGeoG n2 

CurtissED s12n3 

DonglassRA o5 

:Fani'sw'thJS[PP] jel6 
GoodrichCA o3 

GoodsellSarahA ol8 
HendrickGeoW 
HoltLJ-Ellal 
IIorneMrsJW 
HubbellFL 
HurdWR[PutPx] jel6 
LewisFredH oil 

McGarFred Jyfi 

ManrossMrsEli a22 



Jyl3 

Al5 

ol7 
o2 



IVianrossMrsLC s8 

SageAinos s28 
ISpringGAtsl9)&wfjy6 

StarkAP oil 

Stilc^DA jel8 

TurneyDennisH sia 

\V'ilcoxFri'eniaii oil 

WoosterGertiO sl3 

LrRLLXGTCX. 

EaconEmilicL n8 

BarkerBE s-;3 

" Arthur " 

BarnesAnnieS t!26 

BarnesAdna sll 

Barneslsaac&wf n8 

BeldenMrsIsaac sll 

BuuneliNorrisW n9 

BurdictProfiSP s28 

ButlerFM s26 

EltonRomeo a3 

GilletteJN-Mary s7 

IlartlganWmR n8 
HartwellEvelineE sl4 

HenryMrsSarah n8 

HolconibD s7 

MarshallJnoJ sl6 

MosesLH s26 

SessionsWr&wf s8 

SmithCoraM n6 

SpencerEdwardP o30 

CANTON. 

AdamsAR ol4 

AdamsEugene a22 
BarbourHM s5 

BeckwiihA&wf s6 
BlairChasH o23 

BristolAW&wf s6 
BrownSE s7 

CaseAM&wf-EnjFA22 
CaseFrank-WN o27 
CascMrsGco ol9 

C'ascMN-Marvin Nl 
DyerDT-HattieM Nl 
FancherS oil 

PrazierSN 621 

GillctteFA n3 

HallockWmG&wf s8 
HawksMrsAP s29 
HawksMrsMary sS9 
HubbardDB&wf s20 
HnmphreyAF s5 

HumphreyWMllieG s6 
LanibertE o23 

LawtonWellsA-EA s5 
MatherBC s2 

MillsGW&wf sl4 

MooreAH n9 

SissonGilesA s6 

" Caroline " 

SkinnerlMG s7 

StrongCB a22 

WarnerWA s27 

WbiteEdM ol8 

IWbitingPF o3 

WilliamsHA jyl2 

WoodlordCM&wf s27 

CANTON CENTER. 

BarberCH-AJ n4 

BidwellHP o5 

CaseEugeneG o7 

CaseJB o5 

FooteHowardW Jy3 

HumphrevFredG o5 

HnmphreyGeoF o6 

SissonEUaJ oil 

SkinnerAustinH o30 



240 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITON. 



WhiteNellieM o25 OlmstedGJ&fam je21 
iPubblesEmmaF s26 
NORTH CANTON. IshepherciGU&wf a2.3 
CasdEverett n9 BlieridanBO'R b27 

" EmilyU " SmitliPF&wf o(j 

Ca?eHeury-Lorin Nl StroutLB-MaryE o7 
Case Watson n9 StroutSD 820 

" Luciiida-NellieL " iThayerCha8W-FHo24 
PorterRevWL a21 ThayerJL 0l2 

SmithPC N'J Titi'auyRH&wf n3 

ThompsonTennieE n3 Tunit-rGeoF 



Ml9 



ViiiiugRC-ChasH 

WeaverSA 

WeedGeoA 

COLLINSVILLK. 

AldermanCH 

AldiichJC 

AndnisJnoR&wf 



Nl 

o28 
o28 



WeeksAIdaE 



Al8 



EAST GUANBY. 

BatesCW 626 

BealeJosephH&wf n9 

s21 ChamberlaiuMB sl2 

b5 ClarkeCP-NaiicyS Nl 

a9, Clark WayneD o2 

AtwaterOlaytouW o5 ComishJosE-Chas s9 

■ "' n9 

87 
82 



O30 
jel6 

s27 



AtwaterClifford ol7 GayLS 
Bakerf'rancisR o34;Gay\VilbertH 
BavurCS a26 QouklMaryE 

BeckwithOA&wf sl9," JennieM 



"OAjr&vvf 

BeutleyNA 

BishopSeth 

BlairChas 

BiairMrt;EB 

BrainerdFred'c 



GriswoklJasA ol9 

o4GrisvvoWWB o2 

o24 HavdeuWmO a2 

jyl7o3 LeeThosH 86 

" I Mc Kinney Jas o24 

o30 MillerChandlerE o5 



Cai penturRutbE o33 PhelpsRH^uliaE A2;i 
'• Abby " iThomp8onMi88UAsl9 

CanEllenR o4 ThompsonMrsEP o5 



jyl3 
ol8 



CarrEsthorP n4 VietsCJ 

CariLJ-JB A^l VietsEdwB 

CariN o3 VietsHW-PH 87 

ChapmanCharlieC A23[VietsJB a30 

CoddinsrSamuel a29j VietsJamesR o25 

" ChasN " " MrsJas-ArthurE " 

ColtonJennieL Jyl7 VietsMaryL 87 

CraneHattieR o4 VietsSB a23 

DverMrsSL ol4 : VietsVE je9 

ESwardsGeoP&wf N9IWentworthEliz 628 

EUsworthEdward 86 „ . „„ „„„ 

FlintMrsHattieL jel7 EAST HAKTFORD. 
GavinKatie s27lAckleyEwf&daii oil 

Goodman ArthurJjeie I AndereonAlbertH Nl 
GreenOD JySJAndensonMrsNL o4 

HaleDavidB s2i AnioldMissS o6 

HaloDB-LaiiraS o5] Bancroft .las 821 

012 1 Barneses 827 

o(i BeaumoiitMissE s6 

o25 ( BeaumontHG&wf s6 



HarringtonJP 

HartCA&wf 

HawleySiisieB 

Holl)rookDO 

IlotchkissAlfW 

"WE 

HoaghEAAwf 

HuginsChas 

Hu rdHerinan-AF 

Johnson E A 

Johnson WS 

JonesBF&wf 

LaneAM 

LaneRD&wf 

MattoonBM 

MinerOH&wf 

MulvanyThos 

MealMStanley 

NelsonOF 

O'ReillyMaryJ 

PeaseOrrinA 

PerryFR 

" EC-CB 

PerryOIiverP 

Richardson EK 

RobinsonWmP 

Ron an Mi chad 

SearsBH 

SextonEN 



o27, BeaiiniontWD&wf 

0^41" IdaE-FannieE " 

" BoardmanL&wf je29 

o4 BoyntonAlice a17 

s9 BrowerEdvvin-LL oil 

s2 ! Bre werEmmaM o4 

sl9 BiewerLouiseH jel9 

8l4 BrewerM[PutPx] jel6 

a23 BrewerMaryP a18 

o3 BrowerNS je20ol4 

o25(BrewerSeklen o26 

s2!BiimhamMrsYA ob 

o25 BiirtonRobtH n9 

A30,ChaffeeMJ 85 

o3 ChaptnanHattieL Jy24 

87,Child8FrancisR jyl2 

827|ChildeMaryL jyl3 

a23 ChildsSB jvl2 

ol2 ConistockFrankG.jel9 

" ComstockP&wf ol2 

Nl ComstockJabezK n9 

n9 CotnstockJG jel6 

821 [LieiitPiit Phalanx] 

811 CdinstockWmG n8 

jel7 ComstockWGjr ol8 

012," MrsAG-RJ 



NobleHoratio 
NobieJohuB 
CooleyChasA 
DarliuGW 
DowdC 

DowdLouisaW 
" ClaraA ** 

DowdTLCaptPP] je21 
DuflyWm s6 

EatonArthurW 819 
EatonBF jy8 

En8iLrnER(je9)&wfs27 
•' Milton '• 

EnsignFHoward s8 
ForbesAlbertA 6l2 
ForbesChasRjr si 
ForbesChasT o26 

ForbesGn-NellieAsl4 
ForbesMrsGH o6 

" Emma " 

ForbesJamesS sl3 
ForoesSamuel&wf Nl 
FosterNormauD s26 
" Willies 

Garvin P-Nellie ol8 
GilmanMissLouiseolS 
GilmanR-A o5 

GoodwinEO[PP] jclfi 
GoodwinMrsES ol2 
GoodwinGII&wf o23 
GoodwinGeoO s26 
GoodwinSO s21 

Gris\voldFGenevraje9 
IlannierMary je9 

"• FannieM 
HallJKnox jel6 

[LieutPutPhalanx] 
HanmerWm si 

" FrankH-WmH " 
HanmerMrgWm 
HavensMrsHE 
IlaydenEW 
IlaydenHR 
IlerdlenAug 
HillsAP 
HillsChesterM 
HillsFredE 
HollisterChasT 
'• HattieG " 

HollisterSamuelO slS 
" Nellie 

HollisterSW-Geojyll 
HowletteHG ol8 

JamesJHwf&daa o4 
KilbourneA&wf oil 
KuightMrsHH n2 

LawlerRF o]3 

LesterMrsJuliusM ol9 
LesterLawren ce 
LittleEdwardH 
LittleGII 
LoomisWA&wf 
" MrsIIW-May 
LordEllenM 
" JennieL 
ManningEdwB 
ManningWH 
MinerWm&wf 
MoodyEdward 
MooreArthurP 
MoranJasF 
MorseL&wf-EdwL Nl 
MorseMillieE 
Morton A J 
OlmstedAaronG 
OlmstcdAnnieE 
OlinstedArthurG 
OlmstedMrsAG 



Perrj'ChasD n9 

PitkinAddison&wfs27 



s26 
a2 
o5 

jy7 

821 



b7 



o26 
o%i 

821 

026 

o23 
n9 
o6 



o6 

a22 
Jy8 
je9 
827 
o6 
s5 
o2 
Sl4 



jelG 

Jyl2 

olS 

821 



jel6 



jel9 

s8 



s27 
oir. 

Ml9 

o5 
ol8 



OlmstedChasH&wf " 



PitkinllM 

PorterEJI 

PrattGeoW 

PrattlraH 

RaymondAC 

•• MrsEB 

RisleyAH 

RisleyAliceM-JE ol2 

RisleySanfordL o25 

KisleyWmH 

Roberts Andrew 

RobertsChasW 

RobertsHM 

"MrsRW 

RobertsJuliaA 

RobertsRW 

KogersMissGW 

SchlesingerMrsJCPNS 

SkinnerHD o7 

SmithMrsIIenryT s6 

SmithJB-MaryJ s22 

SpencerEmily je-:iO 

SpencerHarrietW s8 

" JessicC '* 

SpencerRG-SW Jyl9 

StanleyChasF si 

S tedman H P [PPx] jel6 

StoneAliceB ol6 

TerryLC oil 

ThorapsonMC jel6 

TreatCiarenceB 

TreatnC 

TullerWJ 

TylerEB 

TylerHemanA 

[ColonellstRegt] 
WhiteJW o27 

WilcoxFannieA jel2 
WilcoxGeoK s28 

WilliamsCH&wf o24 
WilliamsGeoA 
WilliamsHB&wf 
WilliarasKittie 
WlUiamsDL 
" SarahM-EA 

EAST WIADSOE. 



jel9 
ol3 

s27 

6l5 

s9 



oB 
o3a 

s27 
a23 



AdamsSB 

AllenFrancis-SS 

BancroftHN 

BarberWA-HS 

BarbonrEM 

BartlettOW 

BaschUL 

BissellJH 

BriggsDavidB 

Cal-rThos 

ClarkeFE 

CoxEM 

DavenportHA 

" MrsB-MissN 

DunhamM 

Ellsworth.JO 

■' LucyS-EM-Allie " 

EIlsworthMasonP sT 



je8 
826 
s28 
ol8 
a31 
sl6 
jo23 
03 

6ll 

s96 
ol8 
ol7 
829 

o9 

s5 



FittsJohnF 

GilmoreMaggie 

IlaskellHB 

LeavittCaleb 

MasonJohn 

MiddletonGeoW 

MillerMrsEP 

MoodyKittieS 

Morton ElishaG 

Mulliiran.John 

NobleKateD 

OsboruNS-SM 



o31 

629 

s4 

o30 

o5 

o4 

NlO 

ol8 
o3 



a31 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS. HARTFORD COUNTY. 



241 



Par?on?rG-HA ol7 
'• ]SIabL4E-HattieG " 
TriorCB o4 

PriorMrsEJ s22 

IdslejSW-Ellena slO 
SkinnerJH a31 

SniithH je9 

SperryJR-EllenG s6 
SiouchtonJS 
SioughtonMrsL 
"Ljr 

TarboxFrankN 
ThayerEllenL 
ThompsonAJ 
Thompson EP 
ThompsonWH 
*• Mrslluklah 
WatsonGeo 
WellsChasH-HJ 
WoodOS 



BROAD BEOOK. 

AbbeCG 

AdamsG-M 

BendallMrsWH 

Bis^ellCAifewf 

" Abbie-Eliza 

BlsselDIaryM 

BlodgettChasS 

BlodgettEngeneC 

ConiiorFli 

CoxWm 



A3 

a4 

je22 

P22 

Davenpo tCW&wf s" 
" LillaB " 

DavenportWA 
DwightEllaP 
HaighEdwin 
HamiltonFA 
HoneeAnnaP 
LaeburvEG 
" JeanuetteQ 
LasburyGeo 
LasburyGeoB 
" WmM 
LeouardEK 
" MrsEK 
MannFred 
NorthFD 



sl2 
a2 
je22 
s22 
o5 
s28 

olT 



je9jy5 
jyj 
s20 
s21 
NorthEW-MrsMM s29 



NorthSL 

Parson sHC 

PlattHervey 

SchouleRE 

SempleA 

SpauklingLT 

SugdenlSiWales 

" ArthurW 

Tayloi-GeoB 

WeruerFredC 



oil 
s26 
Je22 
je23 
je24 
ol2 
jyl2 

a24 
012 



•WAREHOTJSE POINT. 
Nl 

014 
sl3 
o31 
je9 
o27 
olO 
oil 
012 



AdamsMrsAW 

AdainsLukeW 

AUenFJ 

AllenllWjr 

ArnoklJoseph 

ArnoldMrsML 

BailevEdwW 

BakeiFB 

BarbcrWTitwf 

" Mist-esJR&ML 

BarnesHL 

BartlettEdwinS 

BassingerJos 

" John 

BurtonMissGeorgie n3 

ChapinEA a31 

ColtonJasB 86 

CooperMrsFW a34 



of) 
jcl5 



DcanGM&wf sl5 

DeweyC'J o9 

DiinhamMrsMG s22 
DuuhamWM otj 

FennMrsAP n3 

FilerMisGilbertA a3U 
FishEdwinB s2U 

FishMrsSL a30 

FiskGeoMcC JelT 

FiskMrsML-AF s20 
GoodridgellEW m2C 
" Edward-TWelles " 



AllenLaura 625 TwissHAmelia o26 

AUenLS-Ethel'aL o4 UpsonLA&wf s22 
jAUeuSam'lJ&wf s27 VanhornS&wf slO 
" MrsBartlett " WatsonLulie ol4 

BancroftWB o26 WhitonGeoC ol9 

[BartlettRobt o30 Wood\v'idIIC&sons23 

iBoothGaiusN&wf 031 WoodwardllS&wf Nl 



IlarperSB 

HeathWmH 

IlillWJ 

HodgeMrsC 

IIodgeldaE 

InsleeCT 

KinkelChas 

KinkelRobertA 

KoehlerMichael 

LeonardJN&wf 

LightfootJohnjr 

LynchJF 

ParkerMrsEH 

'* GeorgieD 

PascoFred'cW 

PeltonGeoS 

PettiboneFrankE jy4 

PhelpsChasE&wf ol6 



sl8 
o27 
sl6 
aSO 
a24 
oil 

Jy2(j 
018 
031 
jy3 
sis 
oil 

o31 

a24 



BraiuardAlvah 

BrainardDavid 

BrainardHS-CH 

BrewerFHiSrwf 

BnrnhamNH 

ChapinFrankD 

ChapinMrsJosT 

ConeOT-HB 

ElyFE-ElizS 

PrencbEdgarR 



sl9 

gjrj HAZAEDVILLE. 

o24 BridgeEphr'm&wfol2 

a3 BridgeEJ oi) 

n4 BrklgeGeo&wf je21 

s8 Bridget! ary J ol8 

all CharterMattieE a29 

s23CooleyJS a7 

o3l|Denslo\vEmilyn m20 
a221" MarmadukeH 



GowdyMrsFr'ncisBN2 FrenchLucieM 



n2 
m30 



Price Jamesjr 

RiggsRT-ST 

RockwellSD 

RoehnerWmjr 

Scluiste; Henry 

ScottWinfield 

SextonMissEH 

SextonGeoH&wf ol8 

Seyp'oldtLouisD jy26 

StockerGeoL Jy24 

SmithAaron s21 

SmithMrsIIelenM a31 

SmithPannieA 

SperryGeoS 

SperryGS 

SpoonerEP 

WaklorfltB 

WhippleE 



jel3 
je3 



ol7 
jy3 
o9 
8l4 
jelO 



WhittelseyFH&wfolH 
WoodwardCE&wf " 



EXFIELD. 

AbbeAlbert 

'•jSIrsA-Wolcott 

AbbeAlbertN 

AbbeCC 

AhbeCM 

" AmeliaM 

AbbeDavidL 

AbbePredC-EdW 

AbbeGE 

AbbeJohn 

AbbeNorton 

AbbeRE 

AbbeWA-KittieC 

AbbeWm&wf 



AbbeWoIcott&fam a1 



AldenHenryD 

AllenAsher 

AllenAF 

AIlenMrsAP 

" .)N&wf 

AllenAlbertP 

AllcnEC-NA 

AHen-lamesM 

AllenPrancis 

" MrsF-LonisB 

AllenllenryT 

AllenlraP 



s19 
a2 

s8 
s20 

n9 
sis 
s19 
Je8 

Sl3 



GowdyLizzie 

GrayMr&MrsD 

" JP-MrsJE 

HallOE 

HallRJ 

HathewayG 

HenryMrsPM 

HoskinsCE s9 

JohneonJWarren s7 

KenyonRobt&wf Jel4 

K.mballWT sl9 

KingAdelaideH a31 

KingCO 

" LucindaA 

Kin^Hoiace 

KuightCTerry 

KressGeo 

LawEC 

LawJno&wf-JD 

LeeMaryC 

LordAlbertT&wf 



oil 



827 

03 

A3 

014 

je22 

Jy2(i 

s30 



MartindaleWmF o21 
MathewsonFlor'ceA23 



MathewsonGT 

MathewsonHA 

MiddletownJno 

MorrisonCH 

MorrisonRobtB 

" JuliaR-ArinaE 

ParsonsPredP 



627 
018 
a21 

AlO 

m29 

Al6 



Al8 

FrenchWR oil 

GordonGeoB&wf.icl9 
GowdyAW jel7 

HamiltonCA&wf ol2 
HazardJN 
JacksonMellieR 
ol3 LawJasBifcwf 
LawWH 
LuceLW 
OlmstedFB-OS 
OlmstedMrsMir'da n3 
" MissFAlberta " 
ParsonsMrsFW sll 
PrickettGeorgiaC AlO 
"■ LenaJ " 

RosenbergerHen'yFsS 
ShepherdCWjr m29 
SimpsonGeo&wf 012 
SmilhChasN jel9 
SmithPranklin je21 
SmithMrsF 
" JessieM 

TiflauyChasG jel9 
TiflanyMrsChae je21 



je21 



THOMPSONVILLE. 



024 
Ol9 

o4 AldenMaryA 
o24'AllenAW&wf 
" jArnottJL 
s7 BabcockMerritW 



ParsonsMerwinB o26 BarberLiunaA 
ParsonsNewellA a3 " SelinaM 
ParsonsPB-Emily olllBatesEC 
PattenHorace&wf a31 BklwellJuliaA 
PattenHB a1 BrklgeTC 

PattenHomerW Al CadyDwightH 
PhelpsElliotJ o24 ChapinFD 



821 
je3 
013 
e4 
je8 

614 

s8 
n3 
620 

s8 



PhelpsEudoraH 

PotterAH 

PotterJasE 

PotterTB 

" MrsAnnieE 

PrickettMrsEdwdje22 ElyLillaL 

ReynoklsSC&wf sl8 FowlerGeoB 



a22 ClarkCW-HelenE Je8 
s20 CowingRilla a3 

a2;3 CunimingsMrsJH o2ii 
olS|DoigMaggieE 
iDwinfordGeoW 



RichmondThos 

ScottRienzi 

SimpsonJames 

SmithSam'lC 

SpencerWells 

StilesEliG&wf 

StillmanSA 

StoweChasE 

" GeoW 

StoweJD-MrsSE 



o4:"MrsEllenH 
627 FowlerLoiiisA 

o4 GibsonArchie 

N9|GrahainAggicJ 
AlO HallamDL 
oil HarrisonDavid 
je28 HarrisonChasG 
Al7 1 Harrison Jane 

" IHilditchChasH 
8l2 HilditchDavid 



je6 
m25 
012 

■Ti-S 

a9 
013 
o9 
I.-8 
o2ti 
je]9 
sl4 
026 
s30 



SarahE-HattieB " IWm-Isabclla 

"WillieH " IlIilditchHugh s6 

StoweJW&wf o30 Hiklitch.Iennie sl4 

StricklandR a23 HiklitchWmjr 6l 

" Mrs-NellieL " Houston JohuL m29 

" LizzieH-MyraE " | " JamesB " 

TaylorThomas b5 HoustonMreJnoL s23 



242 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



IIowsonRevJno 


Mil BishopFM 


sr 


lAtwaterChapN 


s20 


ClarkElishaP 


66 


" MaryD 


•• BishopHA 


o25 CookeJamesD 


A23|ClarkeFB 


815 


HunturJno 


oO BishopUarrietP 


o26'Co(.keMrsJ 


0*4 ColeHiramS 


o25 


JackElizabeth 


aU2 BiowuPhilipC 


o4 " ^etlieJ 


" CorbittHattie 


S14 


" Mai-j,'aret 


" jL'arringtouDrChas jelS'DanielsSW 


NlUiCornishJimiesP 


o9 


JohnsouCiiester 


je6 


CoulcsEd wards 


A3:DeianeyFH 


620:Covclll-C 


jy7 


Killain.VIrsE 


o9 


CowlesxMrsFW 


m24 DelangWra 


a5 


CovellMrsFC 


oil 


Kiii^Kred-Ainaodas^j 


CowlcsUA-Nellie 


a29 DunliamGoo-CC 


a25 


LovellMaryA 


jy7 


KiugHeuryW 


s4 


CowlcsMrsJuliusD oil!" CeoM-EcllcB 


" 


CrosbyLE 


sl4 


KiiiijJD 


je-n 


CowlesJS-IlM 


Jel(j!DnuhamMaryJ 


a29 


CurtissEdnaA 


s7 


Kin,-RF&wf 


s6 


CowlesMartin 


je8' Ellsworth JW 


a29 


DanforthMrsWB 


A24 


Kiii','sbnryAS 


Al2 


CowlcsSarahW 


o3U,£llsworthMrsJW 


ol2 


DearingAL 


jyio 


Kiiiu'-ibtiryElla 


n9 


CramptouEllaJ 


OlU 


FrisbieS&wf 


je7 


" SarahH 




'• Isolene 


s9n9 


CramptouMrsR'd 


o24 


FuUerAJ 


Je24 


EmleyJno 


Je9 


Kin^'jibiiryTh'dotia s9 


CrossKatie 


o30 


GeorgiaChaeC 


627 


FrenchCB 


o5 


'• Luciuda 


" 


DaileyCE&wf 


o23 


GeorgiaCT 


S4 


FreuchND&wf 


o28 


La vei-ty Daniel 


s8 


DarlinsTH 


031 


GillcttFred 


sl9 


FrenchNW&wf 


o5 


MallardGeo 


je28 


DormanMinnieE 


n8 


HamiltonJE 


A31 


FryerBA 


f20 


Mai-tiuIIK 


m24 


" Carrie J 


" 


HartBU-FM 


NlO 


GainesEC 


Pl3 


MartiuWni 


ol2 


FessendenMr&Mrs m24 


HartGeoW&wf 


s6 


GainesCT&wf 


Am 


McCrackeuCL 


5122 


GayCarrie 


a29 


HartHubertC 


613 


" Frank 




McGi-ackenMrsFAjiSl 


GayErastii3 


Ol8 


HitchcockWA 


sl9 


GoodrichAliceM 


a30 


McCroneHuffh 


s20 


GayWm&wf 


S20 


HumphreyHW 


sl9 


GoodrichEE 


oU 


McCroneLizzie 


Jel5 


HartNewton 


o27 


JenkiueJK 


025 


GoodrichGeoF 


Jy27 


McFarlaaeEdwJ 


je28 


HawleyA 


s27 


JohnsouFW 


sll 


GoodrichRevJB 


69 


McUregorJas 


m3() 


HawleyAddieP 


OlO 


JonesLM 


031 


GoodrichJQ&wf 


oil 


McLea'uAlex'r 


o25 


HawlevAliceG 


Al7 


lieyesMissCB 


o24 


GordonTH 


ol4 


MorrisouCliasS 


s2 


IlawleyDR 


e27 


KuappGS 


A23 


GosleeBelleE 


je29 


" Prank 


" 


HawleyFrancis 


sl9 


LarkenCII 


s7 


GosleeMrsWmS 


o20 


MoiTi!<onGeoW 


s7 


HawlcvIIenryD 


je22 


LarkinMrsCH 


024 


HardinSC&wf 


el4 


MoiTi:<onJa;neiR 


a31 


•' CA-LM 


" 


MosesAdrian 


s4 


Mollis terEmilyE 


s7 


OatesJohuC K 


jyi 


HawlovSC 


p27 


ParsonsML 


NlO 


HollisterJnoC 


65 


OlJi-oydDavidF 




Uibbai-dMrsAL 


Ml5 


PartridgeMrsGeo 


jy3 


HollisterlN 


ol7 


PalmerNP 


s22 


JaquaFW 


Nf! 


PondLB 


jc9 


HouseLizzieT 


a2 


ParsonsFredJ 


o~ 


LewisHelenM-HG 


jeS PorterKamlJ 


Ii30 


HoweClayton&wf ol8 


Parson sWC 


s8 


LewisJP 


.je9i'- SJJr 


Al8 


HoweFrankB 


67 


PeaseLrt jyllo30 


MytrattHcnry&wf 


old PorterSamlQ&wf 


n6 


HubbardDL&wf 


Jy24 


PeaseNiles .ie9N3 


Norton Edward 


ell PorterSamlT . 


Sl9 


HuntMary 


Al6 


PeaseNiles w&daii s2 


ParsonsLntherT 


je9'PrestonAD 


s4 


KelloggEmily 
" HelenW 


A31 


PeaseTheoJ&wf 


o4 


Parsons WmS 


o30 


PrestonED 


NlO 


" 


PriceMrsJnoB 


04 


RockwollElizA 


SO 


RichardsLucas&wf n3 


Kingsbury MissFE oil 


PriceJohnB 


o2() 


UootKittieB 


n8 


RichardsS&wf 


Oil 


" MissCA 


" 


PriceMrsLouiseL 


017 


RootMissML 


n8 


" Miss-GeoL 


>• 


KingsburyHP 


Oil 


KeynoldsElizA 


S21 


Root!sainin&wf 


024 


RipleyEngeneB 


a23 


KomgiebleWm 


s5 


EevnoldsMisJW 




RootTH-LG 


s5 


SanfordMaryET 


OlO 


LitchlieldJosieA 


031 


" WillieM 


" 


RoyaL\ndrusfPP) 


Jel6 


" HF-Frauk-Chas " 


LoomisHE&wf 


815 


SaddEinersonE 


s22 


SedgwickWmT 


S6 


SanfordT 


66 


LovelandClinton 


s6 


Severance AM 


oil 


SkinuerCephas&w 


fsl4 


SmithJasA&wf 


018 


McManusMary 


a30 


ShackletonEVV 


s2.) 


Smith!'. A 


a26 


TryonFrankA 


o26 


MoseleyAlbertW Jy27 


Siinp;?onDL 


sl2 


SmithRevWmH 


s2.S 


TryonFS 


o6 


MoseleyMissEA 


s9 


SimpsouMrsJC 


je6 


StilesLizzie 


o25 


UpsonAS 


jy5 


MoseleyJohnB 


oil 


Smith A J 


n9 


TillotsonEW 


a30 


WadsworthSN 


S4 


MoseleyRobt 


622 


" MissMaryC-EdwN-' 


TillotsonJno 


87 


WoodfordLM 


ol7 


MoseleyMrsSA 


o5 


SmithEW 


ol9 


Thompson.Mra 


p20 


WoodfordWW 


Je22 


NorthMaryJ 


s28 


SteeleWmG 


013 


TreadwellRB 


ol7 






PhelpsShermanS 


a2 


Stewart Agues 


oil 


TreadwellThos 


Oil 


GLASTOXBUEi. 


PorterFannie 


sl4 


StevvartJB 


olO 


VickersGeoH 


O30 


AffleckHenry 


sl4 


PotterHA 


6l3 


TryonAH 


s30 


WadsworthAR 


a3U 


AndersonllJ 


013 


RaukinJD 


69 


Try on Watson 


s4 


WadsworthHH 


jyio 


Andi-ewsChasE 


s7 


RankiuLucyV 


A24 


UpsonCalista 


o9 


" FA 


a30 


AndrewsGeoC-CB o31 


ReySaml 


a2 


WatsouMaryE 


n2 


WadsworthRnthS 


a30 


BarrowsNellieM 


s21 


RobertsonGraceE a16 


" Christines 


" 


WadsworthWardM ol2 


BarrowsWmO 


s27 


RobertsonJnoT 


jy27 


Watson J as 


S2S 


WadsworthWM 


g7 


BeachElieha 


66 


RogersGeoH 


87 


" CarolineA 




WardEdwinC 


a29 


BentonJosiahn 


jel 


SelTewIsabelle 


018 


Wat^oaThos 


O20 


WheelerMrsEC 


e2a 


BlishTH-HarrietJ s8 


SextonMrsCoraH 


n6 


WellesPD&wf 


s28 


WheelerP 


ol8 


BrainardllN 


6l2 


SlocumJnoP 


626 


WilsonGeoL 


S20 


WheelerPrank 


s21 


Broadheadlsaac 


a30 


bmithMissIdaA 


a30 






WhitiugGeoN 


Ol8 


" JuliaW 


" 


Sommers(. aptR 


a30 


FARMINGTO. 


WhitmoreChasO 


o23 


BrooksClaraA 


025 


StantonEJ 


Jy27 


AlfredA 


s6 


WhitmanCL&wf 


a29 


BrooksDW-EdwD o31 


StevensCH 


" 


AlIinirJopephA 


o30 


WilliamsAF&wf 


sl4 


BuckllT 


s28 


StricklandCarrieM s8 


AllingMrs.JosA 


s2(; 


WilsonHR 


625 


BuckJasper 


jyl 


StricklandMJ 


s20 


Andre wsFrankA 


o31 


WoodrutTMS 


er, BiicklaudMreC-CEol9 


SwaiuThomas 


85 


AyerEC&wf 


o24 


" LM-HM-JA 


" 


BiicklandEvaA 


a30 


TalcottDL[PP] 


jel6 


'* LizzieM 


" 






BunceHC&wf 


oi;;; 


TallcottLucius 


s22 


BarbourllW&wf 


s27 


TJNIONVILLB. 




BnnceCS 


ol8 


TallcottOtis-CO 


87 


'• Anifusta 


" 


AdamsCE&wf 


sll 


CarterCN&wf 


o9 


TrcatEdwinP 


je7 


BarneyMrsDN 


e25 


AdamsEM&wf 


jel7 ChamberlinMD 


a22 


TreatEdwinS-EB 


o24 


JJeusteadLauraL 


o23 


AdamsFrauk 


sill 


ClarkAD 


66 


" Everett-Wmll 


" 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITOES HAETFOKD COUNTT. 



243 



TumerBcnjF a30 WilliamsMrsA M22] 
TuriicrStiiruesP a30 rniiVRT 
WiuUwurthC^ilesH asI (jKANBY. 

BemanEdwinR o25' 

BeacliGeoO je9 

BeujaminSamI n9 

" MaryE " | 

BurwellAS s6 

CooleyA-MrsAL oT] 

DeweyAF s8| 

Dewey Henry J Je9 
DeweyMissLBelle ois! 

DeweyWatson s7 

Dewey Willis oil 

DeweyMrs Willis nOi 

DeweyWm ol2 

DibbleGeorgieL o31 

" EmmaE " 

DibbleHinmanA o27 

EdwardsDrGW Al7 

FieldsChasG&wf e8 

ForsythR s21 

GilletteFi-ancisW o28 

GilletteMA b6 

GoddardByron a31 
GoddardH jy9je9Al4 

GoddardMrsH oHi 

GreenFrankA n8 

GriftinDN 629 

GrifMuGertieL el5 

" JennieE " 
HaiKlMrsJH-Alfred e9 
HayosEdward&wl'MlS 

HokombeMrsH o2 

" JIarvB-ClaraP " 

HolcorQbMrsLC 024 

HolcombRE b5 

HolcombTG jy5 

" MrsTG o20 

JewettFJ 64 

KeiidallMrsAL o24 

LathamAlbertC o24 

LathamNancyL n6 

LoomisCP&wf jel9 

LoomisFN 66 

LoomisJN&wf o5 

MaltbieTM aIO 

MorffanLewisR ol9 

MurphyTD 87 

PostEC 02 

ReedJComelia b8 

ReedLW-KateJ 8l3 

RiceEdwP n9 

RiceHerbert 87 

EiceJessieL n6 

RiceMaryA s8 

SaufordWE s6 

SterrettGilbertA olO 
StrattouLewellynJ s7 

VietsHenryG o26 
WilcoxMrsMahlon ol8 

WilcoxMS-EH s7 

HARTFORD. 

AbbeAHoward all 

AbellMaryK olO 

AbellWmll sl9 

AbbottLF Al4 

AbrahaniLC&wf s29 

AcclesGeo je5 

AdamsAT&wf Mil 

AdamsBerthaJ n3 

AdamsMrsC ol9 
AdameDarwin&wfs20 

AdamsFannieL a22 

AdamsHW n2 

AdamsMrsHW Al7 

AdamsMrsJM 65 

" CarrieK "- 



Wt■lle!^:Ml■bEJ 


s9 


WellesJaraesH 


s2G 


" EmilyS-ivIaryJ 


" 


WellesFu'k&wf 


a30 


" IlattieA 


" 


WellesHenry 


65 


WilliamsBT 


019 


Willianib^DW 


jeld 


WilliamsJamesB 


.7v24 


" iMrsJuliaE-Cai-rie " 


" Samnelll 


" 


WilliamsMaryE 


a2 


" MattieB 


" 


WilliamsWmS&wfo23 


" EmilyS-GeoG 


" 


" WE-Bernard P 


" 


" MarvS 


" 


WrightHM 


8l3 


SOUTH GLASTONBURY. 


Anderson Wat son 


olS 


AndrewsGcoS je9o5 


AvervMissMaryL 


06 


BabcbckAA&wf 


a23 


BarronLnke 


s4 


BlakeHatticA 


sl8 


ClarkAH&wf 


028 


ClossonWP 


Al9 


CraneAW&wf 


sl3 


CraneMW 


826 


DeanWoodard 


69 


DickinsonTD-AH olO 


" Alnerah-SAnna " 


ElliottMreJno 


67 


ElliottJuoE-TC 


jy26 


HaleGeo 


ol3 


HaleMrsHR 


jel5 


HaleJH 


024 


IlaleMarvM 


oil 


HinckleyWW 


" 


HodgeMelornE 


" 


HolhsterDavid 


" 


HollisterFlorenceJ s7 


HollisterJW 


o30 


" Aurelia 


" 


HollisterJuliaA 


a31 


" JennieE 


" 


KellamJL&wf 


s21 


" WalterB 


" 


KinneAW 


o3 


KinneGideon 


oil 


" MaryA-JI 


" 


KinneHenryA 


024 


KinneLS&wf 


o24 


MavnardMissMaryo24 


WillerElijah 


619 


MillerMrsE 


013 


" MrsHG 


" 


MillerJulia-Emily jy4 


MillerWUH 


o5 


MosesNoelH 


o27 


PenfieldOliverD 


017 


" NelsonE 


ol7 


PlunkettChasT 


o26 


SheffieldOodd'ng' 


nsl3 


SheffleldSanforaEje28 


" JuliaL-GeoA 


" 


" IlenryC 


" 


ShipmanEIlen 


s7 


TaylorDavidR 


ol7 


TaylorF-LucretiaSol9 


TibbalsMrsChasMAli 


TryonJnoE&wf 


o9 


WaldoCoraB 


87 


Waldo EmmaE 


o4 


WestBR 


826 



AdamsLillieE n8 

" MamieP " 

" MissH 

AdamsMrsSarah o 4 
AdamsShermanW o26 
Adau.sWmJ&wf s22 
AdkinsFA sl8 

Adkin8TG[FMajl] s6 
AffleckGeo ol6 

AhernJJ[SgtCoBl] s6 
Alie rn Jno- Amandaol 1 
AhernJames ol6 

AhernMatthew n9 
AishbfcrgE 65 

AlbroHenry-AA je22 
AldenWC&wf n9 

Alexanders jel6 

[LieutPutPhalanx] 
AllenAlexLCoFlst] s8 
AlleuEL 

AUenFred-ChasW s4 
AllenMreF-EC sS 

AllenFN ol7 

AlIenFS 66 

AllenMrsHP oil 

Allen JM-WillieHje27 
AllenJIEA slo 

AllenMiss je22 

AllenSH-AbbieA s21 
AllenWD jyl8 

AllenWmG Alo 

" &wf OlO 

Ak'xanderMiseJ 8l8 
AlexanderMinnie a2 
AlexanderSam'l jel9 
AlfordAnnie-Em'aolO 
s5 
023 
Jel7 
s5 
Jy7 
jy3 

6l8 



AllynJWm 

AlpressQeoR 

Altmanlsrael 

AltmanSamuel 

AlvordGeoM 

AmermanChasD 

AndersonMreWJ 

" LeilaE 

AngusAlex-D 

Ann;usJohn 

AndrewsAR 

AndrewsCH 

AndrewsEmmaB 



jel3 

031 

sl2 

8l3 

m26 



AndrewsErnestll jel6 
AndrewsFrankD s25 
AndrewsJasP o9 

AndrewsLillianA jyl9 
AndreweMyronA o9 
AndrewsOliverC " 
AndreweRobtD jel2 



AndrewsSW 

AndrewsWV 

AndrewsWalterS 

AndreweWmC 

AndreweWO 

" MaryP 

AndrewsWS 

AndrusChaeB 



o3 



AndrusHenry&wf sll 



AndrusMissNJ 

ApgarMrsJS 

AppoStJohn 

ArmetrongER 

ArnoldMrsHL 

ArnoldJM 

AshmeadSusieJ 

AspenwallGeo-jro o5 

AspenwallAM-MP o5 



o4 

n2 

Al4 
AlG 
a21 
je21 
sl3 



AtkinsAF&wf 

AtkinsCA 

AtkinsMissEM 

AtkinsJohnR 

AtkinsooEP 



820 
018 

618 
AlO 

s6 



AttletonMame 

AttletonEose 

AtwoodHenryS 

AtwoodSM 

AugurWmC&wf 

AuirtinMrsM 

AveryDrGeoW 

AyresMreJA 

" HenryW-FL 

" MaryB-AliceC 

BabcockED 

BabcockMrsHC 

BabcockWH 

BachmeyerJ 

BackusJJ 

BackusLillieT 

BackueSarahA 

" EllaA 

BaconChasP 

BaconLH&wf 



ol6 

jy26 

o31 

s8 

86 

Jy26 
Nl 
oil 



031 
jy3l 

n8 
o4 

jyi 

o20 
021 

87 
Mil 



BaileyAK-LuciaMjelS 



sl9 
j21 
je2 
oil 
jyS 
n4 
o6 

8l3 

olO 



BainGeo 

BaconMrsMA 

BakerAE 

BakerAH 

Bakerlsaiahjr 

BakerSam'lF 

BakerWilliam 

BakerWE&lam 

BakerWmA 

BaldwinBG[PPs] jel9 

" MrsBG 

BaldwinLtC[GHG] s8 

BaldwinCha6&wf " 

BaldwinCorueliaJ o20 

BaldwinFS olS 

BaldwinHenry 89 

Bakh\inJohnD jyl8 

BaldvvinMaryA s28 

BallChasH o31 

BallMrsLA s8 

BallStephen&wf jyl5 

BallardP-Harriet s6 

BarberCT 

BarberFredJ 

BarberGF&wf 

BarberHorace 

BarberHK 

BarberldaC 

BarberMaryL 

BarberWmP 

BarbourHS-LncyA sG 

BarbourJohnH a22 

BarbourJosL jel9s5 

" MrsJosL s5 

BarbourLA[Majlst] s6 

BarbonrSylvester jyl2 

" C'lI-LizzieL " 

" NellieP 

BarchfieldJ[CoB] 

BarkcrBertha 

" Rosie 

BarkerEL 

BarkerJC-JT 

BarkerWniH 

BarkerLudlow&wf o2 

" Cora 

BarkerWL 

BarmbyGooH 

BarnardEllenS 

BarnardJosieD 

BarnardWH 

BarnesGeoC 

BamesLorenW 

BamesSA 

BarnesSarahA 

BamumJosH 

BarnumMrsJH 

BarrettChasC 



a31 
s23 
ol9 
o20 
a21 
024 
oil 
A28 



s6 



sl5 

s7 

.Te27 



69 

o27 

o20 

s7 

jel9 

Al6 
816 

n6 
sl2 
n9 
s6 
06 



244 



SOUVENIK OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



BarronOG o30 

BarrowaAR aH 

BarrowsAW&wf jel5 
BarrowsChasL 

BarrowsFF-BS jy:24 

BarrowsMrsFF jy(j 
" Hattie 

Barrows PL n-2 

BarrovvsFM: o23 

BarrowsFW s7 

Biirrou'sJW MlO 

BarfowsJohnW ol6 

BarrowsMrsNS NlO 

Barrows Wm n8 
Barrows WniE&wfMlo 

Barry Albert! o24 

BarstowAliceG n4 

BartIettCB[CoHl so 

BartlottDE a24 

BanlettEliza o34 

" Auiit. Maria '' 
B,xrllett\Ii8sFIora o9 

BirtloitPK-SJ s25 

BartlettldaL ol2 

BartlettLoiiisia jy4 

Bartlf'ttLuliiL jyl!) 

BartlettLiither a1 

" MLouise " 

BartonChasD a31 

BassettEC&wf jel4 

BassettE.r&wf s2 ij 

BassettMaryS s6 
BassettOBjr&lady s7 
BastneyJH[GHG] s8 

BatemanldaP a8 

Bates A.J nIO 

Bates6eoD[CoP] s6 

BatesMrsGeoD jelT 
" FredC 

BatesJA&wf a21 

Bates WuiM&wf jel3 
BattersonHA&wf o2 
" GeoT&wf 

BattersoiiHR o27 
BattersoiiMrsJasG je6 

BattersoiiMiss 06 

BayerFG a2H 

BaylissJE&wf s27 

BeachChasC jyl3 

BeachCM-Mrs o'2 
" MissesPA&M 

BeachCN&wf je9 

BeachMrsFrank 8l8 
BeacliMaryE-Edith " 

BeacliGeo&wf o9 

BeachGW a4 

BeachHB n1 

BcacliMrsHB 0I8 

BeacliHarryL ol2 
'• MrsHL 

Beach.JW n4 

BeactiMrsJW a4 
" TheMisses 
BeachMissNellie 
BeachOE 
BeaumontPaul 
BeckwithMrsChas s25 
" KateS 

BeckwithMrsHC n4 

BeckwithTP&wf o25 

BeecherRobtE o4 

Bc'o;<TsNathauiel ol7 

B«)denEW aVi 
Belden.IasS&wf 

BeldenCR e3() 
'• MaryS-FS 
B'^11"nSeth&wf 
" AIM 

BellGeoL jy3 



BellJasH Jyl9 

BeneriictAnnaC jy3 

BciihamMrsJL 825 

BenlminWmP sl9 

BciinettEB jc5 

BennettMjr&wf jel6 
BenuingA[SerCoB] s6 

BensonJasA b19 

Ben ton AD 0I8 

BentonChas Jel9 

" MrsChas " 

Ben ton W.J 85 

BeresfordMiss je6 

BernheimerP a15 

BerryMrsAF o5 

BerryWm a20 

BerrymanJas Jy29 

" RobtH " 

BestGeo&wf ol7 

" AojnesD " 

BestGeoL " 

BestorForonda a29 

BestorMr.'SJ nO 

Bickfordtl s20 

Bid well AdaC s27 
Bid well ASfCo Fist] s7 

Bid well A\V jy3 

BidwellCP o27 

BidwellCH s7 

Bid well MissEW ol9 

BidwellJaneA jy20 

BidwellLBjr-WD jyl7 

BidwellMA sit! 

BidwellMrsMA jel9 

Bid well W- A s2t; 

Biy;elow\VinL o24 
BillES-GeoW 

BilllIL[CoKl8t] 88 

BiUingsCE&wf je23 

BillingsGraceV o26 

Bingham Mary 89 

BinghamSU jy7 

BirctiFannyJ a21 

Birch JosG sl3 

BirchMillie jyl2 

BirchThomas o23 

BirdWmL a7 

Bisbin^'ChasC NlO 

BishopGE 85 

[IstRgtBand] 

BishopSW oil 

BissellEllaL ol7 

BissellGeoP&wf jyl9 

" MissCarrleD " 
BissellLtHl [GHG] s8 

Bisselllda ol7 

Bipsell lamesM oil 

BiseellTH 827 

" &wf je29 

BixbyLE-IdaM n1 
BlackLtBL[GHG] 88 

BlackMrsBL s7 

BlakesleeBF a9 

BlakesleeLillieN " 

BlanchardH mIO 

BlanchardOH n3 

BlandFC 825 

BlairHP 84 

BlissAliceG sl3 

BlissBeui&wf Je21 

'• FredS-GraceB " 

BlissChasHJ ol7 
"MrsRW-MaryP " 

BlissEL je22 

BlissWalter 627 

BlissWatsonH o3 

BIodgettAnnaB je26 
BlodRettRoewellP ol 

BlodgetHenry o9 



BoardmanMajCB 

[GHG] 
Boardm'nWFJ&w ol9 



BoardnianTJ 


027 


Bochny.John 


a2o 


BodgeMrsGeoA 


o25 


BodwellGeoB 


827 


" MispesCD&ME 


" 


Bod well Mrs JH 


0I2 


BodwellHJL 


020 


BogiieJane 


Olfj 


BoissierMrsC 


a25 


Bolle!?GeoA 


Al9 


BollesGeoP 


M30 


Bolles.JF 


a24 


BollesMrsJasG 


012 


" Miss 


" 


BoUesSP 


621 


BollesWm 


o9 


BollesWmC 


All 


Bolt on JH 


027 


BoltonMrsJH 


jel2 


BoltonJHjr 


813 


BoltwoodGS 


A2S 


BoltwoodMrsLM 


a29 


" Lucius-ChasW 


" 


BondD.J 


020 


BondLutherA 


ol9 


BondMissVF 


o23 


Booth.IohnW&wf sO 


BossEL 


je2o 


BostwickMAnnie 


04 


BosworthNA 


b7 


BosworthSBi&wf 


a9 


BotelleElleler 


je21 


BotsfordHA&dau 


o5 


BotsfordMrsIB 


o31 


BovierCharles 


jy27 


BowenMrsEL 


Nl 


BowenWmShaw 


o24 


BowersAliceA 


" 


BowersMlssEM 


n3 


BownAlfredA 


84 


BoyceRII 


sS 


Boyd.Jas&wf 


819 


BoydThos 


n2 


BoyleDennisP 


85 


BoyntonAW 


jel6 


BoyntonEdwin 


020 


BoyntonJW&wf 


8l9 


BraceMissBelle 


jel4 


BraceJonathan 


sl9 


BraceJohn 


o27 


BraceMrsThosK 


jel6 


" LucyM-EmilyM " 


" Julia\V 


" 


BraceWalterL 


a21 


Bradley AH 


jyii 


BnidleyLjr 


jy7 


BradleyMW 


so 


Bradley WH 


a21 


BradleyMrsWH 


jel7 


Bragavvlsaac 


86 


Brair.ardA Allo9 


BrainardB 


8.30 


Braii.ardPG 


819 


BrainardGeo 


o28 


BrainardMissKL 


o24 


BrainardJH 


n9 


BrainardL&wf 


ol7 


" ChasE-MaryL 


" 


" Alberts 


" 


BrainardLucyA 


8l 


BrainardLH&wf 


828 


BrainardWC 


625 


BraleyWG 


86 


BramanNPjr 


02 


BrayEMrCoFlst] 
BredeaWS 


S8 
jy5 



BreedGeo a8 

BreedJasO o26 

BreedJos&wf 8l 

BrennanJasP 66 

BrevverA[PutPx] jel6 
BrevverCS s25 

BrewerLtE[GHG] 88 
BrewerHillaliE o31 
BrewerNS jel6 

BrewerRA o31 

BrewerSE&wf o9 
" LottieN " 

BrewsterAL a24 

BrewsterFW-EC ol9 
BrewsterMrsHT o5 
BrewsterJasH olO 
Bridg'manFB-MHAlO 
BrighamHenryH s9 
BrighaniHerbert jy24 
iiriggsOtisH a30 

BrinleyGP jeli 

BrissierMrsChas a22 
BrittenMrsHeury n9 
BrittenMaryE 626 

BrockSR n4 

BrocklesbyAK jy4 
BrocklesbyJohnH o2 
BrocklesbyWC 024 
BrockwavUH Al 

BrofieldJF Al6 

BronsonAliceE jy3 
BronsonChasT je20s5 
BrooksAE o30 

BrooksEzra m25a12s19 
BrooksHannahE je7 
•' IlenryP-Etta " 
BrooksMissLC Jel.3 
BrooksMrsPR n9 

BrownAP s7 

BrownAP&wf jyl9 
BrownAS 622 

BrownCharlesP a8 
Brown Da vid-Wm s27 
Brown EltonD si 

Brown Francis&wjel7 
Brown Franks 8l5 

Brown FredH Ml8 

BrownMajorPM jel9 
" MrsFM. " 

BrownGedC o2 

BrownGN-JesseH s9 
BrownGeoT 
BrownJasA&wf je27 
BrownMH aU 

Brown RoyalTQ s5 
BrownSH o5 

BrownWA jyl4 

BrownWF o21 

BrownellFB je28 

BrownellMB a15 

" JL-Grace " 

BruceJE oil 

BryanPrankMc 628 
BryantPrancesA o20 
BryantJasS&wf jy20 
Bryant J Sjr Jy24 

BuhserPi'del Jyl2 

BiichananMrsHC NlO 
BuckBenouiE o28 
BuckChasP Jy24 

BuckEW&wf sl6 

BuckHoraceH jy4 
BuckJohhR&wf O.30 
" Florence " 

BuckinghamH Alfi 
BucklandJas&wf o5 
BuckleyJohn 86 

[SergtCoBlstRegt] 
BuckleyWO-WOjr a8 



LIST OF COXNECTICUT VISITORS. — HARTFORD COUNTY. 



245 



BuellMis8AE 

BuellDH 

BuellMrsWH 

BufflngtonJ 

BuftingtonO ' 

BuffiimMcaryE 

BulkekyCO 

BiilkeleyFrank 



jj'2fi BushnellMissFL jc8 CascMargaretM 
jylO ButlerEUen slti CasoNewlon&wf 

K'M ButlerJAjr o23 '• EllenM 

o5 ButlerJM[CoFlst] RSCaseMrsOD 
pU BntlerMalcom Je9 CaseOP 
jy3 Butlorl'P Bl9;CageMrsOP 

ol8|CacldenAhr-Jennie sSjCaseMrsSarahT 
AlliCaseTheo 
CaseyAB 



jel4 CadwellSF 
BuikfleyMoriranG st! " MrsLauraM 
BulkfleyWniH jelSsTjCadyMrsRA 



BullAUredB s2 

Bull Mrs AB o2.) 

BuUJohiiC sfi 

"• MrsJuliaP-LncyC '• 
BuUNorrifB-GS Jel5 
BuUardAlice Jel6 

BiillardWH a18 

BullockAddie nH 

BullockHenryC s4 

[QMasterlstRegt] 
BullockMrsMM n6 
BullockMrsMary sSl 
BunceChas o3:? 

Bun ce JonathanB 
BunceJB&wf 
" Ellen 
BunceJM 



oil I CaseyMarcusA 
CalderGeo jel3iCagcySarahM 

CaldwellFA n2 Caswell Wwf&son a17 

CalhounFJ 67 CatlinAbijahjr s22n10 



CalhounGA[USjSr] elSJCavenaughHW 
CalhounMrsLiicyA BOiChadwickCB 
Callahan R A [CoH] e(i Chad wick MrsW 
CalnenDP AlBJChaflfeeWR 

CambrideelL jelO ChalkerMrsC 
CameronJnoM Nl 
CampMiBsesCE 621 
" KC&EB 

CampLtDS[CoFlst]s7 
" MrsDS-EmilyA ' 



o30 

Al5 

oil 

s26 

028 

ChamberlainCW e!) 
ChamberlainEllen s27 
ChauiberlinHE A2(i 
ChamberlinWS jyl5 
ChamplinMrsEliz ol9 



„..^,CampKateF b18i" AliceH 

0l7iCampWG jv6 Champlin"VrH 

" ICampWmH b27 ChandlerGeoP 

sl3 CampbellAlexCwf o30 ChapinMrsCA 



BunceMissNellie Je7 CampbellJjr&wf je8 ChapinFH a15 

„ „„ .„„.^_„j..TT% ollChapinFiankV&wf s7 



626 ClarkFredO aO 

je8 ClarkGeoH&wf m22 
" ClarkGeoN 6l9 

03 ClarkGeoR g28o24 
olO ClarkH8[PutPhx]jel6 

n9 ClarkMisBjane 
jyl4 " MisBOphelia 

04 ClaikJnoT s6 
Al(j ClarkLD n1 
jy3 ClarkMaryAJ o23 

n9 ClarkMariaA a28 

ClarkMN&wf b22 

ClarkOH Bit 

ClarkRienziA b28 

ClarkRB&wf n2 

ClarkMrsS o28 

Clark Susie A eS 

ClarkSH&wf m19 

ClarkSL m31 

ClarkSidneyW Jy26 
ClarkTheo&wf 820 
CIarkWB-WillieRo24 
" MrtCarolineH " 
" MrsEmilyl " 

a99 ClarkVVmP Jcl7 

B25|ClarkLtWM [CoH] s6 
ol2 Clai-yJiio 6l2 



Bunnc'llSeymour 

" ArvillaMP 

BunnellWP 

BurbankJuliaB 

" Kate 

Burbank,TBjr 

BurdickGB 

BurdickRD&wf 

BurdickRM 

BurdickWE 

BurdonJno 



o20 CandeeJD „.. ^....^...^ 

" jCanfieldCB Ml5.ie30s9 ChapinH&wf s29 

si CanfieldMinuieA je30 ChapinMaryA ol7 

a23 " Harry " ChapiiiWm Jyl2 

" iCanfieldCW a14 ChapmanCarrie 64 

ol7 CanfleldEUenA a25 ChapmanEL s8 

je22 Cannon JuIiaL o5iChapmanEW n9 

o25,CanterburyMrsEM " |CliapmanFP&wf o27 
Nl CapronMrsSM ol3 ChapmanHA&wf s5 

s23;" MissC " I Chapman JL[CoH] sfi 



„ „ „ jy5 CareyFred'kA 620 ChapmanJL&wf je21 

BurkeAlbertL&wfs25 CareyFS AlOlChapmanL&wf o31 

BurkePP s28JCareyGeoB-AnnA g21 'ChapmanLB Jy25 



EurkePat'k[GHG] slO CareyGeoH 
BurkeV.'E o27 " MrsGrace 

BurkcttJeannieH jyl9|CarevGeoS 
BurnellMi-sCJ ol7| CarlisleEL 
Burnett JamesG o4 Carlton AR 
BurnhaniChester o24jCarltonFred 
BurnhamDC N2iCarletonJohQ 



ClaypoolWardM J) 29 

CleasbyWmH 

ClemensFG 

ClcmensJnoM 

ClercFrancisJ 

ClevelandCH 

[CorCoH] 
ClevelandMrsES 
ClevelandJobn 
CliffordTimothyP 
C'lossonCJ-Mrs 
CluteFraukM 
CoanThosS 
CoburnAA 
CoburuChas 
CobnrnGeoL 
CoeCC&wf 



BurnhamEA[CoH] s6 
BurnhamEP " 

BurnhamMrsJD " 
BurnhamTH m25 



BurnhamJnoT&wfs29 



BurnharaJVV 

BurnhamKC 

" NellieM 

BumhamPH 

BuruhamSF-FR 

BurgessHO 

Burpee J Fred o5 

BurrMrsAE n3 

BurrCP Oil 

BurrFC s8 

BurrFrancesEUen o24 

BurrFrankL 

BurrFredW 

BurrMrs.JB 

BurrSidney 

BurrSylviaA 

BurrWarrenH 

BurrWillieO&wf 



oil 



CarneyJnoA 
CarpenterAliceL 
CarpenterDL 
CarpenterE&wf 
CarpenterHattieB Jel6 



BurtCW 

BurtMrsFP 

BurtGH 

BurtJF 

BurtonMrsHE 

BurwellJS 

Bush.TasR 

BushWinfieldS 



CarpenterJB&wf b14 

" MaryL-AE 

CarpenterJT 

... CarpenterSara''l 

o9,CarpenterWmO 

olO CarpenterWmR 

CarrMaggie 

CarrigariWm 

Carson Jessie 

CarterCornelia-E ol3 

CarterFannieH Jyl4 

CarterFP&wf 

CarterHV 

CarterJas-AQ 

CarterMiseLD 

CarterLE 

CarterWN 

CaseAM-FredE 

CaseChasF 

CaseChasG 

CaseCH[CSerlst] b13 

" MrsCH " 

Mi8|CaseEE&wf a23 

ol8 CaseHoraceJ&wf Jyl2 
Al9lCaBeHO s7 

s03 CaseJaeHarper o25 



olHiChapmanSilas&wfoKi 
" OhapmanSjr&vvf a22 

p6 ChapmanTB&wf ol2 ^ 

sll 'Chapman WH m15a15 CoelsaacH&vvf 
s4 ChappellEA ol3,CoeLB 

A2lChappellMis8Lu o4 CohenElsie 
jy21 CharlesHC a15 

olOCharterGH[CoFlet]s7 
s9 CharterJuliaA s27 
jy3 ChaseChasE Jy26 

8l8 ChaeeGeoL JeKi 

n8 
a21 
m24 



jy5 
m30 
s8 
je20 
je9 
o3 
Jy3 
je24 

62 

05 



m22 
o24 
jel5 
b29 
o24 
b3 



ChaseChasE 
ChaeeGeoL 
ChaseMrsHC 
ChaseJS 
ChildsTS&wf 
" MaryL-FannyG " 

•' HelenP " 

ChlpmanMrsHL s25 

ChurchCE Jy6 

ChurchSA Jyl2 

Church Wm[PP] Je20 

Churchill AS mIO 

ChurchillGW jel4 

ClappMrs ■ E Jy5 

ClappCaleb&wf 820 
" Arthurs 

ClappDE Ml0s22 -- 

ClappGeoW AlSiColstonMrsTheo 
Clapp JnoB-Mr8LFje3 ColtFS 

ClarkAM jyl8 ColtMrsSamuel 

ClarkAbelS jyl8 CoUonHE 

ClarkAnnaL o6 ConantLA 

ClarkChasH Al[ConeC 

ClarkMrBDavid jel4 1 ConeEllaB 

" MrsAD-Mary " ConeJlI&wf 

■ Lester *' I" SF&wf 



b6 
a28 

n4 
jy6 

86 

b21 

85 

018 
n6 
ol9 
016 
o26 
sl5 
je8 

616 

jyl^ 
k6 

614 



CoitMattieW 

" HattieJ 

" SamuelB 

" JosephSG 

ColbvGeo 

ColeFW 

ColemanHJ 

ColesFrancis 

CoIeMrsHE 

CollierGoodwin 

CollinsCT 

CollinsMissCL 

CollinsErastus 

CollinBLouisaL 

CoUineMaryL 

CollinsWm 

CollinsWmH&wf ol8 

•' leaE " 

CollumMrsGeo 

CollumGeoN 



a21 

Al4 

jel6 
jt3 
023 
OlO 
Al7 
jel9 
jel9 
o31 

816 

sll 



ClarkLtDW[GHG] e8'ConeJB&wf 
ClarkFC b20 ConeJnoB 



024 

je27 
o2ti 
sl4 

02t 
021 

sl9 
a30 
OlO 

Ml9 
jyn 



ClarkFS 



a7 ConeJosW-EttaCB s7 



246 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



ConeWE sTiCrittendenEUenA n9 

CoueWmR&wf ol-^'CritteudeuLS s;J6 

ConkeyALeRoy A-JCritteudeiiK ol» 

ConklinHW A:3UiUritteud'uWSjy6slls« 

" HS-WP '■ CrockerA-GH sl-1 

ConklinMrsHW jel5 Crot'ootEE&wf 820 
" Balle&MayH " CrooksJS&wf s27 
ConklinJohnA sSS'OrosbyJM jyl5Al0s20 
CouklinL&wf o31 ! Crosby WA[FutP].jel'J 
ConnollyM.ary o-23|CrossIsaacjr-AD aIS 
ConradeCarl s27 Cross WmPH a17 

CookMrsA-KittySAll CrossthwaiteFH a21 
CookMissAE sSl CrowMrsCVV n2 

on CrowellAlb'tB&wf s37 
jel9r' AlbertD-EdvvH " 
CrtimptonBS AlO 



jyio 

olO 

637 

e5 

slO 

sl8 

03 J 

jeJ7 

jylO 

jylO 



ol 
sl5 

o:» 

Al 



CookAS 

CookCW&wf 

" Susie 

CookChasW 

CookMrsE 

CookElizur 

CookMrsEA 

CookEB 

CookMrsEC 

CookHattieH 

CookHowardW 

CookeFredkJ 

CookeSaraJ 

CoolidgeElizabeth sl5 

CoolidgeMaryA o37 

CooniesGH 

CoomesMaryF 

CoouOrphaA 

CopoIaudWmM 

CooperLtSC[GIIG] s8 

CorbinJosP sl'J 

CornellGA[SerCoH]s4 

CorningGeoW&wf s9 

CorningHattieE ol9 

CorningJuoJ 89 

CornishDC&vvf o24 

ConiwallGeoE o3') 

Cora\vall.JG[PP] jel9- 

ConiwellEmmaJ n4 

ComwellSA 

" HattieE 

CorsouMrsHH 

" MrtsterWRO 

CosgroveJasJ 

CosgroveJS 

CosgrovePeter 

CourtneyJP-ElLz J a2() 

CoveyMrsSB a18 

CoveyWE a16s38 

CowaiiMrsSidneyJ j31 

CowlesArthurW s3tj 

CowlesDrF[GHG] s3() 



8l8 
je3 

je9o30 

a30 

87 

o24 
Sl6 
n9 
05 

s8 

o21 

S(i 



o33 

0l3 

838 
AlO 
3 



CowlesCL 

CowlesBdgarP 

CowlesEliz 

CowlesEmilyD 

CowlesMrsGA 

CowlesHelenJ 

CowlesJPrank 

CowlesJnoN&vvf je3:i 

CowlesSW&wf 8l9 

" ArtburJ 

CowlesWA 

CowIesWG 

CoyeChasH 

CoyleMaryE 

CoyneWmB 

CraneEJ 

CraneMissGA 

CraneGeo 

CraneHattieE 

CraneSLG 

CraryDjr 

Crary Edwin &wf 

CrawfordJasG 

CrawfordWmA 



o25 

e3fi 

s9 

a21 

je3(; 

s27 

oO 



s27 

85 

je21 

jy6 

Al5 

s22 
jyll 
o31 
JV3 
olt 
ol7 
018 
a33 
Al9 



CuUeuMissKate Nl 
CuinmiagsDB s6 

[SerCoBlRegl 
CiimmingsSaniuul s28 
CunningbamJ jy5o3 
CiirtisCH 
CurtisEmilyC 
OiirtisMrsGea 
Ciii-ttsGeoD 
" MrsGeoD 
CiirtisHJ 
Ciu-tissHannaliE 
Curry Alexander 
CiirryAlbertM 
C II rry Jno A& wf 
CushiuauDwight 
CushmanHVV 
CtisbinanJE&wf 
CiishmanMrsMH 
CushmauNatG-HG s 
CiUlerCS[GHG] 85 
DanielsFiVI nIO 

" MrsLouise " 

DmielsJasAjr Jel5 
DauielsMrsLeonards6 
DanielsLoreazo sl3 
DauielsTimothyA sl6 
DanforthJW Jy5 

MissesE&M 
DaufortliMrsJW jel 
DarrowAlfredL s8 
DarrowCL MlO 

DarrowFannyG s9 
DarrowMrsLiicyP sl2 
DartE-Louise n9 

Dart M J sl9 

DartTSFGHG] 
Dart Walter jy27 

DavenportRevJS Je9 
•' Mrs-JuliaS 
DavidsonCordelia n2 
DavidsonCS&wf o24 
Davidson Willie 
DavisCB Ml0jy26N4 
" MrsClintonB n4 
Davis FredW a22 

DavisGF&wf 
DavisDrGPifcwf 
Davis Ida 
DavisMrsJos 
DavisMN-MrsIB 
DavisMrsSA 
DavisMissSE 
D visSolonP 
DavisSW-HH 
DavisWJ 
DawesJP 
DayAH 
DayAW&wf 
DayChasEP 
DayCG-MiunieL 
DayGcoH 
DayHoratioE 



Nti 

023 

s8 

827 

jelo23 

a22 

ol8 

s28 

ol3 

jylO 

s30 

836 

835 

a4 

Nl 



DayJohnC 

DayMrsJohnC 

■• CarolineE 

DayThosM&wf 

•• TMills-SaratiC 

DaytonHenryH 

DeanFredH 

DeBartheAdaE 

DelaueyJohn 

DelaneyMA-LM 

DelapGeoN-MrsJ sl3 

DeLeeuwLeopold s30 

DemiugEdward 8l4 

DemingHA&wf 

DemingLtl 

DemingMaryG 

DemingWm 

DemingWH 

DemingWmS 

DennisRodney 



MrsRodney&dau 



M20 

Al9 

a20 
NlO 
oKi 
a29 



o2S 
Jy2S 

s31 
o3il 
a31 
Al5 
a31 



DenisonMayl 

DentonMissMF 

DeutschB' 

DeweyDS 

DeweyFrodP 

DeweyGeoB 

DeweyWelthia 

DeWolfllattie 

DeWolfMrsMA 

" HF 

DiamondM&wf 

DibbellKW 

DickersonGeoN 

DickinsonEH 

DickinsonEmilyF a25 

DickinsonMrsEU s20 

DickinsonFP 

DickinsoaGeoK 

DickinsonJR 

DickinsonKateM 

Dickins"nLA[Pr].Tel9 

•' MrsLA .jyl9o24 

DickinsonWmE 

" MrsNM-EllenM 

DillonC Jyl8 

Dillon JJ[CorCoB] s5 



Jyl3 

Nl 

jy3i 

s27 
o6 

n3 

s23 

A23 

jel9 



DillsDrCC 
DimockJW&wf 
DimockMi^^sJH 
DimockJnoDeW 
DinwiddieRB 
[GHG] 
DithmarLouia 
DixouCJ 
DixonWJ 
DobieMrsWmH 
DoddChasA3d 
DohertvMaryA 
DodgeJE 
DodgeWmH 
DonatsC 
Donahoe.Tames 
DonahuePeter 



Al 

si 
018 

jy8 
s7 

NlO 
sll 

jy25 

Je37 
JV3 

s27 
jel3 
o3( 

828 
s' 

Al 



Al 

St 

031 

Jel6 

s29 

Jeo 

815 

Je22 

Al 

A38 



DowWA 

DowdEdwW 

DowniugE&wf 

DovvniugHeury 

DowusTliosH 

DrakeSyduey 

DraperMissC 

DriscollJasC 

DuBoisGeoT 

Dufl'yThomas 

DugganBcru\l&wfAl7 
DunnamAustiu ailo 
•■ Sarali-Mary " 

Dunham AC jel6 

DunhamJasB-WA n3 
DuuhamSam'lG ol2 
DunhamTM s5 

DunbarWN jyl7 

DundonJohn s6 

[LieutCoBlstRegt] 
DunganJ a26 

DunlapJamesV s5 
DumoutMrsA 
DwyerD 
DwyerJR 
DwyerRicliardJ 
DwyerWmS 
EastonAlonzo 
EastwoodJas 
EatouMissHattie 
Eaton MrsIIJ 
EatonHaroldS 
EatoiiMB 
EatonWniE 
EatoiiMrsWmW 
EberleFred'k 
EckiiartJn 
EckspellerJennieR o3 
EdgertonMrsAW o20 
EdmonstonBessie s28 



o20 
o3 

Sl2 
a30 

813 

n7 
o2g 
ol8 
827 

Je24 
014 
o26 
sl8 
je7 

je22 



jy3 
jvl 
Nti 

a1s18 
a288 

816 



DonnellyThosWjr n9 



o21 
jy38 
a30 

n6 
816 



DooleyMF 
DormanPD 
DormanNettieL 
Doty AH 
DouthwaiteAM 
" FM-Sadie " 

DonthwaiteGeoF jyll 
" RHsr 

DouthwaitcRHjr s7 
DouglassCII&fani si 
DouglassCII Al4 

DouglassOS jy2G8-,'5 
DoutyBP-FA o9 

DowRD&vvf sl9 



EdwardsBW 
EdwardsEB 
EdwardsFA 
EdwardsFredB 
EdwardsHarry 
EdwardsMayLi — 
EgglestonArthurF s20 
EgglestonMrsAF o25 
EhbetsCJ n6 

EldredgeJB&wf ol6 
EldridgeCW&wf s2S 
EldridireJW Jyl8 

EUiottLizzieK Nl 

ElIisMrsAL 
EllisBeiijP 
EllisGregory 
■' MrsAA 
EllisKateF 
EllisTG 

EllswortliF-FH 
Ellsworth FrankB 
EllsworthWV/ 
ElmerEB&wf 
Elmer JH 
ElmoreSam'lE 
ElserFwfifcson 
ElwellMrsS 
'• Rcbcccall-LottieP 
ElvMrsAE Jr20 

•' DaisieD " 

ElyMissMinnio o2 
ElyRichardS m18 

" MrsW-ClarissaM " 
" CharlotteM " 

" MarvD " 

ElyWiiiD " 

EmmousCn&wf sl2 
EmmonsEN Al4 

E mersonFF-SMH jel9 



018 

021 

s6 

s8 
jel3 

86 
Nl 
Ml7 
88 
86 

sl8 
s5 

All 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS HARTFORD COUNTY. 



247 



Emersonlrviug jj'SaIS 
EusiguJ:''H s25 

Euf^worthHI s23 

EuswurthLesterL s21 
EricksonUeoCi Nti 
EricksouJnoM o24 
ErviugHW-WmAjelS 



jy3 

sT 
s25 

Nl 

je20 
o4 

n3 



ErvviuJaiuesB 
EstlowAlfred 
EiistisFB 
EvausMrsJennie 
EvausJosM 
EvausLou 
Fackl&rJB 
Faii-cliildNellieL 
FairchildsRobei't jy21 
FairlieklED sl8 

PairfieldGA silO 

FairfleldMissNellieje" 
FairdeldNellieA s-28 
FairmanJno&son .le-^O 
FanningWraW&wf oG 
FarnhamEB&wf slO 
" WillieA 

FarnhamGA o30 

FarnhamJohnR ol7 
FarrarDrl-MaryA s22 
FarrelCS n6 

FarrestTF o30 

FarwellAsaJ jylls20 
FaunceAT 
FasonGeoA 
FaxonWm 
" Miss 
FeldheusenJohn sli 
[SergtCoAlstRegt] 



jy2o 



m25o18 
ol8 



oil 
ol7 



FellowsChasF 

FellowsHE 

FellowsPark 

FellowsMrsCE 

FeltonllarryJ 

FeuuFH-Harry 

FemiMasterJD 

FennHarryC-Henrj'sl 

" Harrietl-LeilaK 

" NS 

FennWairceTjyl6A25 

FerrisJP n3 

FerrisJnoE je24 

FerrySylv'ster&wfNlO 

FiegeAF-WillE AlO 

FieldNellieC 

FieldingChasR 

FieldingLizzieS 

FilleyJH&wf 

FinlayMisslsabelle s8 

FinneyRL(s4)&wf o5 

Fish AM 

FishMrsGeoH 

FisliMrsL 

FisherChasA 

Fishei-CG&wf 

PisherEvaM 

FipherFaniiyM 

FisherGeoB 

FisherJG[PPh'x] jeM 

" E 

FisherJennleE 

FisherM-F 

FisherMinaV 

FisherSarahB 

FisherS 

FisherSusieM 

FiskB 

FiskMrsDL 

FiskMissEL 

FiskeMrsED 

FitchFP 

FitchHH&wf 



FitchJamesS 
FitzgeraldJohnH 
FitzGeiaklML 
Fitz^MahoiiyMJ 

Fla^KChasN 



oil FrenchAT 

s5 FreiichHL[GHG] 
jy7 FreuchEthelbert 
ol7,FreuchG\V 
ol-i ' French J osephS 



FlauaganTF[CoBl] s5 FrinkAdelia 



0-23 



FletcherWniH 
FletcherWI 

- MrsWI 
Flower AliceM 
FlowerLeilaE 
FlowerLD 
FlowurMrsME 
FlowenSL 
FlowerWm 
Fly nil John 
PoleyThos&wf 
FooteMissKate 
ForbesJnoW 
ForbesWarrenL 

- EP 

PordMrsJW-WmB a9 
FordVVmP 
FosterAliceB 
FosterAnnieT 
FosterBO 
FosterMrsEL 



s28n3 

s28 

jy25 

s7 

s8 

ol2 

oil 

o-2i 

jylO 

s5 

Ml8 
n9 
s4 



FriukJH 



s2 

88 

025 
s20 

je21 
620 
n2 

Je20 

8l9 

a24 

e21 

Jel6sl9 

Bl9 

n8 
jyi2 
sl6 
a24 
Jyl4 
jel3 



FriukJasS 
FrisbieCG 
FrisbieEC&wf 
FrisbieEvaE 
FrisbieLT 
" MrsLT 
FrostEC 
PullerChasJ 
FuUerEdwardE 
FullerMrsEN 
FullerEllaA 
FullerMrsGeoH 
FullerDrllS je9ol3 
FuUerJWeston e5 
[QMSerlst] 
s28 FurlongPeterF je23 
jyl7|" JosT 

s28 FnrlonrrRA n9 

je24 GabrieileBelleL o9 
n3 GahanWmH a21 

FosterFRA w-FRjrje6 ' GarfieldE& wf m19 
FosterFrankK n6 GainesIF ol4 

FosterGB[PPh'x]jel7 iGageWmT e7 

FosterHW&wf olO;GageMrsWmT 628 
jylO.GalberryEtRevT jel 
s6 GaleDH n1 

jy2G GaleJasO-JennieC 9l3 
m26 GallagherChasW s28 
s9 GallupJohnM 
GalpinMaryA 



n8 



jy6 

a31 

a9 



09 

sKJ 

a26 

jel6 



s20 
S-2G 
s27 
014 
jy29 
ol4 
a2 
023 
ol2 
018 



FosterHenry 

FosterHenryA 

FosterJM 

FosterLiicilleH 

FosterJM 

FosterJasPjr 

FosterRalph&wf ol3 

FosterRG olO 

FosterSD-HarryP o2G 

FosterTS sl9 

FosterWalterC Je29 

" WC&wf 

FosterWmR 

FoxChasA 

FoxChasJ 

PoxMrsClaraC 

FoxDudley&wf 

FoxEdgarH 



o31 

a21 

s21 

sS 

n9 

jel9 

je21 



FoxGerson-Emma o5 



FoxHarvey 

FoxLucyE 

FoxMrsLL 

PoxSP 

FowlerAllieN 



s28 

jyi9 
ol9 

Al6 

OlO 



FowlerClarksonN oil 



FowlerEB 

PowlerEmmaQ sl2 
FowlerMyraM All 
FrancisChasE 6l4 

FrancisDG&wf a9 
PrancisDanielW o25 
FrancisHH&wf 
PrancisWm&wf jel5 
" Minnie-PredW '■ 
" EdwardM " 

Fran ey John 
FraneyJW 
FrankenfieldS 
Fi-anklinChas 
FranklinJP 
FrauklinGenWB 



o6 

NlO 

jyi8 

jy2l 

jyl4 

je8 



FrasickSeymourP .jy4 
FrazierWmE ii25n1 
FreemanAnnieM nil 
FroemanEA&wf s28 
FrecnianFD jyll 

" i^atticE " 



oGiFrocmanHB 



GardnerES 
GarretteJPrank 
GarvieGD 
" ReltaMS 
GarvieJohuB&wf s27 



o27 

627 
slO 

jyl2 
jy5 



GarvieRobt 

GarvieWniA 

GaskillJFrank 

GassettWinH 

GatesCarricB 



a7 



GilbertAH-WJ 

GilbertCO 

GilbertMissDE 

GilbertES&vvf 

GilbertLauraA 

GilbertMrsVVm 

GilbertWmH 

GilbertZuletteK 

GillTJ 

GilletteCS&wf 

GilletteFloraJ 

GilletteRalph 

"■ Caroliuo 

Gilhimlda 

GilmanEdwardH 

GilmanGeoS&wf 

" GeoreeH 

GilmanJfS(je29)&wol2 

GilmanLizzieH s28 

GladdingCurtisP 

GladdingSH 

GladwiDgCR 

GladwinRS 

GlazierAJiidson 

GlazierCharles 

GlazierCM-MrsIH jy3 

GlazierDanielJ 

GlazierF&wf 

" MAdella 

GlazierLC&wf 

GlazierMaryO 

GlazierSarahM 

GleasonEdwN 

GleasonGH 

GlennJiioH 

GloverChas 

GloverFrankWT m31 

GloverThos s4 

GoddardllP&wf je22 

GoebellFredjr sl2 

GoldsboroughLou s26 

" May 

Golds^chmidtH s8 



ol9 

sG 

012 

ol3 

jyl9 

si 

028 

09 

Jy21 

jyG 

sl4 

jelO 



sll 
s26 



620 
S22 
024 
Bl9 
Nl 
a9 



0l3 

jel5 

jy22 
N2 

s6 

n4 
ol7 



Goldschmithlsaac a29 

s30iGoldschmidtL oil 

o2j" MissB " 

Al 9, Goldsmith Jennie 68 

GatesLC&\vf-HCje24i" Etta 

GatesWB s2'GoldthwaitJane jy21 

GatlingDrRJ MlQjyGJ GoodaleA Wwf&daus7 

MrsRJ-Ida jvGiGoodaleWB 84 

GaultMrsJuo Jel3 GoodellEB jyl7 



GavinJasJ-MaryA s21 
GayEdwA-FrankB 87 
GayGeo a21 

GayMaryT 811 

Gay lord EdwardB a4 
GaylordGeoE olO 

GaylordMrsH jel7 
GeerEHoward&wf 6l3 
GeerElihu a9 

'• EJennieEUs'rth " 
" EdithL-ErskineH " 
"ElizaS " 

GeerErastusC o31 
GeerEverettS-EP a23 
GeerRobtD 
GemmillJno 
GenetAnnie 
GerwichH 
GibsonJH 
GiddingsMreA 
" CharlesE 



GiddingsMissM 

GiddingsWH 

GilbertAliceE 



GoodellSilas olO 

GoodmanMrsAH ol3 
GoodmanAP si 

GoodmanCS 6l9 

GoodmanE&wf o4 
GoodmanEmma a7 
GoodraanHenry 85 
GoodmanLB&wf s27 
GoodmanSM ol7 

GoodnowFrankA a18 
GoodrichAL sG 

[SerMajlstRegt] 
" MrsAL " 

GoodrichAliceR 88 
NllGoodrichB jyl2 

jyl4 GoodrichMrsB jyl3 
je22 GoodrichCC&wf 6l2 
je20 GoodrichPE je24 

s20 GoodrichMissHD 66 
jy21 1 GoodrichWillie oil 
" " MaryA " 

GiddingsEdwinA a30 Goodrich WmH jelSsS 
Giddin<;sHAifcwf g8," MrsWmU jel5 

8l8|"WillieS 
66, Goodwin Alicell jc8 
623 GoodwinBiirdett o31 
B27GilbcrtMis5 jy5 GoodwinMissC ol6 



248 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



GooclwinMissL olCi 
(iioodwiuC'3 sl3 

Gi)o;hviii.'(IrsD a2;^ 
GoodwiuiiO oil 

Goodwiii'Jeo a7 

GoodwinllenryH ol7 
Goodwin JMrs^H oil 
GoodwinJames Mi5 
" JasJ-Francis 
GoodwinJoaathan ol2 
GoodwinMaryE !sl5 
" Cha::>L 
GmhamMrsIIM 
Graham ML 
GraliamRobt 
Graiigerlra 
GrantHT 
GrantMrsJM 
GravesMW&wf 
" JuliaA 
GravesStiiartS 
Gray Annie jeHA'iH 
GrayJohnS&wf a21 
" Ellen VV 

GroeuAlfred jyfl 

Gr3enAlfW[CoF] s8 
GreeneAliceJ a21 
Green FW a19 

GreeneGeojr-Mri?Gol-2 
GreenHenry&wf s27 
GreenJnoL jy21 

Green VVH mIOjcSJ 

[QMQenn] 
GreggTasB&wf 
Grug;{LeslieS 
Gridk-vCL 
GridloyilR 
GriffiuDJ 
GriffiQMrsEG 
GriftinFannieil 
Grij!;s:sLillieM 
GrippHeiiry 
G ris wold MrsCaleb 
GriswoldCW All 

GriswoldCR a30 

GriswoldPrankC Jyl 
GriswoldJG s6 

( JriswoldNormanW t'it 
GriswoldPB a24 

Gri^woldDrWR ol9 
'' LA 

GriswoldWRjr A2.3 
GroesbeckHarryA slit 



jel5 
a2o 

A3 

jel5 

Al(5 

»i 

Bll 

s7 
p2 



nallNBrigham&\vfs28 HaydenEmmaH 
HallNormanB&wf e23;IlaydenWmT 



s27 
(30 



Hal IT E 

llrtllettEmmaV 

HalletxFiankD 

HallockHenryP 

HamiltouAR 

HaniiltonFrankL jyl8 

HamiltonMissLL ol2 

HaniiltonSamuel 

ilamiltonVVC 

Hamlin EC&wf 

HammondAG 

IlammondElIenF 

HamniondMrsII 

HammondldaV sOHealyJasB 

Hamniond.MarthaSolO Ik'atliHorace 



ose HaynesCE S12 

62G:HaynesCWttwf o9 

Alt)] Hay wardAndrewJ a2 

o26 HawleyCB o7 

HawleyEftherH Al7 

UawleyGF&wf jelOuO 

HawleyGenJosR 

PresUyCemen'lCom 

HawleyMffiJoeRA'JslS 

HawleyWmH o25 

HazenFaniiiell a29 

HazenMrsFL 

HazenllolenR 



Al9 

a8 
jel7 



04 



olO 
a26 

s28 
je28 



Nl 

»i30 



M2o 



n3 

n2 

o30 

je9 

n9 Hebanl(jieoH&wf olO 

823 HrHi-iditC s30 

Mil) HellViclitCA[CoA] s5 

o2U HempstcadClias a8 

" HendeeLuciupJ JelO 

A3 '• Abner-HE-R 

" " SarahJ-Lucius " 

jy3lHenneyD-WF 



HanmerWin 

HansellPaul 

HarbisonA 

Harbison Hugh 

'• JohnP 

HarbisonMrsJP 

'• Mamie 

HardenJamesM 

HardingTH[PP] je'lOHenniug Alfred 



Harknes^sHO 

HarrisHittieE 

HarrisJanies 

HarrisJasB 

HarrisMrsLP 



a24 
s21 
n3 
jeU 
o30 



ol8 
s21 
llenryAiibie- Esterjy7 
HenssilerRH s4 

HerdlenGeoG e27 

Herletschekl si4 

Fannie 



HoadlyChasJ 
HoadlyEJ&wf 
HoadleyGE 
" MnfWII 
HobartMissVM 
HodgeMrsJA 
'• HughL-RichardM" 
HodgesSM&wf s20 
HoladayJnoB&wf s28 
HoladayMaryC o3 
Holadayl'H o26 

HolbrookAB n2 

HolbrookCM&wf Jel6 
" GracieH o5 

HolbrookEUenM ol9 
'• NellieGH 
HolcombOscar o3 
HolcombeJM&wf olO 
HoklenMaryG ol7 
lIollit'JM 025 

Hollit^terAG&wf a21 
HollisterArthiirN sl9 
HollisterCW&wf o27 
•' NetiieW " 

HollisterChasH s7 
HollisterFranklin m27 
HollisterllH&wf jel6 
HollisterHT je8 

HoUisterMies si 

Holli?terThomasA ol8 



lI:irrisNicholas&wf('9lHerlitschokL&wf s29 
Harri-<Sam'l!I NT HeroldChas&wf s27 



HirriinanRcvFW o9 
Harriu,^tonHE&wf n2 
" LizzieS-RF " 

HarrisouHcnryN n2 
HartAfl olO 

IlartBelleL jy3 

" NettieE " 

HartCiiasR&wf o3 
•' MrsAE-EdithW " 
HartFerd'ndA&wf o6 



GroganFG 

GrossChaslfi 

" Nellies 

GreverCP 

G'OvesCliasA 

GrnettWD 

GalliverllenryS 

GiindlachH[CoA] 

GimnGeoM 

(JiithrieJnoM 

Haben-fteinE&wf 

HaiTLizzie 

Halo Sd win J&wf 

IlaleGeoL&wf 

HaleJamesW 

HaleLW 

Haley EstlierL 

HalI\VX[GHG] 

HallEzraH 

IlallFrankdeP 

HallGcoA 

HallGaoG-HC 

HallGeoO 

nilUxnce 

HallUf-nrvJ&wf 

HailJoelE&wf 



o21 
jy34 

07 

o9 

jy2i 
Jy4 

s« 

a4 
a29 

g6 
s21 
p22 
025 
Jy27 
Jy6 

85 

88 

JV5 
Jy"l3 
a22 

jy3 

823 

a19 

p8 

Oil 



HartHenryH 

Hart Mrs J A 

HartPatrickR 

HartSamuel 

IlarveyBecky 

HarveyiJM 

HarveyJamesM 



a25 



HerseyEE ol9 

HerzerTir e25 

Heul)leinA[PP'x] jel6 

HeubleinGF&wf slO 

HeiibleinLP[CoFlt]s8 

HewiusLM a7 

He A in.-iSbeldonW je6 

Hibbi-rdLncyJ n9 

HickmanJP jyl9 

Hickniott^IattieB s6 

Hickmottllattie 87 

026 Hick ranttWJ-EP oli 

je23 IlicksPM-ST .je8 

s7iHii,'i,Mns.r(>hnE&wf s<i 



85 
025 

a30 

a21 
jel9 
jel4 



n6 Hi'^'^'in^SW 
027 HiLTLrsWHAwf 
s(»;llillMrsEC 



HarwoodFVV&wf s27|HillGeoA 



Ha^^kellAB 

HaskellBenj 

Has^kellCU 

HaskellGeoS 

HaskollMrsSR 

HaskellWR 

naspeyWm[CoB] 

IlassettKiitie 



HatchOL&wf 

" WillieL 

HathewayAUieR 

HavenMiesE 

riavenSC 

HavensPW 

HavensFrankW 



s7 
je2 

s8 
s30 

f27 

jy28 

(.18 



sl4|HillJnoJ 
je9;HillSolonA 
A26;HiIlsAnnieF 
N3"Hattie " 

s()]Hinsl5nrton[PPx]jelG 
s(ii" ^Ir-^Biirton " 

85|lIillsCH[PPx] jel6 
ol2'HillsCbasI&wf o27 
IlastingsFrankEjeOsOi" GraceE " 

" HarryE g9|HillsChasS[CoFlst] s7 

HastingsPMAwf M25:HilIsCW&wf o20 

Hastin2rsWD[CoH] s4;ninsMr8Enery sl3 
HatcliGeoE je22 ilillsMitiBFloraE 

" WS-JW-EdB " ilillsMri^GF 

o23|HillsHoraceW 
" " AliceN 
oil HillsJC 
815 Hill? JnoR&wf 
onJHillsLesterS 
Af! " AngevineA 
o4 HillsLoiiis 
Fla vensnC&wf-TC.jy3 ; Hill ver AR 
HavensNcllieS s21;" AiiceL-ClaraE 
HavonsSH&wf ol2 HiltonWmF 
Havens- WmW-AE 87 Hinckley AliceJ 
Haves:,Tno a22 HinckleyHN 

llaydenCarrieM jel3 HitchcockHP&wf Jel 
IlaydeuCL s27iHitchcockLD jy6 



o31 
jyo 
s26 

MlO 
s5 

sl4 

. s7 
m96 



si 3 
jy24 



HoltFredP 
HoltLuciusH 
" SarahG 
HoltWK-CW 
" EniilvR 
HoltWillD 
HonissThosA 
IIookerMrsBE 
" Eddie W 
HookerEdwardB Je27 
HopeNorm"L[PP].rel6 
HopeMr?NL sl9 

HorsfallL jyl 

HortonEnimet jelO 
HotchkissLM 025 

HotchkipsSM&wf Jy4 
" SumnerS " 

HonghCW Oil 

HoughMrsHL 86 

HoughtalingChas All 
HouseES-NellieS s6 
HouseHS Jel4 

HouseJA-JBnrton s20 
HouseWmW-Eliz a23 
HoustonMrsAlex o30 
HowardRevA Je20 

[ChapPP] 
" [ChapGHG] sS 

HowardAlice-May jc5 
HowardChasP je7 
" MreCF-Mis?K 
HowardFrnkL&wfo27 
HowardJasL&wf je6 
" MissEdithM 
HowardMark je21 
" MissAL-MyraL " 
HowardMrsMark ol2 
" MissesLena-Amy" 
HowardMary Je5 

HowardWL Je21 

HoweAS&wf sl2 

HoweDR&wf jel9 
HoweMrsEdmMGjeSa 



HowellMrsAM 

HowellFannieH 

HubbardAddie 

HubbardChasP 

HubbardMrsEA 

' ■ LottieH-MaryA 



s8 

a8 

a21 

n8 

a28 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS HARTFORD COUNTY. 



249 



IlnbbardFB&lady AlSjJaycoxJaneL 
HubbardMC sl9 JenisonJosiah 

HubbardSA MlOjeS 
'• ElizabethBoyd jelO 
HubbardSusanV o31 
" AnuE-Jeannette " 
HubbardWB s26 

HubbardWD&wf sl5 
IIubbardGB-GBWo31 
Huds^ouCW Al4 

HudsonJohnS n8 

HiidsouDrWmM o4 
HiidsouMrsWmM m27 
" RegiuaM " 

'• FiaucesB " 

Hughes V'yRevJas ol9 
llulettKA n6 

HiimesJennieM sll 
" EllenE 

IIumphreyEdgarT o3 
Huiigeil'ordN jel2o24 



s5 

je!» 

a7 

jy29 

s6 



o4 



je5 



HobmerWH 
HotchlcissAS 
Hotchklst^ChasB 
UotchkisHLC 
HotchkiesLtLH 
[CoPlst] 
" MrsLH 
IlungerlordRL 
" MrsRL&son 
lIuntAA 
HnntDrEK&wf 
" Mit^sLB-JC 
EuntMis'sES&CM sl5 
HuntMrsHA ol2 

HnntMP[CoFlet] s8 
HuntWC&wf je21 
HunterAlex a2 

HuuterChas(Tm'y)jy4 
HunterJnoS sl6 

HunterWmM a21 

IIuntingtOD.JT o4 

HnntingtonMrsJT n4 
HuntiuirtonMis's jelO 
HurdJasD-Mrs Je6 
HurlbnrtAM&wf Je8 
" EllaL-MarvA 
IlnrlbiirtMrs^BP jel4 
HurlbnrtirV\\fewf s27 
HussevCaiJtJS jel9 
HurchinsGeoW o98 
IlydeAlvanP&wf jyl2 
HydeEHenryjr o9 
HydeEilaM-AnnaPASO 
ITvdeFrankE jvll 
HydeWWaido jyllNlO 
HydelFC&wf a25 

IngrahamLee ol9 

IshamMrsAB je21 
IshamWm[PPha] je20 
IvesEllsworthD m31 
IvesJohnS&wf jel6 
" Charlotte-FredC " 
JacobiMaiirice a3 
JacobBHenryM-AH s7 
JacobsWardW a16 
" JennieH " 

JacksonGeoA 
JacksonDrJC 
JacksonLS 
JacksonMrsLeeS MlS 
JamesonGW s7 

Jar\i9DrGeoC jel4 
" MrsMarthaG 
" MattieL 
JarvisMrsJnoS 
MrsWm 



s21 
ol7 
JeukinsJames n4 

JepsonJoseph s20 
JeromeAugS&wf Je21 
JewellChasA m19 

" MrsPliny " 

" Miss " 

JewellFD ol3 

JewellMarshall mIOsG 
JewettMaryA s2t) 

JillsonAW&wf-CAje7 
JohnsonC ol9 

Johnson EllaM o28 
JohnsonElisha je9s21 
JohnsouEB a24 

JohusonEC s20 

JohnsonEE&wf a24 
JohnsouMrsEM sli 
JohnsouFL s22 

Kebucca *' 

JohusouFrankE s21 
JohusoiiGeoM jy5 
Johnsonll s7 

Johusonllarry o27 
Johnsonllattie ol8 
JohusonHB m22 

JohnsonllJ&wf je21 
" Fanuyll-Kosal " 
JohnsonMrsHL slS 
JohnsoulIW s27 

JohnsonMaryE s8 
JohnsonMissSB sl5 
JohnsonWmH o20 
JonesMrsAnnieL si 
JonesJames a7 

JonesChasE s7 

JonesOH s2 

JonesSamuelP jylO 
Jor.esWA&wf s4 

JonesWDN s27 

rJonesWF . o31 

JordanDJ ol'? 

JoslynChasM sl5 

JnddnC je21s5 

JiiddMrsHC s5 

" EmmaL-Eddie " 
JudkinsBT jel9 

KatzensteinWolf s8 
KatzensteinW-B a25 
KeenCH o30 

KeenMrsEmma k9 
KeenGeoM o2 

KeepChasD-TH a21 
licepHowardH a21s8 
KcepLizzieC o25 

KeepWmE&wf ol2 
KellerGeo s27 

KelloggAllynS&wfs21 
" ChiisA " 

KelloggDanaW a21 
KelloggMrsEB Jv29 
'■Belie 

Kellog<rEC&wf m25 
" AffnesF " 

KelloggMrsFS n2 

Kel!oggII&wf s29 

" AnnieR " 

KelloggJA sl5 

Kellogg.Tulius&wf sll 
KelloggLGrace sl2 

HattieE " 

KellosgNO je22 

KelloggRodney olO 
" !^T^8Krldney&son " 
jy7jKcll02rgWm s8 

KelscyWH-Em'yAASO 



KellyRevMJ Jel 

KendallChasP Jy21 
KendallEUaG ol4 

KendallES s6 

KeneyHenry s29 

" Walter-MaryJ " 
KeneyWalt"r2d&wfje9 
KennedyH-Nellie oil 
KenyonEL&wf a18 
KenyonEM o20 

KenyonRPrPPha]jul9 
KeiupJno[CoA] s6 
KerrChas-JuoC jel( 
KesslerS o3U 

KetcbumSaml 
KilbouruMrsEB 
KilbouruJK 
KilbournWF 
KimbalJFH 
KingMrsAliceR 
KingChas&wf 
Emma-Addie 



ol9 

jeKi 

n4 

si 

s4 

018 

je3 



a29 

sis 
s8 
s7 

Sl5 
o7 

n6 



s22 
ol2 
o30 



je24 

o2' 



KiugGeoA 
KingHenry 
•• MissEM 
KingMissJennieM o' 
KingJH o20 

KingRA jy21 

KingSarahJ s2 

KingThompsonO s28 
KingWmH s22 

" MrsNettie 
KingZP&wf 
KincsleyHB 
KingsleySusieP 
KinneyJC&wf 
KinneyWmC 
KinyonEdwardF 
KippenHA&wf 
KirkRoss 
KirkSJ&wf-Lilly jyll 
Kleml'elderFrank 
KlimmerJosephH s28 
KnappFred-MaryE Nl 
" LizzieM-MaryC 



s7 
sl3 
je22 



KnappGeo 

KuappHarryS 

KnightAE 

" SAureta 

KnightEH 

KnightMrsJH 

" Hattie 

KnodellCH 

KnoekGJ 

KnoekMrsJL 

■' Celia-Huldah 

KnousMrsFF 

KnonsJacob- Annie o4 

" MrsJacob a26o4 

KnowlesKateS s6 

KnowlesWP o2 

KnoxFranliJ&wf ol9 



olO 



KnosHerbert 

KnoxJB 

KnoxWO 

Koenin:OBcar 

KohnMorrisN 

KomaiS 



osn 

je22 

021 

sl5 

Jyl4 

Jy21 



JarvisRichardWH n4 Kel«ovWriir 
JajcoxGB £21 KellyMrsMP 

U 



KozimaNoriqnki 
KramerAugustH Jyl9 
KranssPh s9 

KrenzerC s5 

KrugEliza sl9 

KnigLoui9[SerCoF]s8 
" MrsLonis " 

KubnlvE[CorCoA] s6 
KnnzeFH s27 

Jv26iLaddArthurC ol6 

b24'LaddMr8E o7 



LalleyJasP s8 

LambEJ sO 

LambLorenzo JetJ 

LambertWC ol7 

LamphereAlbertWjy4 

LancasterE f!25 

LandfearLouiseB ol4 

LandouJnoS 

LaneEH(A4)&wf 

LaneFA[GHG] 

LaneGeoH 

LangdouAF&wf 

LangdouIlelenM 

LangdonHF 

Langdon J [CorCoB] s4 

LanniaiiDTrumb'lls21 

LarkumChasB jy21 

LarkumJGertrude o2 

LarnedAmoSi&wf o9 

" ClaraK 

LarrabeeWW sl5 

" AnnieC " 

LathioiiWH&wf o27 

LatimerF sl3 

LatimerHorace&wolQ 

LatimerMissLoisR s8 

LatimerTB w22 

LauchlamMaryA jy27 

LaiightonTR s7 

LawrenceCH&wf s20 

LawienceJames sl9 

LawrenceKC a31 

LavvrenceMrsRS g27 

LawrenceWJ o3 

LawsonKate a24 

Lawe'uM isLottieBs23 

LeavensEdith a21 

LeeGE[CorCoF] s6 

LeflingwellJDjr 

" GeoE 

LehiJnoJ 

LeigliMrsE 

" MissEmelie "• 

LeonMorns-Jor>aeA23 

Leon'rdBF[S'iCoB]s5 

LerardFP&wf Jy3 

" FrankH 

LeschkeEmil 

LestcrMrsChapE 

LevalleyBenjW 

Levy Bernard 

LevyGc'o 

Levy Julius 

LevySE 

LevyWm 

LewisIIL 

LewlsJB 

LewisME 

LewisNellie 

LewisSelah&wf 

LewlsWmJ 

LiangYung 

LillibridgeFM 

LincolnCG 

LiiicolnChasL 

LincolnDP&wf 

LincolnEttieE 

LincolnFannieM 

LincolnPrankl 

LincolnGilbert 

MrsBS 
LincolnGeoS&wf s26 

MaryE 
Lincoln Maryl 
LlncolnHR 
LincolnTheoM 

CP 
LiudPeterL-MrsG a98 
LindseyEW olO 



a23 



87 

026 



Al6 

s7 

Mil 

p8 
017 
ol3 
s28 
a31 
a26 
Al5 

s4 

a21 

jy24 

a31 

017 

jyl3 

a2 

s8 
si 9 
sl3 
sll 

a8 
o27 



b9 
o23 
Sl2 



250 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITON. 



Lind?leyWB[CoH] s5 
LinkeAug s2!) 

LinkeBeuhardt sl2 
LeitchHeury ol9 

LittleMissBelle 06 
LitllefieklEditli o9 
LiviugstoiiTtiosB a30 
LloydMissAP sl9 

LloydCarrieC sS 

LloydJHenry nIO 

LobdellEditliH oi 
LockwoodJas a26s26 
" JennieA "■ 

LockwoodWII&wMlO 
LondoiiVBlI o30 

Lon"-donEiiimaA s5 
LoobyWuiU o24 

LoomisAG s8 

LoomisAlbortS JelO 
Looini!*Biirdett mIO 
LoomisMrsB je'^NlO 
LootnisClia!<P jylGNO 
LoomisCO s28 

LooinUCR je30 

LoomisEttie jy3 

" Coi-die " 

LooiuisPG sl9 

LooaiisGracieL je20 
LoomisMrsHM o5 
" WT-HeuriettaM " 
LoomisJasM&vvf o9 
LoomisKateM jyO 
LoomisMariette ol3{ 
LoomisMrsMC Je2| 
LoomisSarahE jol3: 
LooinisTM-EttieEsll' 
LoomisMrsWG s37 
LordFJ s6 

LordFVV o5, 

LordUG sl5 

LordMrsJB jelS, 

LordJesseH m20 

LorscliD a25 

Loi-scliMrsDC n3 

" Mi-sHS " 1 

LorschSalomon s8 
LotzeliyjorCoA] s5 
LovellCA jy311 

LovehmdCeleste n9 
LiitzJacob&wf o7 
•• Edith A " i 

LnxPeter o3 

LyraanCG sl9 

LymmFredS a29 

LymanHelenL " ! 

LymanJeuiiieD sl3 
LymanTheodore aIG 
LyinanWniE sl4 

LvnchJnoB s29 

LyoiisMrsEUaM s22 
Lyons.IJ s4 

liVoii.TiioM oT 

MackEHjr oKi 

MackMrt^JasB .Ty31 
MacPlierson.TnoA AKi 
MackiiiFraucbE 828 
MaehlCha* a17 

Miiiih I Fred ■k-Geo.jo28 , 
MaerckleinH s8 

Maei'ckleinHJ a15 
MageeMaryE slO 

MagiiireThod s7 

MiTnGeoA a23 

MaiiiMV-Einily 0I8 
MairsonJosieph sS 
M-doneJno o31 

MalloryMH Mil 

MandlobaiunJ&wf s6 
'• Flora 



Mandlebaum.JH Jy24 
MannMaryA oil 

ManningAlfC-JS olU 
Manu'gAugiistaM ii26 
MaunmgWH[PP] jel6 
MansuyAD-ChaeG s27 
MausuyJustinN 828 
MaraDaniel 
xMarbleVVU&wf 
" MrsEllenE 
MarchantMrs 
MarshAP&wf 
MarshEA 
MarshEW&wf 
MarshGraceE 
AlarshMrsKateM jel2 
" AliceE " 

MarshMS 8l5 

MarshMissPA ol4 
xMarshSethE&wf sl2 
" MissJenniell " 
MarshallAG[CoHl] 85 
MarshallMrsAndr'wsB 
MarshallWELCoEl] s5 



MarslandJ 

MarstonCT 

MarstonS 

MartellEdie 

MartinThosH 

MartinMrsThosH 

MarvelJE 

MasonFrederick 

Mason PrankE 

MasonHH 

MasouSamuel 



Jyl4 
s21 
822 
Al9 

87 

k9 
0I9 

s28 

821 
A3 

019 



Mason W(jyl5)&wfolG 



Jy3 
o20 
025 



MasoiiWH 

MatberAnnaC 

MathurMrsJG 

MatherMaryS 

" LydiaC 

MatberMaryB-HE a1& 

MatherSam'l&wf o24 

" Timothy " 

MatherWmA o25 

Mathe\vsR[CoAl] s4 

MathewsonGilbertjy3 

MatlockGeo&wf Je5 

MatsudalraS 

MayChas&wf 

MayFD 

MayKatie 



McCroneMaggieW ol9 
McDonnellJuoB jel4 



old 



sl9 
ol7 
825 

o9 
o28 

Nl 
jeK! 

o3 
o2() 
013 
oil 

n8 

s8 



jy2i 

s25 

8l2 

o26 



MayWymanJ&wf oil 
~ ■ jylO 



02 

jy26 

si 
jyl6 



MayerBenj 

MayerBeiiH 

MayerDavid&wf 

" Anna-Nora 

MayerHenryC 

MayerL 

MayerSimonjr 

" Henry-Leopold " 

MayerDrNathan jel7 

MayoWK&wf 

McCannJnoH 

McCarthyAlex 

McClayJobn 

McClayJS&wf 

" Susie 

McClatchieJames s28 

McClellandDH a9 

McCIoudRichM&ws2() 

McChmieThos jyl7 

McClureJB f^Vt 

McClureJC[GnG] s8 

McClureNellie o9 

McCoy Jno jyO 

McCrayWB&wf M27 

McCroneW(s8;&w ol9 

I" Netties 



McEvoyWm 

McFarlandVVR 

McGoodinJohn 

McGovernP 

McKeeKobt 

McKenzieJuo 

McKinueyA 

McKinueyWJ 

McKiuseyVV 

McKoneP 

McLarouChas 

McLaugliliuGeoB 

McLeanFD[GIIG] 

McLcanWIi[GHG] " 

McManamonGeoB olO 

" Mary " 

McManusEP-Rose 0I8 

McManusJas-JCliaso3 

" AnuieS-Harry " 

McManusJT&wf s22 

McManusMrsKAH 05 

McManusNellieM o3 

McManusThomas o20 

McNamaraMrs ol9 

McNaniaraSarah 

McNaryDrSR 

McPhersonJnoC 

McV^etyJas&wf 

MeadJnoC 

MeechCliasE 

MeeksKranklinll 

MellonDM 

MereditliMrsE 

MeredithRichard Jyll 

MerriamLB je9s7 

MerriamNellieL olO 

MerriULD s2(J 

MerrillME[GnG] s8 

MerrillMraME o27 

MerrittAE n1 

MertonClias Jyl8 

MessengerMrsMA o3 

MessingerWmC slS 

MessnerEiuil 

MettlerLC 

MillardCT 

Millard WillJ 

MillerArchibald 

MillerMrsAC 

MillerRevAD 

MillerAE 

MillcrBertha 

MillcrBO 

MillerMrsDMcL o5 

MillerEmilyC[MD]o2G 

MillerFlorenceL n9 

MillorGeoS&wf o4 

MillcrGeoW&wf sl4 

" AgnosM " 

MillorllL o30 

MillerDrlsaacS ol2 

Miller.Tobn 



s27.\6 
s5 
n9 



slO 

AlO 

o25 
jel9 
sl2 
s29 
jy6 
n9 



MixMrsJnoQ 

'• ElizaF 

MixMaryAnn 

MonabauTlios 

MonroeGeoJ 

MontagueJuliaB jyl9 

MontgomeryllG sl2 

MoodyLB-CarrieS olO 

MooreAW Ai4 

MooreChas-CW Jy4 

MooreEdwG 

MoorcEverett 

MooreGeoW 

MooreMrsUeoW 

MooreHS 

Moorclrvin 

MooreJas 

MooreMrsJames 

MooreJC 

MooreJR&wf 

MooreRobt&wf 

MooreWmA 

MooreWH 

MoranLtPJ[CoB] 

MoranJas 

Morgan CE 



o26 
n3 

06 

M30 

je!> 

n4 

a9 

a31 

85 

826 

sll 

AlO 

s4 
sU 

88 

jyll 



Al8 
815 

Jy28 
sl» 



jel6 

s7 

sS MillerCaptJA[CoAl 
jyl9- ■■ — 
s30 



MillerJII 

Miller.TClark 

MillerKateH 

MillerThosR 

MillsChasS 

Milton-TasH 

MincrDiidleyE 

]\IinorAltV<>d'W&wfA22 

MitcbellGcoE 

Mitdu'llJcssieD 

MitclK'Il.T 

Mitchell.TII 

MitsnkuiK 

MixFE 



ois 

Sl3 

84 

jy21 

MlO 



Mo rganM rsErama A 87 
" NathanielK 
MorgaiiHenry 
MorganllenryK 
MorganJames 
Mo rganM A 
MorganMinnieH jy21 
MorganMrsNH n1 
" NathanielF " 

MorganWmE 0I8 

M organ WH[CoF] s6 
MorlcyHR sl5 

" CarrieM " 

MorrellDaniel&wf je7 
MorrisJF NlO 

MorrisLB&wf a30 
" MaryS-HelenH " 
MorrisLJ Jel4 

MorseAiigiistuB jyll 
MorseEL s27 

MorseEF s25 

" MaryE-CarricE " 
MorseEllaG jyll 

MorseHowardB o24 
MorsellermanN 
MorseLeonard 
MorseRebocca 
Moseley Belle 
MoseleyDB-DS 
MoseleyMrsDB 
" MissEllaG 
MoseleyGW 
MoseleyGilbertG 
MoseleyllC 
" MrsGW-CarrieE " 
MosesE JylS 

MosesJudah n4 

MoiiltonDN 024 

MowryC[SerCoHl s6 
MowrvLN-MaryA jy I 
MowryMrsNelson o25 
MnhlbcrgerA a25 

"• Mina " 

MiilcabyEdwardJ a28 
MulcahyThomas n3 
MuUerMissC oU 

MnmfordGrace el 
]\IunrooDD[GHG] 88 
MunscUMrsMiiry o30 
MiinwiiMissEUen 828 
MiinvaiiOG&wf .Te22 
MiirphyKdw.T&wf o2(! 
MurphyNellieM o5 



a9 
olS 

o(i 
0I2 
ol3 



ol7 

S9 

87 



LIST OF COA'XECTICUT VISITORS. — HARTFORD COUNTY. 



251 



MurrayWAi: 
NashSanilL 
Neari'F f25 

NeudhamEclwMB Jy-'o 
Neeclham(jleoS a'H) 
NelsoiiAJ s28 

NewburyWmH Nl 
Ise\vcomb\\P Jy4 

NewellWmH&wf o2 
Ne\vmanA[CrCoB] sG 
NewtonGeoB[CoF] s8 
NewtoiiGeoH sO 

NewtoiiGeoW&wf sT 
NewtonJasR s22 

Ne\\'tonJK o3U 

NewtoiiMrsPS Jelti 
Ke\vtonPW[lstRt] s3 
New'tonWA w2T 

NewtonWT jy28 

NeyJohuM&wf a4 
'• MasterEdwarcLM '■ 
NeyJF je28 

NicholsBF jyl2 

NicholsMissCarrie s7 
Nichols? Jas Ml 7 

NicholsJaraep&w .lelO 
KichoIsMrsLizzieJ s9 
" Edwin " 

NifliolsonSG sl5 

Nickers-onJlrsCS sl5 
NickersonMrisF s2(j 
NobleCS-MaryN oil 
NobleEmmaC 



a2P> OlTTistedFL 
<)25 



OlinstfdDiHK&w MlO 
" Nellie&Mamie " 
OliustediMrt^Jno ol8 
OpdykeMrsEJ a29 
OixuttEC ol8 

OnnsbyWT) jel4 

OsgoodOK .ie2H 

Osj^oodMreWmB a14 
OtisJH s28 

OweuEH(je21)&w o21 
OweuGaluslia n3 

0\vcii<;j«oS Jyl5 

OwensFD jy21 

PackardAnnaM jy5 
" Miss 

PackardCalebL o24 
" ChasII-HarrietL " 
PackardDrGcoB jy20 



B2r> i Pen PoITE 



sS 
nG 

ol'J 
sG 

Jy2 

o24 

s20 
sG 

m31 



NollAntliony[CoA] 
JSollvV 

NollmanChas 
NormaiiMissSJ 
NonisJIH 
NorthAW&wf 
" -Chat^W 
NorthJohnC 
NorthamCH&wf 
NorthamLizzie 
" Emily-Sarali 
NorthamR 
NorthamRCjr 
NorlhropMrsECB 6l8 
NorthropMrsEG n9 
" JlissesLS&EM: " 
NorthropIlD ?27 

NorrisJW[CorCoB] s5 
NorrisRichard s3 

NortonDrDaniel ol9 
NortonEdw'dj r&wolG 
NortonGeoW a9 

NortouHattieE o3 
NortonLaviuaA m2G 
NortonLaurenceA ol9 
NortonNellie olG 

NoyesSarahJ sl4 

NoyesWmH Jy5 

KoyesMrsWmH a29 
OatmanLeman&wfslG 
OdholmS-MrsHE s9 
OelkuchA[CorCoA]e6 
O'BrienBJ olS 

O'BrienNellieF n9 
0'FlahertyMichaelAl7 
O'lIaraEd'ward o31 
" Miss " 

O'NeilC&wf ol9 

O'Neil.TE a22 

O'NeilTimothy p5 

0'ReilIyPhilip-AnnN3 
OldsNathan JVo 

OliverEH-ES a3 

OlmstedAF&wf s2.S 
OhustedClara.I aIG 
OlinstedFannieM AlG 



jel 

NlO 



Pfiisellarry&wf 
" WmC-All'redH; 
PeaseZK-BO 
PeekDeWittJ 
[Aide-de-CampCNG] 
PeckEB-FM 
PecklvlrsHH 
PeckSN 
PeckWH 
PeckhamGcoH 
PeckhamHW 
PeckhamWL 
PellettAD 
PellettCliaslSr 
PellettFE-BelleS 
PeltierDrPD 



[SurgPutPlia] 
PeltonMrsWN&drpll 
PemberJS-NellieMi?13 
" FanuieM " 

PendletonCH&wf o5 
PenfieldFC n9 

PepperMrsBH 
PerkinsCP 
PerkinsDC 
PerkinsEmilyJ 



j21'Pitkin"^L je24 

s2 PitkiiiWalter m21 

sll PlattWT[CapGHG] i?8 

g4 I'lautI jyn 

PliniptonAL&wf n1 

a22 " WabclB 

jy2G PlimptuiiFW 6l4 

a23 " Mr^FW&chnd " 

b1 Pliinpton.InliaB o4 

p28 PlimptoiiLB m15o4 

oil " MrsLB-Julia o4 

o3 PlyuiptooMissEM n6 

AlG PoderE a25 

p21 PoindexterChasE aIS 

s20 PolkMrsJames e9 

jelG PomeroyAG a19 

PomeroyAH a25 

PomeroyEllicH-HEoS 

PomeroyGeoS a30 

" PomeroyMrsJS o25 

o5 PonieroyNoah 

n9 PondCM&wf 

05 PondDC 

s2o!PopeLtEL[Con] 

p20iPorterAHaSiS;\vf 

n8 " Mis?EW 

PerryEA[PPha'x].TflG " Henrietta 

PerryEH&wf jelGPoiterD-IMrpEA 

PerkinsGS s9TorterMrslMariaC o30 

PerryMissMM o23 PorterJlartinVB o2 

Perry VD&wf ol3lPorterMrsDrWM oil, 

PetersJolinT&wf n3 PorterSA[GIIG] e8 

PettiboneEmnia o20 PostCharlesA&wf 627 

PettiboneFE&wf oil j" Rosa A-LizzieA " 

PettiboneWC " |Po?tEE o9 

PettiboneWF Al7iPostJennieM a4 

PettitJ-ChrissieA sl9 PoPtWH je9si5 

PhelanMaryS o20!" MrsWH 

PhelpsAnt'netteR .Te3 Potter( H 

PhelpsAlbertS jyS PotturJasE 

BlShPhelpsDS 6^21 , PotterWE[CoF] 

~ PhelpsDrydenTV sll.PowcllMrsJapB 

PhelpsLillianM A22i" CarrieE-Lulie 

PhelpsRH jcl5ol4"Amy 

PliclpsSO jel4f!4! Powell WC 



.leG 
g->0 

s20 

je23 



Jel2 



PackardMrsL 

PackerAR 

PackwoodJD 

PaseChasS[Con] 

PaseChasW 

PageMaryE 

PalmerHW&wf 

PalmerJohnC 

PalmerMrsWL 

PalmerH[GHG] 

PardeeMissSN 

" Miss 

ParkeAE 

ParkerChasH[Con] s5 

ParkerMrsJA sil3jy31 

ParkerJD b21 

ParkerJII olO 

ParkerJL o24 

ParkerOF s27 

ParkerVanH-Wn o24 

ParkhurstEG&wfjyll 

" CoraM " 

ParksFW 

ParksSamlB 

ParmeleGL p2 

[AsstSur^lstRgt] 
ParmeleeFlorence p9 
Parkin son AlissK je27iPhelpsSDryden 
ParsonsMrsBM jyll " MrsSEmilie 
ParsonsEW Mllje21 " Arthurs 
ParsonsHG ol2 PhelpsWmL 

" WalterG-KateM ol2;PhilbrickHB 

ParsonsJnoG jyl2ol2:PhillipsDaniel A23s20'PrattEsther 
ParsonsMrsJQ s8|PhillipsMaryM a2;3," FannyW 

ParsousJnoK jyl2s8IPhillipsTW ol4 PrattFA 

ParsonsMissTM o3 Phillips JH[GHG] s8j" MrsFA-CarrieL sl5 
ParsonsW-]MrsCRol2 PhippsED a30 PrattJasC e2(> 



6l5 

je24 

a23 

e8 

69 



jeSO 



o2G PownallCasperW jyG 



Pratt ArthurG 

" Pratt AL&wf 

o20'PrattChasW 

o30 PrattET 



Jy25 
je21 

jyir 
jylS 
M24 

Miosis 



ParsonsWmS 
PascoHL 
PascoLester 
PattersonMJ 
PattisonLizzieJ 
PattonEF 
PattonAA&wf 
" Bertie 
ParaWM 
WalterN&wf 



oSOlPhippsMrsED slG PrattJos[PPha'x]je]9 

so PickeringWH .Tello9 " Mrs Joseph " 

jelSlPickeringMrsWH slGiPrattKittieC n6 



A3|"Mortie-Waldo 
g& PickettGeoL 

A24|PierceAH 

a2G " 



PajTieBrigham&wf s5 

PearlEugeneT n3 

PearlFrankH ol9 

Pearl PH 

PearlWm 

PearsonEdJ 

PeaseAL&wf 

PeaseChasA 

PeaseEdwardH 

PcaseRM 

PeaseFrankE 

PeaseMrsFS 

PeaseFR-KateE 



PrattLB 
e7!PrattMD 
a2 PrenticeCn 
ol7 



sl6 
oil 



PierceJB 

" SophlaA-May 
e20 PierceKittie 
saO PierceSeldenJ 

Pierce Wm J & wf 

PiersonMissHA 

PiersonWmD 
AlOjPilsburyAmos 
MlOjPinneyEW 
o24 PinneyMrsHM 

p28'PitkinAH(M25)&wf 84' PriceJJ-LE 
jy7 Pitkin AS o7 PriceJW 

jy6 PitkinHS 67 PrimusMrsH 

jel4 PitkinHE-MrsKD oil PriorMissClara 
o5 PitkinKateA n3 PriorLottieM 

jy5 PitkinNT&wf p9 PrudenAlbertJ 

05." Agnes " iPurkisJames 



PrenticeLeila 
PrenticeFrank 
PrenticeSO 
PrestonChasP 
PrestonChasW 
,Te28 PrestonDWP 
.jel4!PrestonEH 
ol9 PrestonLS 
n3 PrestonSC&wf 
n6' " Josie 



a24 
s25 

a1s2G 
s2G 
AlG 
'619 
All 
M20 
s7 

Al5 

je6 



a28 

K« 

n2 
jel3 
jelO 
jy31 

616 



252 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



PurvesJno 


o28 


QuiunPH 


A'29 


QuintAD 


s21 


tJuiutardHeleiiR 


s4 


KaiiiBloidCarrieM f8 


KainsdenKobtJ 


jyii 


Ram#eyVVH-AF 


s20 


KandallWmH 


el3 


IlaimeyJII 


s6 


ItansomMrs 


oU 


RapelyeCA 


a21 


IJiiymondRG 


ol9 


'• KateCi 


" 


RaymondSD 


o4 


RaynorMariaL 


ol4 


Reii'llYaucisH 


a30 


R'U.lML&wf 


slO 


-R-ddaVWm 


s5 


ReckardHarryL 


a3J 


Ru.lfleldllA&wf 


p28 


'• Henry S 


" 


RedfleldJR-Ma'yRA23 


ReJtieldWiUie 


o5 


ReedAD 


N> 


RjedAB 


So 


R-edFannieL 


s8 


'• AnnieL 


" 


ReedJasiR 


Nl 


'• EstherJ-IdaJ 


" 


Ri-idelLtOtto[Co. 


^] s5 


Ri-irt'TliompsouH 


s28 


RL'illyJuoJ 


Nl 


ReillyPH&wf 


8-21 


ReiselEdward[CoF]s8 


ReiuingtonMrsJI 


s6 


RhoiitaiiGII 


o94 


RiiDdesCE 


Je22 


R'iodesMis->EM 


s6 


RtiodesHB{N2)&wf sT 


RiiodebiWilUeH 


n2 


RiceJti 


jyl4 


RiceLuke 


All 


RiceMrsSF 


o31 


R'chEE 


m22 


RichJG&wf 


jy4 


RicliardsAliceQ 


jyll 


RichardsCB 


jel3 


RichardsChasE 


Jy31 


" MrsChasB 


"• 


RichardsFred&wf o30 


RichardsonldaE 


ol7 


RichardsonMrsJas ol8 


Richardson Mrs JC o26 


RichardsouJW 


jel9 


ISerPutPha'x 


1 


Richard9onSam'lKA25 


Richard8onWH&w920 


RichraondEH 


sl3 


RichmondFrancis n3 


RichmondRW 


olO 


RileyJohn 


o23 


RileyPS 


018 


RisleyES 


821 


RisloyMrsEUenS 


821 


RobbinsiOS 


o4 


RobbiiijiEllenM 


013 


" EllaB 


" 


RobhinsFredA 


821 


Robbin^PW 


s30 


RobbiusSiisanL 


Al5 


RobertsAO 


s27 


" JennieM 




RobertsAarnesMay a4 


RobertsCF&wf 


olO 


RobertsOarrieF 


a9 


Roberts E-CB 


o9 


" FloreiiceC 


" 


RobfirtsED 


Nl 


KoberteGeo 


jel3 



RobertsMrsMJ o24 
RobertsOR 621 

RobertsWin o30 

RobcrtsWmC s27 

RobertsMrsWW ol7 
RoberisWillardB o2 
RobertsoiiEtr je22 
RobertsonLJ a'J 

Roberts'nWH [CoF] s5 
RobinsHL a19 

RobiusMissJulia o5 
RobinsonCP&wf ol2 
RobinsonCA&wf sl9 
RobinsonFannieE s22 
RobiusonG s2G 

RobiusonGeo&wf s6 
•' EllaA 

RobinsonHenryC Jy4 
" LiiciusF " 

" Miss&.vlary Alice" 
RobinsoiiHN All 

RobinsonMrsJE o25 
RobinsouLizzieE s8 
RobinsonLena s6 

RobinsonMA ol7 

RocheLizzie n4 

RockwelLMrsChas o24 
" Mira " 

RocliweUEdgarD s8 
Rockwell FC sl4 

RockwcllJW jyl3 
RockwellTF s8 

Rodi,'erslIJ&\vf AlG 
RodgersWJ A2:i 

RodmanChasL a5 
RodmanDC&wf m24 
RoehrerChas 8l9 

RoehrerGottleib je7 
RoehrerS s30 

RogasnerS m22s1 

Roger!*CLA Je29 

Rogeri^EdwardF jyl8 
RogerslIC jy21 

Rogers JasE-Jas A o24 
RogersMrsSS s6 

" MissAliceH 
RogereWH-Mi98 ol3 
RollinsEdwardW 87 
RoodAliceC a31 

RoodDA Je9 

Rood EH [Cor CoF] 85 
RoodFrankD s27 

RoodJLyman 84 

RootCM je6sllo27 
RootEdwK Je2 

RootFraiiklin o2 

" MrsEA 
RootGWells jel3sl6 
RootMrsGWells jel3 
" MaryE-Edw'dH 
•' Erastusn 
RootJohnG n4 

Root-TudsonH s28 

RootLnluM s5 

RootWW a9 

RoseJT o30 

RosenblattB a29 

RosenblattHenry aIO 
RosendorffR a17 

IRossFO s14 

RoPsPhilip a26 

|Roth.T[SerCoA] s6 
RotliermelDN jyfi 
RothscbildD[CoA] s5 
RothchildSatn o4 

jRowellGeoW o27 

RowlovGnoIIR ol2 
RoyalEFB jy94 

RumseyMraWmS s27 



RussCT-MrsCJ 

RussellFG 
RussellFM 
RuseellFW&wf 
RussellDrGW 
RussellHE 
RussellMrsJB 
RussellJohuS 
KussellLewisE 
" MaryH 
RussellNellieS 
RussellRL&wf 
RutherlordWmB 
RyauDennls 
RyanJosephC 
RyderChasH 
RyderSN&wf 
SackettLauraJ 
SackettWN&wf 
SageAJ 
SageEW 
SageFranklinH 
SageJE 

StUilaireEmma 
SalisburyJC 
SahvayWm&wf jel4 
SamsonMrsFred 8l8 
SanbornFredW a21 
SaiiborneRevGeoEs2«j 
AnneE " 

SandsH Jyl4 

SanfordEdw&wf je28 



b21 

8l 

b5 
olO 
Sl2 
o27 
n9 
o6 
jy3 

03 
oil 
sK) 

o6 
ol3 
OlO 
ol7 
a22 
je27 
je7 
026 

a8 
Al4 

a9 
027 



021 

n8 



a23 
oil 
o23 
Je27 



San ford EL 
SangerFW 
SaugerIra 
SargentGeoH 
SargentMrsMS 
SaundersGeo 
SaiindersHH 
SaundersMinnieL o28 
SaundersTW o5 

MrsPHB-MinnieE" 
SaundersW sl3 

SaundersWm s6 

SavageEnochL&w oil 
SavageHH o31 

SavageMrsWm o5 
SawfelleAW&lady olS 



SearsMAddie a4 

bedgwickCF&wf s28 
SeidlerGeoN&wf ol8 
SeigleAF slO 

SeldenEdward&wfol9 
SeldeuJG&wf ol8 
SellevvAH a8 

SeUingSimon o3 

SellingMr8S&8on a18 
SessionsED s9 

SextonCharlie o26 
SextonFG a8 

SextonGeorge&wf o4 
SextonMrsGK ol9 
SeymourAIfred ol3 
SeymourAW-LB AlO 
SeymourCharles olO 
SeymourCL-SarahBsS 
SeymourMrsDF o4 
SeymourMrsD MlO 
SeymourDS&wl s20 
SeymourEugeneE m17 
Seym'rFC[LtGHG] s8 
SeymourFrank a22 
SeymourFreeican s7 
SeymourHoraceS olO 
" Julia " 

Seym'rMrsHarvey o25 
" MissMJ " 

SeymourHW n7 

SeymourHattieH n9 
SeymourHoraceS 84 
SeymourLeverettK8l2 
SeymourME a22 

SeymourMD[CoF] 8(j 
SeymourOD je9 

SeymonrOH sl9 

SeymonrRich'd a21s26 
Seym'rMrsRich'd a31 
" HattieR 
SeymonrSB 
" EngenuB 
SeymsGeoH 
SeymsRN 
" MrsRN-John 
SheddNewton 



je22 



Jy5 

sl5 

jel5 

8l4 

sl9 
N6 
09 

a25 
s2 



SawinCA 

SavvyerGeoO 

SawyerMrsIA 

ScailesFrancesH 

ScarboroughGF 

SchaflferLeon 

SchaubelGeoD 

SchemannE 

SchillingJohn 

SchmidtCha8[CoH] s5 

SchinidtE[SerCoA] s7 

SchneiderAL a22 

SchroederFred'k si 

SchultenChas s20 

SchnlzeLtEd[CoAl]s7 

SchulzeMreH s7 

" HarryB " 

SchwabEmil 

SchwabOtto 

ScofleldCE 

ScofieldDH 

ScottGT[PntPx] jel9 

" MrpGT 

ScottJS 

ScottNT 

ScottPJ[CoB] 

ScriptnreJames 

" Mary 

SeamansH&wf 

"OH 

SearsAgneeM 



MlO 

Al5 

s4 

813 



o4 
a2 
s5 

822 

o25 
a4 



m26 

m2Bo10 
OlO 
820 



SheldonAlfredS 


o27 


SheldonCT 


oil 


SheldonHenryW jyll 


SheldonKT 


a7 


SlieltonWillS 


jyi 


ShepardMrsDB 


84 


" MasterWillie 


•' 


ShepardFW[GHG] eS 


ShepardMrsHL 


019 


ShepardJJ 


017 


Shepard M rs Jen ' IcEnS 


Shep'rdMiPsKB.iy5ol8 


ShepherdFredJ 


m25 


ShermanHW 


jylS 


ShermanCaptJasT 96 


[CoBlstRegt] 


SherryJames 


o7 


ShieldsAnnie 


SI27 


ShoreyJF 


o9 


ShultasJamesB 


jy26 


SirklerJohn 


s22 


SillGeoE 


a31 


SillLtGovGeoGMlOASl 


SillLonisB 


jyl2 


SillWmH 


o9 


SillowaySD 


NlO 


SillowavMrsSD 


jel2 


SillowayMrsWF 


n4 


SilslyJH 


o25 


SilverAP 


020 


SimmonsBA 


815 


SiinnionsNewton 


NlO 



SimmonsWG&wf sl3 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS — HABTFORD COUNTY. 



253 



SimonsDeliaF aIO 

SimoulIjr[CorCoH] s6 
SimpsoiiHW .jel9 

[Com'i*aryPutPx] 
SimpuonJohn 
Sis^sonAlbertJ 
SissonAL&wf 
" Florence 
SissonChasL 
SissouFrecl'kH 
SissonMarieE 
" CarrieH '• 

SlsponTh's(jy4)&wo]7 
" MaidaL-Gert'deH " 
SmallEdwinF o2.3 
SmallMrsEmma n9 
SmaUUH oil 

SmartGeoW 621 

Smart J M n2 

SkeeleHB jel 

SkiltonMissCC oil 
SkillonDWC&wf m29 
" JohuL " 

SkinnerAlbert o2(; 
SkinnerAB s7 

SkiiinerChasA n2 

SkiimerCW 



SkinuerFannieT jy2C 



SkinnerOA 

SlateChasD 

SlateDwight 

SlateDN&wf 

" MinnieA " 

SlesingerHenry&wolT 

SlocumPR&wf ol9 



jyl9 
jyl2 
jel0s28 

818 



ol8 
je22 
a29 
Jy4 
sl2 



SluyterSG 

SmithAM 

StnithArtdieL 

SmithAndrew 

SmithAlexC 

SmithBH[CorCoB] p6 

SmithMissCarrie s28 

SmithChaeB-E ol6 

SmithCG p27 

SmithCH&wf .ie22sl2 

SniitliEdvvardE jyl5 

SmithEL&wf 

SmithFannieE 

SmithFannyM 

" EvaA 

SmithFrankB 

SmitliFred'k 

SmithFred'kM 

SmithGTi-uman 

SmithGeoB 

SmithGoihamP 

SmithHP 

SmithHT 

SmithHenrvT 

SmithJnlia'E 

SmithJuliaL 

SmithJulieP 

Smith JAjr-MaryM ol8 

SmitliMi-sJaneF je24 



SmithPH&wf 

SmithMissKose 

SmitliKStauley 

SmithMisbSarah 

SmithSC 

SmithSEldridge 

" SamuelE 

SmiUiThomasM 

SmithWmB 

SmithMrsWmB 

SmithWmC&wf 

SmithMrsWE 

'• WillisE 

Smith WH 

SmithWJ 

SmittonCH[CoB] 

SneathThosS 

SnowMrsAF-AH 

" Ellen-Alice 

SuowAW 

SnowAWilson 

SnowDrGN 

SnowMrsJM 



s4'SteeleTSedgwick je7 
68 SteeleWC[DMajlst]s6 
a7 SteenAndrew jy2tjsl6 

el4 SteiuMartin n1 

o2jSteiuerBernardD si 
A8'SternA&wf-Julia a25 
" !SternEmanuel jel2 
o9 Stern Jacob s8 

je9:SternMr8Kosey jel7 



o24 

Bll 

825 

jy7 
o26 
s5 
sl8 
sl2 

s29 

s8 

s22 

Jy28 



SteniR 

SterubergAC 

StetsonDwightR 

StetsonJeannieV 

StevensAH 

Stevens : .lonzoW 



Jyl3 
jyll 

s8 



o26 
All 
olO 

slfi 

je20 

Jyl3 

A21 

85o20 

sl5 

o31 

821 

65 

sl4 

85 

025 



SnowdenJohnWjr N4jStevensDrJnoA 
SoperByronP&wf a3 StevensJuliaA 
Sparks JC 86 1" Sara A 

SpauldingCC A30,StevenbMrsM 

SpauldingFW&wf ol9 SteveneNellie 
SpauldineNellieM ol8iStevensNB 
SpearDA'&wf o3 StevensMrsNB 

Si^eirsMarionB jy27 StevensN A 
Spellacy James sl9|StevensWmBjr 
SpenceAlex s7 StewartHJ 

" Catherine " StewartJohn 

SpencerMrt?Br''n''rdol8Ste\vartM Alice 
SpencerChasE a15 StewartSarahB 
SpencerCM&wf s21 StewartWilberF 
SpencerGM&wf s27 StilesHarry 
SpencerMary-Edith o7 StillmanCarrieL 
SpencerNcllieS N2|StillinanMrpEC 
SpencerNormanH a15 |StillmanPD&wf 
SperryAner sO Stock well JC'&wf jyl4 

SperryllenryT M25je9:StoddardJH[GHG] s8 
SperryMrfSD ol4 StoddardSD s27 

SpeyerJames jy31 JStoke^Ajr je]4 

SpragueJosH MU!o4iStokepF-S-A o(i 

SpragneMrsJopH o4iStoreCha9 65 

'•EffieP-SallieS-AdaJ" IStoneCG olO 

SnragiieMrpJF c25 StoneCL jylO 

SponsielJnoA-CW sC StoneEdvvMC Jells28 
SpringMaryC s8 StoneEC [CorCoH] s6 



StevensDaniel a26o26 
StevensEA a24 

" SW-EL 
StevensEH 
StevensFredH 
S evensJasR 
" ComeliaJ 
StevensMrsHalsey 8l4 
- - ■ a4 
jylO 

05 
024 
je9 
ol2 

A30 

n4 

89 

85 

je22 

o25 
64 
a4 

o20 
je29 

sl3 



SquireWH 
Squire WL 



SquireMrsWL jel6ol4 
" AllanB-FredN jel6 
SqiiiresAlvin[PP] jel9 
SquiresMrsAlviu s25 
SquiresEB a16 

StammAmelia 
StammLoulseR 



jeSOsl iStoceGeo 
.lelO StoneMrpJB 



StoneJS&wf 
StoneMaryC 
StoneWH 
Stone WmT 
StorrgMiBsJG 
A25iStorrFDrM 
A24'Storr6RichardS 



StancliflfJW e29,Storr8Wm 

StantonLE jel4o25|StorrsZA 
SfarkweatherJW je24 StoryArthurN 



SmithJohnH 

SmithJoeeph 

SmithJD&wf 

SraithMrsJG 

SmitliJM&wf 

SmithMrsJN 

SmlthJW 



a25 

Nl 

n8 

je24 

n9 

66 

A21 



NlO 

ol6 

Al2 

a28 
jy(3 

No 

jyl5 
jy9 
a23 
jyl7 
jel4 
jel4 
Jyl2 
ol2 



SmithLyman[PP] jel9 



SmithLiicyA 

SmithLD 

SmithMaryB 

SmithMnrvO 

SmithMaryR 

SmitbMW-HY 

SmithPerry-MA 



m20 
Jyl2 
o2 

Mil 

Air. 

025 
o4 



StarkweatherN s7 StoryJW 
StarrBiirgisP olO StoverFS 

StarrBelleC jy3 StraightGeoA[CoH]85 

StarrOhri(!tineH ol2|Straboszew6kiH 66 
StarrEdwC a29| [CoAlst] 

StarrGeorgieE sl3 StrattonMorgan o4 
StaplesGraceE .tv5 StrauseGB aIO 

StearnpHP&wf jel6 StrawJPH o5 

SteamsHenryS a23 StreetFP 827 

StehbineHattieT a9 StricklandChas a2 
StebbinsJM jel9 StricklandLizzieH a23 

StebbinsL&fam a25 StrongMissKateE jel4 
StedmanEdmnndAo28 StnitberpJB s7 

StedmanHT[PPx].iel9 StnartCT 822 

SteeleFC-Ernest s28 StnartlsabelW s25 
SteeleMaryW o26 StudleyFT jel6 



SturtevantFC olO 
SugdenA jy4 

SugdenWmE je2s7ol7 



ol7 

s8 
a23 

627 

Al8 

o28 

611 



Mr^WmE 
SullivanTJ 
SumuerAliceG 
SumnerC'has 
SumuerMrsGeo 
SumnerGeoG 
SumnerTho6&wf 
" HenryH " 

Sunderl'ndJen'ieAoSO 
SwainFR oil 

SwainGE-MreWR s21 
SwainHadwen o4 
SwanMEliz a4 

SwanDrGrosven'rje20 
[Aes'tSurgPutPha'x] 
SwanTC[AQMG] s4 
SwanMreTC " 

SwaeeyA & wf Jy6 
SweetlandFB s8 

'• FA-ML 

SweetzerEH[GHG] 68 
SwiftHowardR 6l2 
SwiftMaryB 615 

SwiftWB[PutP'x]je20 
SykesEdwardS&w 6l8 
SykesFA o27 

" CLillian 
SykesNathanP 
" MaryE 
SykesNellieF 
TaftMarcusL&wf o23 
TaintorMi68 m24 

TaintorHE&wf jel4 
" GeoE&wf 
TalcottCM 
" IILouise 
TalcottMrsEH 
TalcottEttaJ 
TalcottHS 
TalcottMai-yK 
TalcottScth&wf je20 
" AllenB-MinnieC " 
TalcottMreThosG el 3 
TalcottW'M Mis 

Talcott\\ mH o26 

TallmanJH&wf olO 
TapleyEA 
TarbellHD 
TaylorE 
TaylorHenryC 
TaylorJnoH 
" ElizaJ-MaryG 
TaylorJM 
TaylorMaryC 
TaylorMartin 
TaylorMaryA 
TaylorMaryL 
TaylorNW 
TaylorMrsSB 
TaylorSam'l&wf 
" AdaL 
TaylorWS 
TeelMC 
TenneyLB 
TerryMrsEC 

Miss 
TerryHenryT 
TerryMrsOG-Marys22 
Terrj'Stephen&wf 89 
TerryWDjr o7 

ThayerFrancisJ a1 
ThielepapeEdFA .je24 
ThomasFrank-WH 87 
ThomasMrsR n2 

ThompsonChaBB Je23 
" AbbyF 



jy25 
sl5 



je9sl5 

019 

031 

jyll 

ol7 



o25 
a21 

Al5 
8l2 

jyll 
a23 

6l9 

Jel9 

s7 

ol8 

o24 

s9 

s29 

023 

MlO 
8l 

jy6 

85 



254 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



ThompsonMrs C n2 
ThoinpsonEE s9 

Thoinps'uFA&wfje28 
ThompsouGA oil 
ThompsonMi-fiSA o31 
Thompson Mrs VVAolO 
Tli'inps'nWIirCoIIlsl 
ThonipsonGVV a30 
Thomson.InoM a^O 
Thomson Paul slit 

ThormmJohuH jy4 
ThornJasT jy2o 

ThorpTjr Mltj 

ThiallDVV-EC je-iO 
Thix'sherAldeii o31 
TibbalsCM a1-2 

TilVanyED&wf ol7 
" (jeoixiaM " 

Tirt'auyEF s20 

TitlanvEPalmer je2'.) 
TillaiivMAdeliae o3 
TildcilsD&wf s8 

'•Anuiell-KosieP-MP 



Tilliiii,rhastAEI sl-> 

TiUotsonMrsMJ n1 

TinkerllE a2 

TitiisAHjr s2s 

ToUmrstAnna oi!:i 

TolhiirstWniJ sill 

TomliiisonChas o-W 

TomlinsouWL ol4 

TomlinsonMraWLASl 

ToohyWilliam s6 

TorbertJP o30 

TowleWL a21 

TowneMisLD sl4 

TowiiscndC jel4 

TownseiidEllieL ol8 

" IraJ 

TownsendWH-EP ol7 

TracyAbramT ol3 

TracyDVV a21 

TraeyJuoP All 

TracvMrsJohnC n3 

TracyMM MlTiylDi" RootA-MarthaL 

TracyMrsMaryll ol8 WadsworthSar'hMsia 



TuttleAG&wi o9 

" Willie 

TuttleAliceG jy6o31 
TuttleLiiciu8«&\vf ol6 
TuttleSi&wf je5 

AliceG 
TuttleSW jyl3 

TwissHM a29 

TvvattPeter jy29 

TwichellRevJosH o25 



s20 

jy3 

jy3s7 

s8 

sKi 

Jy4s7 

o3 

S22 
S() 
A-1 

88 



TylerAnuaC 

TylerES 

TylerESjr 

TylerHW 

TylerKateG 

TylerRO 

Tylei-WeltheaB 

" HarrietU 

Uhlei-GErank&wf 

Ul rich Geo 

UptonCH 

UtleyGeoT 

UuderwoodChas 

UndervvoodKateM sS 

ManiieL " 

UnderwoodMaryA g5 
VailThosJ g29 

ValentiueMrsHE jyll 
" NG 

VanDykeBF o21 

\'"aaHornAddieE 827 
VanNostrandCA jyl4 
VaaNostraadDL sl6 
VauSchaackErnest n3 
VermilyeMisses ol3 
VeryAlice-Louise a3 
VintonAunM sl6 

VintonHW a2!I 

VintonPS&wf slfi 

VrooniGeoA , jyO 
WadsworthMrsCR jy5 
WadsworthDauielS o3 
WadsworthElizaSjelSt 
WadsworthE&wf 



TracyVVH 

TrappWmWjr&wf a9 
'J'raskCornelia a1 

TraskLouiseG a29 
TremaineMrsLA 
TremaiiieWA 



WadsworthSidney ol4 
Wadsw'thWSLCoF] s8 
WainvvrightWAM o6 
" HB 
oll|WaiteAJ sfi 

s2()!WaiteArt.harS s21 



Triunb 1 A[PPha].jel9 WaiteFredk 
TrumbullAnnieC jy3|\VaitoJN asj 

TrumbiiUAE ol7| WaiteSH&wf s6 

TrumbiillAnnaO .ie2 " MissesML&Emina" 
TrumbuUEP A39:WaldoEmmaL jyl3 

TrumbullIIuirh n!) WalesMrsAG 



Triiml)nil.IIIam'nd.jy3 
TryonAVV s30 

TryonHR a1 

TryoiiJSjr je24 

TryonThoP-Mary sll 
TuckerE-JaneS s2() 
TiickerEA&wf 
TuokerElizaE 
TuckerFO 
TuckerMrsIIelen 
Tucker.IohnD 
TuckerJE 
TuckerRichard 



sl9 

jy3 

je22 

o9 

A22 

jy3 

sl9 



TtickerMrsRich'd Je20 
TiickerWm sl4 

Tucker WW s22 

TullerClaraL ol7 

TiilIerEP a14 

TullerW.I 
TurnorMrsApa 
TuruerWW&wf 



je5 
ol8 
oil 
je29 
s28 
ol3 
o28 



Wales WmC 

WaleaWmH 

WalkerJO 

WalkerLC 

WalkerRobert 

WalkerSamiiel 

WalkleyFrancipS ol9 
Walkley.JasC&wf o24 

" HannahM " 

WalkleyMaryE jel 

" JennieS " 

WallaceAM p6 

WallaceJames a15 

WallachF a29 
WallachJuliu8&wfA24 
" JG 

WalshGteoH jel5 

WalshRevL jel 

s25 WardJE&wf a-J8 

sl8|WardMabel jy27o2 

Mil WardMrsSS b13i 



WardnerFannyL sl3 
WarnerAJ&vvf o5 
WarnerMrsAW jel7 
WarnerChasDud'y jy6 
WarnerEmmaL jy20 
WarnerDrE-SMS s28 
WarnerGeoH&wfjcl 
WarnerJo8[PPx] jel9 
WatersMajJLGHG] s8 



WarnerJ&wf 
WarnerJB 

WarnerWR 

WarwickWH 

WaterhouseJD 

WatermanEH 

WatermauMary 

" Emma 

WaterousRGjr 

WatersAD 

WatersMrsHjr 

•' EmmaH 

WatkinsonEB 

WatroiisCA 



oltj 



S5 

jyi 

a22 

Al8 

sfi 

a31 

jel4 
019 



WatrousWH&wf Jyl2 



WatsouC'hasA 

WattsJohn 

WattlesGeoH 

WattlesJamesF 

WaySL&wf 

" Rol)ertF 

WayWm-WmK 

WeatherbyC;S&wfM:30 

WeatherbyH-C M31 

WebbllC-BH 

WebsterChasM 

WebsterCT&wf 

Websti-rMrsH 

W(_'l)stcr.IC&wf 

\Vcl>stei\VmL 

WcfksJL 

WeeksLM 

WeeksWmH 

WeitzelC 

WeildenJennieS 

WelchGeoK je2r)0l9 

WelchGM&wf je27 

EM 
WelchJennieC 
WelchJohnW 
WelchOliveC 
WeldonJohnV 
WellesArthiirJ 
WellesCaptBenjP 

rCoHlst] 
" BenjF sfi 

" EllaE-MasterBerf 
WellesC&wf je24N6 
WellesMrsCP ol6 

Welles Ed?arT&wfM26 
WellesJasG o26 

" HattieL 
WellesJS&wf jea4A22 
WellesGideon je9 
WellesThosH ol9 

WellesTT[CorCoF] s5 



Jel6 



s21 
027 
sl3 
821 

Nl 

s22 
Je28 
o7 
A28 
89 
s9 



olO 
a23 

Jy26 
o2() 

je2' 



WellesMrsTT 

WellsChasT 

WellsDW 

WcllsJohnC 

WellsMissNM 

WellsWmB 

WelshEmily 

WelshWJ 

" E-Jane 

WeltoiiHenryA 

WeltonLewisJ 

WcnkFS 

WentworthGW 

WeeleyJB 



ol4 
A14 

s8 
Sl2 

sfi 
sl3 
ol9 
o26 

s21 

jeS 

o4 

Jy7 

8l 



jyl7 
s23 
o24 
s2 
o21 
821 



WessclsLcwisC 

WestFredA 

WestMahlonR 

WestphalWm 

WeyaiitJTB 

WheelerAdal'eH 

WheelerCA[SrCoF]s6 

WheelerClaraH jel7 

WheelerFH 

WheelerJ" 

WheelerMrsMS 

WheelerNettieE 

WheelerWR&wf 

WhitakerEmma 



o7 
o5 

Ml7 

sl4 
n2 
026 



Jel 

Al6 

s26 

A31 

815 

Sl3 



WhitakerJosephF ol7 
WhitcraftJH n3 

WhiteMrsAlma Jel9 
WhiteAlonzo o26 

VVhiteFA[GHG] 
WhitcMrsDr 
" GW-MissE 
W'hiteEdwardS 
WhiteFrankG 
WhiteJane 
W'hiteMiBsJ 
WhiteJohnH 
" JennieM-HC 
WhiteCaptJL[CoF] 86 
W^hiteHH s25 

WhiteLaiiraA 8l9 

Whitelsaac&wf 826 
WhiteSH&wf m30o17 
" MissMC-AliceB M:iO 
"■ RichardN-HenryS" 
WhiteTR a8 

WhiteWmCjr si 

WhiteWH-LottieEoSl 
WhiteWmS-EA o30 
•• BelleG 

WhitehouseAP 84 
" EllaL 
WhitehonseLH s8 

[GHG] 
WhitelawWH&wf 822 
WhitingFD o2 

WliitingGS&wf ol2 

KS 
WhitmanMrsEA a29 
WhitmanJohnH a19 
W^hitmoreGeoH jyl7 
WhitmoreMrsOH Je6 
Whitney A bnerK o21 
Whitney Addi8on o24 
" MrsClare " 

WhitneyEP jel9 

[SerPutPha] 
" MrsGeo silljelOsS? 
WhitneyGF[SrCoF]s6 
WhitneyMrsGeoF sl8 
Whitn'yGQ[SrCoF]s5 
WhitneyMissN ol8 
WhitneyEA 8l2 

WhittelseyEG jel2o24 
WhittelseyMreWFoie 

MrsGC 
WhittemoreM 
WhittemoreWE 
WhittemoreWL 
WhitonPorter 
WhitsofiAddie 

Mamie 
WickhamCH 
WickhamHJ 
WiasrinRobtC 
WilburF 
WiederM&wf-L 
WilcoxMrsComelia s9 
WilcoxFredM AlO 

WilcoxJM Sl6 



o4 

s4 
o30 
s26 

n6 

jyl4 
sl3 

jyi2 

Al6 
814 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS HARTFOED COUNTY. 



255 



aiAXCHESTEB. 



WUcoxMariaR 

WiteoUWS&wf 

W'UdcrME 

" MiisJL 

WileyMrsAH 

WileyEdwarclN 

WilevFrankD 

WileVJA je;2'J WoodnittAE jylS BarronAiwf 

Wilc-yLvmanA jy,>(i;\VoodrufiCl:,[CoFJ s4 BidwfUGW 

WiltyOP jyllWoodruffJosS-JB s2:i Bi^^!^c■llKobtP 

Vt'iluyWmH&wf sl2 WoodruftJIrsJS o9 Blis^sEA 

WillaidCL jel6AlUi\VoodraflfMrsOD o3 BliesMaryS 

WillardDH jv;j'WoodruffMrsS o23 BrookBLorenF 

VVillard]>.IrsDH o"l7 " FiankDII '• BrowneAH 

Willard\V( Icutt Ai WoodsGcoH jel6sl BrowuMiss^MC 



WilkuxSW 
" KatieE •' 

WilliamsAlfredCJ s8 
WilianibMr-AP olO 
WilliamsAWC sl5 
Williami^CII k!) 

WiiliarnsEB&wf a18 
WilliamsEutre'eBjyia 
WilliamsMrsEH o3 
" Gracie '' 

WilliamsEuge'eHje21 
WilliamsDrFII jyO 
WilliamsFredW a2;3 
WiJliamsGeoII a25 
WilliamsHelenM o9 
WilliamsIW aIS 

WilliamsJA Nb 

WilliamsJK&wf 
WilliameJP 
Williaint^JaneG 
William^^J 
Williams JosieC 
WiUiamsLauraC 
" AbbvM-LucyS 
" MaryK 
WilliameMariaA 
WilliamsMary 



ol9; Woodh'seMissCKjyll MillerWA&wf n4 

84|W(X)dhou!*eCarrieEs7 WilliamsDvvightLM.'Jl 

o30IWoodhoii8eEIH&wfA2 WilliamsDL-ClaraB s7 

" I " MiifsMBlanciie " VVilliamsWU jeOoo 

ol3 Woodli'bfLilianS.re 17 

jy2tii Woudhousc'UKver ol3 

o24r' XettieB-JaiieE " ArnoldChasH&wf ol8 

a20 
s21 
jylo 
g25 
jelO 
olS 
sl2 
sl3 
sli BuiiceGeo(aged87) o7 
s6 CampbellRevJF jel 
CheneyGW 
o25 ClarkAD-JosieJ 
Al9 CookAaron 
ol9 CookMaryE 
g26 CouchWalter 
je22 CowlesFW 
jy3 CowlesMaryA 
s"26 DimockRR 
je6 FltchAsaP 
WooUevGeoU jel6ol2 GilbcrtCha8H[CoG]s5|SlaterHA 
WoolleyGW sl9 Grantlielen sglSnowFW 



iWoodwardllL 
WoodwardBS 

[SerCoF] 
WoodwardJG 
WocKlworthllL 
WolcottC iiitwf 
WolcottJiiliaM 
WolcottSamuel 
WolcottWillard 
Wollertonllarry 
WoollevEllenA 



je2() 
jyO 
a24 

jyl4 
a24 



820 

olO 

s21 

je20 

jel6 

62' 

s27 
ol8 
oil 



ChildsAF&wf a29 
ChildeWH je24 

ClarkThos (4 

Co\vlesLtWW[CoG>5 
DaitAndrewW ^9 

DrakeLevi&wf AlO 
FitchJA AlO 

Fullerllorace a2 

GiantMrsClayton jy5 
" GertieM " 

Gris\voldGM-GG eS 
IlibbardEE s25 

" Phileua " 

IlillWF oil 

HudsonPhilipW 65 

[ColonellstRegt] 
KeuueyCW o2 

JacquesDiCW&fmolO 
MtCormackAK slo 
" MaryM " 

" Wm 
ParkerMrsfL 
" MiunioL 
PurnellSaml 
PurtillJW 

Robert sonMariaL 6l5 
a2:j 



e7 



S3 
je22 



WilliameNatlianH a29 



MGertrude 
WoollevMrsW 
WooUeyWE-FB 
Woolk'vWmP 
WolfBiujS 
WolfMA 
Woostei-WmS 
WorkThosK-FS 
WorthJiio 
WorthingtonEM 
"EA 
WorthiDgtonJD 

CcoFj 
Wright Em mal 
Wri';hfMr;^G 



WilliainsSarahR je22 WritrhtJaied 



s2G 
Al7 

S(j 

wlO 



WilliamsWP&fam a2 
Willis-CH o23 

WillsouGertrude 
WilmerdiugH 
WilsonAC 
WilsonChasE 
WilsonMrsChasE o3 
WilsonCM m25 

WilsonEH jyl2 

WilsonFBrCoF] s8 
WilsonH n2 

WilsonHenry&wf 6l5 



WilsonHS 
WilsonJas 
WilsonMissJD 
WikonPH 
WilsonSela 
Wilt-onWS 
WinchesterEM 
MrsEM 



GriswoldMrsMB 
ol3 HaleET 
s6HallDC 
Al5 IlallFrankD 
s9 IlibbardWillieE 
o7 HilliardAddieC 
88 HilliardEC 
024 1" MrsEC 
s28iHollandFrank 
s5 KeeneyMarion 
" JKiioxCB-AH 
s6 LewisWmJ 
j LincolnWB 
827|McKeeChasH 
o27 McNallWm 
87 OlcottJB 



olllSquiresNJ 
o4 S^^x•etMr^SG 
N9|WhitfIlatlieH: 
" [WhitellK 
sSiWhite^Iinorll 
je23 WolcottMrsCO 
WoodMaryA 



oil 

jelS 

jc20 

je23 

s8 

n9 

821 

s5 

ol2 

n9 



jyl ParkerColumbus jel6 
8l9 ParkerWG 621 



WrightME 

WimderEniilL 

WvmanWatsonH jy21 ParsonsAnnieL 88 
— • - - — g25 

62C 

sS 



jyl5 PargonsCD 

k2 ParsonsEllenP 
o26 PerrvEmily 
jv3 PerryJK 

sl5 Robbin8FW[CoG] 84 
ol2 RobbinsGeoA 
a23 RobinsonILD 

a1 '■ SarahC 

s7 RichMrsGF 

s6 RisleyWmF 
e2S RitchieSophieL 

o3 SlateJP-GB 



je27 



WingOF[GHG]&wfs7 



WynkoopN 

YergaeonES&wf 

YoungArthurP 

YoungGeoSA 

YoiingsEdwinT 

Youngs^JA&wf 

YoungTcherick 

ZacherE-Louis 

ZacherLouisH 
Al5 ZiebtllMaggieJ 

Zie<:lerEngene 
o25'ZiesIerH 

A2|Zil!hardtC[CorCoA]sO StravvA 
Mil ZwevgartHenryJ jel4 StrawHC 
a26| "„.„„,.„„ iStrawLizzieM 

jyl4 HABTLA>D. !TaylorMi68Emma 8l8 

" iBellDrHS 8l9 TaylorGeoW o20 



ol8 

n9 

jeltj 

jel4 

ol3 
je20 
jel9 



WingateCB 

WinsliipHenryC 

WinshipWL 

M'ini^lowGDifcwf 

WinterChas 

WinterCO 

WitherbvMalv''aAje22 

WoodWJ jel7 



jell 

87 

A3 

s26 
n4 

s4 



CowderyOB-CL s6 TaylorDrOB 



ol3 



EmmonsEW Je9sl9 TracyWalter 
GatesHJ olO " Wallace 

GatesMattieL o21 WadsworthAddieLs26 
GaylordEdnA o25 WadsworthDaniel s25 
GibbonsWE-W 67 WhiteHH sS 

GibbsMS oil WhiteMrsHH oil 

GiddingsMi86Maria67 WilliamsMrsE ol8 
GilmanGcoL o5 WoodOR-RE jelC 

WoodWmL&wf slSiGlazierMrs^HB ol4 WolcottChasO 625 

WoodbridjreJE s4 GoddardMrsAnnaN 87 . ^ „„„^„ 

WoodfordXdaM jel6 GoddardChasP g24 nokth Manchester. 
WoodfordDi;&wf jelO GriswoldLB ol4 BucklandJennieE o7 

" CarrieB " I" MrsJL-Mr8TB " BurgessSH a24 

WoodfordEphraim sl5 JonesEW-Ed'iuP jj'27 CampbellJames o9 



olO 

69 

925 
sl5 

je24 
s7 
a2 

jel6 



o27 

85 

AS 
s20 
sl5 
s20 
021 

65 
OlO 

87 

S21 



SOUTH MANCHESTER. 

AbbeyAlbert 87 

AgardEE-Chas 
AlbertsonJasH 
AlbertsonL 
AudereonSm'l 
BallElizabetb 
BarberGeoM 
BentonSM 
BidwellAL 
BidwellGeoA 
BissellGraceL 
BissellJnoN 
" SusanS " 

BlissCE je20 

BrownJoBeph a2 

CadmanJiio o20 

Cadmai Robt-EL o2 
CadmaiiThosS Je20s5 
Cadman\V-AnnieEol4 
CarrierET o25 

Carterlla ry sl8 

ChenevEdw-Waltero7 
" MrsWmH 
CheneyFW MlOjeS 
ClieneyMrsFW je8 
" MissesAW&L " 
CheneyllarrietK a26 
" LouisR-Herbert " 
CheneyJE ol6 

CheneyJasW&wf o6 
CheneyCapJS[CoG]s6 
ChenevWellesW a15 
ClarkFW&wf o26 
" Alice " 

CouchMrsWalter jel5 
CrosbyAil Ml9 

DavisL 65 

DayCA[SerCoG] 86 
DuunTH[CorCoG] 
DunnWR[CoG] 
ElaRevWalter 
FinlayJas 



85 

o6 
jy5 



256 



SOUVEXIK OF THE CEXTENXIAL EXEIBITION'. 



ForhesOL[CorCoGjR5 LymanAM 8l8 

Forbe*UU[SerCoGJ-' jKussellAJ a1 

FrostJi\I[CorCoG] s6 WaKnerEC-MAnnie 



GleasouAliceB 
GleasonUVVLCc^G] so 
GleasoaWardJJ ol7 
GoaUGeoF o2T 

GrayHP[OorCoG] sti 
GrayJno " 

Halei-'D&wf-Lizzie " 
llalaHo-.iierR o2S 

Hollcy.VIS&w-f oU 



NEW BIUIAIN. 

AbbeRobtM o7 

AdkiUi-ESLSerCoE] s2 
AdkiusGM •' 
AclkinsWmT jylO 
AUeiiWE[CorCoD] s5 
AndrewsCornelius nS 
Andre wsEM 



s8 

Lizzie 

Andrews.TasE p8 

Andrewt<JH&wf ol 

AndrewsP-Mary 622 

AngelMissGrace n2 

AngellLucyG a29 

AreusAugti' ol2 

AriioldEH&wf jelil 

AnioldMrsJP o!) 

AstonAlonzo jy5 

jyi;<;At\vood.TC&wf All 

oW AiistinJuoH&wf s20 

si:i Austin M[CorCoD] s5 

oT AustiiiMS p6 

" JBabcoclvEdw'dQ olO 

Al5 BabcockMarieS o3 

Bl2|BailsyHenryA-ML s6 



HoiiseAP[SLn-CoG] t-l>\ Andrewt>MrsEN 
Hoii.-ieOliasE Aiiuie s7 
HuutingtoiiSarahWN4 
Horde li' s8 

JoslynCP s5 

Joslyn Richard s2 

[Paymaster IstRegt] 
JoslyiiMi-sRiciiard 84 
" Jesrie-Bjatlie 
" Vara " 

Keeney AB[Ooi-CoG] s(J 
KeeneyOlaraJ 
KeeneySarali 
KaowlesBF 
KuoxCIiesterJ 
" SaraliL 
KaoxLB 
KnoxMissMaryF 
LaddGM 

Lay Lt Amos [CoG] 
LayMr^NcUie 



on 

s5 
sun 

si) 
a2o 

o2C 

Al5o20 

oM 

n3 



03 

s5 

s2o 



o2T BaldwinRhoda 
s6 BauksTliosG 
Carolines 



LoomisJL[SjrGoG] " BannanThos 



Mc.ie 
MuKee.\Ia:-y!3 
Mill'ordileiiry 
Moutgom 3rv V 

[CofCoCx] 
MiirpIiyMiciiaji 
MurrayM 
ParkerJulianX 



s28 
A29 



N3iBanningGeoW g28 

Jyl9' BarberGM&wf-GLo31 

s5 BarbourUVV o3 

sOBarnesJennieE a21 

I Bartlo'tMrsEllenSjyl3 

ol6]" MissAnnieG " 

ol4 BartlettJN 

b6| BartlettJP 



[SurgeonlstRegt] | BartletlNellieS 
rerkiinAlmira 820 BartoshF 
PerryEJwiuM o28 BassettOB 

ReadeClarissaW m22! BassettSamuel 
RobbinsFW[OoG] 85 BatteyWVV 
Si8SonEJ[Se:CoG] s6 BeachEdgarll 
SmithHarriettE ol4| Beam Alfred 



SinithSarah 

Spencei'CA 

SpencerOhasP 

SykesBM 

TaylorJE 

TuompsonllE 

Tbompson.ML 

TracyCL&wf 

" Hattie 

TracyMS 

TroyeMaryD 



jel3 
jyl2 
Jyl3 

jy3 

024 
s6 

s26 
jen 

sl2 
jylO 



BrownTIH 
" HS-KateM 
BrownSS 
jBrownWM 

JBriglitmanEdwR 
BurckhardtA 
BurckhardlU 
UurekburdtJA 
■" Louisa 
BuellElkM 
BulkleyWJ 
•' MrsWJ 
BurgesbCliasM 
IBurkartliPV 
BurusELCorCoD] 
BurrLymauS 
BiurillO 
BiitlerGraceE 
ButtiickA-SarahA 
CainpC'C-MaryL o3 
CampC'W oil 

CampDChester J3'3 
CampDN(A22)&w jyll 
Campbell! ;evWS Jy3 
CapronDB&wf 
CarletouGM o20 

CarletouJN Je8 

CarpenterCE[PP] Jel9 
CarpeuterEG o20 

CarpenterJLG n4 

Cars\vellK[CorCoD]s5 
CaryG [SerCoD] 
CaseUO-LiiciaE 
CaseEdwH 
■'■ JeunieE 
CasellE 
CascRobtE 
CaswellJames 
C'hambersAguesEBs25 
ChambersFrancis 
ChaniberlainMrsA p27 
ChamberlainVB m24 
" MrsVB 

Chrii^tEK si 

ChurchillMrsWA ol7 



o20 BeardsleeEllaE 
b8 BeatorChasH&ladys21 
s8 BeattyA[PiitP'x] jel!) 

8l3Beebe Austin [PP] " 

s20Beer8JWA " " 

821 1" MrsJWA 

oll|BegleyJohnP o3 

o25jBegleyTho8 s7 

" iBeldenMrsChasH Jel6 
a4 BeldenMM jyl3 

olliBenhamPVV o27 



Wadsw'thHC[Coa] s7lBenuettLtAN[CoD] 85 
WarrenGco 82;BennettEhnerE s5 

WarrenMariaE a8 BinghamLtJC[CoD]s5 
Watkin-iClarenoe 821, Bishop Wm&wf 829 
Watkiu8FE[CoG] sSIBIakeArthurC 89 

WatkiusLB 820;BoothGeoH NlO 

WatkiDsRB-MariaM24|BoothHM-MaryA 827 
WatsoiJasA jy22 BoothHorace o31 



Wat8onJno jel9 

WeedenHenryH je21 

WetherillAJ 86 

[SerCoG] 

MAKLBOROUGH. 

BuellStepheu a9 

Haliu'^'IIB 

Hall Mary 



AlmiraE-ML 
BoothHW&wf jel2 
" OliveA-MasterFH 
BoothKW-HattieBo24 
BowersHCwf&dau o9 
BowersWraH 
BoyleJohn o25 

je9 BradyTH 

8l4|Bron8onPM 



Jack8onGO s22|BrownPannieL 

LordGeoH-AnnaE ol3 1 BrownHG& wf 



je8 
024 
Jel5 



n9 
o31 

sll 
jyi7 

Al2 



ChurchillWM 

ClarkeMi-sAH 

ClaryGeo 

CIoyesJH 

" CharlotteB 

Collins AP&wf 

CollinsChasO&wf 

ConklinGeoA 

ConklinTA 

'• MrsTA&dauB 

CooleyGeo 

Cooleyllenry 

CorbinChasF 

Corbin Edward 

CorbinFT 

CorbinFrankE 

CorbinHH 

CorbinMA 

CorblnP 

CorbhiWH 

CornellFW[CoE] 

CornwellMrsCH 

CostarMissHJ 

Co8teganJ[CoD] 

CottrellLM 

CurtisLW 

CurtissMiseMJ 

CurtisNettieB 

DamonHomerF 

" SW-Ovrus-GeoL" 

DatesTIM&wf jyT 

'• IVissMlenaJ " 

DavisonJB 8l3 

DavieLlncoln n8 



jel7 

8l4 

sl3 
a23 

ol3 

o2 

Je2 

ol7 

Jy7s5 
jyO 

820 

jy'i 

s22 

s28 

jel4 

826 
s29 
s5 
A29 
o30 

85 

jy3i 

s5 

m30 

b6 

Jy27 



DaviBMW ol7 

DavidsonEH jeS 

DawsonJames jy7 
DealiugCharlotta s25 
UemingNewcllE oil 
DeviueMary sl4 

DoeuUelenKate jy25 
DoeuMaryJ a2 

DowdEVV [Sei-CoE] 85 
DowdEdwW&wl' o6 
DowdJL 
DrummRevJH 
DunhamRC 
t) unlay JohnE 
DugganRevJH 
Durgy Eva-Lucy 
DysonMrsH 
DysonJohnB 
EastmanWR&wf 
EatonFredN 
EddyAJ 
ElamChasJ 
kllinJohn 
Elli8ChasD(88)&wfo26 
EllisMR o28 

EllsworthJH[CoE] s5 
EmmonsEP je21 

" Charlotte b8 

EnoEvaL a17 

Erich8onCaptCBs5jy7 

[CoElst] 
ErichsonMrsCB jy7 
ErichsonSarahJ o7 
" LizzieM " 

ErwinCB-MariaN o24 
ErwinMrsCB jyl3 
E\vin8EP[PutPx]jel9 
FassettFN sS 

FaulknerCn[CoD] so 
FeltHenryW s7 

FfntonSK-OW-P o24 



027 

jy24 

jel9 

026 

o24 

olO 

ol8 

a7 

ol8 

s5 

jyo 

jy3 

S5 



FitldingWI 

Finch AS 

FisherJR-MA 

Fitzgeraldoohn 

FitzgeraldThos 

FlaggChasW 

FlahueryPJ 

FlyunElanora 

FlynnDaniel 

FlynnNellic'E 

FogflstrandOP 

Fo'rdWmE 

ForrestEinestJ 

FossHcnryA 

FouldsJno-Henry jy7 

FowlerChasS n2 

FoxJnojr&fr'nds Jyl5 

FrancisJas&wf ol6 

FrancisJulieM 

FraryJasD 

FreyChasW 

GardncrJL 

GiddingsFredW 

Girardlohn 

GladdenCharlotteM 85 

GladdenSarahA 8 7 

GladdenWmH n1 

GladdingDeanA 88 

GoodrichFred'kM a5 

GoodrichHenry jel9 

GoodrichJK[CoD] 85 

GoodwinEL jel9 

GoodrichL[PntPx] "■ 

GoodwinH " 

GrifBnHenryL 

GrowneyJohn 

GrnmbtArthur 

GrutzmacherA 



jel3 
je30 

8l 

Jy7 
n6 

85 
87 

s9 
013 
a24 

ol2 
oil 

jy5 

8l4 



jy25 
n3 

Jy5 
o25 

84 
je2 



825 
a34 

821 

b23 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS. — HARTFORD COUNTY. 



257 



GuionCL 68 


LambertJennie o4 


PorterMr&Mrs ol6 


GuionFrank o25 


LathamCG sl5 


PorterBC[PutPx]jel7 


GuionFG jel 


LathamHenry [CoE]85 


PorterEA m29 


GuiouNettieL ol3 


LawrenceAB n6 


PorterFrankJ jyl9 


" CoraW 


LawrenceSB a4 


PorterIsaac2d sl9 


GuuniBonFN o2.3 


LaureuceSR o6 


PowellThos jy5 


HackettJeremiah a5 


" EmmaC " 


PrestonEH 65 


HackettAliceA a5o23 


LeeCE[CorCoE] 65 


PrichardHj;PutP] Jel9 


" EmmaB " 


LeeHenryN jyl4 


PrideChas&wf 825 


HacUeyAW s5 


LeelsaacS&wf jel7 


PrideFred o4 


" Grace o2:i 


LegoWmF 67 


RamageJohnG n4 


HadleyCE 65 


LewisCM-BelleG b12 


RapelyeA s7 


Hadl" vCptRW [CoD] s5 


LoomisMrsAUea o9 


Ra\vlingsWJ[CoE] s5 


HaleChasH o9 


LoomisHattieC o5 


RaymondWF&wf 823 


HallChas jy3 


LuntME Hi 


RemingtonMreH o£ 


HallJames " 


MahoneyComelius ol8 


RemingtonNB o24 


UaUThosS&wf je6 


MarkleyWT a15 


Reynord6GL sC 


HanceAC 822 


MasonMrsAA jel4 


RhodeeMrsHarriet 89 


HannaJno[PutP] Jel9 


McAveyJohn jyO 


RhodesThosR 67 


IlannaThomas aIO 


ilcCabePatrick s7 


RiceArthurW o3 


IIarrisTH[PutPx]jel9 


McElroyMrsJane jel4 


RichardsonRH jyS 


HartAnnaJ je5 


McLeanAE ol7 


RingroseElias b5 


HartCE ' s28 


McNelllDaniel jy3 


RiordanD 68 


HartMrsGeo jel7 


Meekerlthamar Jy28 


RobertsGraceM 829 


HartGeoA s5 


" MrsAbbieF 


RobinsonMr8MaryAo6 


HartGeoP jyl2 


MeyerGW ol8 


RockwellMrsS n8 


HartOliverD o2S 


MilheningA a21 


RockwellGP&wf jel6 


HartDrSW sl9 


MillerMrs-DariuB s7 


" JuliaP " 


UaslamEli Jy7 


MillsDP&wf s29 


Rockwells jel6 


HaslamWalter jylO 


" Willies 


RockwellSG&wf s8 


HemenwayLtFM s5 


MillsSusieG n1 


" LillieE 


[CoElBt] 


MingleL[SerCoD] 65 


RockwellSW jyl2 


HennFiancisG jelO 


MinorJH&wf je23 


RogersMHattie a15 


HibbardRG&wf Jyl 


MooreMrsSA o5 


RogersNC a4 


HibbardRalph&wfjy7 


MooreWJP s6 


RootGC 019 


HicksIraE&wf-GA o9 


Murphy JL o26 


RossbergCha80 sS 
RoesiterLG&wf ol3 


HigbyLT 68 


NettingerCaptE je2 


HigginsEB nQ 


NewellGS [PutPs] jel9 


RulofsonGazelleM s29 


" Nelson " 


NewmannEF n3 


Rulofsonlsaac jy4 


HigginsMEstella o24 


NorthCptAH[PP]jel9 


RuPsellJohnC o31 


UillOS je21 


NorthAW ell 


RussellL " 


HillsChasH jel9 


NorthChasF ol8 


RyanJas o4 


HillsOS[PutPx] 


" MissesCF&M " 


SchenvH[CorCoD] 85 


HolmesJW n6 


NorthE 87 


SchmidtFW 6l 


HorsfallThos 69 


NorthMC-EM s6 


Schmidt Henry ol7 


HotchkissEmmaFjel7 


North A 024 


" MrsHW 


HotchkissMaryL " 


NorthendMrsCA 8l3 


Schmidti:enryW a2C 


HubbardFH a29 


NorthropEB 67 


ScottRobtE olO 


HnbbardJohn jyo 


NortonChasW Jyl4 


ScottWW Je22 


HubbardRL b]9 


NortonFL[CorCoE] s5 


ScriptureCI[CoE] 65 


HudsonJas n6 


NortonRosellaM jyl4 


ScriptnreFM o23 


HullCI-BA 026 


NorrisJnoB s23 


ScriptureFO[CoE] 87 


HullDM[CorCoEJ s7 
HumasonCA&wf n2 


NourseClaraJ o24 


SeymourAP s20 


GldershawChasB 64 


SeymourFredS Je21 


" HB " 


Olderghawl-irara sl3 


SeymourTho6G jy29 


HumaeonWL&wfjelO 


OsbomeDS&wf a15 


SimondsAlbert o28 


HumphreyFH 87 


" Edwards 


SlateArthurF je23 


HumphreyMrsH o25 
HumphreyllD o5 


OsbornLM o9 
OsbornPlattD ol3 


SloanJ[SerCoD] 85 
SloperAJ-EUaJ je22 


Humphrey I>IrsJWje21 


OtisOrinM 8l8 


SmithCW ol6 


HuntleyMrsHB ol2 


OviattJN(Al4)&wf o4 


SmithEdgarH s4 


EydeAM o9 


PageSpencer jy6 


SmithFH-Lizzie s5 


JohnsonGeo s7 


ParkerChas J&wf je24 


SmithFredE 82 


JohnsonHattie s20 


ParkerWm s8 


SmithLO je8 


JonesAM a26 


" CarolineK " 


" ElizS-AliceM " 


JonesGeoE jy5N2 


Parson6JW&wf 8l2 


SmithWm o30 


JonesMrsGeo n2 


PeaseLH Al5 


SpencerDC o24 


JuddCoraE a26 


PeaseWW 66 


SpencerMr8DC 8l4 


JnddDB-ET o27 


PeckChae je7 


SpencerEmmaJP 8l3 


JnddDC[PutPx] je2f( 


PeckJohnH a16 


SpringJM 66 


JuddFrankH[CoE] s7 


PeckWmE a21 


StanleyAgnes jy22 


OustWm o30 


PenfieldHorace ol9 


StanleyAugU8tu8 m31 


KellogffRiithL a3() 


PenfleldLorenD s6 


" MrsAugustus jy6 


KempshallE&wf 020 


PenfieldLM o25 


StanleyAliceG jel7 


KennevAC[PutP]jel9 


PeltonFA n1 


StanleyAH&wf 87 


KiuffAlfredJ s5 


PerkinsMEva a26 


StanleyAW Al5 


KingHenryP o30 


PierpontJB o31 


StanleyChaeB&wf o9 


KinrockMreEA ol2 


PillardBaeil&wf o25 


StanleyEN je2N8 


LambertW«fcwf o4 


PlattFG jy6 


"MiesEL uS 



StanleyFT jel5ol7 
WmB ol7 

StanleyHenry&wf ol8 
StanleyJe8se je29 

^tanleyMrsMK je21 
" MissEM " 

StanleyMary olS 

StanleyMer\vinC jyl4 
StauleyOliver&wf je5 
" MiseCarrieL " 
StanleyTheoA sl2 
" Robie-WalterH " 
StearnsSHlCoE] 85 
SteamBYJ-HattieAs22 
SteeleElbridgeJ s29 
SteeleFH o20 

.' teeleWP o7 

Steele WT[SerCoE] 85 
SteveneFF-GraceAsia 
Steven6jnoO oil 

StevensJiiliaA ol7 
StillmauMrsJennie o9 
" AnitaB " 

StiversJnoO je9ol2 
StoneGE[CorCoD] 85 
Stone WmR ol3 

StowEL-AnnaC s4 
StrongHP&wf-SM o2 
SullivanTC a23 

SwanstonJaeA olO 
SwiftMaryW jel7 

TalcottJB&wf 
" EllaJ 
TalcottJnoC 
TaylorAE&wf 
TaylorWS[CoE] 
TenneyHW[CoE] 
ThompsonAL 
ThompsonEW 
Thomp6onKP 
ThompponRJ 
ThomeWmP 
ThomsonMB 



jel4 



AlO 
jel6 

67 
85 

olS 
o2 
826 

jy8 
628 
s4 



ThorntonWH[CoE] 85 



Timbrelllsaac 

ToUesHenry 

ToohyThosJ 

TracyAlmiraN 

" ElIenN 

TracyMrsJH 

TracyThos&wf 

TreatC[PutPx] 

TubbpES " 

TuckAliceC 

" MarieL " 

Tuck J Warren &wf m25 

TurnbullAndrew Jel9 



Jy7 

86 
62 



88 

628 
jel9 

Jil2 



ol7 
016 
625 

k2 

je22 

je29 

Jy6 

n1 

je23 

6S 



TurnbullGeoJ 

TurnerFredG 

Tuttlelda 

TuttleM 

UnkelbachJos 

Up6onCM 

Up8onChasSir 

VailJohnW&wf 

VanceRJ 

Ven6elFE[CoE] 

VibbertsLA-H'nryNlO 

VoightAugustC Je22 

WalesMrsRP 

WalkerWF&wf 

WalterHenry 

WalshJohn 

WardJno-MrpLF ol2 

WebsterWmH NlO 

WeldWL[CorCoE] s> 

WellmanHenrvS o25 

WellsMrsElleriH je5 

WellsHoraceL s6 



a30 

626 

8l3 

a7 



268 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITON. 



■^VellsLcviS mST WamerMrsOJ oil PierceEN 

VestAi-thiir oil WebsterJ-Uattie m30 PierceFannieH 

VetuioreChasE s4 WebsterLydia o3 PollardJohn 

■^VetiiioreP'red'kH o'21 WellsCJ-WmG aIG PowellMn<NathU 
WetiiiDruFK s4 " AiigiistaC " KoyceMrsW 

WliaplesLtSL[CoE]s9 WellsMiegLillieR a18 " AltheaL 



MlO WilliampSusan 
o20 WriglitCS 
ol7 WrigUtStewart 
0-24 

SIMSBUUT. 

AldermauFrauk 



sl5 
sl5 



Mrs LA 
Wheelci-JB&wf 
WljitoWB 
WliitelyJauies 
" AnuieLaRue 
WhitiugHW 
" Mary A 
WiardMS&wf 
" AL&wf 
WilcoxRobtM 
WilcosTB 
WilsouDaniel 
WolffFraiicis 
WoodAN&wf 
WoodSII&wf 
WoodfordMrsC 
WoodniffAliceR 
WoodruffJF 



Al4 

Al9 
Al8 



Wc-UesMartin-Rjr i<4 SmithHelenA olTiAlfordE s2 

o25 WellesRoger s7 SpellmanBD-EA Je30 •' ClaraJ-RB 

a7 WetherellHA Nl StanleyJetmieL o4'AlleuMr8-MissAA sl5 



jy3 White.! U[GHG] p16 StephensouFr'dGjyll 
" IWhittleseyG'r^iaA s8 StrongMrsHH oVi 

s32iWhittleseyHA s6 StrougTheoP&wf olO 

" |Whittles'yMrsHAjy^4 TinkerEdwL 

830," AN-HN " JTinkerFA&wf 

" WhittleseyHC jylO TylerMH&wf 
jel4 VVillardDD je6 UlrichJohn 

o31 nw iTvriTTv lUsherRC 
jy5 PLAIN TILLE. [vicareEUaA 
sdliBeachFL oa5 WarrenLeroyB 



a30 WestWmG&fam 
a30 WoodcockJAlice 
o3 WoodcockJB 

sl9 BOCKI HILL 



K8 
027 

o3 
o31 
jel2 
o35 

05 
sll 
0-25 
jy3 



'• iBuardSH 

sill BishopMrsSA 

81-) BishopTN&wf 

Al8 BlakcyleeWmJ 

s26 BristolAM-Edw 
WoodriiffMJ&wf m30 Bri^^tolTJ&vvMda sl2 AllenCR-MaryG jela 
VVoodw'thLizzieRA^O BuellLP-LouisaM m26 BaldvviiiSarahD a15 
WordeiiNR o3 BumiellLemuel n9 BeldeuES&wf 

WriglitMrsMary 629 BuunellWO Jyll BeldenF_W[GHG] 

s5 Burns Jas 

85 CliapmanEC 

86 ClarkGeoU 



YatesE 

YatesJH[SerCoD] 

YoQugGeo 

YoungJohn 

ZahnlciterAdam 

ZimtaerinauP 



o24 BulkleyEmmaJ 

s4 BulkleyLR 
.lelO CampJWjr&wf 



s5 •' MrsMallie-Grace " ChurchillSP 



NEVVINGTOJf. 

AtwoodMaryK 
" JuliaN 
BeldeuCorneliaH 
BeldenJoshua 
" :MaryE-Julia 
" MaryEH 
Board nianJH 
Brown VVF-ElizS 
CanipJoseph 
CampLW 
ClarkDanielJ 
CorbinPH 
DayChasVV 
DayET-AL 
DeiuiugAliceC 
DeuwngHattieP oil 
DeniingJedediah sG 
FrancisPratt&wf a4 
FrancisVA s9 

HubbardWm a30 

KaDpellLucyB s26 
Kellogg.IohuG jyll 
KelloggHL&wf a23 
" HLjr 

KelloggRW ol9 

KilbourueSH a2;^ 

KirkhamMrsJS s7 
OsbornNewton&wfo4 
RicliardsAbbieP 86 
Eol)bin8DL o26 

RobbinsMrsEP oil 
" LucieA " 

RobbiusMissLucy a29 



jy6 CondellAH 

sl.CorterCH&wf 
CowlesKatie.M 
I" LibbieA 

s7 CowlesWm 

" iCovvlesWmL 

" CottrellLM 
a23 CramerHC 

" jCurtissWaldoL 

" iDenisonAE 
je9 DowJM 
o24 Dunhams Rosa 

87,EddyGeoW 
oil EltonWmL 

sGElyUSiuith 
Al7lFoxDW&wf 
AljiPrisbieE 
olOiFrisbiePP sl8 

s6 FrisbieMrsJaneE a30 



ol8 ChapmanMrsFW 
o27 Denny JN[GnG] 
o2 DickinsonDW 
DimockSam'I 



AUeuHarveyP 

BarbourLJ&vvf 

Barnard.Iay 

BartlettJosephL 

BartlettMrsJL 

Beldeullorace-S 

Brockettlsabel 

BuellOL 



sl5 
je3 
ol 
023 

olO 
825 
024 

s5 



ButterfieklJosieM ol9 



CaseMrsNorris 

CaseRP 

Chapman AaronS 

ChaBeMrsErwiu 

CornishGB 

CurtissJasM 

DolanPeterC 

EnoAarouL 



026 
o9 
k2 
o3 

sll 
o23 
Jy6 
o24 



EnoChaunceyH-G ol8 



EnoFannieA 

EuoGeoC 

EnoLG-MissNH 

EnoMrsSC 

•' MrsEH-MrsCH 

EnsignRH&wf 

GilletteSE 



Al7 

olO 

818 

n9 



ol8 : GoodrichLG-MA 



026 

s6 

jyi 

o26 

jyi 
jyl4 
n9 
o24 
sl5 
si 3 
ol3 
jel4 
a30 



s4 
sl2 

n2 
.icO 



jyi 

o24 

s21 
Nl 



GoodrichEP-HL sl6 
Guernseys FM5&wf o4 
HallRevA-EllaB m26 
HamlinWillisA 
HamlinMrsWA 

MissJuliaM 
HarrisJohnH 
HillsMrsEP 
HillsGeo 
HillsJosieF 
JenkinsJasP 
JohnsonSusanL 

GeoL-Horace 
JonesCH-Lizzie 
LewisEN 
LewisFlorenceS 
" HelenG 
LewisNellie 
ManchesterFB 
MillsMrsCA 
MoodyCW 
MoodyDrGeoA 



Nl 



RobbinsLucyA 

RockwellCH 

ScymourJD 

SholtonE 

StarrJared 

StarrJonathan 

StoddardEmily 

StoddardFrancj 

Stod.lardMrsRufus sl3, PierceBerthaT 

TracvLA jylO'" HattieE 



DimockMrsSam'l ol3 

GilbertChasS s5 

GilbertMrsTimo'y ol4 

GoodrichEC-H.M o9 

GoodrichMissSA 

GrantllenryH 

GreenJK[GllG] 

" NK[GHG] 

GrimesMrsCB 

GriswoldAlbertD 

GrisvvoldHattieP 

GriswoldDrRW 
EstherE-EPH 

GriswoldWP 

Hardy WS 

HolmesAB 

Latham MrsHD 

MerriamHR 

" Jennie 

MortonGeoW 

PorterMarthaM 

PorterRA 

RobbinsMrsC 

olGjRobbinsEW 

o25! RobbinsMLonisa 

s29 RobbinsMrsWalt'rol9 

oeJRussellHA&wf n8 

" ISanfordRS[GnG] pB 

o7i ShipmanAJ&wf 

je9 ShipmanAgnesG 

s27 SmithMarvF 

" jStanlevDrChasE 

jelSiTillotsonMrsGJ 

olOi" LizzioL 

o26 WamerEN 

8l9|" FannieA 

jel2iWarnerEverettS 



ol4 
018 

s8 

o25 

n3 
ol3 
OlO 

n3 

8l5 

n2 
ol3 
jel5 

n2 
825 
S25 
n9 
s6 
o2 



ol2 
020 
ol3 
n4 
je23 

n9 



814 
s6 
olO 
ol9 
oil 
je9 
o2:J 
a28 
o23 



GoodrichNathan 

GoodrlchNellieS 

nolcombi;D 

HolcombDrNW 

'■ MrsDrNW 

Humph reyFM 

IIumi^hreyMD 

'• Rulus 

HumphreyME 

HiuUEllaJ 

LatimerEdwinJ 

LatimerFA 

'■Emily ClaraE-BelleE 

McLean CalvinB m30 

MatherWJ&wf ol9 

01cottnenryA&wfol4 

PardeeCarrieE n3 

PettiboneMrsGeo s27 

PhelpsJeffreyOjr ol3 

" J03d-CharlotteW " 



827 

s2 

Nl 
66 



je9 



s23 i MoodvLS-Mr8GAjel5 ' WebsterCH-MaryCsl2 

o21;NoalePrankS ol3 WebsterMLillie o2 

oil NealeMissJNettie ol2,WhitmoreCL n9 

ss NewtonMrsFB a9 WhitmoreLewis Nl 

Al6 WilliamsElizM 87 

" iWilliamsMrsH ol3 



RobertsJC 


024 


RootMissJL 


sl4 


ShawJohn 


n2 


SiblevGeoW 


n2 


SlddellEII 


A26 


SmithJamesH 


ol7 


StockwellST 


66 


TerrvSam'l&wf 


013 


TovGpoBD 


olS 


TullerPlielps 


85 


TurnbnllJas 


o23 


WhiteCarrieE 


n3 


WhiteheadWH&wf827 


WilcoxMissAJ 


8l5 


WilcoxHenryO 


o24 


WilcoxMrsJudson 827 


" MissElla 


" 


WilcoxLL 


s27 


WilcoxMaria 


024 


WoodMrsCB 


Je29 



TARIFFVnXB. 

AdamsFredC o24 

AdamsLottieH " 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITOES — HAKTFOED COUNTY. 



259 



AdamsMJ-Geo'giaol2iCurtissSamuel&wf o5 RobbinsAggieE 



Nl 

o24 
e22 
018 
s21 

621 



AdamsM rsThosU 

BaikerMis!»RE 

bamardJaueW 

BollesJS 

Brace J P 

CaseMrsCZ 

CaseHeuryA-LS 

CaseWmS 

CouchBelleC 

EnsiguChasA 

Fish John 

FishJonathan 

GoodwinRevWm jy21 

GunnLjNI-AnnaM 69 

HolcombChasB je7 

HurlburtJennieE o23 

MitchelsonA&wf e22 

" Lizzie " 

MitchelsonGeo 

MitchelsonHugh 

MitchelsonJosC 

MunsonSaraL 

PettiboueAird-CFol3 

PilkingtonJaeB o27 

EeedMrsChasW n9 

EeynoldsBelle b14 

RobertsAnnieD ol3 

SanfordMH&wf sl9 

TaylorGilbertA 



s20 i Daniels James 
013 DavisMrsRT 
s8|DeVriesHenry 
is2 DuuhamH 
jy4 [ DusinberreGB 
^ KrbeHerman 
FairchildWmA 
FiuchMrsAF 
FinchGeoB 
FinchNellie 
PiskeMrsJP 



o2 
o31 

Mi 
je9 
o31 



023 RosenbaumFred 

o3 RuleBenj 
ol3 Savage J B 
ol6 SavageMrsJB 
b371" EmmaP " 

66! SnedekerClarenceC a4 
0l9'staunardCJ ol7 

o31 StillmanEdwinC o6 
820 StillmanWC 
ol3 SuUivauWU 

s7IUp9onEJ 



FiskeWW je28Al2sl4!UpsonFi-ankA 
FitchMaryL jel4 UpsonMF 

FooteJuliaA sll UpsouJS 

FrisbieAnn Nl'UpsonSaraliF 

FrisbieMW-LottaENS WalkerT 



sie 

825 
je22 
ol3 



SanfordDrGW&wfAl7 



SibleyMissElla 
WarnerFB 
WaruerGeoR 
WhiteWalterW 



a4 

o3 

o31 

o30 



SOUTHINGTON. 

AckartDavid ol6 

Amet^SophiaH s6 

AndrewsElizur s22 
AtwaterJas o26 

AtwoodMrsEsther o27 
AtwoodE-IdaO 8l3 
BacouLiicyA sO 

Barnes AF-IdaA 
BaruesChasD&wf ol2 
BarnesFH-J 
BarnesGS o3 

BarnesNN-AliceB n1 
BarnesSamuelM o23 
BayrerWmJ o24 

BeecherLNoble NlO 
BowlesIdaW jy3 

BradleyChasA 
BristolGeoD 
BrietolJD&wf o24 
BristolSeymourJ All MathewsGeoP 
BrooksJeinishaC o31 
BuellAP&wf o27 

BullJaneSL jy24 

BurrittWesley&wfol9 
ByingtonFrank s21 
CadwellChasA s7 

CampGeo o24 

CampLM&wf si 3 

CampbellCaro'eM o31 
CampbellLT s7 

CareyAlexF o30 

OarterCL ol7 

CarterCR-KateB jelO 
ClarkCH je28o24 

ClarkMrsCS ol7 

ClarkHenryH je9o24 NicholsE 
" f;arrie-Sarah 
ClarkMWD s25 PendletonTP 

ClarkW J& wf-Rosa9l4 Pi ersonDr 
CochraneWR 627 PlinneyJS 

CowlesJnoM 65 Pratt David 

CummingsHarriet o27 PrattJF&wf 



FrisbieRR 

FrostLewisH 

GriswoldDrRM 

HancockThosC 

HartBenj 

HartCC 

IlartFredA 

HartMaryP 

HartSarah 

HartSN 

HartSW 

HavilandBA 

HavilandClinton 

HinmanDavid 

HillChasE 

HitchcockJosieL 

HitchcockOA 

HobartChasP 

HolcombR 



ue WebsterCate 

A3 WhitingLewisD 

N6 WilcoxAug 

N9iWiUcoxWm 

86 WilliamsGL 
A3i;William8RL 
sls'WilliamsSP 

a2 WithamJH 
a3L" Sallie 
o24 WoodEdwA 
slo2o WoodruflAdnaN Jy29 
812 WoodruffCC&lady ol3 
612 WoodruffDP a17 

jy27 WoodruffEdna ol3 
o21 WoodruftFB jy5 

68 Woodruft'MA jel4 

031 Woodruff Sam'lS Jc2S 



o24 



65 Woodruff WW 
ol6|" AE 



HubbardWilburE jy29 YeomansEdgarC 
" ■ YouugEdwardW 



PLANTSVrLLB 

AmeeChasL&wf jy15 



Ive6HS o24 

JohnstonJV&wf ol8 
JonesD o9 

JonesDwightD NlO 

JuddTF a5 AmesWL-LauraA 6i9 

JuddMrsTrumanF 6l8 ArnoldErneetG o2(i 
KilbournEB o25 Bailey WF&wf Jy29 

LangdonCora 6l2J" Mary-Florence Jy29 

" JuliaP " BeecherHenryM o9 

LeeEmilyE o26'BlakesleeSJr&\vf jy5 

LeePrankE 828|ClarkSC-FrankieAol9 

Lewis AM-GeoP ol6|CookMrsWm o23 

LewisBennett A3o20;Cro6eRalph o24 

LevvisEdwardM o2' Cummings WH&w o24 
LewisGeoE&wf je24!CowlesCB&wf Jy29 
LewisMissML a7 CowlesPannieM 

LewisWarrea o20 FletcherWC 
LongLR o26 PowlerMD 

MartinMrsJackson o3 Francis JnoC 



RandMaryE o24 

ReddigA-MC o31 

" Veronica A " 

RiceThosW a28 

SmithChasD aoO 

SmithGeoP&wf o20 

" EH-HeleuA " 

LottieA " 

SmithWR a26 

ol6 StriebyHenryM w31 

6l3 TalmadgeEdw o24 

025 TwichellEW&wf c6 
jy29 TwichellJuliaE o26 

026 TwichellOH s21 
o3 UpsonBW Jy28 

025 WhiteLS Jy28 

827 WithamWmH n8 

on SOUTH WINDSOB. 

m31 AlexanderEdgar o28 
jel3 AndrossWniF o24 
je3o AveryCarrie ol6 

ol6 BackusLuth'rP&woll 
a17 BancroftCW Je2 

n6 BancroftGW o30 

BancroftJuliaH s8 
BancroftMaryE s6 
BancroftSM jel5 

BancroftTE&wf s26 
" MS-Frank-DP " 
BarberChester sl9 
BarberCG jyl 

BissellMariaL 87 

BowmanAustinL sl8 
BowmanGeoE 8l6 
CarterThaddeus olO 
ChandlerChasH 8l6 
ChandlerLD Je28sl9 
ClappAS o25 

ClappMrsCarlosW n1 
CiappCarrieT "• 

ClappChasS o25 

ClappEC ol9 

ClappGO Jy26 

ClappHenryM 88 

ClappJnoS-Lottie ol9 
ClappMinnieL n1 

ClarkMrslda 828 

ClarkOliver-Emily s21 
DartSE a23 

DawlevGcoE w30 

DeweyL-SarahM oil 

- " o28 

ol9 
o5 
n3 



813 



6'^ 



jyl5 

N9 
N4 
03 



n6| Granni6HS&wf-CSs23 



Matthews J R&lady s27j GreenMrsSW 



MerrellWalterS 82' 

MillerMrsRR o21 
MooreChas-NellleENl 

MortonAbbieT 826 

MortonCT KlO 

NealeAdna&wf ol7 

NealeMrsAddieT o26 

NealeClarenceA sl3 

NealeMrsEJ o3 
NealeRollinW&wf n2 

NealeSD-MrsRA jel 

NealeWS o3 

Newellllenry Nl 

NewellLeviC 87 



HauserC 
HitchcockGR 

Cornelias 
HolcombMrsRF 
IIoughMiss 
HowellSarahJ 
HnllLettieE 
LaneGeoH 
LaneGeoW 
LewisMrsAM 
" MortimerA 
LewisMrsMaryJ 
" LinaA 
MannPA 



jy5o31IMartinTho9 



o23 

s7 
o20 

o23 
6l2 
620 
je]5 
a2C 
o24 
o23 

o23 

n9 

jy28 



OsborneDrJH&wf o2|MerrimanJennieE o24 



A7iMorseCha6E 
o25 MossMiPsBA 
A22PaddockEE 
olO PottsWmB 
m31 Pratt Judson 



02:3 
jy29 

620 
jy29 



DibbleAlbertB 

DotenJohnW 

ElmoreMarietta 

FarnhanaEdgarA 

" ML 

FosterGeo 

GrangerPrank 

GrantChester 

GrantClayton 

GrantMist^PA 

GrantHenry&wf 

GrautLJ 

GrantRoswell 

GrantSheldonP 

GrantWillard 

GreenElminaS 

GreenEmily 

GuilfordGW 

HartHenryE 

HatchHenryC 

" ChasP-GeoL 

HatchMrsJonathanoU 

" MrsJohn-JohnO " 

Holmanllenry o25 

HolmesLydiaA a25 

HunterKA s25 



s22 
o24 

s20 
s25 

o7 
825 
0I6 

a8 
oil 

A3 

sl9 

jyi 

o25 
jel5 
jel3 



a23 JonesFL 



o4 



2G0 



SOUVENIR OF THK CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



JonesJohnPjr s27 

JonesOS sKi 

JcinesNathaniel ol9 
KibbieDC 

KibbiuTillieB o4 

Kin^FreiPkA s2' 

KinL'UeoB 6l4 

KingJW ol9 
Knickerbocker 

*• AnnaM n1 

LanidonCS o7 
Newberry FannieE sl(i 
Newberry llar'ietMsia 

PalniorMV Jy5 

PaniieleeCZ ol3 
" Mrs^HE 

ParmelecUR s9 
ParmeleuWB-MrsC s9 

PeltouBayard All 

PeltoiiLizzieG Jelti 

Peltonli sl8 

PiereyThos Jy5 

PiniieyEnimaB 8l5 

PiuneyllL JeiS 

" CarrieL " 

Riordau Martin o31 

RipleyEJwiiiB sl3 

Ripley VVinW oil 

EisleyAlbertG s37 

EisleyHenryG o-Jfi 

KockwellDrSW ol8 

Sad.lAII siO 

SaddHenryW-FA sl9 

SkinnerAlieel s20 
SkinnerMaryBelle s6 

SperrvLewis Je!) 

StilesHeury.T m3.) 

Stoiishton Amelia aKJ 

Stoiisjhtou Edwin AlU 
" WillG-AlfO 

StoughtonJC a30 
StoughtonOliverAlGNSl 

StoughtouOscar a'I 

StouglitonVVF ol6 

TaborFJ Jvi 
ThrallNormau&wf sli 

ViutouCC sW 

WariierMrsLJ o7 

Well-Wilber ol6 

WhitcMarianna o26 

WilliainsGU o25 

WoodElizaB sl9 

SUFFIELD. 

AdamsAdellaC jelO 

AdainsRoswell n3 

Andrews A J n4 

ArnoldRosella 89 

ArnoldWmP o30 

AtwaterMissSM s2o 

AustinAlbertR Nl 

" HoraceB " 

Au>:tinGeoA o24 

AustinlleiiryH o26 

AustinllattioB 627 
" IsabellaE 

AiistinMrsIJ o5 

AiistinLeverettN ol8 

AustinTC-Edgar " 

BaileyEC ol6 

BallantineMrsE ol2 
BallantineWG&wf 06 

BarnumEW&fam jyl 

BcebeWm 8l5 

BestorNorman ol 

BirgeChasA&wf jy8 

BissellChasS s9 

BissellMariaE ell 

Bradford WmR sl3 



BurbankWE 


Alf. 


HurnettA 


A3 


BiutME 


012 


Chape lA&wf 


c6 


ClarkAddie 


012 


ClarkAlbert&wf 


612 


ClarkFred 


05 


ClarkSWwf&dan 


88 


ComeyEF 


A3 


CoreyCA-A 


o5 


CowlcsHS 


0I8 


CrancGS 


o31 


DeiningOP 


ol9 


DcniijonMrsSE 


05 


DouglassAB 


sl5 


'• NellieO 


'• 


DouglassEO 


827 


DouglassJasP 


Al2 


DouglassOS 


jel7 


EastwoodNellieH 


n8 


FuUerChasS 


a31 


FuUerDwightS 


Al 


FuIlerFW 


jyl4 


FuUorGeoII 


o7 


GilbertMinnie 


s8 


" Emma 


68 


Gillette Leroyll 


s21 


GoodacreJ(A5)Eliz o24 


" EE-JasJ-Franci9 " 


GrangerHK 


o24 


Grange rM 


86 


GriswoldSA 


a9 


GrovenorCP 


jel4 


GrovenorLaura 


A3 


HalladavA 


o25 


HalladayE 


81 1 


HalladayGeoK 


o9 


HalladayH-HW 


o5 


HarmouChaiW 


s8 


Harmon FS 


612 


HarrocksSydnoy 


sl3 


HarrocksThoma3 


o31 


HaskinsJasO 


A3 


HastingsFE&wf 


o23 


HathewayMrs^Jno 


o31 


HathewayMorton 


0I6 


HathewaySaraE 


s26 


" LissaA 


" 


Hemingway J A&w olO 


« HR 


" 


HenshawAA-MS 


o31 


HolcombE 


84 


HollowayMrsP 


626 


IvesJohn 


o24 


IvesMD 


a7 


JenksHelenM 


S20 


JonesOscarA 


Al5 


KelterThos 


64 


KendallGeoP 


A1 


KentHenryP 


620 


KentHR&wf 


013 


KimballJennieK 


Al6 


Kin-EC 


jy5 


KingHJ 


o25 


KingHelenM 


820 


KinirMarthaA 


Al6 


" ElizM 


" 


KnoxWE-EmilyJ 


ell 


" WallaceC 


" 


KnoxWS&wf 


06 


LeeteDrlsaacP 


n9 


LewifNewtouR 


o30 


LippsPS 


Al6 


LippgMrf Philips 


s26 


Loomii^Byron&wfjelS 


" Neland 


" 


LoomipMrgGeoW 


021 


LoomiisHattieL 


026 


LoomisJnoD&wf 


All 



LoomisRH 64 

„()omit-HL&wf 06 
i.oomisSC-GW a24 
LcomisWL sl9 

" MrsAJB " 

" CF&wf jel4 " 
LymauLA-AJ o30 
MatherClaraA a16 
MatherGeoB&wf 8l3 
MatberMaryE a18 
Ma;herDrWmH m22 
'• MrsLibbieB " 

MillerAJ&wf 06 

MoreeA n4 

MyersLibbie o5 

NewtonDrMT&wf s26 
NicholsCP o26 

NortonEmilyL o21 
XortonMary o7 

OsborneldaH 0I8 

Owen Lena ol2 

PeckhamWmP o31 
PomeroyArthurP 823 
PomeroyCE&wf s26 
PomeroyCornelia 86 
" MrsChauncey " 
PomeroyMrsGeoL s26 
PomeroyWH 826 

PomeroyiVW a9 

ReevesDA&ladv o28 
ReevcsMissDcllaJ 0I8 
Rcid(;r(il)\-\vf je26 
Richniondllugb Jel5 
RiglerCharles a15 

RiglerGeoW a31 

RogersIIenryD 620 
RussellEA&wf 87 

RussellHenryB a3 
SavageGeo a16 

SavageMrsEA o5 

SheldonLC o26 

" MaggieC " 

Shores J A Jy25 

Sikes Arthur s21 

SikesMaryA s27 

SikesSumnerP o30 
SimmonsMrsL Jyl4 
SpencerCC&wf ol9 
" BurtAlfred&wf " 
SpencerClinton J}'13 
SpencerHattie Jyl4 
" CarrieE-Jennie " 
SpencerlL-ChasL a31 
" EmilyF-EmmaP " 
•' ClaraJ " 

SpencerJP-AlQr m31 
SpencerWH 8l3 

StedmanFraukA 0I8 
StoneAJ o30 

StubbertRevJR n1 
StrongAL&wf Je7 
SykesFM a23 

SykesMrsHenryM o26 
ThayerLucieA s26 
TinkcrHD&wf s7 
TobeyMrsEdwin a18 
" MispGraceT 
TowneClintonDeW s4 
WadsworthMrsP s7 
" MifsEmma " 

WallaceJW 0I8 

WarnerArthurJ s21 
WesselsER Jyl4 

WestEphraim s5 

" CarolineM " 

WhiteSamuel o4 

WillettC-ElviraE o25 
WillstonGN jy5 

WoodBenj(je9)&w 621 



iWoodworthL 86 

WrightCH a14 

WrightHalseyJ a15 

WrightMrsOP sll 

" MissNellle " 

WrightWJ Al5 

WEST SUFFIELD. 

AustinChasL s23 

AustinMissNellieLAll 
AustinMrsTJ o5 

BaldwinEmilyJS o7 
BartheHS s20 

CannonJnoB o25 

Case J W Je9 

DrakeWmBi&wf o5 
ElderkinRevJ&wf o25 
FreemanWK&wf " 
ProstMinnieL 823 
HanchettLouisaJ s23 
HarmonMrsG s22 

" Anne " 

HarmonGeoA sl9 

HarmonRoland jyl9 
HasangsGerryE o30 
HastingpJessieF ol7 
KnoxMrnIiU o5 

" MinnieA " 

LillieFrankJ-W-Ho25 
LoomisAliceM o5 
MeechJnoH-MaryJ sS 
NelsonCII&wf o7 
NelsonHK&wf s6 
NobleAliceM-HSSol7 
OsbomLinusA o25 
PomeroyWmS o30 
ProphetMrsHenry o2 
RisingJE nI 

RootFC&wf ol3 

RoseMrsED o5 

RoseJamesB&wf s28 
" MillieE-MaryS " 
RoseMissNellieD je22 
RoseOliverC s20 

RowleyMissEvaL o26 
SegarDL Jyl9 

SegarHD 8l9 

SheldonCC&wI o7 
SheldonEmilyC ol2 
SheldonHA 826 

SheldonHS Nl 

" MrsHS je22o5 

SpencerGilson a15 
ThrallChasJ oil 

VanGelderAllieM o26 
VietsSeth&wf 
WarnerCC-JaneE s28 
" EloiseL-FrankC " 
" FrancisN-SarahJ " 
" ArthnrF-IsaacL " 
" LauraM-GeoL " 
" AS-l8aacW " 

WarnerEH jyl2 

Woodruff PD 

WEST HABTFOED. 

AllenJasP&wf s21 

ArnoldJP o3 

BarberGP ol9 

BarberRopaM olO 

BeachTB-CE 6l9 

BeckwithAM o3 

Bishop AS o3 

BishopMrsWmH sSO 

BoswellChaslNI 87 
BoswellMrsChasM jy7 

" LillieM " 

BowlesIIelenA s21 

Buckland^IS o3 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS — HABTFOED COUNTY. 



261 



oSO 

Sl8 
Jen 



BntlerFG 

ButlerMrsHC 

CoffingMrsCP 

" KittieH 

ColtonCA 

CraneHenryP 

DavisCS 

EddyRC-MB 

ElyWmH 

FlaggMrsAS 

FlaggCai-rieE 

FlaggMiesEA 

Flag^PloreuceE 

FootJM 

FrancisGeoB 

FrancisHN 

FrancisLauraH 

" Julias 

FrancisRogerN 

GilmanMrsCW 

GoodwinCB 

Goodwin GeoT 

GoodvvinMrsGeoT s5 

GoodwiuMSd s21 

GoodwinNE-WE o34 

GrahamJB o3 

GriswoldHO 

" Mrs " 

GriswoldJB elS 

GriswoldJennieM o25 

GriswoldMJos'ine s7 

GriswoldSethP o4 

" EmilyW 

HatchChasE 

HatchFS 

HuntingtonAD 

JohnsonJR 

KelloggCE&wf 

KingHenryA 

KingJamesA 

LoomisMri-GeoW 

LovclandMJ 

" WarrenS 

MillardChasA nO 

MillardG-AddieD ol8 

MillsChasSjr Jel3 

MixMrsLE nO 

MorrisEL sSS 

MorrisMN&wf a30 

" ChasN 

NicholasWF&wf m26 



TalcottSarahW b4 
" LibbieH 

WhitingAustin ol2 
WhitingComeliaM s4 
WhitiiigEA 09 

WhitmanSamuel a19 
" HenryC-MaryL "■ 
WhittemoreRE&w o25 
WoodlordSB o3 

WETHEKSFIELD. 

o2o 



oil 
je9 



a5 
jc9 
sl5 

A3] 

o25 
ol3 

06 

n9 

n2 

a23 

o2 

a8 



olO 
ol7 

n3 

o24 

je2 

m30 

Jy27 

o9 
KlO 



ol3 
je9 



OatmanAlva 

PareongPG 

PhelpsDoraG 

PriceRobt&wf 

KavnsfordNG 

SeldcnEM&wf 

" HenryH 

SeyiuourMrsEH 

" Emma A 

SeymonrLeverettK sO 

SeymourWE-WW s2" 



s20 
s21 
a23 

s28 



AdamsAR&wf 

" MaryA-CallieD 

AdamsCEugene 

" AliceS-EUenM 

AdamsC-ED 

AdamsFrancis 

AdamsHeuryS 

AdamsJG 

AdamsMartha 

AdamsNettie 

AdamsLeslieE 

AdamsMrsLW 

AdamsRussell&wf 

AdanisStoddard 

AdamsTGwf&dau 

AdamsMrsW 

AllynAbel-TS 

AllynDwightM 

LizzieR 
AllynLcwisA 
AmidonFH 
AmidonJno 
AndersonJR 
AndrewsChafM 
AndrevvsRevWW o3(J 

MrsWW&dau 
BaileyLII 
BerryThosR&wf 
BlinnMrsSimeon 
'• FStuart-AliceG 
BroadbentKatieC 
Buckllenry 
BuckLI)[GIIG] 
BuckWinthrop&w 0I8 
BuckingbamJnojr a1 
BulkleyAliceM s20 
BulkleyPnidieW jyl4 
BulkleyStephen«fews20 
ButlerLW o7 

" MA-LS 

CapronHattieM Jyl4 
CastleDrSA o4 

" MreSB 

ChapmiinFT&wf s6 
•' MipellR " 

ChurchillMrsPW a23 
ClappRevIIS s9 

CurtipsWF[GHG] s8 



SeymourWHjr 

SheldonEA 

SheldoiiLA 

Shepard^Frs 

SiesonMis-EG 

" LizzieG 

SissonFrank 

SiseonJr.liaP 

StanlcyET&wf 

StearnsGeoM 

SteeleAdaE 

" AnnicM 

Sti-eleJFrank 

StecleShermanS 

" SDjr 

SteeleSL 

StoddardChasC 



GriswoldldaM a31 SonthworthP o21 

RowlandH " StantonHannah 0I8 

GriswoldEF[GHG] s8 StantonJB o4 

GrisswoklFVV 8l5 StillmanAliceW a26 

MrsEA-ElIaF " StillmanMisHA je26 
Grig\voldMrsHan'ahs6 " MaryF " 

GriswoklKateM a24 StillmanHA-KateS s5 
HaleEmmaL oH StoddardMaryP s28 

HanmerCJ&lady jel6 StoneJennieA 
HanraerJohujr 0I8 SunburyMrsM 
HanmerMrsJnojr s20 TieboutW 
UanmerMissNelliejyT TuckerMark 
HanmerTN 06 WaidGeo 

HanoverE s7 WarnerFredW 

HarrisFEstelle ol4 WarnerMisGeoF 
HarrisGeoM^&vvf o9 WarnerJC 
o30 WarnerLW 
je22 WarnerMaryL 
0I8 WellesAIbertH 
o28 WellesAnnieM-FJ s7 
p22 WellesDWlGHG] a8 
013 WelleeEUenE 
o30 WellesGeorgiaA 
0I8 WelleeJFrank 
o5 WellesIdaE 
s27 Welles John 
o7 WellesJohnN 
" iWellesLeonardR 
b2 WellsEW 

jWellsGL-ElviraM 
0I2 WillardClaytonT 
jy5 WillardEmmaA 



HariisJasH 

HarrisMame 

Haven si rvingW 

Havens^OwenR 

IlevvettLyman 

HewittRT&wf 

HnrlburtJO-EdE 

HurlbiirtKateM 

JohnsonL&wf 

KnappJD-LA 

KohnJHenry 

" Mattie-M.'iryC 

LawrieRitchie 

LovelandEN 

LovelandHannah 

IMavAnnM 
sC) MeggetWm&lady je'lfj WillardSP 
slO MeseroleWalterM o7 WillardWmL 
sSMooresMrsFW je21 WiliardMrsWm 



a5 
si 
o7 

o3 

s6 
ol7 
sl6 

s5 
Jy7 
025 



Sl3 
AS 
s6 

Sl5 
S9 

88 

o24 

o25 
Nl 



a31 
a80 
jyi4 
je24 



MorganMrsA 816," MrsEmmaJ " 

" Hattie " |WilliampEliz o25 

MorganEmilyR o2 WolcottChas-CF s26 
MorganER All WolcottHattieB a28 

MorganMrsS Jy25 WolcottMayW &6 

MorganStephen a7s28 WolcottRR s7 

" MattieW a7 " MrsRR&dans 

MorrisMrsAE o2 WolcottSamuel o3 

MorrisFrank-Wm o3|WolcottMrsSam'l a26 
MorrisSamuelW A8i" Emma-Cora " 

MulfdMrsAH&s'no2o|WoodliouseEG je9 
MnllerLjr o25| WoodhouseMrsEG s9 

PearlChas&dan o26| WoodhouseEIizB n1 
PrattJ-Fanny W si I WoodhonseEddieR 
PrattMrsnan'ahHje24 WoodhoiiseSarahH a5 
Sophies 



PrattLizzie a22 

PrattNellieW s5 

RhodesLeverettE s21 
RhodesMissNancy s9 



RobbinsEG&wf 
" LillicD-JIarkT 
" JuliaF-KateC 
RobbinsEJ 



Wright Jno-FannieMl5 

WISDSOR. 

AndrnsAH 



ol 
o3 
jy5 

Oo 

a29 
t( 

NlO 
Oil 

013 
s9 
o5 

s21 
oC 

s27 



CutlernattieS 821 RobbiusFH 

DeckerEgbert |" BellieM 

DemingOcliaR ol2iRobbinsJ 

DemingllenryA je9jRobbinsRA 

DemiiigWm " MrsRA-ED-WWjy7!BidvvellHA 

BickinsonHH a5|" JaneE-CarrieT " BidwellWmL&wf s28 

DillingsMrsAlfredje24 RobbinsSW p29lBro\vnEA:\vf 0I6 

DillingsCH[GHG] s8 RobertsonAnstin jc5 BrownbackEL jy6All 



821 

BarberFrackW s6 

si BarberlNIreMartin s20 

BarberNath'lH o31 

BarbcrSH s7 

BarberWmW n9 

o5 BarrettLizzieM a^5 

BartlettErminaD 827 

" Vlimma 

o24jy7iBeIlMr?NS 



Nl 
a21 



o31 RobinsonEliz 
0I2 RobinsonFW 



DixTimothvE 
DowCarlosE&wf 

DresserSW&wf o5 SalisburyMissMC olO 
EdwardsFW 8l6o20 SavageMrsWmW s9 
FoxEdwardG s8 SkaatsWmH 

FrancisAlfredS 8l6 SmithFG-IIattieM s21 
FrancisEM&wf 8l3 SmithGeo-LncyR o5 
s9 SmithllattieS 
ol4 SmithLouiseA 



FrancisJaneC 

FrancisM-Lucy 

Goodrichl'.nssMV sG Sonthworthllattie A30:ClappMai-}II 

GrisvvoldAC-Almao2o " Mason-Mary " jCIarklTortoiiS 



J 21 BurchardMary 
a9 CarltonA 
CarpenterFW 
CarpenterThos 
" MariaE 
CaseFM 
CaseRD-AJ 
eSjClappMrsAlex 
sSiClappMatticS 



olllGriswoldAddicL a31 " Henry 



jy5 
o31 
s19 
a81 

821 

olO 

827 

A3 

o30 
jel9 



ClarkShclby[PPl jel6 



262 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXEIBITION. 



Ciai-k.TL-.TcniiieII NliJudkinsRevMr jel9 

Cv)Xv;MautoiiE jySlKinneyStieldon oil 

Cro npiooEliz s2l|Laiigdoii\V'S olO 
" Kate " i'' touiseW 

DaauWK A9'Leete\VW jya6 

DresiserJA Aa-llLeouardJS ai^-2 
UuncanTiios s:il " MrsMJ 

DuncaiiTE a1» Leonard.! VV AlO 

Eckspjllei-ClaraM o:iLewiif Florence O'M 

EUswDrtliDavidJ sl3|LmcolnLizzieB a8 



Ellsworth BliP 



N3iLooini#EdmundW o31 



EllswortliEmilyL Pl3 LoomisJE 



ElUworthMrsF 

Ellsworth HH 

FaxonWC 

FerryOliver 

FilleyJennieH 

FilleyWraH 

FlyntLymanC 

Forbe^MaryJ 

FosOliveH 

FrenchAD&vvf 

GilletteTC&wf 

" MasterNcdC 

GriswoldMrsEA 

GriswoldSE 

Griswold rN-GM 

Hake^-iSarahW 

IlakesWinW 

HarveyLucretiaG 



N-2lLoomisOsbertB 
sl4 LoomisTVV 



n2 

je7 
olO 



822 LordLR 

St) LovellEJ-WM o27 

Jyl2 LynchCH-CB sT 

sl4 McCorruicklas o3fl 

je22jMackDauiel\V o2(i 

Nl|McManamonMary olO 
slSiManleyEmmaA. Jyl2 
jy3 MarshallMrsDE 

si Mills F'raukV 

" MoareOrsonB 
olfij MorganHenryW 
sl8; Morrison \.R'& fmn 



s20 



n4 



" MorrisonRobert s8 

a2 Nc'lsonFrankG ♦Je22 

jeSlNicholsGeoF o2i) 

sl2iNde8Juliet Jy28 

HathewayClaraM Aajj Parke rJBjr sl9 

HithewayMayL sTIParsonsAveryH s2.5 

HathewaySA ASoiPeckAgnesP ol3 

IlathewayTB sl3 Phelps AgnesA jyl2 

HaydenMrsGeoP o9 PhelpsAnnieM sH 
HaydenllS&wf je7|PhelpsDEIlsworth s7 

" SarahE " PhelpsDW a17 

HaydenMrsJasL s27 PhelpsMaria s20 

HaydenKateG 6l2 PhelpsSam'lE sl9 

HaydenLG Al PhelpsTS o30 

HiginhothamEtta sl8|PhelpsWm s(i 

HiginbothatnN'llieslG PickardJoeiahH s30 

HigiabothamWG slHPooleG-SarahA a31 

A9,PrattEmmaE AlO 

sl2 RansrmRE sl8 



HodijeGeoW-RP 
Hodge MrsHM 
Ho'.combRS 
MaryM 



a30 RobertsMrsCicero olO 



RobertsDaniel a31 

HolcombeJessieF ol7 RobertsFannieW s7 

'• EifteL " IRockwoodMrsEP jy3 

HurlbiirtFH n2/' NPR-MrsKate " 

HydeAustinA s5 RothermelCR Jj6 



RothermclMinnaCjyfi 
KowlanclDS&wf oil 
SattbrdJP sti 

ijatlordMissKate s2l 
Siniou;^AD s2(» 

.Sill Mary E-AunieMA-^1 
■ VVFA 

SkirrowRob'tW 
SmithBE&wf 
SmithMiuuieD 
StrongMrsESE 
SmithSL-MG 
ThompsonLuella 
ThompsonNP 
■' Katie-JS 
ThrallEF-WA 
ThrallOW-SC 
" JosephG-ThosM " 
TourtelotteCB a24 
TiUtleRevRH&wf s21 
" AnnieE-RulieC " 



s5 
a24 
e21 

n2 
olO 

s7 
O.30 

s;7 

sS 



ConvcrseldaG jelO 
CooganEliza ol2 

CooganKD&wf Je24 
Coogau J W ol8 

CooganTC Jee 

CrowleyUJ je29 

CrowleyFannieM e29 
DexterED je20821 
DouglasBM Jy5 

DouglasJohnB s27 
DunlapMissMaryJ o9 



VibbertEL 

WebbGeo-Wm 

WelchEA-MaryJ 

Welleslda 

WhiteHTudor 

WhiteMrsHT 

WhiteNA 

WhittemoreEJ&w 6l5 

WileonGC a8 

WilsonKateC jyl2 

WINDSOR LOCKS. 

Abbe.Tobn&wf o4 

Abbe J P s20 

AdamsJII o2 

AllenMrsBR-Edithsll 
AllenSH-JS-EL s26 
Anderson WC 
BarnesMrsE 
BarrettHM 
BuniapSR 
BntlorHW 
BriscoFmnkV 
ChapmanDW 
"Fli MissesCE&RJ 
ChapmanMissHC o2.5 
ClarkMrsHH olO 

ClevelandChasF o20 
CoffinHR oil 

ConverseAW jelO 



DuulapSarati 

DuulapSC 

EastonCH 

EganKL 

FoxAnsou&wf 

FoxJ 

GogartyTF 

GradyHenry 

HaydenJH 

HellemansG 

HolcombGeoW 

HoldenHO 

HortonMrsSE 

JoyntThosP 

LowterJohn 

McAuleySM 

McNeilMissC 

MairMM 

MatherEE&vvf 

MathcrWm&wf 

MniitL'omi^rvJR 

Miirk'ssEW' 

MurlessFT-FTjr 

OutersonMrsEllen ol2 

PalmerMrsM olO 

Parson sMrs AW ol3 

PhelpsEN " 

ReedJoseph e5 

SchaeferL sl5 

SmithEdmiindR o20 

StockwellAB&wf sl2 



06 
s20 

09 
012 
s21 
s25 
je9 
626 
MlO 
si 2 
ol8 

s6 
jel6 
o25 
olO 
b27 
s21 
OlO 
s27 
oil 
s20 

o5 
sl9 



SweetlandWL 

TerrvNellieM 

VideonCS-TH 

WaldoCarlosJ 

WatrousRN 

WatrousWC 

WebbWm 

WellsJasH 

WUsonChasT 



85 
a2 

Sl5 
s27 
ol7 
s9 
s26 
a24 
All 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS. NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



263 



l^E^W KCJLVEIsr CGJJlSTmC. 



BEACON FALLS. 

BaklwinHerbertC Je9 
BondJT n8 

CoeJolmA jyll 

CoeJllliu!^C&vvf ol2 
'■ AlbertC-KollinW " 
ElkinsMrsGraceE s-29 



je21 
jelti 



GillelteGeoL 
GilletteWm 
HanisAJ 
HartJA 

LewisRW&wf 

TilleyMH-Jeunie n2 
WheelerJennieF s2ii 
WolleCL-AH jel4 
" Mri^JH 
WolleJohn je23 

BETHAM. 

BradlevJW-Ida oil 
Clarkl)N olO 

DavidsonSG je9 

DavidsonSG&wf s20 
DownsJeromeA J3'26 
" JAjr-AltaH 
Lound^biiryllE oIOnI 
LoundsburyWH jelti 
MansfieldJC ol2 

PerkinsHW-ChasCoSl 
RussellAE oil 

SperryEllenJ s20 

SperryES Jy31 

ToddStreetB olO 

WoodwardAC jel6 
M'oorhvardGW s20 
WoodwardRosaA Jyl9 
WoodwardSR-CF s22 

BRAXFORD. 

AndrewsLydia ol2 



BabcockMrfAM 


026 


BarrleyMrsLS 


o5 


Ba<jlcv?»IaryA 


a8 


BaldwinEC 


sT 


" FannieM 


" 


BaldwinGilbert 


ol3 


Baldwin JE 


012 


BaldwinJK 


o25 


" HelenG 


" 


BarkerllR 


s27 


BarkerJH 


s27 


BarkerLM 


o3 


BarkerMinnie 


n2 


BarkerRoberta 


s2) 


BarnesChasJ 


S26 


BartholomewAnna n2 


BeachDessieB 


o3 


BeachFrankE 


o3 


BeachHarrietA 


026 


BeachllW 


o2.") 


" CorncliaH 


o25 


BeacblsabelL 


oil 


Beach Jno 


OlO 


BeachPaiilD 


oil 


BeachWB 


024 


BeattieCM 


s20 


BeatticJohn 


Ju8 


BradleyRichard 


s27 


BriPtollHarrison 


o31 


BrownWH 


o20 


BiinnellBB 


s5 


BiirtonJA 


sl2 


Buskirk.TS 


sl2 


CalkinsEF 


oil 


Chid8eyBr'dry&w o24 


CoeEH 


s7 



RobinsJH&wf n9 
RogersEdwardH a22 



DanforthW'lk'rWjyl2 

DibbleRichard o27 

DudleyLucyE o4 

" MaryR " 

DudleyNC s7 

•' KateB-AS " 

DurantMaryH k2 

EadepJohn s4 

FieldGeoC-Sarah ol2 

FooteMaryJ sl4 

FooteS2<:l-HattieS o3 

FooteWalter s7 

Foot eMrs Walter o3 

ForbesMrsCV o31 

FowlerHenry o31 

FrinkMrsNC a31 

FrifbieMrsLynde o3 

GallowayJos'ieE 

GriswoldLevy s20 

HammerAE Jyl3 

HardingMP je9o26 

HarrisonMrsAB o4 

HarrisonD ol3 

HartPhilo o31 

HatchWE n3 

IlillKB-EA 05 

HoadleyChasA oil 

HoadleyEramieB oil 

HoadleyHattie o3 

HoadleyJE ol2 

HolcombMinnieB o24 

HopeonJP " 

HubbardEP o25 

HubbardHW s27 

IsbellEdwardE ol2 

KennedyJJ&wf je29 

KerrSamuel o."J 

KimberlyEdwM o4 

KimberlyFredR olO 

KimberlyJuoFifcwf n3 

" MrsCG 

LanphierFrankS s7 

LinslevIsaacB ol2 

LinsleyJA&wf jyl2 

LinslcyRJ o3 

LounsburyJ&wf o3 

" Wm " 

MasonWmR jy20 

MaynardMrsWilbiiro3 

McDermotThosS Jyl2 

" Mary- Andrew " 

MillerMrsLucyA o26 

MorrlsLewisP jyl9 

NettletonJF&wf s20 

•' Lucie " 

NicholsnenryZ&wfo4 

NicholsLJ s7 

NortonMissMary jyll 

PageEdMrD&wf 

PalmerEUenM 

"Magde '" jCookTA 

PalmerEmmaF 028! Corn wallMrsTE 

PalmerQeowf&ch o6 " >Iinnie-EdT 

PalmerHattieT ol2 CorvcllJasB jvll 

PalmerlH je22 CurtisEdgarA o4 

PalmerJG o4 DickermanAlfred o26 

ParkertonLeG&wf o3 DickormanMaryA a26 

PalmcrLouisaM o26 DoolittleEmmaC s6 

PalmerMrsME je23," JndsonA-EdgarB " 

PlantAE sO DoolittleWmH'^nryol2 

PlantMrs-EllenB m28 DunhamEP o24 

PlantEdwinC-EA ol4iElyJohnL Jy26 

PlantLW jel6 FentonJnlietteA a26 

PlantMrsWm oSGaylordFT o25 

ProntHattie sl9,GaylordFP si 

RitchieJA-Da\id N6|GaylordHenry o24 

RobertsHW jy24'Gaj'lordSD jel 



RogersHenry 


NS 


HogersLillL 


jyll 


RogersMrsWr 


jyl4 


RowlandL 


ol2 


'• AM-LW-WA 


" 


ScanlanMaryT 


jyl2 


SheldonED 


013 


ShepherdHG 


o31 


Simpsonlrwin 


"■ 


SimpsonMary 


a8 


SpencerCapt&Mrs o31 


SquireSallyA 


AlO 


VanBuskirkMrsJS sl4 


VedderEW-AG 


024 


WardStacyH 


n2 


WarrenWm 


jyi9 


WayHoratio 


013 


WavHN 


o20 


WobdDrEA 


je28 


WoodLD 


s9 


YoungC'hasA 


013 


CHESHIRE. 




AllenHS 


025 


AllenWmH 


a2o 


AtwaterAbbyL 


ol4 


AtwaterEP 


sG 


" lA-HB 


" 


AtwaterJulineL 


All 


BaldwinNcUieF 


a26 


" MaryE 


" 


BarnesWE 


s6 


BatesChasE s27o26 


BeachMrsEM 


a9 


" MaryA-LouiseW " 


" HarriettE 


" 


BeacbJosP jel4A9 


BeadleEdgar-B 


OlO 


BeersMrsPhiloS 


si 


BenhamWR 


jy7 


BoyceDJ 


is21 


BristolAlf-FannieA o9 


BrooksAlonzo&^A 


■f o6 


BrooksAS-JuliaA a19 


BrooksCA 


o30 


BrooksEllaM 


s6 


BrooksJW jel9o3 


BrooksLillieM 


jel5 


BrooksSamuelH 


Mil 


BrownER 


a30 


CapewellGeoJ 


s23 


ChatfieldMrsChas 


812 


ChatfieldLizzieB 


Mil 


" FlorencoB 


" 


" LizzieBjr 


" 


ChipmanJE 


s6 



GilletteChasS 

GriffinMift-Belle 

GuillordRH-JT 

HallFrankliuN 

HallPhilipT 

Han-yJamesH 

" JMrsJas 

HayesWaJes 

IlendereouWO 

llitchcockAngR 



0S6 

s8 

o24 

Jy6 

o4 

o24 
jy5 
024 



HolcombHenryT je9 



ChipmanTimothyL s7 
jyl8|C'larkeMissLH m20 

Ir-nnlrTA s4 

A9 



HortonMrsSJ 

HortonWmW 

HotchkissChasM 

HotchkissGeoL 

HotchkiirsMayA 

HotchkiPsWA 

InghamFredW 

Ives^Chas-GeoB 

Iveif Harrison A 

IvesTitusB 

JeraldsEdgarB 

JohnsFrankH 

jJohnsonGeoR 

IjonesMariaR 

IJuddEF 

JuddH.nryC&wf 

KeelerGeoW 

KingWm 

iMarchMrsAB 

MarchCA 

MorseGeoE 

iMorseSamuelA 

]\Iunsonlrene 

NewellOttieA 

•' MayH 

PaddockJR 

PayneTB&wf 

PeckAC 

PhillipsAW 

PierpontDW 

PineoJ 

Plumbs 

RafteryRevOH 

RiceJH 

RobertsonSarah 

Simpson WK 

SmikyAG 

SpearJolmjr 

SpearWm 

SteeleGeoA 

SmithGeoW 

StillwellJohnL 

StoddardRevJB 

" LM 

StreetGeoE 

TiltonEV 

WallaceFrankL 

WebsterMajJK 

WellsWallaceR 

WeltonRH 

WeltonS&wf 

WeltonWS 

WhiteChasII&wf Jyfi 

WickhamM.T je6 

WilliamsCW olO 

William sGeoF si 

WrightRWjr o26 

DERBY. 

AlllngLW&wf oil 
AmblerRevEC&wf s2 

" AJmira " 

BaileyHF 6l4 

BaileyNewellJ s27 

BaldwinFrankF o26 

BamesLW-CM m29 



je6 

a5 
o24 

n2 
a26 
s21 

Nl 
013 
o24 
jc9 

Nl 

n8 
822 
018 

n3 
a26 
o31 
024 
jel5 
je20o6 
ol9- 
021 

oO 
sl3 

sl4 
sl(3 
o25 

Jy29 
o2o 

JVl9 
02'. 

jel7 
olS 
026 

jyll 
jy3 
o26 
o27 
o30 
o30 

Jy26 
o25 

Jyl2 
jy20 
o30 
JV5 
o27 
s7 
o26 
ol2 



264 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENKIAL EXHIBITION. 



BassettCL je6o24 BamesWmA 

BassettMaryDH je6 Barrowslsaac 
BassettHW o5 BaseettBelle o7 

BlackmanWmW n9 BartlettEgbert&wfol7 
BradleyLB s8 BartlettET ell 

BrewsterJH&fam a15 BarrettFrankG AiJ:? 
BristolHarrietA o31 BeanGeoE 
Browne WS M2ri Begt^JnoE 

Bro\vneMrsWSM22sl3 BlackmanWB 
BushnellGeo&wf 6l3 BlairSM 
CarterDavidH&wf o2 BoultonP 
ChaniherlinGeoB s6 BradyMaryE 
ClarkOhasE-GeoBAlT BristolJA 
ClarkMrsEM m22o() BristolVVmB 
ClarkGB o24 BronsonES 

ColburnAlbertL n3 BronsonGeoS 
CulverBF&wf sl3 Bronsor.IrwluP 

CurtissCA&wf e6 BrowneWG 

DePorestHL a2 Bryan tEL-ME 

" Sterling " [BuckinghamLM 

Dodge Wm ol4 ' BuckiughamMark o2o 

DownsLA n!) " MartnaA o25 

DownsWmE o27 BuellLizzieA ol3 

DuraudFred jyll CaseAH-AlmedaM o2 

FordWmE a19 ClarkWJ m18s15 

FrenchJD s27 ClarkeEllenJ jeH 

GilbertHW AlliClemensAB&wf olti 

" LLinnie " I" JessieP 

Gilbert JM b15 ClemensPH 

GilbertLouise " CoePL-JC 

HallockP&wf s27 ColburuRR 

HickokLE oil ColemanMT 

HineDB ol2 ColemanNellieE 

HotclikissPred Je28 CotterOhasA 



ol7 

Bl4 



813 
s8 
02:3 
023 
o27 
s21 
o31 
sl8 
021 
031 

je27 
ell 



HotchkissHenryE m22 CotterLuciaH 
IlowelsaacP s8 " Nellie A 

HullSA e20 CotterMaryL 

KeefeWmH o25;CotterSA-CA 
KelladyPeter o7iC()tterMr8SA 

LeftchildChas Je5 CraueMarionW 

MacauleyJJ ol7,CraneTho9 
MarrDA o5 DavieSheldon 

Moore.Tesse o2 DoolittleJH 

MorseChasT s27 DrewPredM 
OsborneJT&wf 82|DuffChasH 
" AggieE " DurfeeM 

PinneyMrsCn jel7ol0 EgglestonEdwH 
PlattS'B ■ A7iEnisMatthewN 

PraetoriusCW eSlParrellLaurence 



KoMrsClarkN jel4 
■ JennieM-MatieB " 
0I8 



RowellL&wf 

RussellMA 

SawyerMrsHS 

" CbcW 

SherwoodMreAP 

SinimonsPrank 

SmithPH 

Smith Mary 

SperryWalter&wf slSlGowdyE 

SwiftJP 0I8 GriflinRH 



PiskAL 

PiskJA 

Freeman Jacob 

PullerMaryW 

GalpinWD&wf 

GardnerJnoB 

" AnnieL-JnoBjr 

s28 GaylordPL 

Bl5|GerringGeo 
gelGilpinChasJ 



0I6 
02:3 

Al 

je28 
Jy28 
o25 
jy7 
Jy5 

ol9 

ol4 

89 

b7 
827 
o21 

Nl 

o4 

026 
o31 
0I8 
ol9 
e22 
821 
o3 
07 
a2 
all 

S20 
031 

820 



o3 

p27Jnake?JL jyl3 

o27 IlartwellFrankE a23 

HawleyCA jcOaIO 



oil 



820 



ThacherR 

1'orranceDavid 

TownsendJnoG 

TreatMrsNC 

" Miss 

TuckerMreJN 

VorceJHowe&wf el3 

WebsterGeoS 827 

, WhitcombRevCB eO 
' " Mrs " 

WtiiteGeoH sS 

I WhitlockJno n8 IIoadleyR 

WilcoxDariue&wje29|HolbrookFtfewf 



HondryxOscar 

HillChasL 

HillMreCL 

" KittieL-LottieS 

" Josephines 

HillMA 

MillhouseJnoS 

IIoadleyPE 



YoungEdwardS 

ANSONIA. 

BaldwinMreSC 
. " AddieM 



820 
Je6 
oC 

06 

821 

a8 

811 

je28 

s20 

eSSlIIolbrookHerman 6l2 

HotchkissBerthaE o23 

|lIotchklesEri-Gco p26 

o7inotchkis8L-AE s20 

" iHotchkissHK&wf s5 



HotchkissWH&wf 85 

" EramaB " 

HotchkissMrsW oil 

JamesPredW n3 

JeromeEM oil 

JohnsonAliceS-NSolO 

JohnsouDT-SL 8l8 

JohnsonDTjr 

JohnsonEA 

JohnsonPC 

JohnsonMiseMA 

JoyWmW 

JndsonWP 

KelleyJnoWm 

KingAW 

LeachAddieM 

LeachDavidK 

LindleyAS 

LindleyMrsGeo 

•' HattieH 

LiudleyGeoS 

LindleyJuo&wf 

LindleyJnoL 

LivingstonME 

MackeyPB 

McManusRobt 

MorrisWm 

NeuschlerPred 

ParmeleeWL 

PaulAlexA 

PaulEliz-Mary 

PaulWm 

'• Margaret-Ella 

PeckElbertA 

PeckRobt 

" SarahL-MinnieE 

PembertonWM o2o 

PhelpsAlbert-HD s2o 



Al6 
o2B 

Al6 

ol4 
je2;3 



06 
825 
s2U 

66 

jyi 

jeSO 
o9 

AlO 
n9 
81 

AlU 

sl2 

01 (; 

ol7 

ol3 



Phelps NellieM 
PikeRG 
PineChasH 
PlattAnnieL 
PlattEB 
PlattMrsJC 
PrattMattieJ 
PlummerWmH 
PostAB 
PostBB 
PrindleGenevieve s29 
RedshawJG a23 

RedshawJM s28 

" SaraA -Sarah " 
RedshawSG n3 

RichardsonMrsCJ Al9 
" MasterWD " 

RoweWmS 
RyderClarenceL 
ScottSamuel 
'* Mai^aretha 
SladeMrsWR 
SmithChasR 
SmithllcnryJ&wf o9 
SmithMVirgiuia Jyl7 
SmithPhilo olO 

SmithSamlW o9 

SmithWniE o25 

SpencerllenryC s7 
SpencerWm olO 

SperryHobart&wf o9 
SplannJohn o25 

SpringEdmund&wol:i 
SpringJM s7 

SteeleChasE Je22 

SteelcC-JennetteL s7 
SteeleTrnmanB b8 
StecloV.'R 8l9 

Steinman.TII s27 

Stein manJIarthaJ s7 
StcphensouRT " 



s25 

06 

m22 

829 

017 

o2 

Jyl7 

07 

815 

0I6 



StillsonCH 


s7 


'' MarionE 


820 


StoddardJH&wf 


023 


StoddardPercyP 


o26 


StowellChae 


jeS 


TaylorJnoJ 


sG 


TerrellWales 


o9 


TerryAnnicM 


a23 


Terry AS&wf 


822 


TerryMrsMR 


025 


" Flora 


•' 


Terry Mary J 


6l5 


■' NettieL-FS 


" 


TerryWra 


o25 


TicknorPascal 


812 


TiffanyLuke 


m24 


TonilinsonGA m17a31 


TomlinsonMrsGA el8 


TuckerOhas 


s21 


TuckerRH 


je21 


WallaceChasJ 


a23 


WallaceEllenB 


Al6 


WallacePrcddie 


Al5 


WallaceJB 


Al6 


WallaceTH 


Al8 


WalshHenryT 


a24 


WcbsterAW 


Jy6 


•']\irsAW&2child 


n " 


WhitiiigBela 


je21 


WhitingJosiahH 


je23 


WhitingWW 


Al5 


WhitlockJM 


NlO 


WilliamsChasF 


sl8 


WoodTJ&wf 


OlO 


WoodrulVNellieE 


829 


WoosterLS&wf 


623 


•' Emma-Nellie 


" 



BIRMINGHAM 

AbbottMary 
AbbottSA&wf 
•' SarahE 
AllingAH 
AllingCB&vvf 
" SusieE 
AUingChasH 
AUisGC&fam 
AtwaterWmC 
BaconUanielH 
BaconJP-AnuieP o20 
BakerSR s21 

BaldwiuEN n3 

BarnardGeoS o26 

Bat^settDM a11o17 
" MrsDM-LillieM ol7 
Basset (Emily e6 

" Fannie " 

BeardslevAlice a9 
Beardsle'vDrGL&wsl9 



a9 
826 

s30 
o2 

826 
AlO 

s4 
sl2 



s20 
n8 
n9 

AlS 



ol9 
o27 

820 

Al 



BedientJH 

Beecher]\irsG 

BirdseveJW 

BirdscveTG 

•' ML-CJ 

BoiimanWV 

Bowenl-Jennie 

Brai-lcyAP 

BrettMaggieA 

" LizzieM " 

BrewstcrWmJ 88 

BtinsmadeDS-JS 88 

BrinsniadellS s6 

BrittinFL je28 

BrittinMrsEL o31 

Brush'-II-lMinnieEACO 

Chatfiol;',TIor.iceG sl8 

ChecsenianCD jeSO 

ChpesmanGW eS 

" MW 



LIST OP CONNECTICUT VISITOKS, NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



265 



ChurchDMiSiwf 

ClarkWL 

ClintonFL&wf 

CoL'BenjL 

CoeCU 

OoeJohn 

CurtisFB 

CurtisGcoE 

CurtisMarthaJ 



• CarrieC-JeiinieM 



m25 
s4 
ol8 
a24 
s20 
n9 
A24 
A26 
sl8 



CuitissMrsFW 

CurtissMrsG 

" ArtieB 

Cu8hmanEjr 

DeForestCII 

DeForestChasS 

DihbleNM 

DonnellyM 

DownsCN 

" EmmaM 

DownsDEtta 

DownsDJ&wf 

DowDsMrsNH 

" Lizzie " 

DownsMrsSarahE o9 

DowusSA jelCoU 

" LidaJ oil 

DownsWmS o20 

DrewJD&wf-Susie s4 

DuubaiirllonryWjrslO 

DuiandWP jyl'J 



PerryMilesB 

PhillipsAW 

PiersonsChasS 

PiperJW 

PiattMrsCF 

RadcliffeWW 

HeidEK 

ReillyBemard 

Rounds8&wf 

RugglesAB 

RyanDJ 

SeaveyEliza 



je25 

je29 

sl5 

6l2 

n3 

8l3 

o4 

025 

oil 

s21 

s(i 

07 



HolfordA [DudleyFrastus 

HotchkissLyman je3; Dudley GeoC 



Al5 
o25 
o5 
jeO 
s25 
Jt'K) 

ACO' 

s30 
i?15 



SespevSU-EmmaE s22 



ElmesWF 

FennRL&wf 

FltzgeraklAliceT 

FitzgeraldNellie 

" MaryE 

Fitzpa'trickEliza 

FrencliJD 

FulleiLutherTH 

GaiiiesMary 

GardnerSM 

" MaryF-RobtS 

GloverAB-EUaB 

GouldAlex 

GrayMattie 

HawxhurstCE 

HerrickCE 

lioiipenGeoR 

HowellGeoL 

HoytDB 

HubbardJC 

HubbellDA-M 

" VeronaM 

HubbellRH 

IIullCJ 

IlullCarrie 

KaneElizS 

KeefeEdwin 

LattinJohnR 

Lewis('W 

LewisElIa-Levi 

LinsburgWH&wf g21 

JIalletteLauraE ol2 

MavAliceE jel5 

MayRobt s26 

McEnemeyH&wf 827 



a22 
o2 

Al 

818 

S28 

All 

a!»1 
n4 
s6 

s14 
n9 
s30 
Jy4 
a21 
s2-> 
je6 
o2(i| 
n9' 
012 

k9 

Nl 

a9 
ol7 
Nl 
n3 

s27 
sl3 



SheltonEN 

SlieltonDrGA 

SheltoiiMrsEH 

" MissesL&A 

SheltonMrsGA 

SheltonWA 

SmithClarenceA jyl2 

" EKverett-ES 

SmithFH jy25 

SmithJosephineC s8 

SmithMrfWmW o24 

SpragueCA-SM 

SpragiieEzra 

SprineAda 

StanleyMrsJB 

" NellieJ 

StanleyMary 

SterlingCF 

SumraersGeoC 

SumnereJennieM a21 

SumniersSN m27 

TomlinsonJoseph ol9 

" AnnieTF " 

TownsendMiesC je30 

TuckerEklridgeR n1 

WakeleeAliceB 

WalshCclia 

WarncyPiiscella 

VVarringMrsHF 

Wheeli'VlIorace 

Wheek'rLewiir^J 

WhippleHenryS 

WhitworthEdw 

WiseMrsJM 

WiseJamepN 



jeS 

All 

je6 

Allo5 
je24 



s21 
n2 
o4 
o5 

a9 
je29 
m31 



Mai lory MrsDD jel4 

" MrsWillard " 
MeachaniMrsRol)tH87 

M orris JuliusH a24 

PardeeGeoW 6l2 

PriestGeoH s29 

RoodClintonD s8 

RussellGeorgia oO 

ShannonJE&wf jy2S 

ShannonOEvans jy5 
Shannon Wll&wf o]3 

SmithAK m31 

SniithLeonardB sl2 
Smith Lester 



SteppMissLouisa 

StreetMrsAug 

'• LottieE 

StreetClifford 

'StrectFredB 

StreetSamUH 



ol7 
o2 
810 

s6 
822 
s22 



StreetThaddeus&wl'sti 



ThompsonJW 
ThompsonLC 
" Julia 
Wilfordlda 
WoodfordCE 

GIJILFOBD 

BanksGeoW 
BarkerC'hasA 



tj8 
a24 



827 
622 



Jy31 



o4 
s27 
01 (i 
o2S 
Je2;j 

Al7 

jyl7 
sll 

on 

o24 



DudleyllenryN 
DudleyJame?A 
DuilleyKateM 
DudleyMaggieC 
DudleyRC 
DudleyWmR 
EliotWmH 
ElliottJS 
EUiottLR-Fan'ieMoll 
" LizzicA-Edward " 
FooteMissEE jel 

FooteMrsGA sl3 

" LillyG 

FootoHH ol2 

FooteLlWT[LtAty]s6 
FowlerArthurS kB 
FowlerGL-MaryL o28 
Fowler.Ioel " 

FowlerThopL 6l5 

FowlerWallaceG aKI 
GilletteEM[LtAty] s5 
GladwinSE-SarahJ k2 



GoldsmithJohuC 
GoldsmithJD t8 

[LtAty] 
GoldsmithJM fS 

GravesEliza oil 

GriswoldChas&wf i-7 
GriswoldClaudeA 
GriswoldCJ 



bniGrii^wcklGeoL 
BartholomewJohn ASOlGriswoldSam'U 
BartlettCO-AmyF oSiGrosvenorJnoW 



012 
o7 
825 
sl5 

n9 

Nl 

sl3 

Al9 

ol9 

828 

WooeterWmB&wf o3 

EAST HAVEN. 

AndrewsFrancisR olO 
AndrewsLeonard n2 
AndrewsTimothy o24 

- • s27 

n9 

8lS 



0l9 



je9 



MillerWinE 
MooreFrank 
MorseHD&wf 
NelsonThosA 

" CM-WillieA •' 

" CaddieH " 

NettletonMrsCH o25 
NettletonFannieA 622 

NorcrossMinnie o4 

NorcropsWH o20 

OsbomHelene p4 

PeckEW-AnnaA o2fi 

PerryMreFG o5 



o5 

Bl3 

821 

je26 



AndrewsSusie 

AiidrewsSWF 

AttwoodJ 

BradleyEdwin 

BradlevMrsS 

" Nellies 

BrainardJE 

BrainardMC 

BurroughsOP 

FabriqueAsaL 

ForbesMrsAW n2 

ForbesFredA jy5 

ForbesFB s25n3 

ForbesITudPonB sl5 

ForbesLizzieA 

FosterAW 

FowlerC 

GerrishWIT 

GoodricbEC 

GrannisEdwin 

IlemincovayCT 

HemmingwavHA 



HeminarwayLillieEoll 
" LottieA " 

Hemingways o24 

5 



BartlettEW 

BartlettEdwS 

BartlettFannieC 

BartlettSophiaM 

BeecherFBJ 

BeersL 

BennettLT 

" MrsWB 

BentonDN&wf 

•' IdaE 

BentonHL-MrsEliz n1 



NlO ' GrosvenorSimeonE 



e4 
s4 



BcutonJL 

BeutonWH 

BentojiWR 

Bif'hopCliftbrd 

Bii^hopEvaS 

BrewerAG 

BurgisFannieL 

CanipHA 

CarterDD 

CoanGraceE 

CoanMrsLydiaE 

ChittendenCJ 

ChittfndenGeoH 

" Dudlev-WmE 

" Fred-Wn)H 

CbittendenHD 

Cl'.ittendcnllS 



ol2:HallGH k9 

024:HillAliceE «.3 

ASiHinckleyGeoW a23 
o2 HubbardJobnB 819 
oSlHubbardMissMS fC8 
820 HubbardSamuelG slU 
" iHullAG M10822 

HullUenry si.^ 

HullMLT 8£2 

HuntllattieL jc7 

o27 " RobtN 
k3 HuntKateE je7K2 
o2S JacksouA-JaneA oil 
Kelirey WD [LtAty] s« 



827 



o31 KimberlyAS 
sHtiKimberlyEli 
jy21 iLandoiiEd\vR-PC 

A9'LandonTH&f'am 
o25 LeeJafE-EdwM 

A3 LccLtWH [LtAty] 

K8|LeeteChaf^F 

04iLeeti'P"dwinA 
s27;LceteEW 

" JLeetcKatie 

" ILeetcGilbortW 
826!LeeteHcnn'W 

o3iLcetcMrs,lF 



619 

814 

o6 
012 
o]9 

f^6 

Nl 
Oltt 
819 
Nl 
s5 

819 

o25 

Nl 

o2 

Nl 

n9 



( hittendonSD&wf 825 LecteLibbieM 
Chittenden.TiioD c6;" REuiton 
CookMrsJIl-FanniesgLeeteNF 
CookRolandC ol8 LeeteSW 

CurtissWmB N3|LoperCIaraC 

DavisCH[SerLtAty]s5l]McGecJS-MreME Je7 
DavisJP f27iMasorEB a2S 

I)avTheoL<Srwf b92 MorscFH 86 

DeLaVergneHS o4;NettletonAnnaA 827 
DouglassMrsMaric slO'NettletonEL o£5 

Do^fdJuliuBA&wf o24JNortonMrpAE f6 

DowdMC je29['- lolandB 

DowdQuinceyL jylsiNortonElouineC k1 
DrakeFA o25iNortonIIF&wf 8l9 

DudleyBaldwinC o31 1" Ant-on&wf "■ 

Dudley ElviraP A28PageJC[SerLtAty] s5 



266 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



oil 



PalmerFannieE 

ParkerMist'hasi; 

ParkerSarahJ 

ParmelebaraliA '" 

ParmeleeWlI o27 

Pendletonlljr&wf s7 

PotterWilbertH 62t 

ReynoldsGP n1 

RobinsouHenryP Jed2 

RobinsonMary<J MlQ 

RossiterBiiiij o27 

RossiterEP s5 

RossiterJohn AlG 

" AdelineP'rances " 

RossiterLC-Mrs 

" FW-WP 

SageC'.araT 

SewardAliceE 

" FanaieL 

SewardAmos 

SewardGeoM 

SewardGeoW 

SewardllattieE 

SewardSE 

SevvardWniL 

ShepardMH 

SpencerDanielR 

SpencerGB&vvf 

" C&wf 

SpencerHW 

SpencerM rsH"nryRsl9 

StarrRW[SurLtAty]s5 

Stone WL-MrsLC oil 

StoneMA 

StoneSamiielL 

TalcottAlvan 

ThrallL[LtAty] 

TattleMrsLucyE 

WatrousGeo 

WedmoreHenryS st9 

WilsonAnnieJ oil 

WilsonRevJohnS oOli 

WoodwardJuliaB jel2 

WoodruffRH s4 

HAMDEN. 

AllenGeoH&wf ol3 



NO'IvesWillie je23 

NS'ivesMrsUennisD AlO 



sl5 
n9 

827 

Nl 

s4 
Al7 
Jy3 
026 
a25 
ol3 
sl9 

sl4 



m29 
a24 
017 

84 
815 

s7 



BarberLH 

BarberWatPon 

BassettLH-CM 

BenedictChasP m31!«28 

BradleyElizaM o2' 

BurleighLouise oil 

CadwellWW-GH ol 

ClarkHiram 

ClarkHD 

CoUettPredJ 

CollettFIenryW 

CollettMrsHW 

" JosieA 

CooperDH&wf 

CosgroveGeoA 

CurtissMr^iCJ 



Ive8das&w-HernMs20 

LeekNellieA a30 

•• AbbieM 

LeekNormanG 

MauiiWmS 

iVlauserLuther 

•• Mary 

Meist-iugerCP 

MixArthurH 

MorseCbasS 

MiinsonHenry 

OsboruJohnifcwf 

OsbornWmA 

OsbomMrsWmA 

ParmenterSD 



bl2 
n:1 



Al5 
s29 



PalmiterliileyR je9828 



MrsRileyR 
PondirJR 
SandersonJH 
SaufordAmosA 
SanfordDS 
SanfordEdwD 
SmithAH&wf 
SinithPMD 
SmithMrstlra 
" NettieJ 
SmithJohnT 
SmithSidneyB 
SwiftED&wf 
SwiftJuliaM 
SwiftLizzie-EE 
TreadwellOP 
WaruerHB-Fr'nci8o25 
WarnerHenry-Julia " 
WebbJamesJ s21 

WebsterJF n2 

WilliamsFrank ol8 
WoodingBC&wf " 
WoodingBurtonH o30 
WoodingMrsM Nl 

MADISON. 

BartlettFrank n3 



IluIlCarrieP 
HuulerWinBjr 
JoliiieouCbasL 
JohiisuiiGraoeH 
LeeTuiiotliyJ 
Lyoul' ioieuce 
MeigslluDryJ-DanDo3 
•' Cyiitliiau '• 

" AoigadS " 

MeigjoK SI2I 

MeigsiVlS 8l2ul9 

MeigsMrsSV n2 

Moudy.VU'sEdgar ns 
MuiigerEmmaLi a1 
MuugurGeo Je2y 

MuugerMyronH sa 
NealetouJC n2 

NeltletouAlir\'mLje;;3 
NortouUeiiiyS o24 
JMortouNA 

PinneyMrsRL el 

RcdtieklCH-EllisB sl4 
RedtteldOswinU t^5 
Scrantor.JSamuel o2(J 
ScrautonS Arthur si 2 



BeebeCS 
BishopChasE 
BlatchleyAM 

BlatchleyEP s5 

BlatchleyNobleS a30 
BristolWashington n3 

CarrChas o2 

CUittendenSH jel4 

ChittendenWF olO 

CoeFW sl5 

012 ComstockCM Jy26 

017 CramptonFB o3 
o3tCramptonKittieB a28 

018 Curtis A s2« 
" iDayFrankW 

023 DowdES^apR 



Bis^hopTVIaryA kO 

lilielutD jyi.i 

BolgerTimothyD a15 
Boole VVEr sti 

Boole VVH jylo 

Boweiiiienry s»J 

BradleyAE&wf si2 
BrucilcyEK A^stt 

i.radluyJnoA&wf old 
Bradley lU.J olsi 

BraiiuaaMri^MaryJ s8 
BrauiariiAnvi' S{i 

BrirlerMark o24 

BroderickKevTW a2 
Brook^JerusihaC o31 
BrookriM 8b 

Biilkk-yWmN Jyl9 
ButlerJ&wi-Flora stt 
ButlerMrsLevi s27 
ButlerWOLCorCoI] sti 
CadyEdwiu&wf jel9 
CaiiipSM[(JorCoI] s4 
CarpeiiterllC&wl' jy8 



ScrautonTil 


o4 


•' MrsSusaiiR 


" 


ShelleyChasE 


o3 


SmithG 


o31 


SmithWilburP 


812 


StoneAL 


s27 


WaydellKateE 


0I8 


WhedonWF-GE 


je22 


WilcoxFrankF 


n8 


WilcoxHenrvB 


n9 


" MA&w-NaucyS " 


WilcoxJewett 


a2S 


WillardHoratio 


821 


MEBIDEN. 




AllenGeoW&lady jy3 


AllenJP 


n9 


AUenMrsLevi 


sl3 


AlhvorthGeo 


f4 


AndrewsCarrieC 


Je24 


AtkinsJasH 


027 


AnbreyWmH 


s8 


AngurMrsMC 


S27 


Bacon EbenW 


a9 


BaconAlbert 


o7 


BaconMrsNPW 


ol9 


BakerEIlisB&wf 


825 


BaklwinNellieF 


n6 



BallEH-MariettaE 828 



BallouAIiceA 
BarkerFrank 
BassettEF&wf 
BassettHD&wf 
BauerLouipF 
A2;BeacbFraukM 
o24|BeachGeoA 



a31 iDowdFC-Lnuisen sl2iBeachIdaMay 



828:DowdFredT 
DickormanSmilyE o(i DowdJH&wf 
DickerinaiiLizzie n9 " MrsES-MrsAM 
Dool.ttleAJ 821 Dudl -yBT 

" MrsAmarillis " iDudlevSherman 
DoolittleEA o23,FieklEdE 

BuckworthJas je20s20i FieldGeoC 
ElyJL A25iGriswoldPM 

GilbertSE s6 Grii^woldSamuel 

GoodyearAlfred " jllartSJ 
" MabelR-Scymour " Hart WW 
GoodvoarMrsE otj HavensRGD 

" WillieH " IlillChasF 

IlenrvJT-MrsEB 821 IlillHenryS-JoelM 
HnmirttonOW ol7 HillHoraceO 
" KatioF '• iIIiU.TosephH 

IvesMrsAM je23 HullBA 



o2«lBpckett.jn&wf 
n8 BcckettJT 



8fi 
s29 

n2 
a30 
021 

o3 

031 

822 

Je23 



B('ldcii.TasE(s8)JL a29 



Al5 BeldeiiJasG 
85 BeldenMaryH 
o3:BellAE 
s12!Bc'11EA-EF 
olOiBeiiedictCC 



o30 

s8 



s27 
010 



je9 " EllfnD 

o9 BillardJnoD jel4 

026 " MrsJnoL 

s21 BinghamCE o25 

812 " Aletha 

88|BlispMercyC o23 

s'i;BirdsevMissAM o20 
'• lBirdseyEC(.Te7)&w827 

o3 Birdt^eyLesterH je27 



CarterAA 

CarterFraucis 

" Ellen 

CarriorFH 

CaswellGeo 

ChalkerMrsMM 

ChapinJIrsGGale ol9 

ChapinMaryA o5 

OhapmaiiFrankE jyl 

ChurchAR&w'f 821 

ClarkRn jel4 

ChnrchWT 

ClarkEB 

ClarkllS 

ClarkeWmP&lady 8l2 

CoanJas 620 

CooRussell o25 

CollinsBW s6 

CollinsRJ s5 

CohinMrsTiinothy820 

CoiinerFP a1.> 

CookChasH n2 

Co\vlc8EB(s28)&wje22 



sU 
n6 

020 

85 

820 



820 
o5 

Sl9 



CovleHG 

CriiiseC 

CnrtisAggieD 

CurtisGeoM 

CurtisLJ 

CurtisRW 

CurtisMrsRn-Celiao4 

CurtisWmA olO 

" Adeline-MarthaH" 

CurtissMrsAW ol9 

CurtissGW&wf A21 

DamstaedtC 

" Cjr 

DavisDrChasnS 

DooIittleGeoA 

DowuintrGenO 

DnstonChasE 

EdgertonFC 

EdwardsFrankG 

Emmon-MaryLH a31 

EptrickerTheo Jyl2 

" Amelia 

EvansJno 

EvansRobt 

EvartsEmmaL 

FayFrankS 

FavGeoA 

FlintGeoE 

Fo8ketCha8C&wf p27 

•' Marie 827 

FosketDeliaA e28 

Fo8terFS ol9 

FosterNancy 8l3 



jy4 
n9 
n6 

je27 
06 

827 



O30 

o20 

o23 

07 

je32 

AS 

a2 



p5 

821 
NlO 

a4 

826 

je22 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



267 



FrenchJosR o20 

(jil Geo sli» 

GillMaryAM kU 

Goldeu.MrsKugene s-2V 
Grai,^anli-Maiia i^l-^ 
(jiruenejVIrtjL»eliaEje:^*j 
HaaelieuryW s:il 

llai^'ijenyHF slO 

HailAUie o5 

HaUKevAH&w' o20 
HallHattieL o27 

liallJuoP-ldaJ o4 
HailLliurtou je27 

llallNflboOifewf o2li 
HallPhilo-li o2't 

liallSethJ&wf sib 
HartEB-Eliza sS 

HartlvesW s8 

HarveyHB o4 

*• EmilieM 
HathavvayKA s6 

HawkinsWE o21 

HigleyGeoE oo 

HigleyMrsMaryA sS 
HiusdaleJasC&wf sl9 
HitchcockHS&wf s2U 
HitchcockWE je2; 
HeatonChas n9 

HolmegGeoB sl9 

HoltJL jylS 

HoimhEmilyL o~ 

HowardCS ell 

HowellSarahM el4 
HuginsDwightC o27 
InghnmJE a21 

IsbellRLee s6 

IvesAJ olO 

IvesE&wf jel6 

IvesElizaJ je;M 

Ivei#FrankT&wf 06 
IvesJno je20 

IvesMrsJno s(i 

" MifsHW 

IveeJnlinsI o5 

IvesLelandH sO 

IvesOthnfl-FannyolO 
JonesWP-HM jy4 
KelleyHenry je30 

KelseyBP 820 

KelseyEA&wf jel 
KenneyMaryE n9 
KimbaUMJ o27 

KingpleyCK&wf s8 
KingsleyWH je22 
KinneCC o3 

KirtlandCP&wf s21 
KirtlandJF o24 

KirtlandJH p19 

LandfearEA ol2 

LaneJN[SrCoI2Rt] s6 
LarkinsHenry s21 
LawrenceAB o25 

LawrenceAS s21o25 
" Mrs A o25 

LeamedCha6Hjel2ol8 
LeVaughnNellieM s26 
LeeThankfnlF 0I8 
LeeWmWallace el9 
LewisSamuelC sl5 
LewisWm sl4 

LinsleyMG-WF a30 
LombraMC el9 

LounsbnryO oil 

LowreyHR n8 

LucasSeymonrW n9 
LymanThosU s8 

MarkhamAC&wf jel4 
MarkhamFG a15 

" Nellie 



:.Ia?onArrsCS Jcl7 
MatherUMLCorColJt^d 
McformackJil k9 
WcKayVVK aIj 

McLcauGA[SerCol]^(; 
MernamGcol. <twt' t~7 
McrriamMrt-SM JcKj 
Milet^JMrsA s27 

MilesMreJW eu 

Mik-sl'A s2(i 

AlilesWallaceA&wf £9 
MillerCX) s25 

MilloiEB-En o4 

.MillcTEG[CorCoI] s4 
MillciEIl Nl 

MilierEddieH s8 

■' Louisa " 

MillerRichard olO 
MinchinWmH sl9 

MoileyWB jy3 

MurdockGeoB s27 
" MissME e27 

MicliolsFS[CorCoI] s4 
NickereonDrN je7 
NorcottR-AlrsMM Jt;5 
O'BrienThopP 627 
OughtouRobt jy2o 
PaddockMrsCL o4 
PaddockJ&wf s6 

PaddockJuoM o3 

PaddockSaiahH a4 
" FannieE " 

PalnierRA[SerCoI] f4 
PardeeDEdwin > ~ 
PaikerChas&vvf otj 
•' MissAD-DW 
PaikerCE o3 

ParkerEvaF s2(j 

ParkiuEG Jyl3 

ParkerMrsGeoW o4 
■• MrsJno " 

ParkerSOlin sfi 

ParkerWmD Al8 

ParmeleeMrsRA s3 
PattersonHC&wf g23 
PeaseEmmaS AlO 

PeckHS s7 

PeltonWmA 620 

PendexterAW o24 
" AnnaE " 

PendletonRP o4 

PepperEG sl8 

Parkin sCM s20 

PerkinsCR s23 

PerkingEJ-JM Nl7 
PerkinsH jy4 

Perkins JC Jyl9 

PerkinsRB o20 

PerkinsWH&lady o2t5 
PorterJas-Anna n1 
PorterSC s6 

PorterWD o25 

PotterL jy4 

PrattGeoE Jy27 

PrattMrsHoraceH je5 
ProudmanFD a22 

ProudmanJD-SW o '. 
ProudmanSTifewf o3 
ProudmanWm n2 
PutmanMH Jyl3 

RebstockCP Je27 

RebstockJulius ol3 
RedfieklMrsJasA s20 
RedfieldJE p21 

ReedWmA o30 

" MissMD 

RiceMrsEliz a4 

RobertsAnnE o25 
RoberteAW o4 



RootAmos-MaryS s20' 
liowdoiiGeo o24 

RiissellMr&Iady s9 
RustTS[CoiCol] s4 
.SawyerGA&wf 0I8 
yawyerLL&wf Je2l 
ScottMaryE o27 

alackWmll jy3 

SlateChasC s8 

SmilcySE A28 

SmithALScrCoI] s4 
SmitliFL)[SerCoI] " 
SmithSamuelD nIO 
SoutlnvickUF-FTjy28 
SpencerThos sl4 

StauuardEVV oti 

btarkeyEA sU 

SteveubAL&lady o4 
TaftCP oU 

TibbalsGG Mlo 

TliomasEN sO 

ThompsonES Jyl3 
TilleyEHLCorCoI] s4 
TiukerVVniAjr o3 

TookerWW 62G 

TreatAS o4 

TrueRevEO&wf eCG 
TwissBClifford AlO 
TwissFannieL oil 
TwissWC&wf olO 
XenionGeoT a3 

WiiniockJC Jyl2 

WatcrmanAR sS 

" AB[GHG1 
Wetmo! eMrsGeoW o4 
WetmoreMattieS ol2 
■' JuliaM 
WheelerGH ■ s2 

WilcoxBC s5 

WilcoxMrsBC a9 

" Emily-AnnieN 
" WmH 
M'ilcoxMrsCarlos s20 
WilcoxDC&wf 020 
WilcoxMrsEE 0I8 
WilcoxJJ 06 

WilcoxNormanT s3« 
" EN 

WilcoxWE&wf o4 
WilliamsFrankO jelO 
WilliamsJasH&wfsSl 
WilliamsRues'l&woSl 
" Jennie " 

WoodsDavid n6 

" EddieH 
WoodLtHB[CoI] s6 
WoodNorman&wf s(i 
YaleFredL-FrankEoG 
YaleHA&wf s8 

YaleMrsLevi s27 

YaleLB n2 

YaleSHW&wf a4 

WEST MERIDEN. 

AllisFH jyl8 

AlexanderMrsT o2() 
AllenCarrieJ-Ed'icA31 
AllenJP jyl 

AUenLewis 64 

AmblerEII&wf s6 
AndrewsEmmaC n8 
AndrewsLauraA o31 
AndruBFrankG s6 
AngenN s27 

AtfiinsChasT o31 

Aubrey WH[CoI2d] s4 
AngtirMrs.Tulius ol9 
AugiirLillieD je21 
AugurSarahE 0I6 



e5 
019 



AugurWmH 
AustinAE 

" Florence " 

AnstiiiRuthBC 0I8 

AveryThosE s6 

Avery WE " 

BabbAlbert e5 

BaileyNN sl9 
BaileyTF 

BakhviuJII n7 

BaldwiuSarahN s28 
BallRR je6828; 

BarioFL o28 

BarioJohnH sl5 

" AddieCS " 

BarkcrChasC o7 1 
Bart'lomewWW&wsS 

BartlettAL 620 1 

BartletlGeoA n3 

BartlettJM&wf o4 

Barton Jnojr o28 , 

" EmmaJG " ] 

CassettLiicyL s6 

BeachJC&wf " ) 

BeadleGeoC sl8 

BenhamWE&wf Je21 

" MaryJ " 

BentleyH a24' 

BevinsLeGrand Jy6 

BillardJohnL n4 

BinghamSethD m30 

BishopJ&wf 6l4 

BishopMaryA n8 
BlakeWmJ 

BloomfieldD n6 

BloomfleldG o25 
BoardmanAR&wf n9 
BoardmanEA&wf s27 

BockinsGeoK jyO 

BoothMrsEliB n8 
BoothJohuC[CoI2d]s4 

Bourne Joseph jylS 

BowmanRobt M13 

BrackcttlMrsH o25 

BracilcyHattieE a25 

" GcrtrudeE " 

BradlcyLucyM a25 

BradlcyNL jel 

BradleyWniA n3 

BradlcyWH k4 

BradishawArthur sl4 

BrainardCarlos s21 

BreckenridgeAC ett 

BreckeuridgeEK " 
Brcckenr'geJH&wo25 
" Willie 

BreckenridgeLM ol2 
BreckenridgeRM 0I6 

BrewsterMrsM je23 

BronsouSO[CoI] 64 

BrooksMaryB s26 

BiowuDJ o23 

BrownFV o28 

BrowuJW oil 

BrownLC&wf ol3 

BrnnellA 627 

BngbcvEmmaF o5 

BiiunellMrsDW 019 

BurnsSA&wf je8 

BurroughsDC y5 

BushnellH 827 
ButlerAaronC Mllsl4 

Butlerlsaac&wf 627 
" Allies 

ButlerMrsJoelJ ol4 

" Mrs John " 
BntlerPhilipA&wfolS 

BntlfrThosP jyG 

ButlerWE Jyl8 



268 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION, 



ByxbeeMrsFrank o26'DnncanCarrieC 
'• Mary " jDurfeeCB 

ByxbeeFM s4'DutcherCW&wf 

[FifeMajor2dRegt] iDwyerJasO 
ByxbeeCaptTLCoI] s4iEai*tonWalterR 



ButzerJC 


ot; 


CahillCW 


s7 


Cahill Patrick 


018 


CampAE&wf 


06 


CiimpNH 


n3 


CampMr-NH 


je38 


Cartei-FraukJ 


sll 


CasperChas jel.jyll 


CasperP-Louia 


jyil 


CitliiiMrsAD 


jeS 


CatlinDrBH je8^7\ 


Catlinllorace 


s21 


(;atliiiWH&wf 


jeS 


ChaffeeFB 


s6 


ChalkerCE 


s9 


Oli'ilkorLR-WH 


Al5 


ChilverMrsMM 


021 


*■ iMissEL, 


" 


ChalkerWJ 


Si 4 


" ChasH 


Pl4 


ChamberrnAjrje3is2r | 


" MrsAjr 


•' 


ChapinJH jc 


2!)o5 


Charlton-JH 


o3 


Chris tesenR 


All 


" Margaret E 


" 


ChurcliGeoA&wf 


Al5 


ChurchSO 


m8() 


ChurchWT 


slO 


CinqainiP 


s2 


ClarkGeoE 


027 


" Nellia\ 


" 


ClarkGeoL&wf 


o31 


Clark Laura 


o>5 


Clark MrsLyman 


o30 


Clark MissNellieJ 


n3 


CoeLE-MrsSPH 


a22 


ConcannonP 


jyl2 


ConverseJH&wf 


ol7 


CookCiiloeE 


n4 


" SarahE 


" 


CookJRjr&wf 


je8 


CooperWilburO 


je23 


CortisiFA 


821 


CouchGW&wf 


80 


" MaryA 


" 


CowlesMrsJB 


n8 


CrainptonGeoD 


sl4 


CurtisGeoR jeSTNfi 


" MruGeoR 


o(i 


CurtisJamesA 


020 


" MrsTasA 


ol5 


CurtissWS&wf 


023 


DaintonSamuel 


S20 


DavisMrsTF 


p5 


" Mrr-CtTS-JuliaM " 


DavisWilburF&wf s8 


DaytonChasE[CoI] s6 


Dean AW 


024 


DelevanThosH 


o2R 


DenisionMrsAB 


o25 


DenisonChaaC 


" 


DerbyFB-AliceH 


o3 


I)ickin9onWm[Con s4 


DoddChasT 


s8 


DonaboeDJ 


819 


DoolittI«l5Jjr m31s12 


" MrsE.Iir 


812 


DowdME&wf 


n3 


DowdZE&wf 


• of) 


Drys^daleJW 


a23 


DrysdaleKateE 


a21 


DiTysdaleWm 


a22 



EatonLF 
EdgertonLP 
EdgertonMrsLP 
EkniarkFrank&wf jy7 
EHsbreeGeoL oil 

EvartsPrankP Mil 
EvartsJA jelO 

EverettProfEB&wfs27 

Mary \ o24 

FairchildHE 

GcoW 
FalesCII&wf 
FayMrsGeo 
FayLeMN&wf 
FayLorenzo 
FasyCR 
FennWI-AH 
FisherCliristian 
PiakCII&wf-Loiils 
HMtchDrPJ&wf 
Flan8burghP[CoI] 
FlotoChasL&wf 
FooteGB&wf 
PooteJohnJ 
FooteMrsNA 
ForbesHM&wf 
PorbesML&wf 
FoaterAlbert 
FostcrCN 
PoBterHarvey 
FosterHiram 
PosterWmll 
FrancisMrsGW 
FrancisHiram 
FraucisNellie 
FreemantleChas 
Freeman tleJohnC Jv5 



88 
819 

jy3 

sl9 

!S14 

06 
o2f. 

87 

jy5 
o5 
827 
ol3 

821 

Je2:3 



013 

All 



DrysdaleMrsW-JM " 



8™l 

jy'< 



019 

M29 
A4 

Sl'i 
8l2 

820 
021 
o24 
jy5 
sl4 
o26 
s20 
nil 
Jy3 
814 



GriswoldNF 
Grlh'WoldTP 
GroganHiigli 
GuyJoelH 
HaggerlyDA 
I!aleHW&wf 
HaleLovett 
IlaleWmH 
HallED&wf 
ZerlineL 
HallFM&wf 



Al7 KentSW 0IO 

o25 KinderMayG Jy28 
87 KingCA&wf s22 

je6 KiuiieMrsMaryA 826 
a14 KintzJoseph je27 

ol7 KintzMrsJoseph ]n18 



n4 KintzP 

o20 KirtlandWJ 

oSOKlocklrvingB 

" IKlockMrslB 

s6 KlockMrsL 



84 Koorcraan John 
s28;KomGeoW 
s20:LakeCH-NettieA 



HarnianJM[CorCoI]s() KnightHiramE 
HarrisRichardA 
HartWilber 
IlarveyAUeiiW 
HarveyWH&wf 8l 
HatchGeoE n6 

HatchLizzieS-CB .Tel7 
Hathaway Fan'eJPA25 
HathewayKS-CH s8 
HathaAvayWB s6 

HaydnHU oSC 

IlayosT-Jas-Jno jy4 
HazardEmersonW sl4 
Hc'inemanChasJ jy5 
HemmerichU jylO 
IlicksAlbert&wf n3 
HicksRatcIiffe sl9 
" MissesEM&MH " 
HigbyFA o30 

Hi^l Rowland Jv27 

HindsMrsSA Je22 

HinmanAF ol7 

HinmanFE&wf jelC 
HinmanNelsonP jelO 



820 
sl9 
s26 
019 
06 
s20 
Jy8 
s5 
n3 
jyM 
jylii 
slT 
jy5 
slO 



FrcnchMrsAA 

FrenchCII 

FrenchDavid 

FiirnissE 

FurnissEdward 

" Harry- Albert 

"• Clara 

GaffneyJas 

GallagerChasS 

GardnerWC 

Garvey Patrick 

GayMissEmma 

GayGeo 

GaylordWB 

GeislerLF 

GibbaJohnW 

GillJF 

GladwinGA 

GladwinRS 

GoodrichCE 

GoodrichEA 

GoodwillGeoM 

GoodwillWm&wf olfi 

GlockChas-TheoHASO 

Graham WmF&wf 

" WillieFjr 

GravesAM Jy6 

GrayDrGH s25 

Green JF&wf si 9 

GreenMraLW 89 

GreeneFW&wf o20 

GreeneWmR[CoI] 94 

QretherChas " 

GrifflnFlora s20 

OriswoldCS o31 

GriswoWFB a80 

GriswoldNA 68 



HinmanRosaE 

IlirschfeldF 

HollandChasP 

HollisterJH 

HoltJL 

IlomauW 

HomanWC&wf 

HoplerWm 

HorningHM 

HortonChasE 

HotchkissGerard 

HoughMissER 

HoughJasW 

HowardCO 

IIubbardllE 

HubbardWalter 

HullAlex 

HullGsearR 

HnllPEthan 

HullRS 

HuntcrAndrcw 

HyattlsnacB 

IlieThcoF 

InghamE-Nellie 

IvesAC 

IvesChasP 

IvesEVB 

JeflfreyGS 

•' MarthaA 

JepsonJohn 

JohnsonAlTred 

JohnsonCC 

JohnsonMrBjno 



s2fi 

s25 

je31 

o4 

Jyl6 

je21 

jel2 

o3 

Jy28 

jel2 

88 

827 
017 

n4 
je24 

n3 
jyl4 

NlO 

o21 
jyl2 
0I8 
Jy26 
jyl5 
027 
sl9 
025 

MlO 

S8 
819 

m25 



LambJohnH 
LaneTF 
LaneWF&wf 
LangJohnF 
LangawaldFA 
LawtouLymanT je20 
LeavensThos 8l5 

LeviMrsNC-HenryBsB 
LewisGeoF 821 

LewisHenryJ o30 

LewisJC Je22 

LewisWilburA s20 
LewthwaiteMrsE s2t 
LightfootJosW a27 
LinesHWales m31o23 
LiucsMrsSarahC o23 
LinsleyCF Jel 

LinsleyMrsChasF 8l2 
LinsleylW o27 

LinsleyJW n5 

LinsleyMrsNA o27 

HattieA-FannieT" 
LinpleyR 88 

LinsleyTH a29 

LittleSB Je3 

LockSainuel jy8 

LohmanG ooO 

LjTnanWW&wf Jel6 
LyonCL ol7 

LyonGeoW n4 

MackeyLt JRjr[CoI] s4 
MackoyWmK sl9 

MalleyEG s7 

MansurChapH jy22 
ManwaringEdgarC n1 
MarehallWm&wf je26 
MatherAB Jy4 

MatherHM[CoI] e4 
MathewsWmS 
MaynesEdw nA 
MaynesMaryC 
" KateN 
McCarthyOliver 
McCleanGAfCoI] 
McElneyWniB 
McGrathTH 



JohnstoneHector aKj 



JonesAH 

JonesWalter 

KaffrothTB 

KavI?aac[CoI] 

Kay.JasT[CoI] 

KavMrr-JasT 

KeilyRobertC 

KelpeyWmA 

KendiickHH 



jy3 
jy5 
olC 

88 

s4n10 

NlO 

Jy5 
jel 
03 



KenneyCC-ClintonslS 



823 

jy5 
a9 



n2 

84 
A3 

Jy27 

McKen8ieTn&wf jel 
McNeelyWm si 2 

MeriiamEdwM o24 
MerrianiHattieL 
" RufiisC 

MerriamN m20 

MerriamMrsNels'ns27 
" Eva " 

MerriamNelFonC 
MerrimanAH 
MerrimanEI&wf 
MerrimanMrsI-II 
MerrimanJE 
MichaelisL 
MillerArthurH 



o30 

s28 
sS6 
020 
jeS 
ol9 
jylO 



MillerCA s20 

MillerGeoW&wf Jyl5 
MillerldaLouise s21 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS NEW HAVEN COUNTT. 



269 



MillerWrnn Jel5s21 
MiiichinWII je-23 

MinorJH ol3 

MorganWmll k3 

MorrillJS s30 

Morrow AiaryJ jyl2 
"HA 

MofherBW ol9 

WosherWW o4 

MunnCC&wf o7 

MuusonEdwardH s20 
Murphy J ohnT s4 

KortonFrankW Jy3 
NortonJohiiH n3 

O'BrieiiMaurice s7 
OtisAL&wf s25 

OtisFrankO s20 

PaddockAB&wf o5 
PaddockGB&wf s6 
PaddockSamlC&wf s6 
Pa<'eBenj&wf s2« 
PalmerChasA o31 
PardewHD sl9 

ParkerEdmundA o9 
ParkerGfiorgieA " 
ParkerGeoL s6 

ParkerHH mST 

ParkerJA o25 

ParkerJI a'J 

ParkerJaredPi&wf n1 
ParkerJohnH a22 
ParkerJohnO s9 

ParkerOscar s20 

ParkerSO-CJ s28 

ParkerWmD s4 

ParmeleeEdv/mE je22 
" MrsEdwinE " 

*' MasterJLiiius " 
ParmeleeHA&wf ol6 
ParsonsHH&wf ol7 
PeckWiUisM s8 

PeltonEramaE oil 
PeltonJR o5 

PenneyTheoS si 

PerkinsChas s(j 

PerkinsMrsChas jelT 
PerkinsChaeS jylo 
PetteeJT-MR Ji20 
PetiteAlbert olo 

PhelpsCH sll 

PierceJogephA p21 
PiersonSC jel4 

PomeroyBFrank Jyb 
PorterJohnB o31 

PowellW olt. 

PowersChasC s2G 

PrattMrsAaron 8l4 
PrattEE o20 

PriceEA&wf Nil 

PriceJW s21 

ProudmanJohnC s6 
KandPC-JIariaF jelo 
EandRP&wf 027 

EentonChas-MrsD sl9 
BeussAnton s2(j 

EiceAnnaC o23 

EiceChasP a4 

RiceHS A3 

ElceMrsHS a3o20 
EiceMrsOliver o3 

'■ MrsNellieB 
EiceWE-SusanH sl5 
EiceWmT olO 

EisleyWM s2t) 

EobertsMrsCA o7 
RobertsNA&wf o4 
EockwellChasL s28 
Eockwe'.nVP jy24 
EogereCB jilO 



RogersGilbert 


o20 


RogersJuliusW 


s22 


RogeisWE 


023 


EogersWilburF 


Bl2ti 


RoseJoseph 


jy3 


RyderE 


o30 


RyderMrsE 


n3 


SanfordE&wf 


NlO 


SanfordMariaL 


o28 


SanfordRulusH 


s28 


SiintyWH 


o25 


SavageEC 


Jyl8 


SavageEmmaC 


o2 


SavageGcoE 


m15 


SavageMrsGeoE 


je30 


SawyerDP 


sl9 


SchmelzerAugust 


S28 


SeeryJF 


s7 


SeeryWmH 


s7 


SegallaMH 


a21 


SeidenstickerFJ 


je23 


SiedenstickerFR 


m28 


" Mrr'FR 


" 


SeipeM-MrsMJ 


jy'' 


"IdaV 




Seymour JH&wf 


o30 


SeymourLucas 


n7 


SeymourWm 


n9 


ShaunessyMW 


s7 


ShawChasH 


Olt) 


SledgelJohnH 
SmithAddieK 


slO 


jy24 


SmithAlfred[CoI] 


sG 


SmithFD [CoI2dRegt] 


SmithHenryC 


023 


SmithHenryV 


o30 


SmiihLiliauB 


625 


" IdaP 


'* 


SmithNC 


s8 


SmithRobtS 


jy7 


SmithWM 


Ml!) 


SmithWmP 


slfl 


SnowGF-WG 


ol8 


SnowGII&wf 


o9 


SnovvGeoH 


jy22 


SomersJohnB 


o24 


SouthmaydHerbert sO 


SpencerHL 


ol8 


SpencerRT 


n2 


SperryAN&wf 


so 


SperryJeromeL 


s22 


SproHiWH 


jy4 


" !MaryA-EugeneL " 


StannifiWH 


Mil 


StevensonFjr&wf o2~ 


" HowardLinsley 


" 


StilesFrankW 


s9 


StilesGilbertG 


n2 


StilesGeoC 


je30 


StilesTruman 


n3 


StilesWmH 


s21 


StoddardF'kE&wfoSl 


Stoddard.JE 


^8 


StoddardWL&wf 


ol7 


StoneMGeo 


s6 


StowMrsJP 


o5 


SutliffJR(.je6)&wf s7 


SutliffJohn&wf 


o7 


Symon'eLiliaA 


aO 


TaylorChas^L 


AlO 


TerrellFL&wf 


o4 


ThomasHelenM 


n8 


ThomasJA 


o25 


Thorp Albert 


619 


TilleyEH 


S3 


TinkerWmJjr 


s26 


TuttleMrsE-EllaM o20 


TvvitchellJasC&wfolG 


UnmackRosa 


819 



UnmackMaryC sl!> 
UphamCL-Uaisy ol7 
UpsonE o28 

ValeuiineLucyW c9 
VernonWlI&wf s9 
"Louis [Col] 
V€rgoyJO[CoI2Rgt] s4 
VockeFredkW 
WalkerRobt Jy4 

Warrenll&wf jy29 
WatrousEA&wf sl5 
WeberH o3 

WeirJohnPjr a16 

WeltonDrNB o23 

WestherMinnie nIO 
WetherellF^P o2:J 

WetmoreAC&wf ol2 
WheelerMrsFrankol3 
WheelerMrsFJ o<J 
WheelerWmW oil 
WhipplellJP M2ajl(is!t 
WhippleMrsHJP s9 
WhiteEmmaR sl5 
WhiteJohiiH s2G 

WhiteheadEJ&wf n6 
" MrsMary-CeliaB *' 
WhiteheadMrsRL s9 
WilcoxChasC s4 

WilcosCH&wf s6 
WilcoxGH Ml5jel7A21 
WilcoxHS(je2)&wfo4 
WilcoxHoraceC je22 
WilcoxMrsLM 68 

WilliamsAJ&wf e22 
" MrslB 

WilliamsCM Al 

WilliamsDS&wf oO 
WilliamsEmmetS s8 
WilliamsIsaacB jy4 
WilliamsJB&wf o4 
WinsIowMS 67 

WordLtIIB[CoI] s4 
WoodNS&wf 60 

VVoodrufi'ClIjr a26 
WinslowCN&wf jc2' 
WilsonEA je2' 

WilmottGR&wf 620 
WrightEH olO 

YaleEH&wf ol7 

YalcJohn&wf ol2 
YaleLillaC aIO 

ZabriskieElizJ Alti 

MIDDLEBURT. 

Abbot tHjmanB All 

AbbottL AlO 

AtwoodHenryS ol7 

AtwoodMV 827 

BradleyChas o4 

BradleyJasH 68 

BronsonMrsEli o9 

CampR sl3 

ChamberlainFS s22 
ClarkAS&wf 

DeForestMjr jel 
DeForestMrsMary sl4 

FennDa\-idM n2 

HineMary s29 

JohnsonSarahE n4 

ScottFG c20 

ScovilleHarrietT s21 

ScovillJC n2 

ScovilleMW o26 

SeelyeBB a26 

StoneJWheaton n19 
TowTisendWB-SC o9 

TylerJIrsMaryA 6l4 

TvlerWmB olO 
WheatonKB je9sl9 



UILFOBD. 

AllenSarahC Al5 

AlliuFrankL a8 

AugurCH s22 
AyresAD[CoF2Rt] 62 

AyresFL sS 

AyresJa^R ol7 

BaldwinAA OoO 

■' SiisieA " 

BaldwinCH n6 

BnldwiiiCW&wf Kl 

BaldwinElijah ol4 

BaldwinEB o25 
BaldwinEmilvL 

BaldwinGE-SH 19 

BaldwinHL 64 
BaldwinJB-HelenlAlS 

BaldwinKatcM ol3 

BaldwinLizzieW sl3 
" LncyH-SarahM " 

BaldwinNA s4 

" NatalieA " 

BairdMissCN A30 

BarnesEJ s(> 

BeachHarvey ol9 

BeachJosieG s20 

BeachTE o4 

BeardAddison o25 

BeardAnnaM o5 

BeardEJ k9 

BeardHattieF a30 

BeardlraP-RA Nl 

BeardJT ol5 

BcardLizzieA " 

Beari'HogersA n4 
Bt; rd ^K-SC-NellieC 

Beaid^leyCW o31 

" Mri^Sarah " 

BeardsleyFredkS sl9 

BeardsleyllB o4 

BeardsleyDrLN slO 

" MrsLN-DrWE '» 

BeardsleyMS o5 

" NellicS " 
BeardsleyMrsSmitho4 

BeckwithFanuy s8 

BeccherhF s20 
BeocherSN&wf 
" MissMattieL 

BeccherWalterN s8 

BeersLewisB n1 

" CharlotteA '* 
BettsHS 

BiddleJA&wf a7 

BlakeFred'kA n3 
BotsfordTC&wf 

BotpfordWD ol8 

BosworthCF-GF a28 

Bo8worthFJ-CP s25 
BradleyEliasE&wf Nl 

BrewerRL&wf jylO 

BristolE 621 

BristolMrsHenry o4 

BristolJasE a8 

BristolJason Nl 

BristolPS-CG o25 

BristolSL o25 
BrooksWm&wf 

BrothertonWm o24 
BrownEphrS&wf a9 

BrownJnoHwf " 
BuckinghamD&wfol7 

BuckinghamFP s21 

BuckinghamS o4 

BuelWmA 6l4 

BurleighEW 86 

BurneiEdithS oT 

BumsEUiotJ s5 

BomsCreoN jel4 



270 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITON. 



Al3 



BurwellEB olO 

BushSAraelia ol7 

BiishWm sl2 

BusliVVB sl3 

ButlerMarcnsB&wfo2 
" Virginia-MBayard" 
CarderKatuP 84 

" LottieE " 

CarringtouMS 
" NellieG 
Chase Wallaces 
ClarlvAlmonE&wf n 
Clark Anson g2 

" MrsNancyT- " 

ClarkBelle olO 

ClarkChas n(J 

Clai-kMrsDavidN n9 
Clai-kEilgarT sIInS 
ClarkEUsworth&w 8-27 
ol8 
sl4 

Ni) 



ClarkEverardB 

ClafkEEP 

ClarkEMAwf 

ClarkGeoIi 

" ArtliurE 

ClarkHB 

'' CarrieM-FredD 

ClarkHezekiahC 

ClarkJR&wf 

ClarkMaiyN 

ClarkNathaa 

ClarkNT 



AnnieB-AbigailP ' 



ClarkThosK 

ClarkWmB 

ClarkMi-sWB 

Clai-kVVII-F\V 

ClarkeDavidL 

ClarkeMA 

ClarkeMarieE 

ClarkeOwenTi&wfolU 

ClarkeSaraM jyl-2 



o30 
n9 
Jy28 
ol 
a9 
s8 

s29 



ConnorJnoC 
ConnorMissSB 
Corn wall EL 
Cornwall F-WmG 
CornwallH 
CornwalinW 
CoxMrs Esthers 
CurtisWmDeF 
DavidsonArthur 
DickinsonChas 
DrummondAM 
DruramondJennieLA2 
DiinlapEdgarC jyltl 
DurandWCecil ol2 
ErwinJO Nti 

FennD&wf oil 

FennGeoN A2:i 

FennMrsMaria 



GunnMyronL 
GunnNjr-EdwP 
GnnnSamlB&wf 
" HarrietNelson 
HawkinsAnnaB 
Hawkins! Sanl'ord 
HigbyHeuryS 
HigbyJasTifcwf 



sic 

on 



s20 
o24 
oil 



PlumbDS a2 BissellGcoD&wf ol2 

PondCharlesH je22 BradleySusie a25 

MaryE-Winthrop" BrombergCJ s6 



ol5 



FisherEugene&w Je26 



FordMerntt 

FordNR-WHN 

FordSR 

FordMrsTheroa 

FowlerFannie 

FowlerFil&wf 

FurmanGH&wf 

GilletteSCliristiue 

'■ MrsSusan 

" MartliaN 

GilletteMrsWm 

GlenneyMLouiso 

GoldBmithWG 

«' JW 

GreenMaryA 

GregoryDrEP 

GrifflnGH&wf-Fn 8l4 

GrinnellGB-LG o28 

GuunGeoM olO 



o4 

S() 

o5 
o2S 
OlO 
Jy27 
sfj 
oG 



o4 
018 
b21 

ol2 

Je29 



HubbardEEugene o2G 
HubbardGU a14 

" MaryE " 

Hubbard JM 
HnbbardLewieC 
lebellWealthyA 
Kellog^HenryJ 
KenipLD 
KimberleyWmG 
LancasterLizzieC Jyl 8 
LawEP olS 

LovellJuliaW o7 

MallettMreHarriet o20 
MallettJosR&wf e4 
MalloryGeo 
MartinMintaG ol5 
MerwinAP-WW sl9 
MerwinCT 87 

" IdaM-MaryC " 
MerwinEmma 88 

MerwinMrsCT b4 

MerwinGeo 821 

MerwinGeoH ol2 

MerwinMrsJW 8l3 
MerwinJaneW olU 
" Laui-aH-WalterL " 
" SliermanT " 

MerwinM2d&wf n1 
" Jennie-EmmaA " 
" NP 

MerwinMaryB 
MerwlnMaryE 
MerwiuMerritt 
MerwinSM 
MerwinWmA 
MilesChasW 
MilesMrsCW 

SaraA-AnnaB 

MattieF 
M lesEGi&wf 
MilesMrsHeuryC 
MilesLucy.> 
MilesMrsWA 
MitchellHM 
MitchellJM-AI 
MitchellWG 
MowerSamuelE 
MungonFrankT 
MunsonNellieC 
" C'oraM 
NettletonAC 
NettletonAlb't&w sl4 
" MattieA " 

NettletonGeoA s7 
" OL 

NettletonJosW 
OsbornWR&wf 
OviattLibbieM 
PeckAlexT&wf 
PeckDaniel 
PeckElisha 
PeckJG 
PeckMrsJuliaT 
PeckLA 
PeckLonisaA 
PlattGeoF 
PlattHC&wf 
'• MissLouise 
PlattND 
PlattTheo-MreS 



o30 
02(i 
jel2 
n3 
015 



oil 

n8 

821 

a24 

s8 

sll 



ol2 

o2U 

a24 

or- 

s20 

019 

jyic 

n8 
Sll 

k9 



0l9 

s8 
o20 
oil 
s24 
sl9 

Nl 

jy6 
o20 
a31 
je29 



09 
je22 



AuuicE-AdellaE 



PondMarthaG 

'■ TillieM-MaryM 

" BessieG 

PopeFB-Emest 

PopeFredJ 

PorterGeoH 

RogersGE 

RogersHS&wf 

" SarahL-IdaO 

RogersIT 

Rogers JnoE&wf 

RoseFlorenceE 

RoseHMi 

RoydenS 

SanfordCH 

ScottCW 

SmithDennis&wf 

SmithEd^arH 

SmithFW 

SmithGP 

SmithMA 

SmithME 

SmithMrsStiles 

SmithTheo 

SmithWB&wf 

" Addie 

Smith WR 

SnowFPepper 

SparksNJ&wf 

JSperryFowler 

SperryHartN 

StoddardHJ&wf 

StoweMrsEJ 

StoweNathan&wf 

•' Benjamin " 

StowTheo&wf 

StrongJnoP&wf f8 

SwiltEL&wf sl4 

" HerbertE " 

" ArthurH " 

ThomsouHG&wf aIO 

" Arthur-Louisa " 

" Hattie " 

TibbalsBF 

TibbalsFannieA 

TlbbalsFredL 

TibbalsGeo&wf 

TibbalsJH 



sl3 BnmdagcDr 827 

" I" Gortrude-MinnieG" 
" ;BuckHW s21 

|CandeeFred'k o17n8 
s20 CarringtonEU&wf n9 
ol5 CushmanAC Jy4 

e21 CnshmanHattie n2 

DennistonMajHG o26 

" MrsHG 

FarrellC'haa 

FullerJB 

GarrisonJT 
je22s27 ! GaylordFrankH 
olS GaylordMrsL 
Al9iGiffordDD 



ol7 
o5 
o4 

8l6 

ol9 
a23 



s20 

Nl 

626 
s21 
si 
05 
017 
oS 
s5 
n9 

s21 

a8 

o4 

jel9 

8l8 

o3() 
sG 



GranberyMrsDW aIT 
GunnMrsAbigailH o24 
HallBC ol7 

HawkinsJH&wf je21 
HigginsEA a23 

HillLucyB o9 

Hitchc'kMrsMaria a24 
HitchcockWmH 8l6 
HoadleyChasH sl2 
Hopkins Wil'rd&w sl4 
" SammieE 
HotchkissEA 
IIotchkissEltonE 
HotchkissEM 
Hotchk.ssFD 
flotchkissJL 
HotchkissRobtE 
UubbcllHC&wf 
IIughesMissMary 



n8 
s5 

Al6 

s21 

s7 
s26 
s28 
Nl 



I'slK-lUnoL-AmyS o20 
JolmsonHattie 
KaneAM 
KaneJO-AnnO 
KelloggEB 
KellyWmS 
KnappAndrew&wf s7 
KunstmanFred a26 
LandonChasF&wf o3 



OlO 
Pl5 
a23 
013 

813 



LewlsChasH 
a24 ' Lewis JennieB 

" iLewisRobtS 
o25 LewisRufusW 

s7 LongdonWmH 



a30 

o26 

je20 

a29 

o3 



TibbalsMarkjr Al0o28:Loomi8RobtN 



MrsCS 
TomlinBonCA 
TreatOtis&wf 
TrowbridgeP 
UlmerWmW 
WeeksWS n2 

WesterveltBessieWNS 
VVllcoxClark n3 

WilsonU jy26 



o28 
je9 
ol3 

815 

je5 



NAUGATUCK. 

AdamsWHjr 

AudrewsFloydL 

AndrewsFred 

AUertonGeoMjr 

BaldwinHC 

BaldwinWA 

BarnumEC 

BeardsleyLS 

BeebeJH&wf 

BeecherHW-JC 

BeecherMaryE 

BeecherMaryJ 

BenhaniChas 

BenhamEva 

BenhamFrankE 

BirdBallWmJ 



MarshallSamuel 87 

MayJasO&wf s30 

MeersNellieL a29 

MiuorSC sl3 

MnlveyMissLizzie Nl 

MulvilleJohuM o25 

NettletonEUiottJ s7 

OsbornWN&wf jy24 

PageJM-Rebecca 87 

ParmeleeES&wf sl3 

PattersonLizzieM 89 

PeckBA-AL s6 

o4!piattLS oil 

ol7jReinmuthWm n2 

o26!RenzRobert o25 

jelO'RobinsonChasW 8l3 

ol7 ScottHoraceB a24 

s28! Scott JAlvin " 

a29 ScottRevJamesL a25 

CIS SearsHB Jyl2 



olS 



Al^SeymourMissEH ol8 

o5'SmithCH&wf ol3 

o9 SmithEdwinP ol2 

jyll I SmithEldredge sS 

" ISmithEH o5 

03 SmithJD s5 

04 SmithNA o30 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISIT0E3. NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



271 



SmlthRW 

SmithSaraD p20 

SpencerAA s2{) 

SqniresGD-r.elleR o5 



SteveusWmE 

SweeneyJjM-JE 

Tay!orLB&\vf 

TaylorLeviB 

TavlorLBA:wf 

TollesFW&wf 

TcllesKJ&wf 

*' Emma^I 

Treat BA&wf 

TuniprJiIissAlice 

TiittleBB jiino-iO 

" ^MaryA-IIowardB " 

TuttleDrFB&wl jel3 

TwitchcUFM sl5 

TwitchellGB 

T\vitchelin(.ie7)&woO 

TwitchellJH 

VolkcrBernhard 

"W'ardL&wf 

WardWattfon 

WardWmitwf 

WarnerBurtonC 

WamerLD 

■\\'aterburyGA 

Waterbury Lizzie 

WebslerJF 

WcbsterWL 

WedgeMissBelle 

WhittemoreAH 

♦' JH&wf 

■WilcoxRuseell jylO 

WilcoxFA-MrsR n8 

WilmotMrsEA 

XVilmotLC 

M'oodEA 

WoodfordGeoE 

WoodinpLB 

YaleMrsFannieE 

YaleLidaE 



jc8 AllingGeoN 
AllingMissHA 
AlliiigJJ 
AUiugJohnW 
AlliiigMrfJuoW 
AllingKatie 
AUingMimiicG 
AllingDrWG 
" Gertmde 
AlterLcniisE 
Aiiu^C'larenceG 
AmiesJII-OliveP 



o^O 



KEW HATEN. 

AcliennanTJ 

AdamsArthurB 

Adam^CB 

AdamsGeoB 

AdamsJaniesK 

AdamsNelson 

AdlerLP-MaryH 

AdlerMax 

AdrianceJnoB-C 

AdtJohn 

AldenMamieE 



olO 



AustinFErCorCoD] sG'BarnesJonineN' o95 

-- - Bai-ncbMi^t'LB ?5 

Ha^ne^!Silm■lH o25 

Baruc'tTAUwater s5 

LBrigliit^pecloiCNG] 

BarnesThoeA&wf o'A 



025 
ol8 



o2G Austin FH 
s2() Austin JamesA 
nS AustinLA 
o5 AvcryPP&wf 
ol8 BabbittCVV 

aO BabbittEM a2 
olO BabcockAElGr'e]A7s-! 

" BabcockFW&wf o3! 

si BabcockJolinll a2!) 

A 16 BabcockJN si 

o4;BabcockWF sl4 

An(lerM)nWM[CoF]s2 BacheJuliusS si:i 

AiKln'aia<'<ib o3 BaconJosiahN' sti 
AiulrtwsAC&wf o2Tj [LtCoKdRegtl 

Andrew sC(irneliaBAl2 BaconPicbekahG m31 
AndrewsCW olo BaconWS[CorCoD] s 

AndivwsFred'kF clT BailLouisN Jy8 

AndrewsID-MaryEolS," FJ-Louis "' 

AndrewsLM o24iBailevAlbcrt a8 

" BelleT " |BaileyMrsAD ol, 

AndrewsNovesT sl2 BaileyAliceP o4 

Andrews'-WF' cl7 BairdJohnG A22 

AndrewsWnill A8o4'BairdMiss»i'W jyll 

AndrewsMrsWmH oG BakerAE-KH Jc-24 

AndrewsPtCvWG 627 BakerFS si 

' s2 



Andi-u>r:>nF&wf 

AiicrusMrs 

AntlionyMrsTIW 

ArmstrongCP 

ArmstrongEL 



sC BalbicrHermanC 
k2 " WE 
a29 BaldwinMrsAlberto"4 



BarmttEllenC 

BarncttllE 

Baiuc'ttJ-EA 

BainnniGooS 

BaiuunillU 

BnnniniSam''in 

Bariiuii.SamlW 

BarnnmMrsSW 

" CC-MissC 

Barnunif^nsieL 

BarnumThosR 

Barrett Annie 

Barron Win 

Barrows Ed v[CNG] s2 

BarryDrJonJ aSO 

Barth<jlomc\vDrOAol7 

Bart"k>nie\vLizzie ol8 

BartelsEnieliaA o24 

BartlcttllE-AM 

BartlettMrsi^E 

BartlettWF 

BartlettWT&wf 



olBiBaldwinAllenD s20 
ullBaldwinChasE jylO 
ArmstrongEM&w o24 Baldwir.MrsCB s20 
ArmstrongEP jel5 BaldvvinDW&wf 
ArnistrongLottieJ.iel4 BaldwinEdwW 



64 

n2 
a30 



ArmstnmgLM jeSO BaldwinFE 
" LlI-EUat'-A " BaldwinFannicA 

ArnistrongM ol7 BakiwinFrankE s. 

" MaryR " BaldwiuGeoM s8 

ArmstrongP&wf Je8 BaldwinGraceD sf; 

" LillieJ-RF " Baldwinllerman ol2 

ArmstrongRD ol9 BaldwinllenryD sO 

ArmstrongRW&woil BaldwiuJB ^.\'.) 
ArmstrongWP jel2l" WE-AJ 

ArnistrongWTB jv5i Bald win JohnB a2 

Armstr'ngWO&w jel4 BaklwinMrsMD o27 

n2 ArnoldAlbertA oil BaldwlnRG o3 
NllArnoldGS [Grays] jv7 BaklwinSimeonE jy:;0 

cl2 Arn> IdMrsGeoS sI5 BaldwinWS ol2 
sis AmoldMrsE olUBaldwinWmStone oil) 



oni" Hattie '• jBallAA-AAjr 

Al4 ArnoklRebeccaP jyll BallChasB 
oii.BallSarahL 
s27 BanksEmmaC 



o25 Arttiurt;ik'n 
Ju22iArthurFred 
ol3'ArviucEP-AJ 
a2| AsherAdolph 
o2 AsherllarryW 
•' AnnieS-LouiseS " AspinwallOC 
Allen AN olS'AtwaterMrsC 

AlleuMrsCW-Mand s5 ' AtwaterChas J 
AllenElkiJ 

AUenFred 620" MissAW 

AllenGeoE s2(;' AtwaterHJ 

AllenHB&wf je26oiyl AtwaterMrsIIJ 
" MayE-MissCG " " MayO-Lilla 
AllenlraB els'AtwaterJM-GM 

o30 AtwaterMC 
olO!AtwaterOE 
o25JAtwaterSD 
jyl5|AtwaterVVm 



67 

jy25 

Al" 
o4 



A3ti 

sll 

a2!» 



o3 

si 3 



a28 



Jt'lt) 

o28 

ol3 

je 3 

Je22 

Jy26 

jyll 

ol8 

Al6 

jy~8 
jy7 
n8 



>:6 
o24 
Jy4 
o28 



Bart ram JIrsEdwinA23 



BatesCkasB 

BatesEllaM 

Bates LewisC 

BasscrniauGA 

•' Louise 

BassettrS 

BassettFN 

BassettGcoB 

BassettMrsJB 

BassettJobnE 

BassettSA-SP 

BassettNE 

BastaiuAdaM 

BeacbBD 

BeachD&wf 

BeachESLSerCoE] s6 

BeachE-AnnieL o25 

BeachFrankG AlO 

BeachGeoL olO 

BeachHenryO s6 

BcachMi-sJobnSMlONl 

BeachKodmondV JilO 



t3 

jeiO 

je20 

sl3 

AlO 

si 

o24 

je23 

n9 

013 

jc6 

a26 

Ml0o20 

a21 



MO-JM 

BarberCharlotte 
BarberEA 
o27 ! BarberEdwardS 
jel3o2 1 BarberJennieE 

M25'BarberIlL n1 

s2,AtwaterMissEM jel3 BarberME[Gray6] .iy5 

BarberMrsME ol6 

BarberWM-SVE sl9 

BarkerDrJC[Gr'B] jy7 



BeardVVmA 
Beardslet GeoE 
Beards-leeMrsML 
Bean A B 

fc2l|BeanjMrsAB 

sl2 " WillieH 
jy24 BeckGeo 



AllenJessie 
AUenKateM 
AllenWmB 
AUenMrsWB 
" JennieL 
AUenWmH 
AllenWLjr 

AlleyJenuetteB o7 
AUingAlbertH s30 
AllingEdwJ&wf Je27 
AllingEdwardN a1 
AllingFA&wf ol7 

AllingFredH o4 

AlIingG&w-MrsSPje5 



AtwaterWJ&wf 
a15n4!" Eddiel-LizzieB 



BarkerNE 
slO BarkerMrsOB 
NllBarkerJPjr 
j}'5|BarnesAliceJ 
je'22i" Florence 
a6s2S: BarnesAmo6F&wjy2' 



s5 BamesCE ol9 

; BamesM rsEstellaEsl 2 



s2 AtwoodWH jyl9[BarnesEn&wf 

AugurCPwf&dau ol2 BamesHA&wf 



AugurMissEB 

" NN-Sara 

AugurFWjr 

AugurHJ 

AugurWmE 

AustinEGilbert 



sSBarnesHattieB 

'* BarnesMlssHM 
a29 BamesHenryR o27 
o2ti " CarrieE-NellleC " 
sl2|Bames'HS M2n 

619 BamesMrsHoraceSoU 



k9 
s4 
o31 
sl6 
sl6 
ol9 

821 



BeckleyChasF-EA o6 
BeckleyWA sl3 

" AnnieJ " 

BeckleyMrsWA o6 
BedentHenry n8 

BeebePB&wf o26 

BeecherBaldwin ol7 
BeecherCarrieJ n2 
BeeeheiChasE jy25 
Beech erEvelyn s5 
BeecherEAwf&son s2 
BeecherFrauk&wf o3 
BeecherJR a25 

je7 BeecherMrsLA a23 

s28 BeersAJ&wf 

B26iBeersHS&wf 

Al5 BeersLJ&wf 



BecrsThosJ&wf 
BeersWI-MrsW 
BeUlenEuniceM 
BellGEM 



k8 
018 
o20 
Al4 
n2 
a29 
jy31 



272 



SODVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



BellMayE 
Beaedict Willie 
" Sarah J 
BenhamChas 
BenhamCW 
BenliainMreD 
BenhamJasH 87 

BeiihainLizzieJ Nl 
BeajarninLizzieQ jy() 



jy]9 

621 

o3 

Al5 

n2 



BenjaiuiuiMrriE 
" MaryE 
BennerfHarryC 
BynnettAlex 
Bennett AH [CoEl 



Nl 



SO 



BjnnettCO-EUeuJ olO 



BeanettEC&wf 

BenuettMrsM.V 

BennettPS&vvf 

BianettSP 

BeatonChasW 

Benton Edwin A 

B-jnton.TF&wf 

BentonPi-edll 

BentonLD-EB 

Benton Mb^-ank 

BentzChasjr 



gl6 

o2(i 

o4 

si 2 

jyll 

019 
o3 



BlakeThcoA jel6 BradleyMrsFrankH s4 BrownCT 

BlakeVVml'hipps MlO " AunaP " BiowuUH 

MeiuberUSCcnCom BrailleyFred'kT jy28 brounPlI&wf 
BlakcslecAddioC s2 BradleyFStanley sG Brownllenry 
BlakesileeCarrieE Jy8 Bradley UeoT&vvf s2t) BrowiiHenryB 
" Minnie '" BradleyGeoW oltj BrowuJames^E 

BlakesleeDW a32 Bradleyllattie olti BrowuJeunieA 

BlakesleeEdwin a15 Bradley HL-WH nIO BrowuJasG 
BlakesleeHWLG's].iytj Br.uiloylda je23 '• HarriettR 

BlakesjleeMrsJA o20 BrddleyJ[CorCoE] s6 BrowuLewisD 
n3 BradleyJC&vvf o9 BrovvnLydiaE 
n8 BradleyJF[CorCoC] sC BrownNellieM 
o27 BiadleyJnoS oSBrownPliiloR 

" Brad!eyL-Emma o5|Bro\vnliA&wf 
o6 Bradley LucyM A24!BrownMrsRH 
"■ B;af!levMariaL o20 BrownSamlP 
jcT BradlevPtobtB a24 
017 " FrnnklinS 
a31 Bradley RobtL 621 
8l2 " CarrieA " 

s6 BnidlevSI&wf sl2 
Bradlc\WB 



BlakusIeeMaryE 
BlakesleeVVH 
BlakesleeMrsW 
■' HattieS 
BlatchleyMissCT 
BlatchleySamuelL 
BlatchleySam'lR 
BUnnMrsGeoP 
BlissChafP 
Bliss EdwinM 
Blisi:.Mi-sFR 
" (iraceE-Annie 
BlissLottieM 
o() Bli'^sLucyR 
A2-i Bliss Mis-SA 
Nl BI;i:uin('[CorCoB] 



je23 

N(> 

Al5 

o31 

sia 

Bl9 

o4 

Al9 

oil 

s9 

s6 

ol8 

o3 

jyn 

s6 

Quart ermaster2dRgt 

BrownoCill [<irays] jy5 

BrowneWmll o31 

" Martha " 

BrowninirWH&wf a3 

o(i BrushGJ HarrietTM25 



jyO BradleyWlI [Grays] s4 



BerkeleLouisH-EP o3, Bl\ MrsAM 
BerkslIenryP jelO:B,)ettn;erJ 
BesserL sl3| Boirart-JamesP 



Beits Pre! A 



jyl2 BradshawWJ 
s9 BradwellMavA 
s6 BrainardNellieE 

ol9 BrangsEE 

jyl BransrsPH 

s21 BraySH 



s5j Bo^ueCW[SerCoE] sli BreckenridgeMyraL 



BettsSam" 1& vv-SD o24 1 Boku m RD 
BevansC.visA sSiBollesMrsSP 

BickfordMi'nieL sU " MarvR 
Bi"el.)wHB.fe\vf s5 Bondf hosH 
" I?rankL-WalterP " BonneyllenryG 
BillCliasE sl2' BaoksbyLottieB 

BillGeoR jcl7iBoothAL o23 

BirchThosT AloljB )OthIsabellaJ oCO 

BirnbaninSaml s6 BoothMarvL-Juliaol3 

NllBoothMrstP sl3 

o17n8 B:)stwickJnoA&wf o9 
o2:BotsfordFred'k sl9 
Al I BotsfordGeo-GN All 
n2 B )iichetEdwardA sl6 



JylS 



BishopCarrieE 
BishopChasR 
BishopMrsEliasB 
BisliopEinmaL 
BishopFP&wf 
BishopPJ 
BishopPrankH 
BishopGeoH 
BisliopCaptllJ 
[USN] 
BishopHW 
BishopJames 
BishopJnoM 
" MrsChas-GH 
BishopLouisB 
BishopLuluP 
BishopRL-AT 
BishopSS 
BissellDrEL 

[Surgeon2dRegt] 
BisscllJE 8l5 

BlackGeoC 
BlackJas 



je24 BrennanJasF-MD 

a31 BrennanJos&wf 

"■ BrennanCaptMP 

061 [CoC] 

Jy28 BrettFD[SerCoE] 



BrightLT 
BrightRobtC 
BrillJohn-Fred 
BrintnallMis 



ElizaT-SaraiiJ 

je29 Bryan Ed w s27 

ol2 BryanHW s22 

jyl7 BrvanWD&fam s26 

s5 BryantClarkB-J jylO 

Nt) BryantELouise o25 

s28 Bryant SJ-EllenE je20 

BryantTW All 

n3 BrydenA&wf o26 

NlOBnchholzChasF sl3 

s4 BuchterLtH[CoB] 87 

BuckSarahB a25 

s6 BuckinghamAH s6 

s23 BrevverWmll m31s7 [ConiSergt2dRgt] 

BrewsterlTeiiry M25lBuckinfrhamFL&wol9 

Brewster\Vin.T-B a18, Buckingham PB&wfs9 

BrewstorML-RC slBuckmasterRS 

ol9 BuellChasE 

jy5 BuellMrs^FWH 

o30 BncllWallace 

ol8 BulkleyDellaE 



a7 
oIOnS 
a28 

s28 
sO 
o9 

820 
el3 

n8 

86 



BourueChasR 



o24 
o7 



Je23 
o2 

sl8 



BowditchEB 
" FrancesS 
Bowditch.TB 
BowditchSE 
BovversCB 
" MrsFM 
" MissFA 
" MasterDwightE 
Bower8HC[GraysJ jy7 
BownesJnoE&wt o25 
BoydEdgarE 
BoydEdwardE 
BoydR 
Brace Annie A 
BraceMrsHD 
A23!BraceSC 
n3 I BrackettKatieA 



BristolCL-Lizzie o25 BulkleyEdwjr 



Al 

slfi 
o31 
n3 

821 

sl9 
olO 
a23 
o5 
eS 
ol7 
s27 
031 
829 
s21 

jy29 

ol2 



BlackmanAbbieB oKi Bradford? 
BldckminAS&wf s7 Bradley BS 
BlackmanCW o3lJj" MrsIdaH 

BlacknianHK jyl4 BradleyChas 
Blackman WmHH 86 BradleyCL-MyraE ol7 
" MasterChasW " BradleyChasB 828 
Blackman WW o24 BradleyChas W n4 
BissellLyman&wf olO BradleyCWjr ol6 

BlairJamesE 8l4lBradleyCliffordS Jy27 

BlakeAFFCoD] 64iBradlevDanielB a16 

BlakeAlidaG Jyl7; Bradley DR o27 

" EW3d " BradleyMrsEUiott oil 

BlakeEL o23 " GertieM 

BlakellH n6 Bradley MrsEC 821 

BlakeMrsHJ.t38n8.Tylj" HelenD " 

BlakeHattieSF jyll BradlcyEE&wf 
BlakeLA[t'oD] b4 BradlyEuniccE n6 



BristolDJ-Geo 
BristolEC 
BristolFT 
BristoIMrsHB 
BristolHenryD 
BristolJames 
BristolLambertJ 
BrietolMF&wf 
BrockettOeoH 
Brockett.TB 
BroderickJH 
jyl9 BroderickLS 
je28 BroganJP 
a2 BromhamWmH 
jel BronsonAnnie 
je20 BronsonEllaJ 
Ml8:Bron8onHG 
o2,') BronsonHenryT jyl3 
je7 BronsonRobtA o30 
olljBronsonRSifcwf s9 
" " EmmaG " 

ASO'BronsonMrsS b26 

BrouBonWA o20 

BronsonWW s7 

BrooksCharlieH 
BrooksEdwM 
BrooksFE 
BrooksHM 
" AliceT-HW 
BroschartPauline o2."> 
BroughtonAUce ol9 
" Clara 

BrownBE[Gray8] jv7 
Je22 BrownCE&wf a 15 
HattioM-LillieE '■ 



026 

813 
81 

02 

o25 



Bulkley.JeunieB 
BulleyLT 
BunceMrsE 
Bunnell EC 
BunnellFredB 
BunnellHenrvH 
BunnellL-IlattieMA29 
BunnelIChasS&wfAl7 
" GeorgeH " 

BunnellElizaC 
BurchJlI 
BurchellRP 
BurdickMorrisM 
BurgessJE 
BurgessJnoR 
BurkeJohn 
BurlockJennieS 
BurpeeLucienP 
BurrAH 
BurrowsSE 
BurwellAR 
BurwellDC 
BurwellEmmaE 
BurwellGE 
Al7iBur\veUIIorace 
je27 j BurwellRF [Grays] jy7 
jy27|BurwellRH-LG jy4 
nG BurwellRM o28 

BurtonGeoR a30o21 
" GeoL a30 

BurtonMrsGeoR o21 
BurtonJnoH a29 

Burtons s20 

BuschP&wf All 

BushMrsCA Jel5 



84 
85 
N8 

a29 
21 



N8 

jyl8 
a21 

A3 

o5 
n2 

jyi4 
jy2l 

s4 

84 

027 
sl9 

jy20 

6l3 

si 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



273 



BnshChapA 


Jy28 


BushCarrieE 


O-20 


" KittieJ 


" 


BushLiicyP 


ol9 


But^hPW 


o20 


BushWmH 


" 


"LottifE-ElizaA 


" 


BushW xN 


je27 


Bushnc'llMrsCS 


028 


" IdaE 


" 


BushnellEF 


s8 


BushnellFrankC 


s5 


BushnellMissFG 


019 


" MissJF 


" 


BushnellJH 


027 


BushnellSamC 


sS 


BusseFrancisT 


a2!) 


BiisseyRH 


Jel6 


BiitlerAnnaMJ 


n8 


ButlerB 


ol8 


" MissPsFA-SttsieA" 


ButlerEllaS 


o24 


BntlerFannieA 


Jyl9 


ButlerMrsFH 


621 


ButlorG-GC 


o30 


ButlerllD&wf 


jel3 


ButlerSB&wf 


Bl5 


ButlerThos 


627 


BiitlerWmM 


olO 


ButricksClarence 


n8 



*' Charlotte-Nancy 



olS 



827 
630 
017 
s4 
A22 



ButricksWN 
ButtricksCaptCA 

[CoE] 
BvingtonHM 
ByrneME 
ByronEL 
CachvellCn[CoD] 
CadwellChasK 
CadwellMrsChasK o2 
CadwellE o4 

CadyA je24 

CadyMamieE o31 

CadyMrsSL jyl7o31 
" NellieE jyl7 

CaldwellCarrieJ ol4 
CaldwellH [Grays] jy5 
CalhounFred'kS a23 
CalhounMrsDP o26 
CallahanT[SrCoC] s5 
CallenderMrsJB jel6 
CameronJH 
CampChasL 
CampEllery 
CampWmE&wf 
CampFA-EllaE 
CampHenryS 
CampLestt;rM&wje23 
CampWalterO jylO 
CampWmT Ato 

CampbellFU&wf sl2, 
CanadaFW Jy27 

CandeeMrsCT o4 

" Su?ieJ " 

CandeeJennieM s29 
CandeeKH jy24 

CandeeLeverett s5 
CannonFredC&wf 828 
CannonJames jy28 
CannonMrsJW n8 
" LeGrand " 

CannonMrsLeGr'd ol9 
CanuonMWilliam o27 
CarberryLtJLCoC] p6 
CargillEJosie a25 

CargillFA&wf n4 
CarlinBernard o27 
CarlisleChasH a30 
Carringt'nLtS [CoF] s5 



ClarkJennie 


a30 


" LillianJ 


" 


ClarkJE 


017 


ClarkJG(jel4)&wf si) 


ClarkLW&wf 


Je8 


" MissMinnieM 


" 


ClarkLottleA 


o4 


ClarkMaryE 


jyii 


ClarkMassena 


oil 


" JuliaA 




ClarkRS 


jy6 


ClarkSA 


o27 


ClarkSarahA 


jy27 


ClarkMrsSmithWjyl7 


ClarkWA 


87 


ClarkWmH 


s29 


ClarkeChasH 


o23 


ClarkCM 


o24 


ClarkeEdw'dN 


85 


ClarkeMH 


ol2 


" MrsMJ 


" 


ClarkeMreNW 


s6 


ClarkeNT-EllaH 


n2 


ClarkeWH-KateC o4 


ClevelandJaii-H 


Al8 



jy25 
829 

jel4 

o5 

o31 

n8 



CarterlmogeneL ol9 

CarterLewis ol9 

CarpenterAJje24s8ol6 

CarpenterAliceJR 88 

CarpeiUerJ jyl7 

CarpeiiterJM&wf 822 

CarpenterTB o24 

CarpenterTC ol9 

CarringtonAliceH o27 

OarriugtonDE [CoB] s4 

CarringtonMrsET s21 

••JBjr-MissesEA-HT" 

CarriiigtonHO jy7 

CaselVlreEdwin a22 

CatlinMreHenryS olO 

CatlinJennieR n3 

" - izzieM-GraceL " 

CatlinWBjr[Grays].Tyt; 

CanfleldMrsEM o20 

" Louise " 

ChadboumeAH o3 

ChalkerCC b14 

ChambersMrsH ol2 

ChamberiainGW a9 

ChamberlainJHP n9 

ChamberlinAC ol8 

ChamberlinC&wf ol9 

" MissME 

ChamberlinGeoR o3 

ChamberlinS o20 

ChamberlinSF s23 

ChandlerFrank a29 

ChandlerFF o25 

ChandlerWE&wf 89 

ChapmanEK b6 

ChapmanJoshuaE o25 CobnrnCS 6l9 

ChapmanMaryK o20 CobumJasH je29 

" Kate-Lillie " CoburnWmF s28 

CbapmauSW je23 CochranChasW je20 

ChapinFannieE ol9 CoeAnton a22 

ChapinWG[Yale] jc28 CoeMrsBenjH s27 

ChamleyWS Ml0s6,CoeChasW sl8 

[PayMWen'lCNG] CoeFredJ&wf o4 

CharpiotSA&wf ol2 CoeGeoH sl3 

ChaseCA&wf Nl CoeHL a29 

ChaseCF-EffleA a9 CoeWard&dau 821 

ChaseRandall je24, Coffin WA je5 

ChaseRebeccaD n8 , CoggeshallEL jel4 

ChatfieklEA&wf 89 CoUMrsJ sl4 

ChatfieldFrankH A22!ColbumWN[CoE] s4 

" WinetteE " ColemanMiss o31 

ChatfieldGW&wf o20' Coleman J-LM b27 

ChatfleldHenry olO CollinsClarissaE Ml8 

" ~ n9 CoUinsDC Jel6 

819 CollinsHattieS 89 

o31 CollinsMissIda a5 

ol9 Collins JerryF o3 

CollinsJosA-DH o4 

ol8 



CleetonS-PhebeA s22 
CliflfordEdith o7 

ClintonMrsGH je27 
ClockJH&wf o4 

" JHjr-Sophronia " 
CloseSolomon&wf 829 
CoanCR&wf s28 

CobbEE&wf Alo 

CobumAH ol7 

" Emm a J " 

CobnrnCS 
CobumJasH 
CoburnWmF 
CochranChasW 
CoeAnton 



ChatfieldHenryB 

ChatfieldPhilo 

ChattertonE 

ChattertonFW 

" MissL-FG 

ChattertonLouiseE n1 ComstockLF 

ChicksWm NlO " HannahM 

ChipmanDO-HA ol2 ConklinFE 

ChipmanNellieR n8 ConklinGeoW 



si 
821 

s5 
o31 
jy5 



ChittendenMrsG 
ChittendenHH 
"EE 

ChittendenRH 
ChristieMissEP 
ChristyWM 
ChurchDrDL 
ChurchJamesA 
ChurchMrsJasA a5s5 
ChurchJasR n1 

ChurchillChasS Jy27 
ClappJW oil 

"MrsMF-HM-OL " 
ClarkEdwL&wf Jel3 
ClarlvES 828 

ClarkFE 822 

ClarkHenryW aSO 



02 

016 

jyl9 

8l9 

826 



026 ConklinWT 

a29 ConlanRM 
ConnorPS 
ConnellFred 
ConverseMr&Mrs ol7 
ConverseChasR sl3 
ConverseFL s29 

CookAlex&wf 
" GeoF-JennieL " 
CookMrsAug s7 

CookGeoifewf 
CookGL-Isabella o4 
CookJasB je21 

CookSE s5 

CookWmJ jy26 



CookeFannieY b20 
CookeGeoL[Gra'B]jy6 



CookeThoe ol6 

CooleyGeoR 86 

CooleyLouiseW sll 

CoolidgeMaryJ o4 

CoolidgeWH jy78l9 

CooinbsJ [SerCoE] s6 

CooperAE ol9 

CooperDS s6 

CooperEW&wf sl2 

" ZW&wf 

CooperFA-WJ o26 

CooperFredG sl6 

CooperGertrudeL o20 

CooperHattieJ s21 

CooperHenryS s28 

CooperMG-KateM ol9 

CorbinAB o30 

CorbinFA jy26 

CornwallArthurB a9 

CornwallEStanley o26 

CornwalllR-DoraCAll 

CoruwallWW je22o30 

CorsaMreJnoE n2 

CorsonRobtT a20 

Cos ton WH [Grays] jy7 

CouchRobtl&wf o3 

Coun:rymanN 

CowellDavid&wf 

CowellEttieM 

" LucyA-HattieP 

CovveUSaraR 

CowellWmG 

CowlesEmilyJ 

CowlesEL 

CowlesMrsL 

" AliceM 

CowlesRP&wf 

" LouisC 

CowlesSEUen 

" EllenE 

CowlesSH-SJ 

CoxTM 

CraftsChas 

CraftsSamuelP 

CraftsMrsSP 

CraigFrankE 

CraigJR [Grays] 

CraigNevilleB 

CraneRobt-AugA sl4 

CraneSam'lH&wf b22 

CrawfordEvelynE o9 

Crawf'dHWNl-FMslS 

CreedMjr[CoC] s4 

CrisandEmil o28 

CrittendenCE 

" MrsCE-KateH 

CrockerllM 

CrockerJA 

CrockettCW 

CrockettDavidT 

CrockettLizzie 

CrofutMrsPS 

CrofutWS 

CronanPJ 

CrossleyFC 

" Nellies 

CrossleyHattie 

CrossleyJohnG 

CrouseRobtL 

CroweWm&wf 

CruttendenGeoO 

CudworthBS 

CudworthJessejr Mil 

CulbertsonMaryA jy8 



s2e 

o4 

a30 

a30 
a21 
je23 
je22 

8l5 

jel7 

023 

o2 
n2 
819 
85 

s38 
026 

84 

M29 



630 

812 

013 
Ml9 
o27 
OlO 
o9 
n4 
a24 

sll 
a25 
o4 
ol3 
n3 
jelO 



CulbertsonS 

CullumPatrick 

CulverGeoT 

CummingsWm 

CunniBgnamEH 



829 
s21 

o26 
a2 

on 



274 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



Cunnin?hamWJ jy3-3 DcwcllCH n3 

C'urtisdF sl8 UuwcUChasK A23 

0-24 DcwellLtJD[Gr'8] jy5 



Ciirtif^sAL 

Ciirti.KsJW 

Cur,is=;MrsMD 

CusickJohuE 

L'listerF 

CutlurMrsEUa 

CiitlerEvarts 

CutlerHE 

CntlerJennieE 

CutlerLabaaS 

DadeChas 

Da.leilattie 

DadeJohnT 

DaggettDrDL 

DaggettHenry 



jyGoSO 

Alt) 

s4 



sl8 



s9 
jytj 

on 

je37 
a25 
a24 

025 

oil 



jy35 DewellJesbieK 
o3ti •' MaryE 
jy5 DevveyTHenry 
o9 DexterllS 
n1 DexterStanleyW 
Al6 DibbleEzraB 
si DibbleWm&wf 
Nl DickermanChas 
o28 DickormanEliG 
jel DickennauES 
je23 " Minnies 
o20 DickennauMrsE 
n4 •' AeaG 
n9 DickermanFC 
DaggettLeonardM s4 DickerinanFH a13o24 
Datr^'ettWinG jyl2AlO DickermanGA Jy3 
DahTineyerE a17 DickermanJulia jell; 

DahlmeyerW a17 DickermanMissME o5 

DaileyHugh o24 DickermauNellieM o2 

" CarrieF " DickennanRC el8 

DaunJohnA je8 " HelenA " 

DannWF-ElIenM jyl DickennanWP s4 

DaunWalterK jy25 DickennanWP olO 
jyl2 Dickin80uAG[CoEl s4 
012 DickinsonAS[CoEJ eti 
" DicksonllC Jy5 

o5 DietterJjr ol2 

" DietterOtto&wf sl3 



DarlingES 
DarrowGeo&wf 
" Idalena 
DaveuportAM 
■ MrsRS 



DavenportMissEWjeO DikeraanOscar 



DavenportHG 

DavisChasD 

DavisCL 

DavisCM 

DavisEllhiiS-JB 

" Susiell-MayE 

DavisHenryC 

DavisIsaacF 

DavisLauraA 

" LulaB 

DavJsMH 

DavisThosHB 

Davison DA 



sl4 DillMrsCD 
o24 " ArthurC 

88 DillJasB 

o9 DisonCha8&-FA 
ol8 DixonGeo 

" DixouHG 
All DoddL-EleanorS 
olO DoeringLoui3 

s2 DoliertyJohii 

" DonuellyJolia 
8l5 DonovanJere 
jylO DoolittleEuiilyJ 
All " LouiseE 



DavisonSidneyH m22 DoolitiieOT 



DayAP 

DayEMurray 

DayGeoEE&wf 

DayHorace 

DayHN&wf 

" SM ME 

DayMrsTL 

DayMrsWF 



p6 
a31 

jye 
jy5 

s7 
Je6 
o26 
sl5 

n3 
ol9 
slo 
013 

jy28 
o2;i 



DudleyCW 

DudleyEM 

DudleyEPL 

DudleyFredA 

DudleyGeoE 

DudleyHL&wf 

DudluyMrsLW 

•• MissCE 

DiidleyNellieE 

D eyJohnK 

DiiflyFJ[SerCoC] 

DuuglisouRF 

DuulapKobtJ 

DuunUannaii 

DuutzeJohnR 

DiirandEA&wf 

DiirrieMrgSA 

DiitclierGW 

DutcherMrsR 

" MissA 

DnttonMrsH 

DiittonMary 

DwightDrEdwS 

DwightMissEC 

DyasJF [Grays] 

DyasJTLSerCoF] 

DyeOE 

DyerChasB 

EarleEC 

EarleFredC 

" Harry P 

EarleJohnE mIOnIO 

[TreasBdCentMangrp] 

EarleMrsJE o12n1() 

EarleJosepliC s4 

EastmanSarahC 

" KatieG 

EatonDan'lC n2 

" Mrs-MissBessle 

EatonldaE n3 

EatonRG-SaraC m27 

EdwardsGE [Gr'ys] jy5 

EdwardsJulia a2 

ElderMrsWm-WJ o24 



s8 
N8 
o5 
s9 

jy8 

o25 

s6 

s2e 

019 
m27 

n3 
014 

s8 
oil 

s21 
jy2i 

sl3 
013 

jy 

si) 

a29 

n4 

s4 

o26 



jel9 

n8 

jy2J 

sl4 

s6 

jel9 



jel7jDoolittlPMr90T 

a9 " AnnaM " 

jy8'DoolittleTE&son jc8 

jyl2 DoolittleWE[CoD] s4 

Jel2 DormanGeoL m2U 

" DormanLucyE ol9 

822 DormanOA o2 

o4 DormanRO-Nellie o5 



s27 
s2 



DayWilburP-AH Jel6 DoughertyHzzie a24 
DaytonGeoH o4 DouglassBH ol7 

DaytonJC-WL ol9 DouglassBHjr s6 

DeanJJ o3 DouglassFredP o2 

DeBowsJJ o5 DouglassSJ si 

DeForestAW&wf m22 DouglassWmK o4 

" MissLucia " DowEdZ o25 

DeForestCS jel5 DowdHLB n1 

"Eugene " DowdMQL-N'lieH AlO 

DeForestEmily a18 DownesEdw-Alf sl2 
DeForestGeo §7 " MaryB-JT-Julia " 

De Forest JW jel DownesLtSA[CoE] s6 

DeFrancheauCIaritajS DowningFrankU o23 
" Lillienne " DownsMrsChas o25 

DemingCL o30 " WR 

Deming,TL-MS 8l3 DownsJI o26 

" CM-LS " Draine.Ino[GrayB] jy5 

Denis^onCarrieR ol2 DrakeCarl s4 

DenisonWA o5 DrakeGeoS a22 

DenslowWL s7 DreyfuesEdward 82 

DepewFrankL a22 DriggsMrsHD jelO 
DevereauxEranoras22 DriscollCT e27 

DevlinWmJ ol9 DuBoi8DrHA&fams28 

DeviiieER-CM a9 DudleyAE-ML s27 

Dt;ViucJO[CoD] 84 DudleyChas 6l8 



EldridgeJD 

ElliotCS 

EUiottGH 

EUiottMissJC 

ElliottljewisEjr 

" MrsEP-LouiseA •' 

EUiottLA Al5 

ElIiotML-LouiseFjeie 

ElliottWhitfleld All 

EUisEE a31 

EngelCaptCG[CoB] s5 

EngelGV^LSerCoB] s6 

EngleJP s7 

EnglishBR[Gr'8]jy5o7 

EnglishMrsBR o7 

" Master JB " 

EnglishChasL slS 

EnglishEH m31o18 

EnglishMrsGeo ol9 

EnglishGeoL " 

EnglishMrsGraceE s29 

EngHshHenryP a12 

EnglishJasE 

EnglishJT 

EnglishE-JuliaA 

EnglishLewisH 

EnglishLillie 

EnoJA 

EnoMrsJA 

EnoWmH 

EnsignHarryH 

EnsignMrsTW 

■' JessieH 

EnsignWP 



EvansMissjn 

EvartsEmeliue 

EveritRM 

AM-EddieH 
EveritWLctwf 
EveritWniLjr 
EysingMissAL 
FabriquejMisC'has nS 
FabriquellJ a23 

FagauTII s21 

FaircliildEliza Nl 

FairchildllD 627 

FaircliildLB[CoE] s6 
FairmauJas a29 

FarnhamAN a23 

FarnhamGeo 826 

FaruiiamGeoW a15 
FarnsworthFB&w A22 
" Emily J 
FarrellJolmP 
FarreuEP 
FarreuGeoP 
FarrenJosephD 
FarrenRB&wf 
FehlbergA 
FeldmanLouis 
" Clara 

FentonEH-EG 
FergusonCH 
FergusoiiEd 
FerrisGL&wf 
Ferry Pb Dander 
FieldBK 
FieldEdwW 
FieldMA 
PieldMEmma 
FieldingJames 
FieldsMissAA 
" MissJE 
FieldsIIoraceH 
FieldsLizzie 
FieldsWml' 
FilleyMyronW je28N3 
FilleyMrsMW-HG ■ 



All 
023 
A26 
s6 
sl9 

el3 

ol7 
A23 
Jy3 

67 

025 
je23 
ol6 
a24 
s6 
827 
Jy5 

o30 
a26 

s20 



o25 
sl3 

828 

84 



029 
Al5 
ol2 

o3 
Jv8 
oil 

n2 
OlO 
jyl3 

o2 



FiuneyGeoL 

FinkChasW 

FisherGeoE 

Fi8herHT[CoE] 

Fiske Alice F 

FiskeMinnieE 

PitchCH-AnnaM 

" MissEmmaS 

PitchDeliaC 

FitchHattieL 

" CarrieB 

FitchJohnB 

FitchJT&wf 

FitchL-EmilyG 

FitchWm&wf 

FlanaganJohnJ 

FletcherJohn 

FlintP 

FolsomGS 

FolsomND 

FooteA-AnnetteM oil 

FooteMrsA o9 

FooteChasJ Jy24 

FooteCaroline n8 

FooteBdY s8 

FooteMrsJennleM 821 



89 

jel3 
Jy5 

s4 
825 
oil 
012 

87 
821 

64 

Jyl2 
827 



sll 
n2 



o23 
EvarisMrsJ-Fannie e9 



PooteLozelle 

PootcMII 

FooteRobt 

FooteSF [Grays] 

FooteST 

FooteTrnmanS 

FootcMrsTS 

FodtcWilfred-RobNlO 

FooteWI-AM n9 



jy5 

n8 
sl9 
«22 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS — NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



275 



ForbesMrsAM 

ForceMrsBEliza 

FordDeWittE 

FordEJeuuie 

FordHowardG 

Ford JW [Grays] 

FosterChasB 

FosterMrsDwight 

" RSB 

FosterER 

FoeterHarrieL 

FosterHeuryB 

FosterWmL&wf 



028 
N-2 

a:31 

jyll 

k9 

s4 

sl9 
a8 

o20 

oi) 
sl5 



Fo\vlerCE&w-MrsTN3 



jelo 

Jy5 
o24 
a23 
a2o10 
oil 
o27 
n3 

66 
S29 
olO 
Jy3 



FowlerCE 

FowlerChasH 

FowlerCNewell 

FowlerMrsEC 

FowlerED 

FowlerFA 

FowlerMissIE 

FowlerJohnH 

FowlerKatieM 

" EllenT 

FowlerMaryF 

FoxGeoL 

FoxMrsHenry 

FoxJohn 

FoxColSimeonJ m10s5 

[AsstAdjtGenCNG] 
FoxTimothyJ so 

FoyJasH&wf jy26 
FrancisAnsonW jyll 
Francisco n9 

FrancisFH&wf 86 
FrancisGeoL o5 

FrancisWalterR a30 
FrankEmil ol4 

Frauk^Iilius olO 

FrankenbachGeo a12 
FranklinJnoL a29 
FrankliuW-MaryLAlH 
FranklinVR sO 

FrayJnoH[CoE] s4 
FrazierJas jel4 

FredericksMrsCD jy5 
FreedmanStella o30 
FreemanCH 
FreemanCN-NR 
FreemanJulia 
FrenchChasJ 
FrenchEmmaG 
FrenchGracie 
FrenchLillieH 
FrenchMrsTrumanon 
FrenchWP o27 

FrisbieMrsDennis sl2 
FrisbleFrankW jyl4 
FrisbieFrankE 
FrisbieGeoE 
FrisbieMrsHE 
FrisbieJno&wf 
FrisbieWT 
FrostHP-SHyatt 
FrostJH 
" MrsHenry 
FiiUerABifewf 
FullerHG 
FullerMartha 
FuUerSarahL 
FnbnerFrank 
FultoiiJH-CE 
FultonTHir 
FultonWiilH 
" SarahM 
FylerMFrank 
GabrielOeo&wf 
GaffnevTW-NH 
GalbraithRobtT 



GalbraithLucyL 

'• RosaF 

GaleLeRoy-AM 

GaleWm&wf 

GallagherJames 

" ML 

GallagherJasjr&w si29 

GallupC jy5sl4 

GalpinCarrieM jy7 

GamsbyEmmaP ol8 

GamsbyHE 

GansEM 

GardnerGH 

GarrityJ[SerCoC] 

GatesFrankB 

GatesJno 

GawthropJR 

GayWm&wf 

GaylordES 

GaylordMrsEdwS o27 

GaylordFH-JF Jy20 

GeerGeoW ■ 

GenungEdwW 

GernerChas 

GerrettDavidB 

GessnerEA jy7s6o23 

[CaptNHGrays] 
GessnerMrsEmilA o23 
GibsonWmW Je30 
GiddingsMenaA jy21 
GilbertAgnetiH 
GilbertCB-Mary 
■' SarahA-Helen 
GilbertEB-SaraB Nl 
GilbertEllaB m30 

GilbertED-ElizaC ol4 
GilbertFA&wf jyll 
GilbertMrsFP m31 
GilbertGeo m25 

GilbertGE-CM a23 
" AnnieW-MaryA " 
GUbertMrBlID 
" MissLizzieB 
GilbertJuo 
GilbertJB&wf 
GilbertJF&wf 
GilbertLeviC 
GilbertLM 



Hll 
o9 
s26 



026 
sl3 

All 
66 
Nl 

jel6 

NlO 

a8 



jy3 
n9 

a31 
03 



o5 
jel 



GoodnowAlbertR nIO 
GoodvvinEdwE m3() 
" MreChauncey "■ 
GoodrichHeppieE a24 
GoodrichJI&wf o9 
" Frank " 

GoodsellEL a29 

GoodgellEPjr a4 

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" JosephineA " 

GoodseUGW jy5sl4 

[Grays] 
GoodvvinllenryC sl9 
GoodwinJnoE jy25 
GoodwinMaryS n2 
GoodwinWA-EH s25 
GoodwinWC je24o7 
GoodwinMrsWC a21 
" WR 

GoodyearMH-FH o3 
GoodyearWmB n2 
GorhamChasE jyGNS 
GorhamHB-\VB sl8 
GorhamLottie-FC o27 
GorhamMC jy31 

GoughChasH sl3 

GourlayWD[CoD] s4 



HalflngerChas 

HallAD 

HallAT&wf 

HallBelleM 

HallCB 

HallMrsEE 



024 

olO 

jyll 

o3 

o2 



Sl2 

si 3 

021 

jy31 

s6 



n8 



a29 

sl9 GilbertM-MissAM o30 

820 
jel4 
jel9 

o23 

Ml9 



024 

s18 

n2 

s6 

jy4 

827 

66 

b7 
jelO 
Jy21 

s7 
jyll 

86 

85 

811 

o6 

012 

a4 

b6 



GilbertMary 
" Mary A 
GilbertMaryW 
GilbertMG&wf 
GilbertMrsSJ 
Gilbert WF&wf 
GilbertWH 
'• MrsWH 
GildersleeveMrsLR 61 
" Anna A " 

GildersleeveNancy s6 
GileJoseph jy26 

GilletteAnnaF jyll 
GilletteGD s9 

GladdenGeoB a16 
Gladdir.gHenryH a8 
GladwinCliasP 67 

GladwinLillianA Je28 
GlamptnerJoeie a1 
" MinnieV " 

GleesonJamesJ ol2 
GlenneyDS&wf ol7 
GleuneyFA o4 

GlenneySW ol2 

Gold8mithGH&wf n8 
GoodellEB-TD jyl3 
GoodellJasP 87 

GoodmanAndrew 8ll 
GoodmanSaml 68 

" Sophia " 



GowerGeoD 

GowerSC 

GraliamCBjr 

GrahamHW 

GrandfieldTP 

GrannieCE[CrCoF] " 

GrantMrsJuliaW s5 

GravesAnnaD e21 

GravesFrankA ^9 

Graves J A-MaryH jy 10 

Graves J noS ol9 

GravesWmB ol6 

GrayAJ a25 

GrayMrsBessieW jyl6 

GrayMrsChasS jel3 

GreelyES&wf je6 

GreenMrsBC 

GreenJnoD 

Green WmH 

GreeneEllaGL 

GreeneFrankH 

GreenleafGeoE 

GrifflnMrsEben'r 

GrifflngMrs 

" Misses 

" Johns 

GrifflngPC 

GrifflngCaptJ 

GriffingMrsJ 

GriswoldMispC 

GriswoldGeoM 

GriswoldHB 

GrossGeoH 

GruenerLeopold 

GuernseyMrsCA 

" Henry-James 

Guernsey WmL 

GunnAlbertW 

GunnGeo 

" HarriettP-EllaH " 

GiitbrodtJ[SerCoB] s6 

GuttJno[CorCoB] " 

GnttJoB[CorCoB] " 

HadlevArthurT olO 

HadlyGeo 

HadlevJnoB 

HadsellSarahM 

HagueBenj 

HaleEttaH 

HaleEA&wf 

Halellenry 

HaleMattliew 



017 

8l9 

OlO 



' MissesliV&Belle ' 



o20 
05 



o3 

jy8 

s4 
s21 

627 

87 

jyll 



o27 
820 
jy3 

MlO 



HallEdwEjr 

HallFanuieP 

HallFC[CoBl 

HallFP 

HallFranklinW 

HallHA 

HallLizzieP 

"■ LizzieC-Comelia 

" FannieP 

HallMrsNelson 

HallNF&wf 

HaUWniM 

HallldayHattie 

" Gertrude " 

HalliwellSam'l&w ol9 

HaniiltonRose o7 

HaniiltonTS je29 

HanimC[SerCoB] s6 

HammettAnnieL jel3 

HargerOscar&wf ol2 

HarrisFH-NH je8 

•' EF-MrsEW 

HarrisFN&wf je21 

HarrisWH o2 

IlarrisonAlbertC jel4 

Harrison ArthurWjylS 

HarrisonEnmiaC s8 

HarrisonFrancis 

UarrisouFredH 

HarrisonGeoH 

HarrisonHB 



ol3 
ol3 

621 
sll 



HarrisonHB[Gr's] jy5 



HarrisouSaml 
" Arietta 
HartAB 
HartCE-BelleF 
HartDC 



6l4 

ol7 
sl9 

a31 



jy3 HartFranklinH&w8l6 
615 HartMayA 
jyl|" MinnieL 
84 HartMrsJJ 
o24|HartRP 



Jy25 
Jl5 
je5 

813 

a28 
JJ'6 
n3 
014 

o20 
o31 
o25 



628 



HartMrsSW 

HartMrsWH 

HartWT 

HartensteinS 

HartsonMrsET 

HarwoodE-Alida 

HarwoodMayT 

•^ Bennie 

HartzelJnoS 

HassellLouisA 

HatchMrsHR 

HatfieldllR 

HatliawayWA 

AnnieJ 
HatstatEA 

MrsAA 
HatstaUW 
HausmanChas 
HavilandWT 
HawcsEdward 
HawkesCiiasB 
HawkesSaniN 
HawkesWmW 



814 

ol3 

jyll 

Ml9 

o9 
a30 
620 

s8 
012 



06 
a7 

611 
613 

a25 

o28 

o20 
819 
66 
MlO 
Al9 
o4 

64 



a5 Hawkins^MH&wf a92 



jel5 Hawleylin 

A92:HaydehldaC 

o4 HaycsEFred'lc 

s27 Hayej^EdgarL 

s26 HayesEdwR 



je]6 
ol2 

jyso 

s4 
o26 



Bl9 HayesF-AnnieE jy27 



276 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



HayesFrancesD 


o28 


Ha.vet»MH[idR},'t] 


82 


HuyesNathanielJ 


Nl 


*• FannieRutherford" 


HayesPJ 


sl9 


HayesWmB 


o21 


" So!)hiaE-MaryJ 


" 


Hazel.MrsGW 


s20 


HazenHA 


a22 


HealyB 


s2fi 


HealylJart 


s9 


HealyBjr 


o2o 


HealyJnoE 


88 


HealyM 


s5 


HeaneyJasJ 


jyii 


HeatonMrs^Ed 


Jel 


" MissAB-CA 


" 


HedgesMrsAE 


Nl 


HeilemannP 


St) 


HeitraanER 


811 


HellebergV 


Je29 


HellerEmily 


o24 


HellerLeah 


m30 


HemingwayCW 


a8 


HemiugwayD 


o25 


" PredB-WE 


*' 


" HC-WA 


" 


HetniugwaySjr 
" JS 
HeiideeED[Gr'8]j 


a23 


y7s6 


HeudrickAU 


s6 


[BngAdjtCNG] 


HendrickAD&wf 


o4 


HendrickCB 2dRg 


t]s2 


HendrickEllaL 


o21 


HeudrlckJA-AD 


jyl3 


HendrickWR 


S2(i 


HenleyJnoA 


NlU 


HennanHenry 


a7 


HerrickLewis 


a21 


HerzHenry 


821 


HibbardEWir 


s5 


HibbardRP&vvf 


822 


HicksChasP 


s7 


Hicks Eliza 


n3 


HicksGeoW 


82!» 


" Marietta 


" 


HigbyEW&wf 


sl2 


HigbyMrsEP 


o27 


Higgin^JiiliaA 


s6 


HigginsWmO 


jyli 


HildebrandC 


819 


HildrethJD 


o26 


HillAB jel5o3 


HillEiiireneC 


s9 


[SergtMajadRgt] 


HillHenryLLGr's] 


jy5 


HillHenryR 


ol2 


HillsMA 


87 


HillMaryE 


031 


HillRichardH 


ol2 


HillWB-CyrasP 


Al4 


HillWmT 


Nl 


" MaryJ-EmmaE 


" 


Hill9AddieL 


o6 


HillsRansom 


024 


" Mattie 




HillsMrsRansom 


a30 


HillhouseFrank 


jy5 


HillhoiiseJames 


sl9 


HillerAH 


ol6 


Hil5irtorfAC[CoB] 


s4 


HiiidslevFrcd 


o4 


HiiieCW 


s27 


IltneDavidH 


o2.-, 


HineG Edward 


olO 


HineGS 


a23 


Hinell.I-EH 


s7 


HineJBurton 


a22 



ol2 



IlineEdwardL 

HineNVV 

HineVVS 

IlinraanOhasW 

lliaiuauEmmaL 

HirsciiAdolph 

Hir6chG[SerCoB] 

HitchcockAbigail 

HitclicockBtirritt je23 

HitchcockMrsCR a12 

HitchcockWmH 822 

HitcliingsWH 

IIoadleyGeoC 

HoadleyHenryS 

Hodgson.) oiin A 

H odgs on Marie A 

HoffmaiiJSmitb 

HoggsonSJ-WJ 

HolcombGP 

HolfordLizzie 

HollandGustavus 

HollandJohn 

HollidaySamlS 

HoUisTC-TC'jr 

HollisterFH&wf 

HoUisterJoiinC 

HoUisterVVillie 

HolmesAlex-AM 

HolmesAWilson 

HoltA&wf 

Holt Alberts &wf 

HoltMrsGH 

HomanChas n2 

HoodJasB[Gray8] .jy7 

nooghkirkHC[CoD]s9 

Hooker AE 87 

ilookerHenry ol9 

■' Carrie-MrsAnna " 

HookcrWG[Gr'8] jy5 

HookerMrsWortuing- 



ol2 

s7 

Nt; 

n8 
s27 
8<i 



814 
MlO 
Ol4 
ol7 

Jy8 

A2ti 

S27 

Jyl3 

a4 

ol:^ 

n9 

Nl 
819 

o:iO 
oil 
oil 
sl9 
jy(i 
je8 
o2 
819 



jel 
a23 
s26 

8l4 

m2] 



ton 
HopkinsFredC 
HopkinsGeoJ 
HopkinsMaryJ 
HoppenDanielM 
HoppinJM-JMjr 
HoppinMrsJM 
HopsonWmP 
HornHH 
HomerCW 
HortonCeliaA 
HortonMaryJ 
HortonPC 
HortonWm 
HosmerPredA 
HotchkissMrsAH s20 
HotchkissAP ol7 

HotchkissCarrieE s2U 
"JasG 

Hotchki?sTT&wf ol9 
" MaryDeF-MrsEW" 
HotchkissEAjr 
HotchkissEE&wf 



je3 

820 
jeG 

Al6 

n9 

s22 

Jyl3 



s4 
je3 
m19 

jy8 

s29 

s4 

88 



Hotchki8sLR[Gr9].iv7 
Hotchkis8LS&wf o24 
HotchkissMrsLS m26 
HotchkissMaryL 
HotchkissN&w 
Hotchki88NA 
HotchkissSaraG 
Hotchk)88SE 
HotchkissTB 
HotchkissVVP 
Hotcliki8sWW&wf o2 
HowardAL 626 

HowardH ol 

Ho\varthAM[Grs] jy6 
HowarthER 8l4 

" IreneC 
HowarthJamesA o27 
HowarthMr^JH s22 
HowarthJHjr&wf s21 
HowarthSani'lB n6 
HowlandChasH s26 
HowlaudEliha a30 
•' NormaE 
HovtChasH n6 

HoytMrsPrancesMNlO 
HoytNIIjr je21 

HubbardAlexS a8 
HubbardHP&wf a22 
HubbardlsabelD jylO 
HubbardJoelP s5 

HubbardWillardB Jy8 
HubbardWmH jy5 
HubbardChasP n9 
HubbellMrsCP-SM s6 
HiibbellFannieH n3 
IhibbellGcoH 84 

HubbdlHatticE s8 
HiibbellJW-MaryGolO 
HubbellJennieE n3 
" Sarah A 
HubbellJohnB 
HubbellMB 
HubbellNathan 
HughesFrank 
" Isathaii 
HughesHNAwf 
Hughes WW&wf 
HugoPhilip&wf 
HullMA-AB 
HullCeliaJ 
HullCE 
HullMissEffie.I 



sl9 
o24 
o30 
ol6 

ol2 
ol8 



Hyde AnnaC s27 
InixersolK-'hasR m10s7 
[PreeBdConnMangrs] 
IngersoUMrsChasK 87 
•' JuPtineH-ElizS " 
IngersollColinM ailO 
IngersoUMrsCM 89 
" MaryE-Maud "■ 
IngersollCMjr m25 
IngersoUPrancisG s9 
IngersoUJona&wf 
InofersollRobt 
InghamPD o4 

Ingham S J [Grays] jy5 



IrvingLinda 

IrwinTP 

Isaacson AnnaM 

IsaacsonWJ 

IsbellGA 

IsbellMS 

IshamPrankW 

IvesMrsPredk 

" Henry 

IvesGA 

IvesGeoH 

IvesMrsKB 

IvesKateM 

IvesLelandH 

IvesMissLT 

IvesMaryC 

IvesRS&wf 



s9 
826 

85 

je3 
ol9 

Mil 
Nl 

a25 

m24 
Jy27 

814 

815 
Je27 

8l4 

a25 
ol9 



AlfredS-CarolineS' 



IvesMrsSC 

IvesWmB 

JacksTMjr 

JackeonPredkA 

JacksonGeo 

JacksonRebecca 

JacksonSL 

JacksonWm 

JamesHB 

JarmanPT 

•larvisChasL 

JenkinsN-FC 

JenningsWF 

[CorCoF] 
JenteEdward 
8l4 1 Jente Julius 
a24 JentePaul 
jel2 Jepsonli&wf 



027 

n9 
Al2 
o2« 

n3 
829 

s4 
027 

a4 

oil 

jyl8 

o20 

s6 

s21 
820 

ol8 

Al5 



023! JeraldsMart'aV-SC n4 



o23 JeraldsOL s21 

HuilEdwII [Grays] jy7 JeromeLE-LM o24 

c)19|HullPhilander sl4 JeromeMrsS 8l8 

825 HullVVmH je6 JewettJVValdo s23 
HumeSarahJ aIO JewettDrPA-WH s4 

HumistonFT ol6 JewettStephen 622 

HumphreyBr[Gr8].Jv5 JohnsonChasE je27 



a'24 JohnsonChasLjel5o27 
822 



HumphreyChas 

•' EllaC " JohnsonCL 

HungerfordFL&wfol7r CoraS-EilaA 
s2|HuntCT olG JohnsonEM 

o7lHuntEmelineF All JohnsonEmmaM 



o31 

HunterCarrieS ol9 
nunterMrBFa'nieLs22 



HotchkissGH&vvf o3 HuntMrsGW 
HotchkissGM&wf Nl 
HotchkissMrsGeo sl6 

"MissMJ-PG " HunterJM a9 
HotchkissHattieA o30 " Owen 

HotchkiesMrsH o21 HuntleyEllaO ol7 

" SV-ES-MarthaP " HuntleyWmH 821 

HntchkissHO&wf oil HurdJohnG o2 

"Miss " HurlbntAH-MW a23 

HotchkissHenryL jeS HurllnitCA a19 

IIotchkissHL s22 HurlbutPW o23 

HotchkissJS&wf m15 HuributHW&wf ol7 

HotchkissKatieA jy25 HurlbutJH .. o7 

HotchkissLona o6 HurlbutWallace ol7 

HotchkissLGwf ol2 HurleThomas Al2 
" LizzicB 



JohnsonFrank 
JohnsonFA 
JohnsonllenryJ 
JonnsonHSi&wf 
Johnson JasC&wf 



o27 
823 
je27 
Nl 
n3 
sl2 
o2 



JohnsonJQA a31 

Johnson.JR Jyl9 

John son LP a24 

" AnnieS-Louise " 
JohnsonOliver Jy22 
JohnsonSamuel a23 
JohnsonSB&wf .Ty28 
JohnsonSW&wf .iel2 
" MissCA 
JohnsonWm jyl4 



HutchinsHL jyl8o26'JohnsonWmB ol6 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



277 



JohnstonAC s20 

Johnt^tonEdwS S-9 

JohnstonJC Jy6 

JohnstonJCM n2 

JohuetonMaryS Je7 

JohnstonR a25 
JohnstonMrsWm n2 

JonesAK a26 

JonefEdwardL s5 

JonesGraceA ol9 

JonesIf^aacE&wf sl3 

JonesJC ol6 

JonejiMrs All 

" Josephine " 

Jonesltatie a5 

JonesTillie Je30 

JonesWB s7 

JonesWH s6 

JordanCFwfison s21 

JoyChagF Jy31 

JuddAimieC o2 

JuddEII 17 

JuddEM s8 

JuddMrsEdwP o24 

JnddGeoE s\ 

JuddGeoW o20 

JuddXelsonE s22 

JnddVictoriaA ol9 

JudsonEA je23 

JudsonllE a28 

JudsonJaneP o20 
" CharlotteE 
Judson JohnB&wf ol8 

JudsonDrWalter n1 

KatsenChasE o2 

KayJH a22 

KeelcrJohnH s21 

KeeganMF[CoC] s6 

KeelerChasW sl5 

KeeierJS a20 

KellamAII o7 
" t mmaC-Fred'kB 

KellerChasB jelO 

KellerWmj je23 

KelloggCW-NS o3 

KelloggFrankE a16 

KclloggFrankDjr o24 

KelloggLF o4 
'■ Frances 

KellyJH ol3 

KelseyA olO 

Kelr^evE&wf-Hjr Al6 

KendrickWD s5 
" JMD 

KennedyDA a29 
KennedyWW[CoD] sC 
KentMrsEliz 

Kern Abraham sl4 

KernFanny o4 

KerrMrsRobt a30 
KettendorfL'uiseAoll 

KettererEmmaL 8i9 

KettererFredH a24 

KeyAF a22 
KeyFC 

KidstonAL je24 

KilboumBH&wf el3 
KillamE&wf 

KillamHenry ol2 
" MrsC 

KillamJE sl5 

KillamNcllie a30 
KimballDR 

KimballHA 828 
" HannahM 
KimberlyChas&wjel2 
KimberlyEEIliott 

KimberlyMrsEE o26 

KimberlyES&wf je3 



KimbcrlyMrsGeoEsS? 
KimberlyIIN[CoE] s7 
KiugDM&wf n6 

KingJoseph s7 

KingJulia n6 

KingJW^ra-FM a21 
KingLouiseM Al5 
KingNA-GeoW n9 
KingWniH o25 

KingsleyED s6 

KingsleyWmL Jy4 
KirbyMrsJohnB a28 
KirbyLizzieC a3 

" EmmaH " 

KirchgesynerJ o20 
KirchhoffFjr s7 

Kirk e Johns a16 

KirkhamGC n9 

KirkhamLeroyJ o25 
KingsburyEH ol8 
KleinFredericC s27 
Klein F[SerCoB] s6 
KleinJF o20 

" MrsMinaL 
KleinJohnJ-GJ Al7 
KlemMaryJ sl2 

KlockCarrie 
KlockElizD s6 

KIockEmma n4 

KIii2:FrankJLCoB] s4 
KnappCL a29 

KneringerRFC ol2 
KnightilenryA&wol8 
KnightonJobn ol9 
KnothWm a29 

KnowlesSeldenW a9 
KnoxIIarrietC jylO 
Kochlsaac s8 

Kohnllattie o24 

KomLP[SerCoD] s6 
KraftHenry jyl2 

KrizerChas ol7 

" MissSA 

KnskeHenry sll 

LaceyWm n(> 

LaFayettePDjr 
LaflinH-Lizzie jel3 
Lake;Mr8BCjr n3 

LakeFerris ol8 

LakeLI 
LambGeoD 6l9 

LambertBL s7 

LambertGD o24 

■' EllenA-FrankJ 
LambleyFP a17 

LampsonEdwinA oil 
LaneFredA o2 

LanfairML 
LangdaleFrankR jy5 
LangdalellattieA jy8 
LangdaleR-Sarah o"31 
LangleyWmA sl3 

LansingChasW 84 
LansinsGH[CoD] 86 
LarnedGeoH Al9 

Latham JasD[2dRt] s4 
LathropRL&lady e9 
LawGeoA ell 

LawLizzieF " 

LawLyman ol3 

LawLjTnanT Al4 

LawMaryE ol3 

LawShermanB b19 
LawWnir jylO 

LawWyllysA 8l2 

LawlerJohnS Jel3 
LawrenceSoph'ieC s27 
LawtonTJ o25 

" ImogeneC 



LayneChasP sll 

FannieE "■ 

LeachLH-MrsSA o2 
LearnardAUen s4 

LeavenworthDC s29 

MrsJH 
Leavenw'rthMrsEA o9 

Jessie " 

LeavenworthEJ ol7 

IE 
Leavenw'rthMreJBje7 
LederorP mIO 

LeeCR je28 

LeeFT o4 

LeeHoraceH b11 

LeeWH 86 

LeckEmma-MaryAASO 
" CharlotteR 
" Minerva " 

LeesRolandL 
" MrsMA 
LegartDP 
LegoWF 
LeightonJE 



LovelandMrsJO k2 
LowMrsWW n3 

LoweGreoH [Grays] jyl 
LowellMr?R-CC o21 
LowellWmH ol3 

LuckeFA s8 

LuddenMrsMJ Ml 5 
LnddingtonH'tieA jy6 
LnmBC a23 

LundbergEH a16 

LutzPJ o3 

LynnLtEdw[CoC] s6 



sl9 



o27 
a26 

LeiRhtonMrsJT&snAl 



LyonMrsCC 

LyonDC 

LyonsF-MrsE 

LyonsIIenry&wf 

LyonsNathan 

LymanAbbie 

LymanCS&wf 

LymanCW 

LymanDcIiaW 

Lyman Ed w 

LymanllN&wf 



s21 
Al4 

s5 

o9 
a31 
m22 

s5 
a31 

s6 
825 
M29 



LintonEW 


Bl4 


LeonardJN 


s8 


LesseyHW-PC 


NlO 


LeeterSam'lA 


n9 


LesterMrsT 


m29 


LewisAdeliza 


o9 


LewisAnnieE 


olS 


LewisArthiir 


827 


LewisRevAN 


s6 



[Cliaplain2dRegt] 



LewisC 

LewisCarllA 

LewisMrsEA 

LewisHenryG 

LewisMrsJC 

LewisJW 

" JosieM-MattieC " 

LewisT&wf-Hattieol4 



sl8 

ol8 

814 

s7 

je2' 

614 



LincolnWmA 

LindeGeoS 

LindonMrsWV 

LindsleyDrCA 

" LydiaL 

LindsleyCP 

LiefcklAll)ert 

LiefeldAF 

" MarthaA 

LiefeldETheo 

" Mary J 

LiefeldGeo 

LinesAE 

LineaMrsAE 

LinesIdaWilmot 

LinnGeoE 

LinquietChasF 

LinquistDrMFMrs bl7 

LinsleyCM[CoD] 86 

LinsleyFA 

LinsleySD 

LittleHG 

LittleJA 

LloydSam'l&wf 

LloydWmR 

LockwoodCP 

" MaryG 

LoebSeligman 

LohmanFA 

LoomisEtta 

LoomisHB 

LoomisLtnR[CoE] s6 

LoomisLonF o27 

|LordHenryC ol3 

LoudenbachLena 8l2 

LoundsburyTR jyll 



A24 

64 

827 

n2 

S20 

05 

n3 

o4 

JJ'12 

Jy25 



s22 

o26 
Jy24 

a23 

jel3 

s6 

sl4 

a31 

Al8 

02 
016 



o6 
o31 

s4 
024 
o31 

n3 

827 

ol7 

jySl 

s6 

819 

OlO 
a4 

6S0 

s6 
n9 
018 

AS 
8l5 

023 
a23 
621 
a25 
o7 



LymanOEllsworth aSO 

LynchllenryP 

LynchRia 

MacholH 

MacholSarah 

MacomberMrsJA 

MageeNellie 

MagieTB&wf 

ManerMichacl 

MailhouscMas 

" Sarah 

MalletSS 

MallonChas 

MallorjABjr 

MalloryArthurS 

MalloryCook 

Mallorj'GeoH 

MallorylH 

MalloryLauraS 

MallorySaraA 

MallorySW 

MaltbyBelleC 

MaltbyChasT 

MaltbyGeoE&wf 

MaltbvJasE 

MaltbvMrsOE 

MannBA-MrsWM s21 

MannBelaA-BelaH o24 

MannChas[CorCoB] s6 

MannSamuel o3 

ManningCM-CE o30 

ManningMJ-EB sl5 

ManrossRobtE 84 

MansfieldEF&wf Al4 

" BenjT 

" MrsHarriettJ " 

MansfieldHenryW b12 

MansfleldMrsHW o31 

MansfieklHoraceJ s26 

MansfieldMrsJM sl4 

MansfieldLoisA 

MansonJT 

" CaptG 

ManvilleLewis 

" Mri^Mary 

MaplesCR 

MarchallNettieT 

MarleyWmR 

MarsdenS Arthur 

MarsdenSL 

MarsdenMrsSL 

MarshCarrieA 

MarshFredC 

MartinAndrcw 

" Fannie-BelleD 

MartinFrancis 



sl2 
o30 

NlO 

Jy26 

Al4 

n3 
025 
m26 
o25 
a25 
o28 
o26 



NlO 



278 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



MarfinGeo 
MarlinUK 
MirtylvanM je-,'4 

MarviuiiijuP&wf jc-S 
Marx Waco)) s7 

MasloiiLatiraE a21 
Mason II JoU 

Mason MrsIIerbert sl2 
MasonJZ 87 

MatherTVV a24 

Mason LouisS [Qrys] s5 
Mason Mary E o5 

MatherllenryP jy5 
Matt he wmanC [Gr] .ry5 
Mathcw.nanJohn jel4 
Mat'wnian Mamie jy27 
MatthewsCMAwf jeia 
MatthewsMrsBJw s20 
MatthewsGeoS o25 
MatthewsWalter n3 
MatthiasJolinJ 
MattinglvJM 
May J 

MayMarthaB 
MayhewW 
MayerLW 
McAlisterA 
" L-.\A 
McAlUterMrsA 
McAlisterMrsNL 
McArthurD 
McArthtirDuncanjr 
MuBrideWniK 
McCarthy El ward 
McCarthyMaryL 
McClellaudThos 
McCrackenJ-JH 
McCiienReva 
McGilvrayChas 
McGilvrayForgus 
McGilvrayMa"-"-ie 
MsGrathPM&wf 
McGiiireJC 
McIntyreAW 
MacIutireJC 
McIntireMrijRW 
" MrsTC 
McKean.JB-WW 
MclCeeMrsWE&chsl4 
McKennaP 827 

McKenzioColinM sU 
'• Helen R 

McKenzieJK a5 

" ChasW-GertrudeS ' 
McKiernanP 82' 

McLanghlinJ jyl9 
McLau'jrhlinJasF ol7 
McNeilMrsCH o24 
McPhersonMrsM NlO 
McQueenJB[CoP] sO 



olf) MorwinBR[CoF]jj-7NC 



so 
ol2 
02.-J 

je22 
sl4 

jeao 
s22 
sl9 
on 



018 
All 

n9 

Jy28 

n3 

o2J 

02 

o3 
o3l 



sll 
Jy3 



s8 
o4 

814 

sl2 
o25 
jyS 
o30 

jv3 



AlcruinMrsbK 
McrwiiiCH&wf 
-MerwiiiCP 
LMcruinEP&wf 
MerwiiiUuhisS 
MerwiiiJeunie 
MervviiiLouiseS 
MerwiuOH 
.erjvinNW 
" MrsEH 
MerwinMrsSmithjelS 
MerwiuSEjr jL-(i 

MerwinTP&wf 8l5 
" FlorenceE-Helen " 
Meservclsaacl' jyl4 
MesickChasS&wf o7 
Metzgei'CJ Je22 

" MrsCJ ■ ol2 

Metzgerllattie sl2 

MetzgerSC-SJ jy20 
MeyerPrank[CoB] «!4 



MeyerSidouiaA 
MirauderJ 
MilanderM 
MilesHarriettC 
MillerAdatn 
MillerAP 
Miller.ToscphT 
MiHer^MrsJona 
•' CAIMU 

MillerR-A'[SerCoC] s6 
MillerSamucl a1 

MillerWB NlO 

MillerWE-MaryB el3 
" GeticVvr " 

MillcrWniW Al 

MilNChasJ n9 

MiUsJnoB-WJ pO 

MillspaughFrank a1 
MinerfIyattP[Gr's].Jv5 
MinerNP&wf je20 
MinerMrsWA Jv2i» 
MinorHenryA&wf s2l 



o31 

sll 

jy20 

s21 
Al2 
je27 
a24 



MooreAnnaF 
Moore \\il«te\vf 
MooreVVP 
MorehoiiseLP 
•■ HA 

MorganGeoD 
MorganLtLL[CoF].iy 
MorganMaryL jy21 
MorganRobt&wf 614 
Morgan WE^Gr's] J3'5 
MorreliOE s7 

MorrisI' red s8 

MorrisJU 
MorrisRobtT 
MorrisSamuel 
MorrisWm 
MorseBW-MaryL 8l2 



MorseEII 

MorseEW 

MorscG-MaryA 

MorseHHenry 

MorseLF-SG 

MorscNellieB 

MortonllJ&wf 

MoselevSH&wf 

•' M'H-SEmma 

MosesGeoN&wf 



aa4' dvPMcGce-FHFleet 

c!t J Knodell-FCMitchell 

a7 GTSeward-CCWaitt 

NHareiiYachtVtub a3 

W CRoberts-SHRead 

BurtouManstield-G L 

Goodsell-T Bostwick 

ThosRochf rt-Walter 

SCoe-Edw'd Roberts 

H'nryLGower-Edw'd 

Gillettejr 

NicliolsMrsAJ a29 
A23 NicholsAS s7 

NicholsJohnW o5 
Nicholsonllan'eyJ n1 
NicollStellaE ol8 

" AgnesC " 

Nolan D[CorCoC] s6 
NorrisHG ol8 

NorthEdwYdC&wfAlS 
NorthGeoP jyl4 

NorthJohnC&wf a15 
NorthJG-ElizD jy26 
NorthJohnIi jy8 

NorthOB&wf jel2 
" NellieA " 

NorthropCyrus&wf a8 



S2« 



je2' 



JelO 
n3 
sll 



jel5 
a29 
si 3 

Jy26 
n4 

Jyl2 
a25 
017 

s22 



MeadChas 

MeadLizzieS 

MeadStephcnS 

MeigsRevMT 

MenuezMrsVA 

MerchantMaryE 

MerchantW 

Meredith,! 

MerriamCIIart 

MerriamJF 

MerrickChas 

MerrickFM 

MerrickGooF 

MerrillMrsDaniel 



s4 

8l4 

o21 

jyl 

Jy29 

S() 

o5 

031 

ol2 

a31 

je27 

8(1 

o12 

821 



MinorLncv V 

MinorMrsNJ 

MinschC 

MitchellDG&wf 

■' MissIIesse 

MitchellWP 

"■MissesM&L 

MixAlIenjr 

MixCharlotteB 

" FannvL 

MixDwiirbtW 

MixEli&wf 



Jvl2 
s2G 
n9 

jyl9 

jel5 

olO 

a29 

o3 
Jy25 



MixEdwardE&wf m2.' 



MixEN 

MixMF 

Mix^IarvL 

MixterCK 

MoffattMaggieP 

MoftattSB 

MontagueWG 

MontfordllelenE 

MontgomeryMD a7 

MonsouChasC&wjelO 

MonsonChasH ol6 

MonsonCJjr-Mi98 o25 

^ron!ionMrsFraukAo2 

MonsonNellieJ oil 

Moore DM sS 

MooreJF[CorCoC] 86 



82(; 

KlO 

s22 
"a1 
a28 
024 

a24 



iMossmanWD&wf A23jNorthropnE Jyl2 

MoulthropEA s2l|NorthropWT&wf s7 

MoiilthropJI jvSlNortonAnimi&wf o4 

MoulthropL&wf 821 jNortoiiGeoE&wf ol9 
MoulthropM 86 NortonPron\'A 0l6 

MoulthropMayE ns!" ISIrsWA MlO 

MuUinF&wf o4|NoyesS-HarriefW n3 

Mugfordll Al NoyesSam'lStJ je30 

MulhonseM jy20 Oakley WM 8l3 

MimsonllD s21|0akesIlenryA .Ty8 

MurdockDa-^id s(jj " llatticA-RebeccaM" 

MungerEdwinM jel4 OaksEbonL jy8 

MmuiFS s4 OaksChasII&wf ol7 

MunnMS&wf A9|OberndorferE sl3 

MnnsonFannieT A5|0"BrienDeclan ol2 
MunsouFredB ol7|0'BrieuL m17 

^tlunson.MrsL o26 O'BrienO-MarvB s27 

MiuisonLE a24 O'ConnellRobtVV a9 

" LucyA-May-EdL '■ O'ConnellWmJ n3 
Munson^NIamieL sl2 O'Connor.Tohn n2 

MurphvLA jv04jO'ConnorMJ[CoD] s4 

MnrphVWm si6 O'CounorPatrick a7 

MurravEdwardB .Te2o! 0"DonnelIJas 
MnrravJD-SadieE s20 O'DonnellJohn 



MerrillEF s22n9 

MerrimanllattinN s21 
MerrimanM'nsfldjcH 
MerrittCL n!) 

MersickJohnC o2S MooreStillman&w IIW 



Moore.IH&wf 

MooreJasL 

MooreLnluW 

MooreOllieS 

IMooreXW-MA 



o4 

n3 

je8 

je]3 

82' 



]\IurrayMr8jED ol4 
MurrayKate nIO 

MurrayThos je27 

JlyersNathanC sll 
MyersMrsSH ol2 

MyersThomasF .tj'2' 
Nau'jrhtonMichael a23 
NealeChasR n8 

NeimcyerJohnH jel5 
NepelJ je2S 

NettletonAliceL s27 
NettletonFA a16 

NewcombGB&wf m30 
" EddieW 

NewcombSW n6 

NewcombSRoss .ij-11 
NewhallAE je30 

Nc\vhallGTir[Grs] jy5 
Ne\\-hallTW[CoE] s6 
NcwellAdaA s7 

NcwellMrsHB 
Newton FL 
NewtonMB 
NevilleJohn 
NIIavenBBavb 



n9 



je28 

k6 

n4 

n3 

a4 

024 

n3 

a:30 

jyll 

s5 



O'HolorauMary 
OgdenDavidJ 
OVdhamAnnieRB 
Olmstead.Tas 
01ni8teadJasjr 
OrmeED 
OrtonRebecca 
OsbornBenj 
" EJ-FII 

OsbomMrsCH s29 
OsboniChasJ sl6 

" EnimaS " 

OsbornEstherM s9n4 
OsbomES sf> 

OsbornFA-RQ a7 
OsbomnM a23 

OsbornJJ s21 

OsbomMrs.T.T-JJjrsl3 
OsboniLE&wf o28 
OsbornWaltcr&wf o4 
OsbonieAD&wf 8l2 
■' Tl:osB-AS 

o7 OviattllenryN 

o2|OwenAustin 
.Te24 OwenJohnE 



TRJowptt-ABCorbin PageAL 

C II Pabor-IILSpence PageMrsRM 

baniWright- JPCassi- i PageSK 



ol2 
o4 
a9 

68 

s5 
e2» 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



279 



PaceMaryJ s-29 

PainterMaryA-Jas o:27 

PalmerCW olO 

PalmerEdward s28 

PalmerEm'aL-J'os a'23 

PalmurllenryN s2 

PardecAnnaM o4 

" JeunieC-MaryJ " 

PardeeChasR a1Co20 

PardecGraceA ell 

PardceHEG sC. 

PardeuHenryE oG 

PardeeJS b11 

PardeeMissLena sd 

PardceMrsMarvA ol9 

PaideeWmB-WmS n3 

ParkChasE o26 

ParkDrEA&wf o24 

I'arkFA 

ParkUalphH 

ParkerAngus ' 

ParkciFE' 

" J-EK 

ParkcrC-coF 

PaikcrliL 

ParkerJosephjr 

ParkerNS 

ParkerWB 

ParkerWmll 

ParkmanChasB 

ParishLW 

Pai-mclceAnnaR 

ParmeleeAY&wf 

'• IlarrvD 

ParmelceCC&wf 

ParrnelccChasL 

ParmeleeEL 

" LncyE 

ParmeleeGeoF 

ParmeleeJohnS 

ParmeleeMrsWm 

" JemiieM 

ParsonsJasE 

Parson pW A 

PatteuFW 

PauldingGrace 

PayneF'C&wf 

PeaseEL 

PeaseJopie 

PeaseJW 

PeaseMrsLH 

" MattieF 

PeaseSG 

PeckAC 

PeckAliceR 

PeckChas&wf 

PeckChasE 

PeckClark 

PeckEB 

PockEdwN&wf 



o2C 
Jy21 

m30 
s2o 

S2G 
o31 
e2 
s5 
ol2 
sl5 
a26 
At 
o20 
a25 

Mil 

OlO 
p21 

jen 

sll 
sl4 

a24 
ol(5 
S26 
s9 
o30 
Jy25 
019 
ol4 
Al2 

Jyl4 



PeckhamPrankE o23 
PeckhamMrsWH sl2 
PeeblesGeoF&wf ol7 
PeetsCBerry&wf o9 
PerkinsCD n9 

FredB 
Perkint^EA-LE a26 
PerkiiisMrsGeo n6o27 
PerkinsNW&wf s27 
I'erkinsMrsSteph Jel7 
PeriiiiEL-IIattieM sl9 



PerryMrsES 

PerryGeoA 

Perry GracieA 

PersianiEA 

Peters John [CoB] 

PetersonChas 

" Emma 

PetersonGeoF 

PetrieJohn&wf 

PfaffGeoH 

PfairLonisC 

PfciferGeo[CoB] 

PhelpsEdwardB 

•' AW-MA-EJ 

PhelpsGeoC 

PhillipeLtH[CoB] 

PhclpsFiR 

PhillipsCaptnD s 
[C'oD2dRcgt] 

Phillips JII [Grays] jy 

PhippsMrsDG s28 

" LenaM 

PhippsEH 

PhippsFG&wf 

" MissK 

PickettGeoA 

PickettRH 

PickettRufnsS a23s19 

PierccDavidJ-WJ sl( 

PierceDwightE a23 

PierpontMrsElias 

PicrpontJE jul 

PierpontWH 

PigottJas-AnnieE 

PlnneyLA jy4 

PitmanTG&fam s2U 

PlattChasN olC 

PlattFrankS&wf Jel9 
s2S 
ol3 
el8 
n4 

Nl 
NlO 

s9 
sl9 



PrattLizzie olO RicksMrsJohn sl3 

PrattSamuel&wf m30 RiehlHenryG m23 

PrattWmA Nl RiggsFNoyes slS 

PrattWG 025 RileyAnnieH s23 

PrenticeAndrewT s2tj RileyEH si; 

PrescottHarry&wf A21'[Ass'tSurgeon2dRe£;l] 
.„._^ -..-..., ,._..-. . ^2^ 

s(! 

s27 
n9 
s7 



a31 
oil 



024 



PeckEIlaE-FloraL o9 



031 

nG 

NlO 

028 

slolO 



PeckFred'kJ 

PecIilvIreGB 

I'eckGeoI 

PcckllE 

PeckllF 

Pcckllenryll-FW o31 

PcckllirariiT o2o 

PecklTomerH o3 

PcckJD-MaryED ?1R 

I'cck.IohnM&vf jelO 

PeckJasL-EmilyF 



PeckJosA 

PcckJ^VS 

Pcck:»Iilo 

PockMilesLiwf 

PeckSam"l&wf 

PeckStephenAjr 

PeckMrsWyllys 



Pl2 

n9 
o4 
o9 
s2G 
jeT 



PlattJII-MayF 

PlattJohnsonT 

PlattMAdell 

PlnmbHenry 

PlumbWmW&wf 

PlunkettJD&wf 

PomeroyM rsDan'l 

PondJ&wf 

PondPhilip 

PoorWC-Mr8 

PorterAlbert 

PorterES-JA 

PorterJL 

PorterNoah 

PorterWallace 

PossnerA[CorCoB] sG 

PostCC&wf n3 

PostJTI-WmW ' o9 

PotterCatherineS sS 

PotterEW&wf-BD ol3 

PottcrFrank 

PotterF-MaryF 

PotterTA&wf 

PowersMrsAE 

" MrsAnnie 

PowersBenM 

PrattCA 

PrattChasS&wf 

Pratt.TTJ 



o6 

s22 

a2(; 
jyi3 

ol9 

si 



s20 
014 
026 



s7 
024 
olG 
jy6 



b6 

A31 

o23 

Jyl8 



PrescottWmE 

PreussRenateA 

PrevostE[CoD] 

PriceWW&wf 

PrinceCE 

PrinceEdwA 

PrindleAliceG 

PritchardDavid&wb25 

PritchavdWLG o24 

PniddenllenryJ jel3 

•' LillianE 

PryccIIatticJ o2 

PuuderfordEmmaGNl 

PundersonLS sl3 

" MrsLS-SF 



027iRik'yIIattieL 
AUlRitteiMrsDavid 
s4 Ritter.IohnC 



RoathChasE 
RobbinsHC 
RobertsonAH 

[AidedeCampCNG] 
RobertsonGcoE sl9 
Robertson J noB o9 
RobertsonJBjr o5 
RobertsonMHelen o20 
RobertsonWL&wfM22 
RobinsonChas&wje:il 
RobinsonEA&wf ol8 
RobinsonMrsET o4 



PurdyGW s8 RobinsonFA 

PurdyPF-EL a1S|-' WmC 

PurringtonEdwin o2GiRobinsonMrsGB 
PutnamBlandinaM sll" HarricttE 



sl6 



PutnevFW 
QuintardMrsES 
•' Fred 
RabeC 

Rabc'Fred'kEA 
RabeWmC 
RamsdellAJ-LA 
RandolphEllen 
RankinWm 
RayllM 
' FannyC-AnnieC 



o28 

Jy2() 

n9 

a30 

a26 



o3 Robinson JH 
ol2 Robinson LW 

" jRobinsonRA 
o2S,Robinson'rheron oil 

N2lRobinsonWS&wf jy3 
sl2lRochcJ[CorCoC] sG 
oSGlRockwellMrsDF ol9 

Nlj'" JennieE-EdithA " 

A4iRock\vellEmilyJ Nl 

s9:Rock\vellGeoF 
RockwellllL 



ReadMrsSD s22 

RedficldCH sG 

[Q:\IScrgt2dRegt] 



Jy3 



RedfleldGeoW 

RedfieklHenryW 

'• IIG 

ReedDO 

ReedGeoW 

ReedJIrsGWM 

Reid.TH&wf 

ReifW 

RciniannJohn 

" Minnie 

Remington JennieSsl 

ReynoldsBL o3 

ReynoklsCO[CoF] sn 

ReynoldsGeoA 

ReynoldsGF 

RevnoldsGeoW 

ReynoldsJG-FE 

ReynoklsHattieN 

RevnoldsJames 

Reynolds WH 

RhodesJA&wf 

RhodesJohnU 

RiceAM 

RiceFannieL 

RicellelcnL 

RiceJoelT 

RiceLC 

RiceMK 

RicePS 

RiceRE 

RichGeoB 

" CatherineE 

RichardsEL 

RichardsSA 

RichardsonHE 

" JiiliaE 

RichardsonJA 



a23 
si 3 
je9 
n2 



RodmanWm 
RoemcrWalterW 
RoesslerPaul&famAll 
RogcrsAJ N(5 

a2; Rogers WII woi) 

'RonaldJF[Grays] jy7 



o30|RooseC 
olG RootCarrie 



ol4 

sl4 

o2S 

Jy27 



a2 
olO 

827 
n2 
a7 

s21 

819 

a4 
o4 

JVS 

028 

o4 

o2 

a30 



a31 



RootEdwinP 

RootFrankD 

RootGcoA 

RoctHE 

RootJnoM 

RootRichardC 

RootMrsSam'l 

RoseDS 



jel7 

a5 

o4 

s4 

s7 

025 

ol3 

ol9 

o25 

s7 

jy3 

jy23 

s9 

o4 

S27 
si 



RoseWm 

RosenbachHP 

RosenbergChas 

Roscnberg.Ienuie 

RosenbergJnoW 

RospnbhithS 

" Rosa-EdwS 

RothChasJ 

RothschildD 

RothchildLonis 

RoiindsCE[SerCoF]sG 

" " "' n9 

Mllje9 

a30 

nG 

n3 

013 



s9 
olO 
OlO 



PrattLeonard&wf a28 



RoweDan'l 
RowcEdwin 
RoweJustinB 
RoweJnoF 
RoweMrsJM 
RoweLucius 
RowcStephcn&wf jyG 
RoweWraA s25 

RowcZF Nl 

Ro\vlandTF jy26 

sl2;RowlandThosFjr a3 
" ;RneCH n3 

o25iRuffJ(je20)EmmaC s9 
RichardsonLettieG o4 RuffJohnR s25 

RichmondCT jy5 RnickoldtDrArthur oG 

RichmondWF jyS RuickoldtJasR jy29 



280 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



RussellAngieJ Je21 
RiissellArtnurL n4 
RussellCjr so 

RiissellCK jyW 

RusseIlFW[Gray8]jy7 
RiissellHerbert 
RiisselllrviugL 
RussellLA 
RussellPhilipG 
Russell KG 
Russell Wm&wf 
RyderJasB&wf 
RyderLC 
Ryder LoulsB 
SachsA-Sigmund 
SachsMrsA 
StJohnHenry&wf oil 
" Ca/rieL " 

StJohnRH o27 

SalewskyPWL s~ 
SalisburyEE jelo 

" EvelyiiM 
SanboniWH-JiiliaRxO 
SanfordAbm&wf a'W 
olO 



019 

n4 
A.31 

oj 
je*5 

s2 
o31 
jy6 
s21 

o4 



SanfordAli 

" HeleaA '* 

SaiifordA.P s20 

SanfordCEP a9 

SanfordChar^P 87 

SanfordCiiasW s5 
SanfordDavidC&woll 

Sauford.VIrsEiuily o2f) 

SaafordEE olO 

SanfardEIjr o25 
SanfordPL 

SanfordJnoS n9 
SanfordDi-LJ&wf Jel4 
" Leonardo 

Sanford^f UlianH jeT 

SanfordOE o'M 

SanfordSaul&wf ol2 

San lord WH s6 

[SerCoP] 

SanfordWhitingS nG 

SanfordMrsWS sl3 
" Horace Vt 
Sargent PP 
SargeutGL 
" Russell 

Satoriu9W[CorCoB]s6 

SaundersDavld o3 

Sava^eMrsFE olfl 

Sayllenry ol3 

ScharfUhasA a3 

ScharfPW Al7 

SchillerA-GH a31 

SchleinW s21 

SchruiijErnestA s7 

SchillerGHjr s(i 

[CorCoE] 
SchmidlWK-Dora a31 



Scran tonLorenL 84 
ScrautonMrsWinTol9 
•' WiuB 

SeabrookChasH s4 

SeauianAUen Bl4 

SearlesJEjr&wf je22 

ClaraA-FloraA " 

o3 



Sl4 
jy3 
s20 
s2 
Sl8 
o24 
o26 



OlO 

Al(i 

s9 



SearsJWm 
Sears WH 
SearsMrsWH 
SeelyEddieB 
SeelevWG 
SellcckGeoF n2 

Se\vall.Jerry[Gr'8l Jy5 
SewardPrank o31 

Minerva E-Moses " 
ShauluyWalterJ Jc28 
ShannonRevOE jyH 
Mrs " 

ShaunahauJ[SrCoC]s6 
ShawJB M25 

SliawLottieB a14 

ShearlockJG Jyll 

Shears Rev AGwf&das5 
ShearsPE-MarieA Jy5 
Sheldon EUonW 
SheldonJoseph 
SheldonTH&wf 
ShelleyEdwinT 
ShelleyMrsMB 
SheltonChas&wf 
SheltonColCW m10s6 

[AidedeCampCNG] 
SheltonTD s21 

ShepardCJ o3 

ShepardMarthaB m24 



SmithCarlos&wf 
SmithChasA 
SmitliMrsCA 
SmithCC 
SmithCP 
SmithCL 
SmithCM-LT 
SmilhCW&wf je24o20 
SmithMrsChasR o31 
" Mist^SM 

SmithEA sl4 

Smith ER[SerCoD] sG 
Smith Ed wS-HL a15 
SmithEliasM a24 

SmithEmilyMP s22 
SmithEphJ s2 

Smith EugencH s(i 
SmitliFli Al 

SmithPrancis&wf n3 
SmithFrankP s29 

SmithPredSumner s7 



82 

jel3 



SmithGeoE 
SmithGeoP 
SmithMrsGW 

EvieL 
SraithGeoW 
SmitbGeoW> 
SmithMrsGeoW 
SmithllE-MrsNS 
SmithllermanE 
Smithllll 
SmithllerbertP 



si 
m29 
sl3 

Alf) 

a29 

826 

jy6 

jylO 

NlO 



SchtilzPaul 

SchurzCR[2dRgt] 

SchwabJL 

SchwebelAdam 

ScobicMary 

ScolieldJS 

ScottChasL 

ScottEsther 

Scott MB 

ScottSarahE-ED 

ScovillMrsTH 

ScovilleWJ 

Scran ton AG&wf 

ScrantonCH&wf 

Scran tonMrsGH 

Scran ton M rsH A 

ScrantonKateE 

BcrantonLilaJ 



jyi 



Al7 

a29 



02;-^ 
a22 



n3 
ol4 

jyl7 

o24 

828 
ol8 
o5 

85 

je5 
811 



ShephardN 

ShepherdMrs 

SheridanPeter 

SheridanRM-JP 

ShermanPC&wf 

Sherman Jacob 

SherrardHO 

SherwoodPA 

ShewLW-MrsJE 

ShipmanHN&wf ol8 

ShipmanMrsMJ oil 

ShippeyHM a9 

ShoningerB m22s12 

ShoningerBJ a8 

ShouingerJos 

ShoningerSB 

ShrivesJno 

ShubertAB 

ShumwayEllen 

ShusterLtJ[CoD] 

SiebkeACRuth jyll 

SillimanB 

SimpsouHE 

SinciairWH 

SkiffChasW&wf 

SkiffPC 

" EmmaMcG 

SkillmanA&wf 

SkinnerAMS 

SkinnerME 

" WmS-FannyE 

SkinnerWm o24 

SladeSM jylO 

SlaterChaunceyM olO 



jel4 
je5 
019 

82 

sl9 



o30 

8l4 

jy4 
olO 
o30 
o2 
je21 

8l9 

jy2() 

SmithHWillard&wol8 
SmithMrsIlM 
SmithRevIE o4 

MrsM E-LouiseR 
Smith Jas je23 

SmithJGibbs&wf 8l3 

Al 

s5 



SmithJH 

SmithMrfJH 

NellieM 
SmithJH&vpf 
SmithJasM. 
SmithLyman 
SmithMinnieS 
SmithNelsonH 
SmithPT 
SmithMrsRufus 
SmithSBjr 
SmithSarahN 
SmithMrsSidnevD 821 
SmithColSR[2dRt] s6 
SmithMrsSR oil 

SmithSylveeter a15 
SmithTA a31 

SmithTB sl9 

SmithWC 821 

SmithWH&wf o20 
SmithWillisM&wfo2' 



820 

8l5 

OlO 
023 
819 
o28 
OlO 

slJ 



SmithWilbnrT 

SnellMrsAG 

SnowChasP 

SomersAdaT 

SomersCB 

SomersGeoE 

SomersSA 

SonncnbergJos 

" S-T 

SonnenbergM 

SouthworthEC 



s22 
S6 

8l4 

Jy20 

81 

o3 

0l4 

a31 

je22 

n8 



SperryElizurH jel9 
SperryMrsEH 822 

SperryEK o27 

" MrsSarahA 
SperryEP[CoF] s6jy7 
SperryPH a19 

SperryGeoT s22 

Sperr\'JA&wf o23 
" Effie-HattieA-LW" 
Sperr>MrsLP ol2 

FreddieA 
SperryMamie n2 

SperrvND 

SperryMrsND oil 
SperryPeck n9 

SperryWL n2 

SpicerSarahS s21 

SpierMoritz 8l3 

SpohrGeoII s6 

SprawlTliomas a9 
SquireHC sl5 

SquireHenryW ol7 
SquiresWalter 87 

StadtmullerHR s25 
Stafl'ordMrsSusan s22 
StahlE o5 

StannardEmmaE Al6 
Stannar 'lEss^i a15 

StannardMrsEssi o26 
StannardMrsLoren o6 
StannardLH[CoF] e2 
StaplesMrsGW m15 
" HS 

StarkeyPSLCrCoDl p6 
Starkweatherll-J o9 
StaubAnton 8(j 

SteinertJIorris jeS 
SterlingP 86 

StetsonCptJE[2dR] f6 
StevensMissAC sS 
StevensAdeliaA o30 
Steven«BerthaY 88 
" ClaraL " 

StevensCC f5 

StevensEliasB o31 
StevensEffieE Jy20 
StevensEvelynE ol7 
StevensEP A-J4 

StevensEJ oil 

StevensFannieD o30 
" DcliaA " 

StevensPrcdW s21 
StevensGE slS 

SteveusGeoE je24 
StevensGW o31 

•' HattieW 

StevensH o23 

StevensHJ&wf s25 
StevensHWGW&wfN2 
StevensR-AdeliaA so 
OlO 



n6 



sl4 



SlaterMrsCM 
Sloan AP&wf 
" EmmaJ " 

SloatPrankDLGr'8]jy7 
SmithAM 8l2 

" Mrslsaac *' 

SmithAliceE-RB .Ty22 
SmithMrsAndrewG 88 
Smith AndrewTiw olO 



SouthworthMary s' 



Helen 
SpauldingWA 



8l3 



SpcigeintCorCoB] 
SpeigelJ Nl 

SpencerPrankO o21 
SpcncerRT ol2 

SperryAL a3 

SperryCA[CorCoE] bO 



StevensRosaW 

StevensSC&son 

StevensMrsWni 

StevvartCaroline 

StilesFH 

StoeckclMathildeB n4 

Stocktonllek-n o9 

StoddardHE o24 

StoddardWmB Jyl2 

StodclAndrew ol2 

StokesCA[SerCoD] s6 

StoiieBJ[C-;rays] jy3 

Stone.MrsUJ 

StoneSM 

" MissHattieM 

" MissJuliaM 

StorerAlex 

StoryMG 

" FI^MJ 



jyi7 

s7 



n2 
je21 



Jy25 
n3 



LIST OP CONNECTICUT VISITOBS NE'W HAVEN COUNTY. 



281 



StowSCarrie-Julia a19 



ThompsonES n9 

ThompsouFB&wf o5 
ThompsouFJ Al2 

ThompsiOuFS a2o 

Thomps^ouUII&wfsai 
ThompsouHeuryl s20 
ThompsoiiHarnetS o4 
ThompsouL o31 

ThompsoiiLibbie o9 
Thompson LydiaA A2d 
ThonipsonMag'iejy'iO 
ThompsoiiRutisell s6 
[AdjiitaiitadRegt] 
o2t) ThompsonSC-AA ol3 



SlowHW&wf 

'• Edith 

StoweJamesS 

StoweMrsJS 

StoweVVmH 

StoweWW 

StrausMax 

ytrt'OtAugiistusR 

StreetMipsIda 

StiicklandEA 

" Mi>EP 

StrongHII&wf 

StrongJPreston 

StrongSW-SFred ol-2JThompsoiiSarahJ k3 



sl3 

ol8 
Jyl5 
A-23 
sl5 
sl4 
sl5 
sl6 
NlO 

slO 



StroiigWmT 
StrongWM 

^[CorOoD] 
StrouseDavid 
" Louise 
StrouseRobtM 
StuartJIi-s 
StudlevMrsJ 
SucherThcoII 
SnllivanRose 
SutterLizzieC 
SuttonJiiliaB 
Sweeney JJ-MD 
SweetPredJ 
SwezevMC&wf 
SwiftAL 
LottieM 



jy6|Thomp!?onSS&wf ol2 

"sOjThompsonTheo o4 
I Thompson Wm J 
o26 Thompson WT 

" ThomsonDW 
slllThoinsonELP 
oSliThomsonFA 
ol8iThomsonGG&wf 
s2~;ThomsonMissHP 
je30 1 Thomson WH&wf 

s9 1 ThormanMinu ie 
A21 ThornHEL o5 

s22|"Sam'!G-SL-LR " 

n9: Thorpe AliceC sC 

s27 i Thorpe JA [CorCoD] " 
A22:TiceEllsworth s8 

TiernanJ fCorCoC] s6 



sl4 
jel4 

s7 
sl9 

All 

s« 
p5 
09 

si 2 



SwiftEdwardSMllAlTiTillouWalterG 



SwiftFC 
SwiftFIsahel 
SwiinVmU 
SwinburncLJ 
SwingAT 
TaftAS-AL 
TaftSV 
TaintorHn 
. TalcottMrsCJ 
" BessieC 
TalmadgeAT 
TahnadgeFA 
TaiinerNorm''As20olO 
Tan'er>IrsSD&daus21 
TaylorEdward s8 

TaylorGeoW slo 

TaylorMrsIIenryll s27 
TaylorJohnll o3 

TaylcrlSIariaN 
TerrillFElsine 
TerrellGcoW 
TcrrellMellieA 
TerryMiss 
ThalheimerMax 
ThacherMrsThosA n8 
ThatcherLClcrc jy 
ThillMrsRR a1 

" Alphonse " 

ThomasAir[Grays]jy7 
ThomasDW&wf Kl 
ThomasEmilyG s8 
ThomasEvanC sl3 
ThomasGeoE a12n2 
ThomasMrsGA sl5 
ThomasGS-EP k3 
ThomasIIO [G reT.ryGs4 
ThomasLtLILCoBJ s4 



olOTiltonA 
Al7 TinlverML 



S20 



Nl 

o31 
s21 

s9 

p4 
s21 



o4 
A21 

c30 
Nl 
jyG 

s8 



ThomasMayJ 

ThomasWmL 

ThomasV\^W 

ThompsonA 

" EneasA 

ThompsonCA 

ThompsonChasP a 15 

Thompsor.EA&Avfjel5 

ThompeonEF-JS sG 



020 



s30 

o23 
o6 
Sl2 

ol9 



TiiikeyJames 
TobeyGeoA 
ToddAlsonB 
ToddAlfred&wf 
" MrsAB-AT 
ToddER 
ToddMrsHW 
ToddCLizzie 
" JcnnieA 
ToddTheronA 
TomlinsonM&wf Je21 
TompkinsHattieLje29 
TookerJamesB o3 
TorbettMrsLucyC slG 
TowiisendAlonzoAs]9 
TownsendDeliaB s21 
TownsendEmily oil 
TownsendHattieR o21 
TownsendMrsJ olO 
" MissE-JJ 
TowuscndJosH ol2 



TrowbridgeKate 
" Lucy 

Tr'\vb"dgeTRjr&ws27 
" FraiicisBacoa " 
TrowbridgeWJ a29 
" YD 
Tro*bridgeWP m10s6 

[AdjutantGenCNG] 
TrowbridgeWPjr a31 
TrowbridgeWRHjel3 
" WRHjr-MissJT " 
" MrsWRH .icl3s25 
TrumbullDavid je3 
TrumbnllJL 
TrumbuilJohn 
TrumbullRL 
TrumbuHS-A 
TuckerSarahA 
TurnerFrankB 
TurnerGeoII 
TiirnerMrsLA 
TuttleAlictJ 
TuttlcChira 
TuttleChasA 
TuttleCP 
TuttleEHjr 
TuttleGH-BSC 
TuttleGJ 



a31 

S21 

o3 

Jj3 

se 
jylS 

o4 
jy7 

a1 
a24 
ol7 
oltt 



Jcl2 

Jyll 

M22 

Al 

Jyl5 

S22 

O30 

si 

017 

k9 

JvG 

^Vi 

Air. 

s9 

013 



TuttlcIIenry&wf oil 



ol3 
jcl5 



o21 
Nl 



TuttlellLouise o4 

TuttleMrsJP p5 

TuttleJ-Martin s:i4 
ol8 TuttleJulius o3 

o20 " ISIameL '• 

a2G TuttleMiloD&wf 
a31 TuttleWmJ 
n4|" MaryA-WS 
n4 TwiuingMaryP 
TwissG&wf 
TwissJiilius 
TwitchcUChasS 
TwitchellMrsDO 
TwitchcllGeoE-DO 65 
TwitchollLillieB o21 
TwitchellSS&wf a31 
TylerFrankM el9 

TylerGeoA a21 

TylerMrsGeoA o31 
TylerJiiliusjr&wf je2 
TylerMorris&wf jel 
TylcrWR je24 

TyrrellJohnP jylONl 
TyrrellMrJP jc3.-.6 
" JohniiieB 
TvrrellTheoS 
UffordJuliaE 



WagerAL 

WagnerSn&wf 

WakeleeJ S 

WalcotFriinkC 

WaldmanAlcxJ 

■WaldrouFredll 

WaldroiiElizaA 

\ValiiroiiSC[Grsl 

WnlkerCi.arlesM 

WalkerGe. W 

AVulkcrLII&wf 

WnlkerlMiss 

W!ilkirFiiikBAwfAl4 

WalkerFrancisA ?5 

WalkerCeo s7 

WnlkcrKM[CorCE] sfi 

WallJ<;sT a9 

iWallaceAlex s21 

iWallateRW Jy8 

WallaceThos[Grs:i jy5 

|\ViilshJas-Tho3 k6 

jWalterGcoP a19 

iWaltoiiSA 

'WardAE 

jWardGcoW 

Ward J 11 

WardPat'kJB 

Wr.rdPE 

WardellChasH 

WardellFl^ieK 

Wariiig'W E 

WarnerMrsAE 

WanierCC 

iWarneriSrrsDP 



Nl 

s21 

olO 

o7 

NlO 

jelfi 

s7 

N3 

Al 

o23 
Jcl6 

028 



s22,\VanieiEiiiil}CE jyl9 

oiof" 



TownscndRobtD ASOiUllmanChasL 



Towns'ndWK&wjelS 
ToiversChasW o30 
TrainAL-AnuieL oil 
TreadwayAR o2G 

TreadwayGco je7 
TreadwavLH si 

TrcadwcilOVV&wf s22 
TreatAW s7 

Treat GB-LizzieM .tc8 
TreatJohnL&wf a17 
" MissEllon " 

TremaincCIIB oil 
TrischH&wf jyl4 

TrowbridgcEd&w s21 
" SarahL-MabelleW " 
TrowbridgeEP o3 

" MissFM " 

TrowbridgeFL ol3 
TrovvbridgeHy&wfo27 
" MasterCourtlandt " 
TrowbridgeJP olO 
" Rutherlbrd. " 



Ulhiiaiil 
UllmanJ a31 

UllmanLeah o24 

" Annie-Fannie " 
Uh'icliJohn s7 

UmberneldD&wf p28 
UndermyerM sll 

UpsonAA s22 

UpsonChasE je20 
Upton WH a28 

VanNameCJ&wf je24 
'• HerbertB " 

VailleFW a2G 

VeadcrJMjr[Grs] jy 



VeitchA 


&14 


VeitchRobtjr 


sG 


VeitchWm 


" 


VibbertGeoA 


013 


VibberiHC 


s4 


VibbertHH 


a12 


YibbertWE 


jeTolG 


YogclsEdwP 


n3 



WaincrJ'.Fva 

WarnorlMrsGP 

•' IIcnryA 

WarnerllA&wt 

WamcrJarcd&wf 

WarnerNcllio 

WarncrWIlctwf 

WarucrWRjr 

WarrenCA 

Warren]\IrsCA 

WarreiillC 

WarrenRobtD 

WarrtnTn:manA NlO 

WarrcnTBfGrays] jy7 

Waterl)iiryW A olO 

Waterh'seC'eciliaW n3 

WatermanRexL sl5 

WatronsChasW jyl2 

WatrousCooD s7 

WatroiisGII&son Al(j 

WatrcusIMrsGeoII 



s5 
el3 

a£5 
<2 

jy8 

p7 

Jyl2 

c6 

jySoG 

jel4 

jy^O 



o81 
0-.7 

Ju7 

o2e 

s4 
jy23 



WatsonFO 

WatsonMaryA 

WatsonNellie 

WatsonWm 

WashburuC'S 

WayHS 

WaylandProfF&wfw25 

WeaverEII&wf o2G 

WebbChasH n2 

WebbJasH f6 

WebsterB a19 

WebsterC'has&wf o4 

VVechslerll b9 

WeedSG[CorCoF] sg 

WddEL[Dr]\Iaj2Rt]-' 

WehncrRK-AP a30 

WehncrMayP 

WeedlraDeWitt 

WcedSG [Grays] 

WeilPanl 

" MrsJohanna 

WeirProfJohuF 

WcirMifcs 



n4 
a21 
jy7 
a30 



MlO 

jelO 



16 



282 



SOUVENIR OF TZE CENTENNIAL EXIliBITION. 



WelehArthnrS 

WelcliEstelle 

" IdiiM 

WelclilIM&wf 

WelcUH.VIjr 

Welch MrsFN 

" MissiZL 

WoklArtlmrJ 

Wl'IJCC 

V,'ekU*'lI-AB 

WeklLorinL 

Weld Mary E 

'• EiiimaF' 

WekUVinE&wf 

WeLiVViiiJ&wf 

WellsIdaJC 

WelbMis;; Mamie 

WollsMi-sTiios 

WoUsWW 

WestPA 

WornsmaniiER 

WhaleuPE 



s4 
017 



WilcosDn o4'BarnepArthur a4 Lanera^T^Inrj'A 06 

MastersDH&FU " I" Edward '• 1" EUieA-Coruelian-' 



031 
jyo 
a29 



eO 

jelo 

si -2 

027 

MlU 

jel'2 

Je6 

Sti 

o3J 



WlieatoatiVancesRoSO 



WheacouStl 

Whe lonCR&wf 

" LizzieL-CIljr 

Wiio.imS!I 

WheelerAlbertS 

WheelerMisEi 

WlieelerPa-inieJ 

WiiealerTHAioa 

WiieelerWil-irtuC 

WiieelorWil&iVf 

W.iippleJeiinyL 

WiiitakerHanryL o'21 

Wuitakei-MrsIIL ol7 

Wjiiconii>MA&vvf 00 



s2j 
Nl 

jylO 

jyl5 

A:iO 

All 

o25 

S() 

0I2 
o3 



WiiteChasA 

WiQeDrPO 

W:AJleHoarvD 

WnitoJVV-\VR 

'^ HH-Mi-,^WII 

W;ut.eWuiW 

WliftehealLn 

WhitiTHjreM:'^ 

Whi(Sii.,'ER 

" M sLA 

Wtiitiiij,'TohnH o7 

Whitin!jPatiiainL.iel4 

WhitneyCL s22 

WhitnevEli&wf o2!J 

" MissHE 

WhitneyEM 

WiiitncyF'i'ed 

WhitneyWD 

" ElizB 

'• E.unyll-MP " 

WliitteiseyMiMEWolS 

WnitteWeyHN jetC 

WiiitteL-ieyHXjr jy7 

[Grays] 
WhittclseyJosT o20 
W'uttelsoyN'jllic'M n2 
W.nttle>eVHattieN s7 
Wliittlo-ieySE n3 

W.'iitteinorAnna o2S 
^^ h!tt';nioreFfI.two2! 
Vv'hlt t emoreDrF.) .io-27 
WhittemoreMrsJM ^3 



Sl5 



je23 
jyii 
jel5 



a31 



Wilcox Ella 

VVilcoxFW 

WilcoxSaliieA 

W'ilcoxSiella 

WdcoxsonJA 

WildlsaacJ 

VVillardliarryK 

VVilliamsCB 

WilliamsChapH 

WilliamsEdwinL 

WilliaiusH aboard o28 

•' Ella-Luilda 

WilliamsJas 

WilliamsJno 

WilliamsMayJ 

WillisES 

WilloughbyAL 

" MaryE 

WilmotRobtW 

WilsonCH 

WilsoaGeo 

WilsonMS 

WilsonMaryS 

SVinchesterMiss 

Winches terOF 

WinesEdvvard 

WinnMrsBS 

WinshipHS 

WinterPhilip 

WoodAF 



sl5|BartlettEdw)nS&wfN2 LaiuiersJasP 
nG BisliopFraucesA sU LuidsieyAhceM 



slIBishupGeoA 
sl9 j Bishop J E-J Ejr 



BishopWalterS 
Bit-hopWmF 



o;)0 

018 

sl5 



AlS LiiisleySam"! 
a23 EooiiiislceviUI 
s;7|'' E(jr-;:.adie 
s2U Lovc-laudiiA 
Bradley Goo A-Em 0l7 Lutlii)gt(,nAP&wf o":i5 
BradleyJoelM s(JiLudii;;;touMrsJ jeU 



Jy6 



o26! BradleyWakemnn oti.Ludiiii^tonL&vvf 
' BrayCA-Emilyii ol3|i\'a. eeXcliicE 
BrayKT Sd|Mal;oryliLeo 

BrockettMaryA oSjMalloryJeninfB 
Brought onJcunieCsloJMauslielaFrank J 
BrowiiMissAGrace o7 MaiisflcldF&wf 
BrownlsracIE&wl" >il iMausfieklJcuuieE 
BrownWmE s2!)[l\lansfieldSL 

BurwellUhasB&wfNlO MiUprMrsAiiiiicM 



je28 
sl3 
si 2 

s7 
s8 

a23 

ol9 
o26 

je27 
olO 

jylO 



II A 

ButlcrChasP 

ChaseChasP 

ChidseyllR 

ChipmauJosepIi 

ClarkLP 



" jMiilerChasHR 
nO MonrooCiiasW 
slo MontgDmeryWO 
Al;NortoiiMrsFE 
K(> OrrGeoC 



o2o 
n3 

r7 
013 

s-i7 

Kl 

s8 

0I8 

N2 

N» 

o23 
bio 
jy5 



ConklinAminette c]3 KiceAL 



s2<j PariiieleeMrsJ-rjje22 



s7iCorbiuGeoJl 
s9|CorbinB-MaryB 
s25 DadmiiiiEE 
A26lBadm»nGW 
A30|DaileyMrsMT 
o30 " NettieM 



s(> 



WoodJW[CorCor] s6!DavisIiG 
WoodWSLCorCoE] " Dudley LF-BR 
WoodfordSarahM AlslEmeryJE 
WoodhousoFlore sliEvartsWmR 



&25 PacoAIrsJT c5 

f^21iRoi=eOrtouA&wf NO 
017 RoweE.JtherA Ql3 

si!>,'- IkuTietA-EmestC"- 
o2|RoweHat!ieE o5 

Ro\\cHi'urvE&wfje2.3 



Wick<JnoA 
WidininTno 
WierStepheiiM 
'• JcHsieA 
WightmanWL 
" Katie 
WilcoxAO&wf 
" AgriesE 
WilcoxOha><A 



All 

s4 
a22 

s8 

s27 

o24 



WoodingHE 

WoodmauFJ 

Woodruff MrsC 

WoolruffGeoW 

WoodsSam'lVH 

WoodwardGeo 

WolfJohn-Lena 

WoolseyEllenS 

WoolworthFrank 

WoosterChasB 

WrightAmelia 

Wri^htDexterR 

" Paul-ArthiirB 

WrightEL&wf 

Wri,'ht Grace E 

WrightPatil 

WriijhtWmA 

WrislevLillaJ 



o25'KowoHB-EC 
Nfl;Ro\vcLottieE 
0I8 1 Ro weM i-^W illct 
s20jRowla!idJ)ioO 
oKi hiist^ellMrisilM 



sl9 FarrellJG-l,izzie 

jy5; FurreuWillitfH-SA BOlRussellMA 



SI 30 

n8 
o30 

Al 
All 
019 
o24 

o(i 
S27 
017 

a23 
o25 
a7 
Sl3 
019 



WurtsCPembertonjyS 



WiirtzR 
ValeMissAnna 
YaloFloraR 
YaleFT 
YalallA-MH 
Yeaman-sChasN 
YoomanES 
YorkstonRP 
YotiiigAlbertH 
" AliceG&son 
" EddyH 
YoungermanG 
[CoBl 
YonngermanGW 
ZunderS-M 
ZiinderA 
ZiinderSophie 
•' Seligmaun 



PC- 

s2(i 

jvl5 

jy20 

si 5 

s4 

jy5 

N(i 



e6 

si 
m27 
Jy20 

6l2 



Field FraukE 

FordEP 

FordllA&wf 

Fo\vlerDV/m 

Francisi;lia--0 

FrancisFII 

GrannissChasW 

Graiinipslin 

GravesGeoM 

GrootMissL 

" MEdith 

Hemingway AC 



g23 

n5 
JC'9 
n3 

o28 
o25 

o9 Scran ton EinmaA sll 
o2() ShariuonHY&wf jel6 
ol8;Si))ithJa^P s26 

ol8'SmithRof,'er s8 

No'StonellE&wf je21 
Al'StroiigElliiF A2-2 

s21 ThomsouMrsSCB m2S» 



031 TiitlleAnnaE jeS 

s22 TuttleGraccA oil 

n3 •' LibbieG " 

'• iTnttleSM olO 

je22 TuttlirSadieE o« 

HemiugwayArth"rFs4 WayWnill n4 

HemingwayMrsCW s5, WedinoreMrpJared ^^8 
" Kinuie " |Well.~Roniauta o5 

HemingwayFH e25 " MrsET *• 

HeininirwM"yJF&wfo19 WilliatnsClarence a18 



Ta!!ip>\V " jWoodwardJC 

Heiiiing'ayMrsMC 019 " EllaA 
IIcining'ayMinnieANO YouugJamesS 
Heminir'avMinuieRN2 
•' EvaE-IdaM " we.^tville 

IlemitiiTway Nancy n2 AdamsII^M-AH 
HeminixwaVWinD oS, AldenDavidR 
Hig^HnsHatliell o24!A]denHR 

BeachEB&wf 



HillSB-HannahC 

HitclicockHW 

lloveylloraceC 

" MrsHclenL 

rInbbardllelenM 

llnllMrr^LB 

HuntHattieJ 

IvesIlB 

IvepJno 

JohnPonMinnieF 



0I8 



jy5 
09 

o30 
c6 



A28;BeecherWm3&wf ol7 
0I7 



jy22jBradleyGeoE 
" " MrsGeo 

sSiBrownJnoE Jv3 

Alf) PownpAlbertZjr o23 

jy5 DownsSarahL o'^ 
018" EllaC 

n3 FarnhamMrsWn 017 

012 FordWmK&wf 06 

fTouesIIerbert&wf jy5 GilbertGoo jpI 

KingNA-LA o38 GorhamChas&wf ol7 

KrampUP n8 IlargottW je3:J 



WilcoxCiirtif&wf jeS 



FAIK HAVEN. 

BaldwinGeoW nO 

BrildwinLizzieS Pl5lLancraftGeoE&wf o5 IIopkinsES 
BaniepMisAndrew.Tt'8 " HarvpvB-LottieJ " HotchkispSarahA o5 
BarnesIIerbert&wf a4 LancraftlleiiryS oC IIurlbulChaBR o23 



LIST OF COXITECTICUT VISITORS XE'vr EAVEN COUNTY. 



283 



MerrimanChasP 

MixiililiuL 

Pai-kerAiidrew 

PeckGeoC 

PohlmauII 

SkiiinerWJ 

SpenyWmW 

SumuerJames 



olO 
k4 
sl!l 
sll 

sir* 



KO. BRAN FORD. 



BabcockGeoA 

Bi^ardi^leyMrsE 

IJitfhopMartinC 

BunndlCornelia 

CurtissGeoC 

rurlissWBjr 

FooteNoah 

FredGL-WD 

Fi>rdWmD 

FrisbieCH 

GordonGeoA 

HaJlEdwarclE 

HarrisonMrsJ 

HarriPonJefseL 

HarrisonJouaL 

HarrisonL 

HarrisonMary 

HillAH 

KingDeliaA 

Linslej-ChasE 

MnngerMrsGeoH 

" HuienK 

PatreCharles 



o31 



s21 



o24 



a8 
0-25 



Ai) 



PageliO-DessieR o25 
PagePhcbeL 
PafmerJA&wf 
RosseC'yuthiaA 
Ro?eG('0-KW 
KoseVH 
RussellClark 
RiissellEliza 
RusscllFlorenceR a17 
RiiSbellMartha s2> 
RiisscllSeth&wf o3 
RuesellSarahXi o55 
StiortWmD Nl 

StentEaton-MS o3 
WheatouEmilyM o?5 
WoodsRevWm jel7 



TvlprMIST 

TylerMi^MN 

WoodJoliU 



S7: Clark Anfriista 



S7 



>ORTH HATEX. 

Anf=tinFW n2 

llishopAnnicE ol2 
lilake^lecllattio .iy21 
BradlevFredC&wf o2 
BrockettEliJ s26 

■• FH 

BrockettlnzemeA slO 
CnlverWaltertJ oin 
ElliottWhitiiey o31 
'• Ileury " 

ElliottMrsWhitney sO 
" Giiftavus " 

FitchMaryD 
FowlerLewisJ n2 
GilbertStephenC jeO 
GilbertSG-Celia ol!) 
GoodyearEL n2 

GoodvearDrRB&wfs() 
HallFE-Mr^ME oil 
HartleyAddie ol>' 

EIeniiiig\vayMri5WBs5 
l.'oadleyLfmuclG o2.") 
IloadlcyWellsC nO 
LinsleyAO ol2 

LinsleyEA s2(l 

LindsleyEdw'dL jyij 
LindsIcyMr&wf n3 
LiiidsleyLN 
LnrdAustinMD 
MaiisffieldMrsCA 
:MansflcldSereno 



a4 



jyti 



s5 
s21 

e28 



ClarkEvcrettB 

CroftulVVA 

•' EmmaM 

DonohueDaniel 

Foi-besDavid 

IlineEIlaG 

IlineGeoT&wf 

HovtMinnaE 

MainEliasB 

MainWalterA 

MeadL 

MenvinAN 

MervviiiJJ 

MilesAlbertF 

■' MarthaE 

RusBcllElizurB 

•' AnnM 

RuPsenWmC 

RussiellWmM 

" MarthaL " 

RnssellStcphenD sO 

" DeliaA 

ScottJH n3 

SmithCF je!) 

TreatElbio.J-FJ s21 

TreatFloraB f.10 

Treat Howard s27 

TreatLuliiB s21 

" WalterL " 

Treats J-FannicE oil 

WoodruffSD&wf je21 



S20 



NOKTHFOKD. 

AllingCE sT 

AllingMrpJ]VI olO 

Augur WD o31 

BarriomewFC&-v\-folii 
BrooksWmB&wf nHj 
FolsomGeoDeF ol2 
"■ MrsSusanB " 

FooteJM&wf 
" BessieA 
FooteChasjr 
FcoteDwightM 
FooteSM 
FooteWM 
HarrisonDelia 
" EllaA-LouiseA " 
HarrigonReubenSd s27 
HarrisonUT sG 

MaltbyAJ jel4 

M al tby CarrieL-ELol 
MaltbyHA oo 

MaltbyWH-MrpH oil 
PheIanJnoG[CoIi] 
SmithTA o28 

SmithMrsTA s21o28 
StcvensDS&wf o28 
" MrsAB " i 

StevensDSjr s7 

TylerLizzieM a17 



oil 
o31 



m9 



WEST HAVEN, 

Andre\vs.To8 o26 

Baldwin JnoM&wfol2 
MansfieldZenasM olO BarnettWmN sll 

MunsonJF jc20 l!i?hopFW o20 

MunsonWillardL slit BishopLB s21 

OrcuttPaysonB o3i;Bish()pSH nIO 

PageGS sTiBrooksWE-WilsonoK 

PidmerMaryA s27 BrownFE p8 

PardeeEH n2 BrownMinnieR 820 

ParmeleeG-EO ol2,BushFP a23 

Piei-pontMrsIlR o2 CandeeAliceE a7 

PierpontJos&wf sfiCandeeLottieE jyl3 
PotterHnbertP N2!ChaseNA s21 

PotwineMreLT o31 ; ClarkChasW Nl 

" IdaE " ClelandGeoM s21 

PotwineWmE sa'CollinsWR-Annie o2o 

o4 



LewisJuan 

MainArthurL 

LinesES 

LomasJE 

'• JennieR 

McAlpineJames 

MetcalfGeoW 

PardeeAllVedB 

PeckClaraAM 

PeckWmA 

PeetLB&wf 

" Lynian-Edward 

PikeDollie-MinnieAlO 



Jy5 
614 
03 

NlO 



ol8 
o20 
S21 
s20 
629 



ReynoldsWT-JB jyl5|CrainMrsLC 
RobinsonAug n6 DeweyMrsEP 



o4 



ShepherdMrsF ol8 

SmithHenryG o2G 

SmithSP[CorCoK] sli 

SquireGeoH n2 

StilesEzra&wf 

StilesHenryH 

•' SarahJ-MaryC 

ThorpeCH 

" JennieE 

ThorpeSB&wf 

ToddFHayden 

■' MrsHayden 

ToddOS 

ToddWmS 

TuttleEdwin 

VilesDeliaL 

WamerHoratioF 

" MissAJ-MaryE 



ORANGE. 

AllingB 

BarnettJohnF 

Brewster.TohnM 

CadyMreHP 

CanleyAiinie 

ClarkAN&wf 

ClarkEnocliT 



DownesEA 
EkkolniK n<) 

FairThosS A24 

GaffneyPeter NlO 

GillespieJames 85 

025 GrahatnJas sl4 
" " MariaF-MatildaM " 

a28| Richard " 

" iGuiinA s9 

Oll;IIeacockMrsJS o27 
s() HigginsHenryC ol7 
" IlIineRollinW 
olSiHullFL s20 

o2|IIumphreyBF[Gr] jy7 
o31 1 JacocksFannieB s'27 
JohnsonBO sS 

JohnsonDwightD n2 
KelseyGeoR&wf a24 
'• ZS-HG-Georgia " 
KelseyJA sO 

slO KettleFrancis jyl2 
a23 •' SarahA-EstellaS •' 

026 " TdaJ-M arietta " 
o31 KimballMrsJM a17 
si 9 " ArthurR " 
oil KimberlyMrsMary o4 

So KitchiiigMisgSJ jcf- 



jy25 
Nfl 



RichardsBF 

RoyceEB 

PussellEC 

RnssellWA 

ShepardD 

ShermanChasT 

SmithChasA 

SmithDeliaM 

'■ CarrieE 

SmithEF-HattieE a17 

SmithHH-BW o23 

SmithJennieL jel5 

SmithMary-AdaJ a7 

SmithSL-AddieM sll 

•' HarriettEW 

SmithWmT 

SomersElmer 

SomersEII&wf 

StevensFN 

StevensMrsFN" 

ThomasLottieC 

ThompsonOE&wfjelS 

ThompsonDS s20 

ThompsonSilas 

TcllesJas&wf 

TnttleEA 

WagnerDW&wf 

WagnerStellaM 

WardJIrsFD 

" MiPsIIB 

WardwellCW 

WarnerGW 

WellesEdw 

" CharlieF-Frances 

WilliainpTvB s21 

WilniotEW o20 

WoodAF&w-IdaMsl 2 

Woodruft'EN 020 

OXFORD. 

AndrnsWmN 

BarnesT.ewisMD 

•' Carolines 

BaniesR 

BassettMaryA 

BcecherBJ 

BuckinghamSW 

" Emili'eV 

CampbellCD 

CandeeFred'kC 

" HanrahA 

" LouiseE-MaryH " 

ChatfleldHW si!) 

DavisEmmaE a18 

FlaggCB n3 

FlaggGeoA jel9olO 

FlaggJohnA 

HargerMary 

HawkinsChas 

Hawkinslralj 

HawkinsMinnieL o27 

HawkinsSam'l&wf nO 

IlawleyEmma n2 

HineGM s8 

HinmanAB ol6 

HiumanRS sl3 



NlO 
ol7 
s20 
ol3 
oil 
s21 
s8 
s20 



jyll 
A 23 

AlO 

o2t; 
jy6 



sl4 

olG 

o30 

m22 

Nl 

o30 
s25 
o3 



o30 

s7 

a2 

sl3 
n8 

026 
013 



07 



023 

02 1 



284 



SOUVENm OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION, 



IlinmanTTnllAE 


Bl3 


JohnponNA s25 


PulfordGraceS All Hallllezeldah p8 


JoliiisouGA 




JoliusonMissSS 8l8 


RussellRachelA s30 " Harriett 


LimbiirnerRB 


s7 


KissamMarie s2 


ScottMrsSusau je29 HallHL olO 


" ElleiiM 


'■• 


•• Faimie " 


SmithCH n1 HalllK oil 


Mallet tStephenS 


0-33 


LaddTS olt 


SmithFloraE s20!HalU\VaUer s2 


OjbornOrlaudoU 


NlO 


LcavenwortliGeo jyll 


SmithGeoW olOlHallWB st> 


SanforclGeoP 


0'^5 


LockwoodLibbie o2;i 


StilesBF 8l3 


HallWBnrr&wf All 


Nichols Benj jeCr^lS 


McEwenVH&wf o9 


StilesDavidF r2U 


HallWmB-Ella s7 


SmithEdgarll 


o-io 


MerrickBH s2T 


" AngM-AiinaF " 


HalleubPckMrsDW o2 


SmitliGS 


'■'■ 


MitcheUFrankK o24 


StilesGidueyA a19 


ElarmonMinuieL 87 


SmitlillcnrvE 


o24 


NorthropJos'ueL AlG 


StoneAA-Chas so 


HarringtoiiBF je8 


TruatrtoUtE 


o'2(J 


NoyesWC gU 


StroDf'Benj n9 


Harri5ionGeoW&wo25 


Walkei-Nathaniel 


Al8 


RadlordHA o3:i 


TreatJaneE o5 


UarwoodChasP a4 


WheelerJM&wf 


09 


" MrsKateC 


WebsterMrsCE 828 


" GraceR " 






RankinSM Je30 


WheelerAlfredN a3 


HarwoodMrsCF o2 


PROSPECT. 




rfeynoldsMarthaE Nl 


VVheeleiHS s30 


HawkinsWE 821 


Bro^TiBB 


sfi 


Reynoldi?Miu'eE jyl2 


WheelerMarthaE s2S 


UawesAA o31 


HutclikissDB 


s5 


■' SaraliL " 


WheelerMitchellS ol9 


HodirettsMrs JyS 


Hi)tclikissJiilia 


" 


ReynoldsWB sG 




•' Afice 


'- David 


"■ 


RiderGeoA o31 


WALLISGFOKD, 


HodgettsJno Jy3 


Hitc'icockWC&wf o3 


SliarpeWmC MlS 
SmithBW-Sarah o25 


AllenChasS oil 


•' Geo-Samuel 


IvcsWillis 


Je9 


AlleuFC&wf s27 


HodgettsJosephF jy3 
HodgkintonW sS 


MixEH 


n8 


SmithWni s6 


AllenGeoB s20 


NashMrsEJ 


ol3 


SwiftHV ol9 


•• HenryB 


HopsonGeoA ol2 


Payne AM 


o4 


TibbakChasA Nl 


AndrewsGN-CA olO 


HoughAlbertP 620 


" LydiaA. 


"• 


TomliusonEmma AlO 


AndrewsHeni-yW s6 


HoughAliceL s22 


PayneHL 


o30 


VVcaverLloyd a23 


Atkiusoun[CoK] '■^ 


HonghEIijahJ n2 


PlumbDavid 


s5 


WheclerHeury&wf a2 


AtwaterJohn n3 


HoustonMrsFR Bl4 


PliiinbDM 


'■'■ 


VVhiteNellie o24 


AlwaterLillie s9 


HubbnrdLM s22 


ScovilleMrsWmW o5 


WilliamsChasn n2 


"• Libbie-E '' 


HulICG jyl4 


SEYMOUR. 




SOUTHBUKT. 


AustinH Grace n3 
AustinMrsHorace sO 


HnllGF jy3 
HullGW je9s27 


Adams.TK 


sl2 


AverillPB sl3 


AustinRS s4 


•' MrsGW-MissGSs27 


AtwoodM 


A<» 


AverillSP&wf si 9 


BarberCHartwell o7:HiitchiiisAF[CoK] s2 


BassettEF 


S!> 


BaldwinMrsNC-CE o5 


BarberWJ jy29 IvesEH&wf s2t 


BaachSA-MaryH JT-JSi 


BennettHL Nl 


BarbourWH[CoK] sG p' Mis>*HC 


" CE-Hari7R 


" 


BostwickGeoS " 


BarkerCAiCrCoKl " IvesER olS 


BeuchSD 


sl2 


Bradley AnuaP 8l4 BamesGL[CorCoK]"- IvesLM s2 


3JeachSY&vvf 


oT 


Bradley FrauklinD s8 BartholomewFM efi Jeralds^Bennet o23 


BettsD&wf 


Nl 


•• MrsHattie-MissCE'" BartliolomewGW 6l4!Jeraldf'IR o21 


BoothLottie 


OJJ 


BrownCS s2] BeachZP[CorCoK] sG JohnPoiiF&wf NlO 


BotsfordEdwnN 


s20 


CampJH&wf s30 BeckleyLvmaa e2G JouesCN-BT s27 


Bradley EB&wf 


olO 


CautieldElizaO sl4 


BlakesleeJW s6 JonesGeoT a4 


Brown EC 


018 


CanfleldRobtM sl3 


BluntChasE je26Al3o7 JonesMrsPB ol9 


Camp LA 


a4 


CanfieldSadieE Jy24 


BlnntHA-DollieE 826i" Alberts 


CautieldSH 


'' 


DownsAB n4 


BoiceJR-SE s7 JonesSLillie s2T 


Ca3tleVlR-DC 


s6 


DownsAnsonTreat a5 


BotsfordMrsStau'y828 JuddMorton oil 


CtmrchSheldon 


n3 


DownsChasP s7 


BronsonJJ s20 


" MaryB-MarthaL '^ 


ClarkJA 


olO 


Do\STisHeuryP 821 


BrownCH s7 


KeenevNellieM s8 


CookeMrsSA 


jel3 


HartwellJ si 9 


" NettieF 


KendricklleuryD 8t> 


DavisJohn 


n2 


" MrsSW-CW 


BnnockGEjr[CoKl 86 KirklandCH m22 


DivisMarthaE 


Al8 


HinmanJno.I oil 


CarlisleE s21 KirtlandMC ol8 


Davis NettieE 


Nl 


HinmanW-Edw sl3 


CarrollWmN 3s2,Lanet'haj=N Jyl2 


DavisSP 


o21 


HicockBS OlO 


CarrinjrtonGK sG'LaiieWF&wf s20 


DayAG&wf 


jyl3 


HoytN ncieC s21 


ClarkJE jy5 


LaRueWL - stt 


DayHenryP 


jeO 


JohnsonRH n2 


CoeMrsChasW oG 


LeavenworthWJ "■ 


DeVVolfeHH 


jel9 KeenevPA 830 


Cook A n6 


[CaptCoK2dRgt] 


DibbleMary 


a9 


MitchellChasW s9 


CookMarcnsE[CoK]s7 


LeavenworthMrs sfi 


DibbleSarahQ 


s21 


Mitchell DM&wf s21 


CookeFannieE o4 


McKenzieGeoC ol8 


DoolittleMA 


oil 


MitchellEdwardL s8 


CookeGeoW&wf " 


McKeiizieJno o20 


DuuhamAB 


025 


MitchellGW 8l9 


CowlesAL s30 


McLanrinJno[CoK]s4 
ManuingMrsFR sl5 


DiinhamD 


n2 


MitchellJE 


CowlesWalterL a29 


EdwardsJnoS 


jel4 


MitchellJnoL Jel5 


DavisSimon s26 


MarkhamMrsES 827 


Eggles>touHN&wf o27 


MitchcllJndithA 620 


DoolittleAlraon o4 


" FredL 


" AdaM 


" 


MitchellMissNP o5 


DooIittleEJ 8l5 


MartiuHarryH Jy3 


ElliotMrsJos'phi 


es20 


MitchellWraE oli 


'" MrsJaneE-OrrinS" 


MavEvaE aIO 


FairchildMreSE 


ol3 


OatraanEL o27 


DndleyDCfSrOoK] sfi 


Mix.TnoB[SerCoK] e8 


Flag^'GB 


n2 


OatmanWillie n2 


EltonMrsGeoW o31 


MixLtWmN[CoKl sG 


GarrettLL 


s6 


OlmstedJW o2' 


EltonSR-AnnicM Jyl 


MonroeLM&wf o31 


GilletteDester 


je30 


OsborneChasK olO 


FonnfainJoseph. bO 


MorpeES[CorCoKJ pG 
MorsenC[CorCoK^] " 


HalliganllarveyS 


n3 


OsbomeSA s2~ 


Fri8bieRu8sell oil 


HolbrookAndrew 


b2() 


PardeeCH o3f 


GresherMrpEM s27 


MunsonChapS " 


HolbrookChasP 


o24 


Perryllermon&wf o7 


" MasterEII 


MnnsonGeoA s20 


IIurlbtirtRilla 


o33 


PicrccChapB ol2 


HallMissAA o4 


MnnpoiiGeoD s5 


HurlburtRE 


Jy28 


PierceRenbon jeO 


HallDM-GD jy27 


MnnsonMD&wf m22 


JamcsGeo 


031 


PlattAlfN-EdnaG slOllIallEA-Fanny 's9 


MnnsonVni s2!) 


JamcsLE 


825 


PlattSidnevS g21 HallEdwT o4 


NortbropLewisA 84 


JamesLizzijE 


jcf) 


PlattWillisE s9 HallGeo-,TA 66 


" Edmond " 


JamesThoa 


031 


'PostGeoU oO 


UallUenryL 


INorthropWC s7 



LIST OF COOTJECTICUT VISITORS NE"W HAVEN COUNTY. 



285 



KortoTiCOICorCoK]s6 
Is oyesJosepbF m19 
Ot^bornllE AlO 

I'eckVVniS s9 

" Aimie " 

PierpontJasN je9 
liicliAugut;tusF&-wo30 
RicJLb'A-AF jyl7 

KichmoiidWC a5 

KossLlDavidlCoK] s5 



a28 
ol2 
olO 

s7 
jy2S 



liussellWis 

SchwabGeo 

SherwoodGH 

SilvaJuoCjr 

Simpsoii]\lissMD 

SimpsonSamiu'l 

" MarthaD-MB 

SmithAK 

SmithJWilson 

SperryAW 

«peny\MrsEW 

SperryFannieA 

StecleEF£SerCoK] s2 

ThomasMKICoK] s6 

TliomasWni Jy2S 



s25 
s6 
oil 
S27 
o23 

Jel5 

s9 

Je9 

06 

o9 



60 



s6 



ToddUB 

TollsSII 

TraskWniieB 

Treadway Lyman 

TreadwayMrsL 

" Emily C 

TylcrGeoP 

UpsouJno-EB 

VanRadenMrsT 

VernonWillieA 

" GeoH 

WallaceFA 

■" HatlioE-DelleC " 

WaUaceRBISrCoK] " 

WaplesFL s4 

WaidMS s21 

WatcrhouseFredTkjyC 

WhitnevST sG 

Whitney WF o5 

WhittakcrEljen jy7 

WhittakerWM jy-f 

Whittlesey Elisha m30 

" GeorjreW " 

WiardEllaE 

M'iardFrankS 

WiklmanRevJE 

WilliamslTiaJ 

WilliamuS&laciy 

Wooding-Hetiry'C 

WoodinjrJM 

Wooding.TiioN 

YaleCha^E 



BaierJulinsjr 

BaileyEmiua 

Bajlcylda 

BairdAudrew 

BaldwinChasR 

BaldwinMrsElias blO 

"JAllie 

BaldwinGeoR&wfs30 

BaldwiaHJ n1 

"■TniniaiiH " 

BannouChasK sC 

[CaptCo02dRegt] 
BaimonPF[CoG] s4 
BarbourRobtC jy4 
Barnard\\'M jy31 
BaruesGeo sS 

Bai'n-esMrsGeo sl:i 
BartlettDrSC&wfje27 
BassettElliccE s2(i 
BassetteJasG o25 

BatesJobusouE 827 
BeachFrankE s2 

BeachGeoW&wf jel3 
BeachllcuryD je2' 
beachLS 
BeachTB 
BeardsleyGieoP 
BeardskyMrsL 
BeckwithEG 
BeckwitbFA 
BeecherWW&wf s30 
BeldenOscarJ&wf sl5 
BelmontF-Wm A2ti 



s2U 
sl2 
jeS 
sl3 
s7 
je3U 



s20 1 Beiiham£A<&ivf 

AlU 



o24 

Jy21 

o31 

o31 

s27 
?5 



WATERBUET. 



AlibottAF 

AbernetbyWP 

" ArthtirB 

AdamsFL 

AdamsGeoG 

AdtAlbertA 

AlcottJasL 

AlcottMorrisB 

AlexanderGeoJ 

Alesander.Tohn 

AlexanderMaryJ o24 

"JesssTnine 

Alk'nCM£.-wf 

AllcnFred'k 

AlIenFL 

Al'.cnJIrsTVIE 

AncIcrsoTiJos&wf 

Andcrr-oiiWm 

AtwoodL-T 

AtwaterS&Tvf 



f=15 
sl5 
oG 
ol3 
o27 
sl2 
Jy31 
o3 



sis 
jy3 
n3 
sl3 
jy5 



BcDcdictAA jeSsG 
BencdictChas jel 

BenedictlMrsChas jel9 
"•AC-Clmrlot eB " 
BenedictMrsFJ 
BencdictCieoH 
BeuedictJohnS 
BidwellJemiieE 
BinghaniJoelF 
" l\lrsSG-Howard 
"TA 

BirchSM a29 

Bisbeell&lady a24 
BissellJamesM 
BlairJohn-MaryW olO 
BlakeMai-yE o28 

BlflkeWII&wf-WEo27 
BlakeslccAJSI m25 
" JennyE " 

BlakesleeEII&wf oil 
BlakesleeRN s27 

•' MrsJL 

BlossWF 819 

lUuntHeniyA&wf jyC) 
BoothllEl-Annle a1 
I5oothJnoC-Mai-yEo30 
BootbJohiiE&wf jy3 
•' WinardE 

BoothWE[OorCoA] sG 
BougbtonEliz o28 
Bon<,'htonGeoA oG 
Conf,'htonHeni-yI ol7 
BoivenSH n2 

Bo^\nWalterA slS 
BoylcnJohiiT£CoG]s4 
BradlcyAA Jy4 

BradleyChasS sl9 

Bradleyl^IarsarctA c7 
Bradley]\lF[2dRegt]s2 



Bristol WH sl2 ClaikDB el!) 

BrousoiiAL je21 Cl;u-kEdwL o5 

Bi-onsoiiMrsCT s22 ClaryG sll 

BronsonMrsChas sH ClelandAlfixjd o24 

"CarrieL " CoeAdelaidcE o-i 

BiousonEL 820 CoelrviugH olS 

BronsonFloraJ n9 CoerJast-Ellen o5 
BronsonHD-JP s20 CogswellFredkH n3 

BronsonJuliaM s20 CoTeEdwardP je2(» 

BrownFredkJ s4 ColeLD sU 

BrowiiMrsRobtK 0I8 CollinsJennieE jy5 

BrooksPcter&wf sl3 ConneiOeoW s7 

BrooksWB jel CookDrJO&wf Jj'12 

BrooksMrsWm ol3 CookeGeoW olS) 

BrumierilM 87" GertmdeE "• 

BryanBG s7 CookeSnsanL 815 

BryanEW-FK oil CoweJlGeoH sS 

BryanJAwf ol2 CowellMai'LaJ ©20 

Bucldiigb'inSM<StwfN6 CramptoaCS 8<» 
Buc'lJennieM o5| [SerCoA] 

BuflPB s5 CrossFred'kB c27 

BuellHM nl.CrosslandAE sO 
BuellMrsHenryM a30 " LibbieB 



BradlcyNellieJ 

JIaryA 
Bri'igsCA 
BrigfTsEllenA 

WilhelminaA 
BristoJFB 



a23 



Nl 

s8 
Sl2 



BuucelJanielD 

BuncellanuahC 

BiumellJA 

Bui-usM[CoiCoG] 

BurnsSM 

" SarahM 

Bun-all EM 

Biu-rettA-AC 

BiiirittHattvM 

BurrittJD&wf 

BurrilUM 

CadyFD 

taiiusAnnaE 

CairiisMissMF 

C'aimsRobt-RA 

CainisSH 

CallaghaiiTHC 

CampAL 

CampHS 

CampIII 

CanipLM-JuliaC 

CampWH 

CargmWB 

"airsJW 

CarterJF 

CartcrLE 

Cat;cvDJ[SerCoG] s() 

CastleDrFE&wf o2^ 

CastleSA-MA 

CaswellllFifcwf 

" AdaB-Nettie 

CatlinCoriielia 

ChapmanFoster 

Chapman 



A25 CnlhaneM[ScrCoG] s« 
a25 CinnniingsAnnaR o5 
o31 CunninghaniA jy7 

sG CurtisEvaD 
sl4 CurtissFL«S:wf 

" jCutlerJohnG 
Al2 DanidsMrsDN 

s7"Clam ■" 

o31 Dar]ingMrsMarsh'ls26 
0I2 DaiTowJD s7 

s20 DavisFE-MrsJJ oil 

o7 DavisJosephK 
All DavisLSifcwf 
AlO DayEL 

o2 DayLouie 
All DeaconJohnS 
jy5 DemiugAlthea 
s28 DickinsonAM 
sl9i"Kellie 
sl9 UikemanN 



027 

ol'J 

a2 

o3 



617 

oyi9 

s4 
017 
n8 

Al6 



o24 
jy4 

s5 
Jc5 
jel 



ChapmanSamueIWjy4 



Sl4 



a2 

jy28 

sl8 
s2 
A3 



ChaseAS&wf 
•' JlarvE 
ChaseFredS 
ChasellenryS 
ChasellelenE 
ChaseJ 

ChaselrvirgH ^., 

ChatfieldBP&wf ol9 
■' Johmiie-Willie " 
ChatfieldMaryA slf) 
CbatficldMinnie ^0 
ChipmanMS 88 

ChipmanEanpom s6 
" LotticM-HK " 
" ]\Iartha " 

ChnrchCF-KateA a28 
" Albert H-EltonC a26 
CliurchEW 
ChnrchGeoW 



■sll 

'• Harry-WW-LonC" 
"JC 

DonahueJnoC Je27sl6 
BonahueMaryA a24 
DonahueThos si 6 
" Michael "^ 

DoiiglassJas&wf Nl 
DoiighertyFA n<) 

DohertyJB[C'rCoA]sti 
DoiighcrtyMrsMA o24 

Thos " 

DoughertyNellieCje23 
DoimcyCF s5 

DowiisWarj'A s23 

DowneslMrsMaryllolS | 
DraherMary n8 

" Sophie *' 

DriggsMattieE 
DuchoiTneD 
DudleyRosaW 



S3 
s2G 
023 
DudleyMrsWhfgBo2G I 



DuffieldVVS 

DurandDLnCS 

EganTP 

EgglestonJohnC 

ElliottGeoH 

" ChasT 

EllisJE&wf 

EUsF-lMrsEvaS 

EltonJasS 

" JohnP-MrsOM 

ElyEW 

Jv4|EmMerGeoP 

A21 FaganJas 



ChnrchillHwf&sODMlS FanchorE 
ClaffejPatrick sSFarreUohnA 



olf. 
J.v2 , 
je5 I 
Pl5 
o23 I 

sl3 

s8 

o31 

sl2 
a25 
o25 
s20 
jy6 



236 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



FennAH oil 

FeimEdwP s5 

FemiEJ o"io 

Femillarris&wf ol2 
Fiel(il''B-ES siy 

FiolilHU-SamhB s-JU 
rhicliVVA s-^1 

FislierFraukll&wf a7 
FitzsiinoiisGtiO f4 
FitzsiiiroiisTJcwfjylU 
'• MissAlice 
Fo'-Wallurl o25 

'• HJ-E M-lIattieE '• 
FooteTlieoMD s7 

Fori)ejiWO sll) 

Fowl.^rElizaR sail 
FpjiiinanUaleb jeS 
FreindJohnP Jv5 

'• ChasP 
Fi-e;icliHenryW 
FrenchLillieM 
FrisliieEUvL 
FrL-ibielleleii 
FrisbieMA 
Frost(JliasX&wf 
Frosti^reclM 
FiillerMrsLucy 
Fulton WE 
GaffiiuyJW-BJ 
GainesAlfredE 
GalpiuHI 
Gayl:)rd(JL 
Gayloi-dEH&wf 
GavlorJMattie 
GehyER 
GilljGi'tOhasJ 
GilixirtMrsChasJ 
" NellieM 
Gillette vIrsCW 
GilinauII!! 
GoodricliCaptAI s5 

[Cai)t.CoA2dRe?t] 
Goi)di-ichMrsHeleQ,Js8 
" FreddieS-AlrairaM'- 



sis 

jyi 

s4 

o.' 

jyl-J 

jyfi 

jyl2 

jyl9 

je26 

sJ> 

jyti 



jyo 
s5 

All 

jy4 

ol9 

jel3 
oil 



HeffennanMort oSlKieferDanlcl jy4 MitchcllLP&wf s32 

UeiniiuvayMr8Genol8!KieleiiyirsUan'l jy7 MitcheilAl[(;oiCoGJ stt 
" Aunie " iKingLE Jy;^B MoleyCA a. 3 

IlendersouJno-Jjr sTiK-iuysburyFJ JllUjeiT MorauJ:.6-C[CoG] s(5 



llickoxVVmS 

•• LiicyM 

HillGilinanC 

UiilHarrietlW 

HlllJVV 

UillMrs^JW 

HUlSusieE-RW 

iliilMrsVVS 

HillRevWmJ 



A21|LMeuilJd(JeuteUiMaas] jNloryanJP " oH 

'• ii^iujTfiburyMrsFJ jeli MonartyJohu-iLE i/T 



Sl3i" MaiyE&AliceE 
aSI " FdiiUDJtFJjr 
slti'KirkKBLCorCoA] 
o2a K-irkThos 
oil KuukelJ 
jy20 LalorgeFH 
a18 LaiubChas 



MorricerieuryK a24 

" lMom;^Ut> Ni» 

Stt •• MisbS '' 

n3 MorribHenryR je9 

s2l!Mon'i><Nelsou&wf o:^ 
sll" NellieJ 

SiO'Monis'VVmA&wf ol8 



HliichcliffLP[CoA] sULanipsouiiR&wf s27;Mos!*mauBe!<!*ieG Jeit 



GoodwiuCF&wf 
GaodwinCliasH 
GoodwinGeotI 
GoudwiniMarieL 
GouckerWra 
GrautJEiigeue 
Grisji,'sDi-EL 
" MrsFC 
Gi-i;.'!,-sHenryC 
GrilleyRELOoA] 
GrilleyWiu 
GiiilfordSarah-HJ o21 
GuilfordT jetj 

Hablitzei-F o3 

HallCNT-ConieliaM 827 
Halls W-MrsHP o.31 
" Fli)rence " 

nallWillUC&wf 
" GardnerM&wf 
HamiltonChasA 
HamiltonCath'neDsl-> 
IlamiltonDB&wf s->3 
HamiltonLB A31sia 
HarporEdwB sO 

HarperMrsHG o-2 

Harrison WR[CoA] s6 
HartChasH&wf jy21 
HartDF 95 

HartJir&wf je27 

HartOlinP n1 

HawleyDennis&w s90 
HaydenFIW-ES sS 
" LenaM-FII " 

HayesDF&wf ACS 
HayesTH b5 



jy6 
je2l 

je8 



sl9 



o9 
a31 



HinelsaacS «y^ " FKjr 

ilirsclibauniJohn s21 LampsonFW 
IIitchcockAguesDMl9 " Esther 
HitchcockGli o26 LaueBruce 

" llelenM " jLaneFW 

HitchcockiMrsHM ol3 LaugWalterC 
'• Jennie " iLatlimKTivvf 

Hitchcockllow'dL sl2 LeacliIIenry 
HitchcockMrsJC Nl LeggettW-Jjr 



MosuianMrsLaura &8 
S29 MosmauLM s2U 

" jMungerJ olO 

k3 ]SUiu.~onA[SerCoA] bG 
a24 Muii!?ouAS A29 

s21 MunsoiiLI je2Gsl9 
sl3|'- MisI.l-MisBj>lE " 

■"''^ Murray i!- k6 

**~Nealljl'' -Fannie sl4 
s'ti NelsonArVilU btf 

jeD) NelsonEW 

^'•^^ Nelson Wninjr 
s7 NevilleJolmJ 

A2(i NevilleJM 
06 NevilkMattliewF 



s8 
ol!> 
Je28 
024 



IloadleyPii s(i LewisAliceS 

HolfinauJoa ayS LewisEC-ldaE 

•' \Iary " LewisHarrietM 

HolgateWmA s4 Lewis WF 

llolinesMrsIsrael je.2S LimeburnerAJ 
" FrankO " 'LiuesJohn 

HolmesMG m29 LongworthWmJ 

HolinesSamuel m1:> LoomisFloraA 
HolinesWuiB 
HolmcsWmG 
HoruCliasC 
HortonllH&wf 
" MinnieR-ClaraJ 

HotchkissEH ol9 " WalterL-JohnM " lNoonanW[CorCuG] sR 

HotchkissPM&wf 0I8 MaddenEdwardW .TySiVorthAlfred s8 

HotchkissKateA s8 MagrawLtDA Jy4s4,NorthropAC m19 

Norlhrop.TnliaE o27 



s8 NewtoiilsaacE 

so Nic-holsi'larkH 

si LounsburyC&wf o20 NicholsDanielH 
je27 Lud(lyTF[Co6] s4 McholsEEUiott 

0I8 LuraEdwinA&wf ol2 NicholsonJames 
A:iO MabbottJohn&wf so >;obbiEP[C'oAI 

NellieJ-C'liasB " XoonauDP[CoG] 



je21 
Sl3 
^2 
s7 
s26 
s(> 
sB 



LillianM 
HowlandChasS 
HovtEdvvinS 
HurlburtEJI 
" LilUe.I 
ElydeTRir 
IddingsVVC 
IsaacHolt 
lacksonThosJ 
JacksonCtias 
JacqiiesEngeneL 
.JacqiiesJean 
JacquesMrsSLM 
JeffersHarveyE 
JohnsonllattieE 
•TohnsonHeleuM 
JohnsonHC&wf 
■' CarrieW 
Johnson.! 
Johnson Willis 
'• EW-GiissieM 
JonesMaryM 
TonesWniHjr 
JopsonGW 
JnddAnuaM 
JuddJB 

JuddMargaretD 
JuddSM 
JudsonTP 
KaiserM 
KeelerllW&wf 
KeelerNW 
KelloggLizzieQ 
KelloggSW&wf 
" MissesSA&LW 
" Liz7.ie-JohnP 
KellyJas 



s4 NorthropMilanP je29 
jel4 NorthropWmC Nl 
SI5 O-DoiinellTfC'oG] sfi 
'• lOsbornenCAwf a15 
90 OsbomeSheldon je6 



s8l [CoGI 

sl8MahprLtM[CoG] 
ol3 MaltbyBenj 
s22 MaltbyKatieL 

" 1" SusieB 

o3 ManvilleRC 

" !ManvilleWB[CoA] s(;iParsonsCN&wf 
Je30 MartinAII&wf A28|ParsousGS&wf 

s4 MartiiiJennie a24 " SK 

o31 MartinKateA slfi ParsonsLJ 

s5 MartinThosR slolpartonFrank 

s7 MasonFredA&wf s4iPartreeMrsCha8 
s25 MasonJohiiD s5 PartreeOo 



ell McCartvAII 
Jyll McCartyHenrv 
s20 : McConnack JF 

o9 [SerCoGl 

" IMcGivnevRevMJ je27 
o24!McGraththos o25 

jyll'McfntireMrsSarah n1 

" jMeloyDH 
0I8 MelovEd 
e27:Merc>'antBennet 

Nl MerrillChasB 
0I2 MerrimanChasB 
a24 MerrimanH&wf 
A22;MerrimanneIen 
Jy29s21 " CharlofteB 
san MerrimanWB 
sl9 ATev'TLonisM 

s8 MillerOhasS 



olfl 
oil 

je5 
s21 
027 

620 



sllPattonWH&sister sS 



N8|PaulAndrewA 
s6 



JTfi 

o20 
je27 
olT 
jel 
031 
9 

Nl 



PanlJasA 

PaiilWAO 

PeckAsaC 

PeckHH 

PeckMissKateL 
s22 PeckNellieM 
s6|PeckSamhME 
s4 PeckWallaceE&wfo2;i 
Je9[" CarrieE "• 

N3|PeetOJctwf 
olOlPendletonEA 
o271PercvHC 
" I Perkins JB 
sis PerrvFN 
s21 PhillipsDaisyN 
sl9'" EstherA 



813 
024 
ol9 
829 
821 
a30 



a25 MillerFH[CorCoA] sfi PierceMaryJ 



820 MillerWC 
p5 Mills ES 
" [MinorMary 
" iMinorSC 
jy7 MintieJH 
Kelly Wm[SerCoG] sfi Mitchelicrp 
KendrickGreene je9 MitchellOhasM 
KenneyCorneliaA oS MitchellFrankW 



024 

o3 PierpontAiistinB 9l9 
ol9 PierpontEA o25 

s5 PierpontEdwA s26 
el3 PierpontRJ " 

s22 PierpontJL ol7 

je20 PierpontSarahAT ol9 
Ml8 '> HattieA-MrsEA "• 
s25 PlattChasE Jel3 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS — NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



287 



PlattCM jy5 SingletonJohnS 

Plat tJVlrsCarolineT slS bkiUmoi-eilA 

PlattGideonL 

PlattHeieujW 

" CarrieA 

Plattl^'raucisW 

PlattHB 

PlattVVS&wf 

" IrviugG 

Plumeii C 

PopeChb' 

PurterJL 

PorterJ uliaS 

PolterJB-iiiller 

PoweilAUieN 

" IdaL 

PresiouFM&wf 

PriKbaidEdS 



jy5 
jyl4 

s2ti 
jel5 

Je8 
013 



sll JSmithAM-Orrin 
jtiiS SmitliChasE 
" SmithKA 
" SmithEC 
s6 SmithEdwardL 
812 SmithMrs'EVV 
" SmithLtFHLCoA] s4 
8l8 SiuithJE je20A24 

A^'J " MreJE-LucyL a24 
je24 " EH 
ju22 Smith JR&wf Je22 

s7 SmithJW je7ol9|L psonFraiikW 

Al9 SmiUiRH iilUo-^l iLptronliattieU 

" SmithJ.lrsRP 0^7 UpsonIL 

o5 SmitLWalterJ soltpgonLavalette 

olG KuovvEGjrwl&son slit|LpsoinLeRoy 



620 'WhitonEJ a9 

620 WliitnejU je29 

" I" GL)-CF 

Ml5 Wilcoxl'rederick a12 

>' iWilliaim-CS o21 

k2 \V illiaujtJuojr o2 

Jel9 WilliumtSl <fcwf 621 

TylerMrsWmMjeigfet) Williamt-WK exO 

LuderdowuEvaL A'^(j Wili-oiiABwl&dau k6 

UptonMi-sAJ w20 \\iltoijDB<S:\vf ©18 

UpsonAS Je3U Wiltoiia l.o^W fc8 

LpbOuEmilyE ^ a9 \Vilso]l\^■jl•[C'rCoA] t6 



TumerCE 

TuinerET 

" JE-EdithJ 

TuUleED 

" Lizzie-Louise 

TylerJA 

'I'ylerWmM 



PiilcliardHr'iiceCo2«j SuyderFL jelol psonMrsLM 

PiitcLardSaraliJ iilO SomersGeoE&wf Jyl2 LptoiiTC 
PntchardJennieL ol8 Spencerl- redlcA s6 UpsoiiWC 



sl9 
je27 
J el 



PruchardMrsL a19| [I'aymasterSciEegt] 
PntchardMary §7 SpencerJVIisIiiiriA sle 

PritchaidiSam'lH o30 SpeuderJosepli sl5 
PykeChas ol9 SpenderW 

EausoniSarahB a25 SperryML 
EayiuondL &20 SpiagueDB 

lieudFiaukS 821 1" MreFJ 

EiceAE je27 SpruceJas-AE 

EiceFB&wf o4;StacyPearl 

EichardnHN a28 StancliflCH 

EiggsLewis 0I6 StanuardER 

EobbinsMaryE o9 StantonCarrieL 
EobbinsThos a8 StarkweatheiMC 

EoberteDavidrCoA]s4 SteeleAnnieEH 
EoberteGeoW i*19 SteeleED&wf 
EobertsHarry 813" MaryE 
EobinsonWJ Jy26 SteelebP 
EodmanDrCS&wf 8l3 SteeleNonimn 
EootChasH o25 " JNIrsN 

EootET&wf 
EootMarietteB 

EootSam'1-MreV e28 " LouisH 
EuseellChasW 8l9 StoneAA&wf 
EuesellFrancisT Jyl2 StoneMO 
KnesellGordon s5 StoweGW 

EussellHunt jyl2 StrongDE 

EussellMrsDrIN N8,StrongEmmaM 
" Cora " iStronglraJ 

EnssellSiffonmey jyll iSwiftJnoL 
EyanPF[SerCoG] s6iTateFredW 
SampponFloraR sSliTaylorSS 
SampsonJnliaA " jTaylorSara'l 
SanipsoriRA " Taj-lorTR 

SandlandJH&wf jel4!TerrellEdward 



I psonEWLCorCoAJsoAViltoiiLL) 'ji8 

" " "' " iWolflALCoG] 84 

jel5 M' oodl' 1 ed J s23 

fc22;\\ocdiL-\\R a28 

Nl WoodruflMariaR nl 

je23 WcodrufiKSitwf sl3 

t2t) Wcodv\aicJno&wis£2 

a22,"JH 

WcchvorthPP&wjySl 



^ ietslSIiseMaryL 
WadeHL 



86 WcoeterFJ 

c2G WoostciHB 



HelenM 
WalkerJH 
V\alkerJW 
WalkerMarj'D 
WalkerThosB 
"W'alshPH 
n4l'Wa]ghTho8J 
a23 WardjDoH 
8l8 WareHowardR 
026jWanierFred'kA 
jel9 MamerMrpJH 
" IWarnerMaryC 
017 WarnerNellieA 
o2ti WarnerMreWH 
" WatereGeoH&wf 
8l2 StembergMathiasjySS VVatrougSA 
jy5 StockiiigHM&wf s20 Way land JuoE 



■^ adhamsJessieM sl9 WiightChatS 
WalkciMrgJuliettasoO Wii^litJan.fS 



W rightfcarah 
sl9 WyniaiiES 
827 Yale]V!i>PN 
0I8 YorkMF 
s7 lorkMisWF 
85 

WOLCOTT. 



o3 

89 

jel5 
jy4 
0I8 
ol7 
628 
a8 
»1 



BronfonBL 



aS3 

621 



^^' Bioi.i^ciiES 

J™ CarteiGeoW&wf el5 
olO 
0I8 
o5 
620 
0I8 
a9 
OlO 



o2< iiallEaiiecmB 
o^JiLaiitAlS&wf 
N;^ Mt)ni>oi)FC&wf 
o^ToddJiioliS 
N^jUpsonEM&wf 
^jLlpsoriEvalenaJ 
031 upsouMilesS 



SanfordHF 

SawnCliasH 

SaxeJohnL 

SchlegelBalthas 

" Eoeina 

ScbmitzHenty 



o27iTerrellGeoF 
s22|ThompsonDB 



MrgCN 
oil WebbMaryE 
jyl7 WebsterJohnW 
s27 " JosieD 
625 WebsterNLfCoA] 

N-8 WellesMreAlfred jyl5 BarkerJW 
ell " MattieC-CN " " 

s6 WeedenWniN 
821 WeltonMrsED 

67 WeltonFD&wf 
818 WeltonFL 

" i" GeoL-NellieA 

88 WeltonGeoR 

67 1 " Emily J 



WOODBBIBGE. 



827iThompponGT&wf 0I2 WeltonH-ED 
89iTirenMinnieE 66 ^ eltonJopeph 

" |Tob!riJas[CorCoG] p6 WeltonNelsonJ 

619 1 Todd J A jyl2 WeltonWP 



68 WhiteCH 
o5 WhiteChasL 
87 WhiteEdwL 
o3 WhiteLtFR[CoA] 
621 WhiteJC 



SchmitzWm-Chas 68 Tompkiii6Fred''k 

ScofieldJennieL o27 TompkineMrsP 

ScottDwight o3|TompkiusGeo 

ScottHG ol7iTompkiii8GeoE 

ScottJordan 82i:TottenLoni?A 

ScottWC s22 TownsendMrsER 622 WhiteLewis 

ScovillEttaM el5i" FllenR-EmmaC " iWhiteLeRoyS 

ScovillGB 622 j" LiicyH " " SJ-EmraaL 

SevmourChasE eCTracvCornelius Nl " JennieC 

ShacklevMissSE oil TieadwavCS a31 WhiteLC&wf 

SheltonBelleG 88 TreadwayLA 

SheltonMartha n3 TrottCT 

ShepardWmH jy27 TrottJnoT 

ShipleyAtfredJ&wolO TrowbridgeSW 

Simon6Cha8 67 " FH 

SimpsonMr6JP a2S TrumbnllLL&wf 



021 
68 

" AngnrDC o23 

s7 BaldvvinMarcueE s20 

a26 

BeeclieiAmoe a8 

n2 BeetherHeriiMjyl2A8 

87 Beech eiKatic'L Jyl2 

64 ClarkNettieJ 

o9 DoolittlelrvaDP 

" jJudgeli'arry 

o4 KeyEmilieL 

" iLinet^DC 

a7 WeItonHomeiH&wf69!Liiiei:^>ir<S:Mr6JMjel6 

s27iMaiivilU'Lyman 820 

e21!^IarvinJM n3 

M31iMer\\inlIeiiryF 68 

828" JnoH-FN-MrsJM " 

Bl'MorgaiiFloreuce a3 

s4: Newton AliceM 

84 NewtonErwinJ 

66|NewtonMrpPeck 

6l4iNewtonRC&wf 

jY8iPeckFrance6R 

jel6|" Ella J 

" PeckHoward 

" PeckPE 

sl6 PerkinpStephenP 

" [PerkinsThereeaH a26 

o3; SperryMiloD&wf 

jy3 " Minnie 

jy6 SperryPP 



027 
ol9 
826 
o2 

84 



Jy5 

A28 

85 

A31 

828 

el3 
820 
Nl 



Singleton J 
SingletouMreJas 



Jv6 " GraceJ-IdaA 
67 TnckerSN 



jyl2 " GeoL-HattieS 
0I6 WhiteLvman&wf 
o30 WhiteMElla 
84 WhiteNM 
" :" MarvW 
8l9 WhiteEosaE 



8l2 

85 
Bl2 



WhiteTrCorCoG] 
jyl2 White WW 



SperrvVirgilP 
821 TerrellMarsliB 
66 TomlinponW 
je29 W'alkerChaeT&wf o27 



288 



SOUVENIK OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



DFJ^ITiZFIELI? COXn^TT-Z-. 



BETHEL. 



AmblerSS Jel4 

" JasW-Nellie 
AmblerMrsSS jel4N8 
AndiewsET ol9 

BaaJeyWmP 
B-iirdHII 

BairdJohnll-GE je() 
BaklwiuAL Je-^S 

BiU-l)i-rAEX-\vf Jel4 
" LizzieM-AlinuieB •' 
BamesMrsDH Jel5 
Bai-uuni \nnie si 

BarnumED Jyl 

B:irmimLB[CoA] h5 
BarnumWA a1 

Bad8ettFE[SerCoA]s5 
BeebeJohnO Jel5 

BeersChaiincey olS 
BenedictAL 
BenedictMrsAL 
Benedict FraiikA 
BfinedictFB 
BeuedictJM 



a-i 



ol-> 



BenyD[S«rCoA] so 

BlackmaiiMiiTF si 

BolaudHeleuNt Jel5 

BoiiirhtonTlieoH m?,1 

BrauueisT oil 

"■ M-MaiyA 

BrothertoaHII 

B:irnsHM 

Biin-JIIoward 

Burr.TosephW 

" Juliott-JiiliaE 

BarrWmisT 

Chapman Alfred 

C;h:ipmaiiSar.iti 

ClappUiiss^ellO 

ColeWiuF 

Coruiii:?CM 

CrofulBeiijJ 

CrofiitGS 

[Major4thTlegt] 



o2() 

oil) 

jyi 

JoG 
a9 
So 
o24 
si!) 
o'ij 

84 



ol8 
olO 



NlO 
A3 

a9 
o2i 
o2l 
m31 



DibbleAunaT 
DibbleFrankT 
DibbleMiryE 
DibbleWm 
DuaniugMaryA 
DminiugNellieM 
DiinningSS&vvf 
DurantPredE 
DiirautGeoG 
DiirautGrauvilleA o2i 
EUiottSfl s-2i 

FairchildOhasE olO 
FairchildGB mITaIS; 
FamaniBT jelj 

ParnamGooW M-iO 
Faniam Howard s21 
FarnamJohnG jel3 
FerryGS[SerCoA] ?<> 



024 



GilbertCaptlTA 
[CoA] 

MrsFIeuryA 
GilbertGH 
GilbertHovvardS Jel5 
GilbcrtNathauS Jyl 
tTilbertPhilo 
LJloverllS 
(iloverMrsIIS 
GreciiCliasH 
GreenElbertW 
HibbardMrsOH 
HickokUP 
HickokGeon&wfjelS 
HickokSH jel4 

HoovnanFredC ol!) 
HoytAiigustaG m3(J 
HoytGeoil s9 

HoytLtWF[CoA] p4 
HiibbellDT 

[Adjiitaiit4thRegt] 
■TeiikiiieJas n3 

JohnsonJL ol8 

.lohnsoaMrsTC 
JadilArthurS je7 

JiiddFrcd"k o2.J 

TiKldPA Ml7s7 

JuddHenryC&wf nO 



024 
018 
O30 
a2 

on 

o2() 

Pin 

n8 
ol7 



s7 
je28 



jel5 



o26 



Ferry IIcuryM 
" GeoW 
Ferry J VV 
Ferry LottieG 
FosterBF-ThosP 
FosterChasJ 
Foster.TessieP 
FoxTW 
FoxWatson 
GilbertEW&wf 
" IdaJ 
Gilbcrtllenry 
" Mary-Uriila 



o2(j 

o2o 

a2 

Nl 

o24 
ol9 

s2 
o26 

s20 

je28 



JiiddHowardA 

Jud.lTB&wf 

JiiddLucianP 

Iiidd Martha A 

JtiddWinA 

KeelerCP 

KnappUavisD 

LacyAaronS 

Lee.ML-Jos 

LockwoodAB 

LyouEdwarJ. 

McKayThos 

SarahP 
McKenziePW 

Howards 

CorneliusS 
Mackenzie .E 
McWaters Aggie Jyl3 
MayhewJS jy6o31 
MayhewHattie a2 
" MariettaL " 

MeadJohnC[CoA] s5 
MorganChaeO o25 
MorganGeoK[CoA] so 
MorganJR o5 

MorrowMaggie Jyl3 
" Julia A 
MurrayJasT 
Oakley WH 
OsbomeHM 
PattisonAB 
PlattGeoH 
ReidEH 
Reidllugh&wf 
" Julia-Huglijr 
ReidJohn 

RichmondPH-EB m31 
RitzmanKattie 
RockwellFA 
StClairMarion 
SchmidtChas 
"■ Bianca " 

SchoonmakerF e6 
SevensME o5 

Shaw.TW jel4 

SheadMrsJopeph n9 
ShepardEmily jel5 
ShepardGeoA&w jel4 
" FrankH-GeoP " 



o23 

n3 

Al 

027 
026 
jel4 

o27 



n4 
m30 
je21 



ShephardWmC jel5 BagpettFrancisII sl4 

!5hennuiiL[C\>rCoA]so Bassettlt<adoraG s2J 

t^horiWS-tjiiaceE jcl5 Bat^settRocmeyS Jy:i3 

SmitliDaiiiulH nU Ba:sl(Jarrie oltt 

SmithEUiottD n3 Bas-tC'harles s7 

SiarrGeoEjr ol9 ButclielurliE olO 

tjtoneOUver jeti BatchelorSoI ol9 

ArthurJ '• |B.ixturC'ornelia a25 

SturdevaiitEdgar je20|BaxterKL s2 

TaylorHerm'u<is\vjel4!BeaehEhna o3 

EddieJ " |BoachFred'kS n2 
Taylur^MrsJH olljBeachJamesE&wf s21) 

TimauusIIW ol2 BeacliJohuM s28 

WardClareiiceM jy3!ljeachLizzieH jel 
WatersKevGooF jel4lBeachMrt;MaiyL 
WattsJohnS o2o BeachMrs'l'VV 



WheeierAJ [CoA] sO 
Wheeler()W[CoA] '^ 
WheekrGeoVV n8 

Wheeler i-JnliaM ol7 
WheelerJH&wf NlO 
WheclerMri^SB 
Wheeler .\Ir!<SJ 
WhitlockMi-sSJ 
WillianisIIenry 
WoodChasM 
Woodman AS [CoA] s5 
WoodmaiiMaryR aIO 



n8 

jel4 

jel4 

n9 

023 



BltlDGEPORT. 



o3 



Nl 

o31 



017 



AbbottRevLW 

"• Louis^aB 

AbernethyDrAH 

AckerLafavette 

AlvordOE&wf 

AlvordMrsJD 

AlvordWIAwf 

Ander;5onFW[CoK]s5 

AndersonJjr&wf a29 

AndrewsAli 

ArmsbyGeoP 

ArmstrongP 

" CII 

AnnstrongL-E 

Ayre^MAR 

AstellLS 

BackusAP 

BachEE-J 

BaconEllaL 



s20 

ol7 

o2e 

oU 



Boardt^leyJasW 

iJeards'leyJuliet 

Beard^sleyMarietta oil) 

- eardiileyMB 828 

"■ LucyJ " 

BeardsleyOscarL o25 

BeckwitiiAL a31 

BeecherCMcd'c' Jel5 

BLechurMrsMai-ia a30 

" FannieM 

Bcecherl'hosH 

BeersAB 

BeersChasE[CoB] 

BeersGeorgiaL 

" NellieL 

BeersGB 

BeersGW-CA 

BeersMr Henry 

•' MrsChas 

BeersOR 

BeersPM 

Bc'eri?RD-01ivcA 

BegleyJ [CorCoE] 



o24 
je7 



N8 

A29 
a31 

Nl 

N8 

jy-t 

025 

„^ ..^„,. _, 85 

o31 BelknapChas&wi sl9 
a2(> BenedictRevAN sl4 
Mil BenedictGW m18 

" " AliccM " 

ol8!BcnedirtME o6 

o9|BenediciWmC&wfA33 



s7 

s21 

ol6 

s20 

BaconMissLizzieEA2:3 



Bailey LIS! 

BaldwinC'-asF 

Baldwin ElizaA 

Baldwin^L 

BakhvinSW&wf 

BallMissI\IW 

BallouRobtB 

BanksChasR 



012 

s28 

ol8 

s6 

o9 

a30 

019 

a8 



BankRMrs^EdgarG o31 



BanksEdwinJ 

BanksFredJ 

BanksWmH 

BarberCC 

BarkerEarlM 

BarkerGW 

" EllenP 

BarkerNellieL 

BarnesEW 

BarnesWP 

BarrettSP 



o23 

o3 

a23 

je8 
m31 
a3U 

m31 

jy8 

o4 

819 



BenhamPW&wf o7 
BenhamGeoT n3 

BennettCH s28 

BeuLettFrankC&w.ieS 



BennettFW 

BonncttGW 

BenzMrsLydia 

"" Clara 

BettsGE&wf 

BidwellG-MrsA 

BillDrCII 

Bill i ngs-Mrs John 

" Julia-Dwi^ht 

BiliingsJnoH 

BillingsJnoS 

BirdseyHenryS 



m20 

s2T 

je20 

ol3 

oil 

o4 

019 



811 

je28 



Birdsey. aryjane o31 

BishopMF 

BishopNellieM 

Bit'hopDrSydney 

Bis'hopWmb 

" NathaniclW 

BishopMrsWmD 

" Henry 

BishopWmDjr 



BartholomewE]laFs29 BishopWP 
BartholomewTL a16 " LA 
BartonJ[C'orCoD] sSlBissellGejS 
Bart ram A E jy4jBlackJA 

BartramEB a22[" JMH 

BartramFA el4 BlackMrsJA 

BartramGeoH s25 BlakeReubeu 



614 

o26 
sl3 

814 

8l3 
8l5 

04 

87 

827 

ol9 
e2« 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



289 



BlakeSS 


64 


BlakemanLtCA 


bU 


LCoB] 




BlakesleeC'B 


Nl 


" MS 




BloodHN 


n2 


Bluntlvatie 


a9 


Bolton KB 


o9 


" Mrt^SJ 


'• 


BoothHannah 


a30 


BoothKeimie 


ol7 


Boughton.JB 


n8 


BoiinclageFKS 


g4 


BoudreuMrsThos jyl4 


" Nt'llie 


" 


BourThos 


n4 


BouineFJ 


a9 


BoydW'in 


oat; 


BoyleEiiz 


n2 


BrackettFrankA 


Ml7 


BradleyEttaB 


o2T 


BrailleyFIlsr 


621 


BradlcyMrsHelen 


s28 


BradleyWmA o18n6 


BrauaganP[CrCoEJ s5 


BrewerDE 


JV7 


BrewsterSJI 


sl2 


BriggsWP 


je20 


BrinemadeFannic 


Nl 


BrinsmadeJR&w 


• 02 


BrlnsmadeMaryE 


sl4 


" MinuieR 


" 


BroadheadJen'eS je22 


BronsonGN&wf 


ol9 


BronsonS 


olS 


Bi( nsonWillisN 


o3 


BrooksJnoB 


s29 


BrothwellMiimie 


je29 


BrothwellWmE 


NlO 


BrowuCR 


n8 


BrovvnGM 


on 


BrownJnojr 


619 


BrownM 


025 


BrownNM 


sl4 


" IlarrietE-WillieL " 


" FrankliuN 


" 


BrowneMrsMaryE s20 


BryanWP 


jy4 


BuckinghamCB&wls8 


BuckinghamN 


o3 


BuckinofhamMrsN o4 


" MissNellie 


" 


BuckleyCE[SrCoB] g5 


BuckministerOE 


04 


" MH 


'• 


BullWm 


ol3 


BullockES&wf 


a24 


BuUockJVV 


M31 


BunnellCS 


Ml8 


BunnellEC 


o25 


BunuellMrsH 


Ml8 


BunnellHW 


o6 


BuunellJuliaH 


m31 


BurkeAndrcvv&wf s2-2 


BurnhamWE 


si 


" Mamie 


" 


BurrAnnieC 


a23 


BurrMissAJ 


Mil 


BurrLewis 


s20 


BurrittHLW 


Jc28 


" Jno 


" 


BurrittMaryL 


jel9 


BurrittMrsNM 


a23 


BurrittW-EM 


62 


BnrroughsMrsC 


s29 


BurroughsEmily 


oil 


BurroughsJasR 


je7 


" MrsGeo-Mit-sMK" 


BurroughsMrsWA s3 



BurtCn[CorCoB] s5 
BurtonCharity ol2 
BurtonFrankP jy2G 
BurtouGeoF o23 

BurtonMaryE a23 
BushelEdwLCrCoBjsS 
BushuellChasW sl9 
BussRT jel5 

BiitlerEC o2t5 

CableAJ mH 

CaleiJulia m18 

UalulThomas m18o4 

CarrieJ-Caroline o4 
CalhouuCM s5 

CallioiinMissMS 8l2 

MissFay " 

CaliaghanP[CoE] 65 
CanK-ronRobt olO 
CaiuleeJuuD 68 

ALiilii " 

CaudeeHattieK 
CanfiildA[CoE] 
CanfieklCS 
Cau field WalterE 
CapenWN 
CardGeoP 
CardGeoR 
CareyJuoJ 
CarleyMreRW 
CaroliJnoS&wf 
CarrMv6AH 
CarrollLizzie 
CarpenterCW 
CarpenterF 



CookGeoF&wf o25 DewherstElmer ol9 
CookMrsHenry o2(5 DewherstJE n3 

CookMlssLaura o6 DewherstWIIH a27n3 
CopelandLH s21 DiutschEmily s9 

"MreWJ-MasterFJ-' DimonJas o31 

CoreyHenryF 69 DimondCH jy7 

CorliesHH jeG DimondGeoH Jel3 

CorDellLtGW[CoB] bo DisbrowWniE Jyl 
CorniiigJnoC s21 Donnelly, t J [CoE] sli 

CornvvallJnojr o31 DonnelyMyra s(j 

CornwellTimothy g8" Leonora 



65 
6l5 

olO 
a30 

Al4 

n2 
Sl8 

03 
je2G 
a23 

023 

s8 



MaryR 
CoughlinPatk 
CourterWmW 
CoueeTheoO 
CowieJennie 
CowlesGB&wf 
" GBjr 
CoxChasW 

MrsSarahE 
CoxJnoR 
CraneEttaA 

CarrieE 
CraniptonMrsEM 
CraneFrank 
CraneHarriet 
CramptonWH 
Crawl'ordJasG 



CarpenterFannieHo21 

CatuCT 

CateSM 

CatlinEC 

CatliuEL&wf 

CatlinliymanS 

CliadburnS 

ChamberlainJC 

ChamberlainOB 

ChamberlinWII 

Champion ElizU 

ChapmanFredD 

ClarkClaraB 

ClarkCR 

ClarkEmma 

ClarkEA 

ClarkGeo 

ClarkHL&wf 

" ML 

ClarkHP 

ClarkKate 

ClarkLW 

ClarkLilianE 

ClarkRevSylv 

•' Mi66F 

ClarkWJ 

" ClaraM 

ClarkWalterL je20 

ClearyT[CorCoE] 85 

CleavelandGE&wf 6l3 

CleavelandJames Al8 

CodyAdaJ a23 

CodyJnoB&wf ol9 

CoeChasP jel3sl2N3 

CoganJ s5 

[FifeMaj4thRegt] 
ColcCH m30 

LoleGeoW s20 

ColeJasS&wf 
ColemanClaraP 8l2 
CollinsLizzieF ol8 
ComlyWA jy6 

ComstockGeoifcwf o6 
CongerDavidN slti 
ConklingCH a30 



o30 
ol7 

Ml8 

S(J 

Ml7 

je26 
a5 

Jyl2 
821 

Ml8 

s8 

026 

612 

n8 

613 

a2 

sl4 
ol8 
620 
A25 
n6 

025 



DoolittleET 
ol2 DotenChasA 
a29 DoiiglasJunnie 
Al6 DouglasG-EC 
^9 DownsMrsCG 
827 DownsOrigeuP 
" iDownsPW 
o2l!uo\vuiiTW-FH; 
" JDownerMM 
67 Di.yleNellieC 
s6 DrewMrsA 
'• iDrewHenryB&wf 
n2 DuiihaniGeo 
Dunham Mrs JE 
DunnJasT 
•■ JoseyB 
DunnJuoH 



821 

Jy24 



84 
024 

627 
S27 

87 

o24 
013 
o4 
o4 

aSO 

82 

o2 

627 
jel 
Nl 



CrittendeuAnnaS i)18,DiiraudLizzie 



CrofutMrsMB 

CrookerGeoB 

CrookerWillH 

CroselyTE 

CummiugsJasH 

CunninghamCJ 

CurtisEmma 

Curti6E&wf 

CurtisEM&wf 

CurtisEPjr 

CurtisGeoE 

CurtisJC 

CurtisJosephB 

CurtisLF&vvf 

CurtisRodney 

CurtisMrsS 

Curti8Victory 

CurtissFred 

CurtissW 

Dalla8Ales 

DallasJohn 

DaniolsJE 

DariganE[SerCoE] s5 

DavenportD&wf ol9 

DavenportJG&wf ol8 

DavisArthurP jy24 

DavisAR 

DavisEK 

DavisHenryF 

Davi6jN 

DawsonEM 

DaweonES 

DawsonOlive 

DawsonRC 

DayJB-EmilyB 

DeForestLN 

DeForestMreLN jel6 

DeFore6tTB&wf sl3 



ol9 
o7 
o4 

823 
o2B 
ol3 
814 
018 
823 



DeLaneyEE 
DeLaneyWm 
DenchEddieC 
DenchJB 
Den6moreAF 
DerrickAlbertA 
•' MrsKate 

DerrickGE[SerCoB]s5 
DerrickMrsLaura oil 
DevittPJ s27 

" Jas " 

DewhurstMrsEli ol7 



ol2:DurginCT 

68 DustinEM 

o4 DuttonAD 

" iDyerBW 
o30lEamesHL 

n4 EamesSW 

o3iEarleGeoS 

04 " OTjr 

EarleOT-NR 

EberhaidM 

EckelJohnW 

Edwards-AB 

EdwardsC-EvaG 

EdwardsE&wf 

EhrsamAugusta 

ElligGH 

ElliottAugu6tu3 

EliisSarahE 

ElyMr8MaryEW Je22 

" MissLelaM 

" MarterHW " 

ElybW Je22827 

EmmoneMrsEJ o30 

Esi^igElmerE 

EvauBAE 

EyreJIl-WH 

FaganPafk 

FallonMAlice 

FairchildMrsA 

FairchildAB 

FairchildCclina 

FairchildilrsCN 

FairchiklDaniel 

" AnnieE-JuliaE 

FairchildES 

FairchildFA 

FairchildGW 

FairchildHC 

" ML 

FairchildMaryA 

FairchildMrsMS 

FaircldldPN&wf 

FairchiklRB 

[LieutCoWthRegt] 
FairchildSH o25 

FaristJoel 825 

FaristStephen 66 

FaristStepheuE w26 
FaubelWm n3 

FaycrweatherJP el2 



Jy5 

829 

8l9 

jel4 
Jy5 

829 
je7 
je8 
n2 
024 



ol8 

Al4 

68 

Mlls8 

o3 

jyi 



828 
e21 
o4 
623 
Al5 
Nt 

o3 

626 
jy4 

jyi4 



69 

jytj 
a31 
013 

63 

016 
016 
Ii2 

sl3 
013 
012 

814 
621 
813 

je9 

Nl 

018 
a28 

s5 



290 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



FeatherstoneFC 


s20 


GonldGA&wf 


012 


" WB 


'• 


GrannissCA-CF 


a31 


FeuleyJames 


034 


GravesNM 


s7 


Ferris W'L 


S9 


GrayBessieE 


M31 


FiuMFrodW 


s7 


Gray* has-Hattie 


A2;i 


FieklLillicA 


jyib 


GreelyFM-GF 


64 


" MA 




GrecnCE 


o4 


FitchFE 


a30 


GreeueW'mH&wf 


Sl8 


Fitch Mary L 


jel:i 


GregoryDrE 


s7 


" LizzieJ 


*^ 


GregoryWA[CoB 


85 


FitcliMarionS 


Aa4 


GriesingerWm 


s21 


FitZireraldD[SrC()E]sJ 


GriffinJoel 


02.5 


FitzOihbousK&wf #14 


GrirKthWH 


a31 


FlatlierEdw 


S-J9 


GrosAVniH 


JylO 


" LizzieA 




i^undlachWH 


jyti 


FlintCliarlieE 


Mis 


" MrsSE 


" 


" Mrs^CH- Alberts " 


HaabHarry 


s!) 


" EininaL 


" 


HaasMaaieE 


02.5 


FlymiMrsWL 


N(i 


•' MattiuE-ChasR 


" 


FooU'MrsD? 


S31 


IlaluAML, 


A3 


FooteDT 


Si;) 


,Iah^GeoDY&wf 


62(} 


FooteVVmll 


sil 


HallAbulS&vvf 


027 


FoiiusAE&wf 


jy.-) 


iIa!lCatlicriueS 


o6 


FoUansbeeJS&wf 


s;iJ 


HallMisCW 


ol7 


" MrsER 




•■ Gertrndc-Louie 


'• 


FosketWniH 


s38 


•' SophieS-MrsPJ 


" 


FowlerFG 


jyi 


HallC'W&wf 


jy4 


FrancisJohnF 


M.31 


•' MissAGertie 




" Fannies 


'• 


HaliMrsEW 


023 


FrawleyMichaol 


S4 


•• Geo\V 




FredericksWH 


Olij 


HallMrsFB 


olS 


FrouchCil 


sT 


ilallHL&wf 


o20 


FreuchEB 


oil 


IlallKateL 


027 


" EiniiiaE 


" 


Hall.MLouise 


Nl 


FrencliB.VI 


s2(i 


HallOA&lady 


031 


FreiioliGeoK 


s3i) 


HallOrlandoB 


"• 


" EUaM 




HallOIIovvard 


s9 


FroiiclilIE 


012 


HallMrs^SB 


00 


Fri#bio\VuiR 


s-i7 


■' Louijc'S 


" 


FullerJolinE&wf 


02tj 


HallW-WillD 


a9 


GaiiisbyAH 


sv:5 


HallVVB&wf 


Al4 


GalpinWR 


s5 


"JWalter-ClaraL 


'■ 


GaiusbyAliceW 


jyU 


HalliganWmE 


All 


Garduei-Mr.--Lizzie s-i-2 


Ilallsadn Amelias 


Ol8 


GarduerLizzieD 


ol8 HamiltonJenaie 


Ml9 


GaylordEL&wf 


A'J HamaiondGA 


SO 


GorbicbJG 


621 Hand rt-MaryA 


Nl 


GerdeulerCA 


o4 •* LizzieM 


" 


" CM 


" HanleyJM 


s5 


GibnerWinP 


s5 llansonChas 


g2,) 


GiddiugsMinotS 


jy(i Hanson FL 


024 


GiddiugsVRU 


o5 Hanson Kate 


jy2(i 


GilbcrtCharlotte 


s29 HardingOrlandoA 


o25 


GilberrJames 


jelO IlarralMrsEW jelosli 


GilbertMP 


s8 IlarralGeo 


jel2 


GillettAH 


Sl8,'- GS 


s25 


" Emily A 


" HarralWW&wf 


ol2 


GinandD 


g6 HarringtonDH 


n9 


GirdcrUay 


Ntj " AnnieC 


" 


'• Maiui;Y 


" jHarringtonHM 


.iy27 


GleasonHelenA 


AlO Harris WA&vvfMl8bl2 


GluasonJosepiiM 


jy2(i HartMissCJ 


Je21 


GlennRiissuil 


olS HartChasL 


n3 


GlovurChasT 


s2^ Hart^horneMrsK 


614 


GoodsellEBjr&wf s-^,) -KittieS-TylerW 


" 


G()odse!lEB&\vf 


o2l) HatchChauiJceyM Jy7 


" KittioE 


'' 


HatchMrsCM 


82 


GoodsellGW 


o30 


•■ MissAB 


" 


Good><ellLVV 


jyl9 


HatcliGC&wf 


629 


GoodsellPS 


s5 


HatchllF 


sl3 


GoodsellZalmon 


oil 


Hatch.IennieB 


ol9 


" CarrieE 


" 


HauxJJ-FE 


6H 


GoodvvinCaptEN 


s4 


HavilandWT 


" 


[Co El 




HawcsMissBE 


813 


Goodwin IlenrvP 


616 


HiiNvlcvES 


jel 


GortonWB'-CE 


a4 


■• MarvW ChasW 


" 


GoKsiingGeorgiana ot 


llawl.-vFB&wf 


je21 


GotildAE 


o2( 


Hawh-'y Freds 


Ml7 


GouldChasM 


019 


HawleyllarrietW 


n29 



nawleyHattieK 


036 HnbbellWL 


n2 


HawleyJM 


611 "MissFE 




UawieyMaryL 


828 HuLdiesFrankJ 


05 


HawlevMist-SA 


n2 HuIlCE&wf 


Je22 


llawleySW 


olU HiillGeoF&wf 


S18 


HayesHN 


a8 Unlllrving&wf 


812 


HaywardCR 


i" HarryS 




HealeyChasE&w< 


n3 IIullJlI 


a30 


UealeyVVni&sou 


a7 HumistonGeoP 


828 


HedgeMrsNeUie 


je8 •■ Ann 




Held Louis 


jclO HuniphreyEmmaLoSO 


HewitCH 


Nl 


HuntFK 


o31 


HevvitJH-AJ 


o3 


HussHenry 


je5 


HewitSFH-Etta 


017 


IIutchinsHB jyCs2e 


UicksFanny 


jeKi 


Ilutchins'ihos 


o24 


lii-bvWR M31S29 


IlutchinsonU 


ol8 


HiC'l)VMaryA 


s29 


HutiiMrsCL 


o3 


•• NcilieA-MarthaL " 


" CliasL 




IligginsJS 
HillKate 


Al9 


HurdF&wf 


02 


024 


•■ LauraK 




HillPark 


A2.5 


HurdFW 


a15 


UincksAnnB 


jel 


HurdPLilo&wf 


n22 


HincksEP 


je21 


InglianiAA 


o2.> 


HincksJohnH 


o4 


InghamJosieS 


o5 


HindererllF 


S20 


InghamWmW 


829 


HineCW 


Nl 


IrelandMrsJosN 


oil 


HinellenryM 


ol7 


IrvingFloreuce 


olO 


Hinsdale E' 


a21 


IvesSadieJ 


019 


'• Cornc'.iaG 


'* 


JacobyJuhn 


olO 


IlinsdalellG 


Bll 


JaqnesLotticJ 


80 


IlitclicockMC 


01.0 


JamiesonGeo 


sl9 


HiichiusCarrieE 


o21 


•'IL 




HochstrasserJN 


jyo 


JaniiesouGeoA 


026 


HolconibMrsWII 


slO 


JarvisSS 


s28 


" Florence 


•' 


JayncsMVS 


88 


H<)ldenFVV-JD-SMsl2 


JenningsOS 


018 


HolleyRevPT 


jyi 


JeuuiugsSeth 


ol7 


HollisterDF 


S6 


JepsonWra 


o20 


" HattieL-MinnieF '• 


JohnsonThosE 


jy7 


Holt OS 


s28 


JorffesCiviliou&wf a5 


HoltTL 


jyT 


" Grace 


" 


HopeMrsTH&dau sG 


JonesHcnry&wf 


s20 


HopkinsAlli-ed 


n9 


J o n e s J li n'H & wf 


s2t 


HopkinsFred 


Nl 


" Edit'S 


'• 


HopkinsMrsLM 


s23 


JonesMrsSB 


Al4 


HopsonWmR 


s29 


JonesWH 


n2 


HorauJ-EdC 


A16 


JohnsonEdw 


ail3 


HortouRC 


jy5 


" Mariraret 




HotchkissCA&\vfjel3 


JohnsonMrsGH 


oil 


•• EdwardS-EllaS 


•' 


JiidsonlsaacN 


a9 


HotchkissChasB 


je8 


JndsonRLP 


oil 


■■ MissEmnia 




•' RM 


'■ 


HotchkissCB&wf 


019 


KanePatriek 


825 


•• VVillieL 


" 


KeatingBeinard 


Al4 


HotchkissCL 


Alt; 


Keeli rPrancisP 


n9 


HotchkissEA 


sl2 


KeeferTW 


Al5 


HoughAnneA 


je2li 


KeelerAdaL 


018 


HoughMrsRE 


0l8 


KeelerCE 


si 


" ChasE 


'" 


KeelcrCV 


o3 


HouseHA b20n4 


KeelerPrank 


018 


" MreHA 


n4 


KeelerMrsFrank 


N6 


HoustonFloraM 


013 


" Ada 


•' 


HoustonPH 


s9 


KeelerPS 


a30 


HoustonRM 


s2 


KeelerGcoW 


o30 


HowardGB 


n2 


KeelerRC 


s5 


HovvardMaryE 


a23 


KeelerTheoA&wf ol7 


HoweGeorge 


a2(; 


" Jennie-lMaryP 


" 


HoytHM&wf 
HiibliardFrank 


012 


KeolerVVmli 


o30 


wis 


KehrcrErnest 


830 


HubbardShermanll >7 


KclleyFL&wf 


825 


HubbellAnson 


s2.s 


Kelli«i;i:RmmaJ 


a34 


HubbellcE&wf 


a22 


Kcllou- i:\VS 


s27 


HnbbellEE-IS 


ol7 


KellyPatrickW 


Jy30 


HtibbellESmith 


031 


KelsevC-SH 


018 


HnbbfllGertic 


n3 


Kelse'yCH 


s« 


HuhlielKiooA 


05 


KelseVStnartP 


013 


HublxllMrsHA 


n4 


KelseyWH-CS 


66 


HnbbcllHG 


je22 


KeltAnnie 


A23 


UubbellLouiseM 


05 


KensettMrsSA 


Je30 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



291 



ol7 



si 

627 

s2G 

s26o25 

025 



KenpettFannieM jeSO 
KeoghJIorrls jy5 

KcppyJuo-FB s8 

" LydiaM 

KetchainCJ Al6 

Kiel'erJacob&wf Je21 
" MissUJ 

KilliDgb'kCE[CoB] e5 
KimballJR o2 

Kimmei'leAugJ o25 
KingF A [SorMaj4th] s5 
KiugmanElla a9 

" Marv-Carrie " 

KingnianOP&wf 
KingmanCaptSC 
[4thRegt] 
Ki n gm anMrs S 
" KatieB 
KippenT 
KirkDeliaA 
KissamDW 
" MrsDW 
" Jenuie 
KleinBernhard 
KnappMrsRC sl4 

Knoedlei'Uhrist'n jel6 
KiiowlesCornelia a30 
KuukelmanEB&wfsl8 
LacyAR&wf o24 

LacyDavisS s8 

LacevGeoM o24 

LacvRB&wf s21 

" NettieB 

LahyWmD[CoE] s5 
LakeWalterB&wf o30 
LamberiER a11s2T 
LambGrtHenryA ol2 
LaucWmD 
LauderRobtMB 
LandoiiMrsAH 
LandonMrsH 
LaneVR 
LarkinES 
Lai-kinSam'l 
LathropCyrusC 
" Gertie 
LathropJC&wf 
LafhropJohuW 
LeavenworthGeoE a2 
Leaveu worth LW s4 
LeavenworthMR Ml8 



LewisWm o24 MiddlebrookAJ b12 0'RonrkeD[CoE] s5 

LibbyAA s21IMiddlebrookNB o2G Olnit-teadSufran ()4 

LillBartholomew s29 MiddlebrookRB jy5 OlseiiJoliiiN a;.0 

LillBarbara 830 Middlebr'kSM&WMll OmaiisJoelP o25 

LippincottAgnesB o27 MiddlebrookWN s25 OrcuttJerome&wf c5 

s7 

p5 

620 

k8 
03 



Lock\voodAlice-LBA9 MillerChasD 
LockwoodDB je9o9 MillerCoraE 
LockwoodMrsDB s:M|MillerNG&\vf 



o26 



sl6 
s27 
ol7 
o25 
a2G 

Jy26 
o20 



LeeElla 

LeeGeoH 

LeeGeoHjr 

LeeGurdonB 

LeedsElizaC 

" KateE 

LeedsFA 

LecdsJasE 



Al7 
017 
s5 
Al7 
oil 

a8 
ol2 



LehmauE[SerCoE] s5 
LeibinsrCH ol9 

LeiffhThouC s27 

" WniB-MSophie " 
LemmonllC sl4 

LemonMrs Lionel o5 
LeonardBW n8 

LeonardMrsBW o3 
" GraceF-WillieA " 
LeonardJasJ m20a15 
LesserEvaG o31 

LestserP-EHL Nl 

LewisMrsEdw'dA oil 
LewisFred'k s9 

LewisDrGeoF 66 

[Siirgeon4thRegt] 
LewisHattieA a29 
LewisH Matilda Jyll 
LewipJFaunie slH 
LewisMary ol7 



LockwoodHJ o51Miller\VR&\vf 

LockwoodWD o24!MillikeiiCD 
LnndouMrsJas sl2'MillsBenjK 
LoomisJasC&vvf olOIMillsSnsieA 
LordWm 6l9!MincrMreEC 

LoweWm olOlMinerMaryJ 

LuceyDauiel o23|MixEli!?hajr&wf 

LiiptoiiHW 625 MohrAiig 

LymanlNIrsMaryL oil j MorehoiiseCB 
LymanJohnN&wf oni'" MaryE 
LyiichB[SerCoE] 65iMorfor(lGeo 
LyncliMici:'! o24lMorfordJarratt 

LyonB-Jeunie o9|MoriranEK 

LyonHanlord&wf Je21 MorrillLE 

" ChasG ~ 

LyonllW 
LyouHenryM 



6l3 OsborneMaryJ 

s7 OsborneMichael 

o5 OtiePalrick 
a28 PaddockKE 

o2 Palli^erGeo 
sl3 PalmerTM&wf 

" i'^ TMjr-MM 
026 PalmerWB 
A12 PalmerWR&wf 
ol7 Pardi'eWF[4thRgt] s5 

68 ParkerEdw&wf 620 
619 ParkerEdwiuM&w o9 

" ParkerElyS JilO 

613 ParkerGioM oil 

614 ParrottED Jel4 
627 " MrsCharlotte 
n2 ParrottFraiikS 

611 ParrottFredW2d 
019 ParrottHattie 



LyonLeoC 

LyonRA 

LyonSH 

LyonWK 

LyonWmH 

•• Masters A 

MalloryGeo 

MallorvMrsGeo 

MalloryWD 



MorrisME&wf 
oSJMorrisWmP&wf 
Al5 Mos6opAlice-Juo Jy7 ParrottBR&wf 
olO MonlthropMr6j olO ParrottMrsLevi 
ol7 Mulligan WT[CoE] 66 ParrottWH&wf 

69 MurphyAlbcrtE jyl4 ParsoiisRE 
Alo '• GeoA-ElizaJ •' TPartreeKC 
jy5 " EmmaM " IPartrickSC 

MurphyAndrew Jy6 Patcnllattie 



a28 
620 



ol7 
o3 
019 



ol9 MyersChasL 
m31 NasliJesseS 
ol3 NashMeuden 
MaloneMrsFanny o25 NashOlin 
ManwaringMW N3iNearJohnN 
MarshDE&wf jel6|'- SarahF-WmN 
MarshEdwardW Mil Nel6on A-WH 
MarsLMrsEgbert je9 NelsouEmily 



MarshMrsEM 

MarshFH-LC 

Marj^hFW&wf 

Marshalljames 

MartiuMr&wf 

MartiiiRichardJ 

MastertouMrsII 

" Belle 

MastersonKateE 

Master6onMaria 

MatsonRJ 

•' Mi66EM 

MaverA 



se'NelsonEttaE 
ol7J Nelson Ja?H 
jel2|Nel?onJoel 

n6 Nel6onMaryF 

JNevilleM 
jy3 NicholsClaraB 
019 NithokFC 

" iNicholsFannieL 
a23," Carrie 
a23 NicholsFrcdL 
je7 NicholsMrsHB 

" [Nicholt-HP 
8l9 NicholsLouigaS 



o4 

OlO 

635 

018 

024 

ol7 

69 Patter6onEmniaC oil 

8l9 PattersouHenry Jy4 

^ '" 016 

019 

628 

62 

Ml6 
NlO 

^3 



68 PeckE 

o2 PeckJennicS 

89 PeckJewett 

" iPeckEeziaA 

o5 FcckTE 

A31 PeckMieTE 

n6 Peett Ujr 

Ml8 PeetGE-EvaninaS o20 

027 PcelGilead n2 

630 PeetTC m27 

629 PlaiiMargaretha 6?>0 

o20 PcndlefcuSam'l a8o28 

ol8 PenfleldAndrew 019 

612 PcnficldJiiliaH 

" iPerkini-CC&wf 

n6 PerryAlfred&wf 

613" JasN-SG 

ol2 PerryFL-RJ 

on Perry FM 

elPerrvMrsPL 

05 NicholsSV&wf 618:" AliceC 

628 NicholsWarrenB 6SlPerryWH&wf 

" JNiCKCrsonFA&wf nS PbelanJobnJ 

N8!Nicker6onLB&6is ol9 PhillipsJohn 

65iNobleJF 6l'" DavidM&wf 

622 NobleWH&wf Alo!pierceBD&\vf 

" iNolteChas je24i" Braddie 

o4]PikeBF 

oll|PikeJennieS 

je21|PinkermanJP&wf s26 

NorthCaptH[CoB] 66 PitcherLT ol7 

N2'NorthJohn olSlPlattGeciS-WillieJ olO 

olG NorthSarah jyl4|PlattOS o26 

MeadILCDMaj4Rt] 65 NorthropGeoW o23; Piatt Wm 620 

MeekerEdF sl4 NorthropN je8N9 PliniptonEC&wf 619 

olO NorthropSC A25iPlumbBB n2 

827 NorthropMrsSC m22 PlumbHC jelSsli 



McCormickCri68ieo20 NicholsMrsSF 

McCoyRS 

McDonalds 

" iVngustE 

McGrathW-Wjr 

McIntireJS[CoB] 

McIntyreWH 

■' MrsCatberine 

McKelveyllA-AA 827|NormanFP 



6l 

013 
018 

je26 

65 

013 



87 

a23 



McLellanEA 
McLellanFW 
" Geo A 
McNairWmS 
McNallyKatie 



Ml5|NormanGL 
6l3 NormanPcter 



Kl 



819 

ol8 



MeekerOH 

MellenEllaF 

MerrillLE 

JlerrettMrsCG 

MeiiettChasG 

MerrettCH 



k8 NortonLHwl&son jyl |PlnmbElia6N 
027 Nortor.ME o3lPlnmbSE 

a8:" SarahE 



PolandBernard 
ol2 OaklevFA A9i" MrsSarah 

MerwinMrsMeritt o5 0'BrienEdw[CoE] 65 PorterCbarlieW 
MiddlebrookCM a2:5 O'ConnerDan'lW jyl9lPorlerMrsE 
MiddlebrookCS ol8 O'ConnorEL jy24 PorterDrGeoL 
" DrAnneM " !()'DonnellD[CoE] s5! Porte rJasF 

MiddlebrookLN 6l2.0'NeilJohn n9 PorterdohnE 



828 

66 
69 

jyl3 

6ll 

620 
^9 

s7 



292 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENKIAL EXHIBITION. 



PorterWniH a23 SangerGP 

*• SarahG " Sava^'e WW 

PorcerUeo-T a25 SawyerEG-GE 

PowellC.ias[CoB] so ScheyMoritz 

Pi)\vellS[.Sei-JoBJ " I'SchlittenhartJ 

PoweistJ.ViI ol7 SchmidtJuo 

PowcrsiloratioX je21i" Eliz 
Price J. vl 
Piie-'tL'^ 



s7 
S25 
o4 

S7 



Priii'lleBB 

Prill 11 !JiiliaE 

PriiidleL')uisC 

" Miuiiie 

PriiidlePH&wf 

PritcUariES 

PvleElwinl&wf Jell 

PVlellil&ivf jet) 

PylcTohuF jylO 

PyleW,u.\[CoE] s5 

PyleWui 1 

PyucUoiiE 

RnKlGP[CorCoB] 

Riiidall.VrthurW" 

RinkinSB 

RitliboiiuCB 

RivHarbcrtB 

EiyiiiaiidGM&wf o>3 SelbieJH-P 

RiViiDudSE&vvf o(i,SelleckW\V 



jeKi 

o3i 

o3 

jy~(i;SclimidtPeter jeKi' 

sC ScliiiciderEmmaL .«'2!( 

AH|SclioeiibergerElisie olti 

N3r' Mathilda- Willy " 

ol8 SchreadC[CorCoB] s5 

" !Sco!ieldGW-GE e27 

sUiSjotieldHG A'i^i 

n2 Scott W J s21 

SecorDavidP jilli 

SedgwickMrsCR oil 

SeegeeLM sll 

SeeleyCbasR n1 

SeeleyEN&vvf jylO 

SeeleyFS o\2 

SeelevPloraB oi;3 

SeeleyGeoM o30 

SesleyMrsHB s22 

SeeleyLAI o'25 



n2 

s27 
s5 
s23 
jyci 
s25 



o20 SeeleyWmE&wf Je21 

SM 
p21 
R lytmiul Vlr^jSM: ol2"SewardFH[CorCoB]s5 
ReadCha^B mIO SeymourEJ A2:i 

" DavidP " SeymoiirMorrisW ol8 

ReidDavldM s6 " Charlotte " 

[BrigCora'ir>saryCN3] SextoiiJno-W s7 

EeadNCrsDM-MayL s4 ShannonEnimaL 
ReelJo^ephP jejNlU ShattuckDrLA 



ReidAiiQieE 

" Lizzie 

KeidJas 

R(^i(lSani'l&wf 

EeidWin 

EeillyThos 

ReiaiQgtonWT 

ReybiiruJasL 

" Laura F 

RichardsW 



s8 
NIO 

n2 

jy5 
s27 
sll 
o4 

s7 



ShawKdwardJ 

SheauNellie 

SheldonRP 

SheltoiiAnnieA 

SheltonChasE 



SheltonMasterHS a3o 



Riehards'uGWAw ol3 



RileyHarry 

Ki!*hor.Miiinie 

RoclvMrsAime 

R JckMinnieL 

RodgersGR&wf 

Rogers MrsCHB 

" MissCornie 

RogersNoah 

EootBenjP 

** VleuiiaH-Benj 

RoseLyinanL 

Ros-Robt 



SheltonHTjr 

SheltonJnoC 

SheltonMrsJoel 

SheltonSarah 

ShelfonWinH 



jyl5 
n9 

jyi 

sl6 
oil 
a24 

o27 



s28 
g2J 



Riiffii'r\ri*sesS&Mo38 



RiiggHP[CoBJ 

Rii^glesCN 

RundelEBW 

RiipertJasC 

RussellFA 

RiissellJlI 

RusseliWmC 

" Ja* \ 

Ryan DA 

SageDrLewisE 

Sailers E-Pred 

SailerWin 

SaadersonllattieA 017 

SaijfordDrChasE sl4 

SanfordMrsCE jel2 

SanfordPS-EC 

SanfordOeoIt 

SanfordMrsH 

Saiiford.IW 

SaufbrdLD 



Al7 
o27 
olO 
ol7 

jyia 

jel 
jy3 



o25 
a23 
olti 
o2ti 
je28 



Smith JamesH 

SmithJUenry 

SuiithJeuuieii 

•' EvaM 

SmithUrlaud 

SinitliSC 

bmithSain'lJ 

SniithSaraM 

SiiiithThoirM 

Smith Warren 



si 2 

s3 

s28 
s25 
Ml8 
So 
o20 



SiiowEJoisephiiie el3 



jeS 
a31 



a9 

Nl 
Sl4 

Nl 

o2l1 
o30 
olO 
o4 
ol2 

OlO 
o4 

oil 
o3 

ol9 
64 
N2 

o24 



SheridanLtJ[CoE] st! 
Sherman BL 
ShermanCH 
SherwoodDW 
SherwoodAB&wf 

LizzieJ 
Sherwo;)dChaa 
SlierwoodCB 
SherwoodPrank 
SherwoodHC 
SherwoodWm 
SherwoodWII 
ShepherdChasH 
ShepherdJohn&wf " 
ShepherdJnoE jyfi 
SilliinaiiFredE o27 
SillimanLB&wf 
SillimanSG 
SillimanWmH 
SkidmoreJW 
SkinnerChas W&w ol3 
Slason EugeneP jy25 
SmithAlraaP 
" Ottilie 
SmithCarrieE 
SmithCF&wf 
SmithCW 
SmithFrankC 
SmithFW 
SmithEliC 
SmithGeoH 



n3 
Ol9 
0-.7 

627 

o3 
Al8 
Ol9 
m31 
621 
a24 

o4 



818 

s8 

02.3 

s8 



p8 

ofi 
oil 

620 

n9 

M25 

629 

Nl 



SmithlsaacB&wf olO 



olSlSniithMrsJC 



oi:^ 



SnowMrsJB 

SnowIIS 

SiiowMrsLM 

SomersWm 

SoulcsBlaige 

" Virginia-Marie 

Si)encerAustin 

SpencerWmB 

S perry MrsFB 

SpinuiugTA 

StaiulisshJNjr 

StaiRlit'hMdesS 

StanloyllD&wf 

StantoiiRE&vvf 

" AlbertN 

StaplesWM&wf 

StapletouWm 

StarrJuo 

StarrWmWjr 

StephensChasA 

StcplieusJacob 

SterliiigAdaC 

" CarneM 

SturliugDavid 

SterliugDH m10o2<; 

St«rlingEdw&wf a21 

" EmmaR " 

SterlingEmilyM s27 

" MrsEliza " 

SterlingFred'k s28 

SterlingGeoB s1'->n1 

SterlingGeoS m20 

SterlingGcrtr'deMsill 

|SterlingJenmeH m17 

SterlingJiioM 8l9 

SterliugMrsJH s29 

SterlingML o3 

SteriiugMin'M m10o26 

StevensChaeH A". 6 

StevenpFrankH o31 

StevfUsJohnG o4 

•' HeiiryW 

Stevei.sMrsMaryJ nG 

Steven^^ouCF&wf s27 

" CarrieL " 

Stevenson Emma 

StevenfonGeoF 

SticklesET 

StilesFS 

StilesKB-AA 

StilesWM-Susie 

StillmanFM 

StillsonGertieA 

Stillt^c iiSarahE 

StirlingThosifcwf 

StockwellMrsGA 

StockwellWH 

StoddardG&wf 

StoddardLillie 

StokeisMichael&wfjyO 

StoneCB 828 

StoweCW 85 

Stowe.TA n6 

" MrsEA " 

StrattonEdC 8l2 

StroiigEmoryFA w o24 

StiirtcvantDD sl3 

SturtevautMW sl9 



s29 

819 
828 

819 
819 

a30 

828 

Nl! 

017 

821 
8l3 

a23 
O20 
o17 



SummersIdaG 


n2 


SumnerEdwS 


ol2 


SiimnerSam'LB 


s6 


TarbellDA 


A13 


TaylorPrauk 


n3 


" NellicK 


" 


TaylorFrankB 


Mis 


TaylorDrPhilip 


jeS 


TeepleGeoM-LP 


o3 


TerryD\vii,ditU&wf e7 


ThatcherES 


jc29 


ThomasFrancLs 


o25 


Thomas WM 


OlO 


ThompgonCaro'eC s2l 


ThompsonCiirtis 


o3 


ThompsonEli 


o5 


" DW-CarolineC 


" 


ThompsonMrsH 


je24 


ThompsonJosII 


o5 


ThorneMissMary 


69 


ThorutonWilmot 




ThorpeMrsDT 


n6 


ThorpeSam'l 


829 


TichenorAL 


a9 


" EKate-CB 


" 


TichenorMaryE 


827 


ToddHenry 


a28 


" AlmedaN 


" 


" EmerettN 


" 


" ElbertH 


" 


TomliuWm 


o24 


TomlinsonJM 


819 


TomlinsonLL 


o3 


Tom]iusonMi88MLj21 


TomlinsouOK 


o2i 


TompkinsEdw 


ol 


TownsendJMrsPA a22 


TreatAmosS&wf 


019 


TreatDanielA 


A19 


TrowbridgeJL 


n3 


TrubeeFred''k&wf o9 


TrubeeJessieA 


o31 


TrubceWE 


n8 


" Susan E 


" 


TuckerHattieE 


sl9 


TurneyAB 


OlO 


TurneyMrsAB 


83 


TurneyCR 


o3 


TurneyJB 


ol8 


TylerWmC 


821 


UlrichHcrmanL 


622 


UnderhillGE 


013 


UnholtzWmB 


s22 


Upson EA&wf 


o9 


Van KeurenLouis 


N3 


VanSykelL 


82 


VanYorxWT 


s7 


VeitHcnryP 


jy25 



VeitTheoE 
VredenburghOB 
" MrsMF 
WagnerGeo m10a9 



s5 
829 



s21 
olS 
813 



WahlJno 

WakeleyDavidA 

WalesMrsHenry 

" LillieE 

WalesLucy 

" FannieD 

WaleeSB 

WalkerJnoJ 

WallaceAW 

" ME-HattieA 

WallerWmG 

" HS-MaryG 

WardChauncey 

WardEdw[SerCoB] 85 

WaltersDavidJ o31 

WaltersFA-E Jy7 

WarnerAF a1Gs19 



ol2 
olS 

8l3 

ol6 

o6 

o27 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



293 



WarnerAllenH oil 
WarnerGeo s7 

WanierGeoE o . 

" ItlaM 

WanierlTenryA jel4 
WaruerJP 06 

WarnerNS&wf 829 
WarrcnEdm Je29 

" FloraB " 

Warren FL o9 

" SLonis^e " 

WarrenMary.I Jyl2 
WarrenSarahP jy20 
WarreDTB e25 

WalsonFL s8 

WatsonJasjr 8l9 

WatsonJennieE o20 
WatsonTL&wf o2 
WatsonThosS sl5 
Way Julia si 2 

WelchFM&Iady b9 
WelchW[CoB] p5 

WelcliWm a8 

WellsDMS o30 

WellsGeo-HAda a30 
WellsJnoW o3 

WetherellFP o2o 

WheatonGeoE&wfsl4 
WheelerAlex sl9 

WhcelerAngie a26 
" Hat tie 

WheelerChas s21 

WheelerCorneliaB a17 
WheelerDwight n3 
WheelerFE 0I6 

WheelerGK&wf jelti 
Wheelerllorace s21 
WheelerHR s7 

WhecIerJM 0I8 

" MrsJM 

WheelerKateL Al 
WheelerNathaniel silO 

[VPConiiManagers] 
WheelerMrsN s6 

" MasterArchieC " 
" MasterWillleB " 
" MasterHarryDeF " 
WheelerSH&wf je5 
WheelerSL o3 

WheelerSP s29 

Wheelerd: misonBand 

S C Ropenberg-H W 
Grant-GuoMiller-Geo 
Street -JDiefenbach- 
C W ei(leiihammer-H 
F Keys-Geo Sanjxer- 
Wm Paddoclv -Jacob 
Schlatter-EEOshorn 
Fraulc B Sperry-W M 
Jones— R W Curley— 
Jas Gilbert— Joseph 
Pereira-Lou Schmidt 
FrankBFuller-Ilor'ce 
Plumb-H C Bronson 
EETibbals 

WhelanMartin n9 
WhitcombHH sl9 
WhiteAnnieE o4 

" JA 

WhiteJohn b]9 

WhiteMH&wf a28 
WhiteWH-LncyP s29 
" EloiseA-AN-ldaC 
WhitelyWJ p9 

WhitneyJD&wf o19 
WhitterCarftline 89 
WildJnoF e22 

WildmanMrsGF o3 



WilkinsJ Jy5 

WilkinsonGC s2G 

WillettChasIl s21 

WillettES n6 

WilliamsChasE a5n2 
WilliamsCP n2 

WilliamsNB a21 

■' EdithM-EugeneB'" 
' MaryL "■ 

WilmotChasE&wf o4 

MrsE 
WilmotFA o2G 

SarahM " 

WilmotFM&wf s29 
WihnotHS o3 

WilsonAlfredH o31 
WilsonChasC[CoB] s5 
WilsouFranklin jyl4 
WilsonFraukM jyl2 
WilsonJB n8 

WilsonJE k6 

WilsonWn c3 

WisuerAlbert&wf s23 
WinsorHE Jy7 

WiuterMrs Albert Je20 
WintonAL s5 

WintonDavidT p6 
WintonElizaB s27 
WintonGeoE p20 

HannahM " 

WintterA 621 

WolUO jy3 

WoodEarlS o4 

WoodFA sl9 

WoosterJnoS a18 
WordiuMrsCW sl8 
" AugnstaM "■ 

WordinFannieL mIS 
WordinLizzieC k2 
WordinDrNE jySNl 
" MrsNS-HC n1 

WordinTC Jy4 

WrenPW s27 

WrightMissKateP a23 
WrightllL jy6 

YoungsChasA o20 
YoungsJanies o(i 

ZehnerIIC[SerCoB]s5 
ZingsemFW s22 

BROOKFIELD. 

AndrewsIIW a24 

AudrewsLA 65 

BabbittEmmaJ s28 

BarnesEmmaC s6 

" LauraA *•' 

BeersMrsBR oil 

BeersMrsDG s8 

BeersET w31 

BeersHB s4 

BeersHomer&wf s28 

BeersHenrvS&wf o24 
BennettChasJ-FA s7 

BiddleEdwardD s5 

BooraemAnnaH s20 

EdwardsMrsWJ a14 

FairchildSarahL o20 

FerrisDanielP jy5 

FosterFA 0I6 

GreenF 87 

HatchWP n6 

HawleyJohnN 0I8 

HillMrsGW olfi 

HughesMinnieJ s7 

JacksoHiSIrsBT o27 

JonesRebecca ol3 

LakeHN s4 

LakeHenrvD p27 

MannllatlieC olG 



of) 
o4 

jy3 
s6 



MeekerDH-IIElizaolT 
MenvinFL s8 

MerwinPhiloC Je7 
" JiiliaA " 

NorthropAndrew 
NorthropAE 
*•' KatieM 
NorthropE 
NorthropGD 
" Amelia 
PeekHenrjS&wf o24 
PierceAC s22 

PierceEW n3 

PierceWilsonH a31 
PorterSMH o25 

RichnumdMrsHA o27 
'" Bertha , '•'• 

RoeAD sl8 

StevensJT o2(i 

ShepardEP o7 

ShermanMissBE o71 
" MissC " 

Sherm'nSam'I&lyjylS 
SkidmoreJiiliaW^ o20 



SmithAliceH 

SmithFW 

SmithKobtB 

SmithMrsRB 

SomersEM 

StarrC 

StnartChas 

StuartMrsC-ElIaS 

TerrillAnnieS 

TerrillSB 

WanzerWmD 

WilliamsElleaF 

WilliamsWP 



DANBURT. 

AbbottJoshuaP o3 
AbbottLeanderF jcl8 
AdamsJiiIiaM 829 

AdkinsL[CoG] 
AllenChasJ c25 

ArublerArthnrA s29 
AmblerChesterG jy21 
" MLibbie-MaryA " 
Aml)lerPeterW o25 
Ander80nWE[CoG]s5 
AndrevvsMrsChas s8 
AndrewsChasE 
AndrewsCS jel5 

AndrewsJG[CoG] s5 
AshworthGeo je28 
Atkinson AJ[CoG] s5 
Au8tinFi^ jyl9 

AustinWH aIO 

AustinMrsWH oil 
AverillHE 828 

AverillRoger s27 

" MaryP 

BaconJohnW&wf jeS 
"MissesSarah&Eliza 
BaconJohn&fam n2 
BaileyFrankll&wf 80 
BaldwinArthurR jel 
BaldwinEM o5 

BallCarrie 88 

BallLibbieB 
BarlowDP-LncvJ 
BarlowMrsWmii o26 
BarnesDH je22 

BaniesMaggieH jel5 
BarnamAH a4 

Bai-nnmEH je23 

BarnnmMrsEM 82 
BamumFW&wf s2n 
BarnumH 
BamumNathan'I oSO 



BamtrmSarahM n2 
BatesStephen '* 

BatesWH[SerCoG] 85 
BeckerleA ol2 

BeldenRA All 

BellAlfrccl o25 

" LauraJ-LncyC "■ 
BenedictAG sl2 

BenedictKate 8l4 

Ben edict M o27 

BencdictN[SerCoG]s5 
BenedictMreTC ol2 
BettsWm k9 

BiggertJos a23 

BlissardC[CoG] 85 
BoothDB-JohuR o24 
BoothDavidB&wf a22 
BoutonJohnW o24 
BownianJH >i9 

BradleyTB s26 

BradyTE o25 

BrewsterLD " 

BronponOrinL o31 
BrothcrtonNeva sl3 
BrothcrtonTheo s28 
BrownAgnes nS 

BrownDrEA je9 

BrownEdwA je(» 

BrownJStewart a23 
BrownM [CoG] 85 

BrownWC jei) 

BrushMrsCA s8 

BuellEllaG a23 

BuellG-CarolineT a24 
BnrkcWm&wf a7 
BurraiicageGeo MlO 
CallmanLouis 8£6 

CarlsonMrsWA oil 
CarnerGW 821 

CarpenterTJ ol9 

CaiterTALSerCoA] 85 
ChaseChas je28 

ChichesterAM ol 1 
thichcsteiGA olO 
ChichesterMA r29 
ChittendeuMorgano28 
ClarkHT s28 

ClarkTheo o25 

ClasonAT sl3 

CoeAlex[CoG] 85 

ComesLtGCLCoG] s8 
ComesMrsGC " 

C'omstockChasH jyl4 
ComstockChasL s20 
Conklin!S[CoG] 87 
ConklinTD[CoG] s5 
ConeRW-KateB ol7 
CostelloJ[CoG] 85 
CowpertluvaiteGE o30 
Crispin W-Charlieje30 
CroalJA [CoG] 85 

CrofutCH NlO 

CrofutFredB 8l9 

CrofntH&vvf-Su8ieol7 
CrosbyChasII&wf o25 
CrosbyOM a23 

CunninghamJasF 0I8 
CurleyEngeneA o31 
CurlevEK n6 

DaIevWE[CorCoA] 85 
DarlingGA ol7 

DarlingGeoA-EllaS n9 
DavisMrsES n2 

DavisRW olO 

DavisSAnstia o25 

Day James o4 

DayJosiahL-AM n2 
DeForestTJ n8 

DeklynChas&wf s9 



294 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXEIBITION. 



DeklynAntoinelte s9 TIodgcDM-MarieL aIS 
Duklyn'l VV sill IIodtieN jeit 

DuklvnVVF " !ll(.flnian[CoG] so 

Del()iiL,'livC[CoG] s5 HolltiyAhnerli 8la 
Den-ickCS JolO Holk;yMr.-^AB a24 



DibbluTT a!) 

DikeiiKUiGeo s27 

DiiribrowElizabeth o20 
" GS-T^J 

DoaiieVVE[SerCoGls5 
Ml8 



jy7 
oio 
oil 
oil) 
oil 



UoneyAVV 
•' MLouit^c 

IlolleylienryE slO 
UolleySC .Tcllol9 

" MrsSC-IIattieB ol!) 
HoraisJ[(.,'oGJ 



HoiighUA oil) 

Jloui,'lil{uvJJ a2 
" Mr^SJ 

Ho\vaithWH[CoGl s5 

IIoytAugut^tus jyi" 

s5!lIoytMrsCVlia s9 

JcTiIlovtC'Il je30 



DoiiovauT 
DotyL 

D<)\Vllr<GCO 

DownsGeoR 

l)uiihai;u<\^I 

DiiraiilFB 

DiirkinlUCoG] 

EarlcChasS 

EarlcPiura 

" .IcuiiieP 

EastonDA&wf 

Ehvcl!ET[CoU] 

ElvwllFraukJ 

ElvWni-V 

Erickf^ouCM: 

FaircliildKS 

Pauclior-rohnP 

FaiUoiilIN Ml8je33o'M 

FaiitouIINjr o35 

" LucyA " 

FaiitonJII o2J 

FantoiiTB-LottieLA'itlHallMrsLE-Belle 

FayThosK cOiHallLauraB 

FayerweathcrBellesiiiliiiillSadieM 

FeK".is()uFB[CoGJ t^SilliintingtoiiAB 



so 



McPhilcnyE[SrCoG PSrnrdvGSrCorCoG] s5 
MalloryEA oiOJPuriJyGeoS&vvf Jy4 

Maii!<f.ul..Mrs sa~|Piirdy Horace a23 



MaiiyiJounyThosP s!» 



jyU 



JO 14 
o21 
a31 

Pl8 



IloylUfnryJ&wf sS' 
IloytllenryW 6=28 

HovtLillieA 
HoytHW ol8 

" Henrietta " 

HoytThosJ ol8 

HubbellGracicL 
IIubbellMit's.Jiilia olG 
HiibbellLL-HR 
'• JiiliaM 
HulL'V.ndrcw 
HullMrtfAiS 
HiillGeo&wf 



ol8 
si 



Finc'.iEJwinA 

Fi«;ht!rPJ[OoGj 

Fol^i):uJi)sH 

ForrosterFredH 

FofiterJG&wf 

FosterMvV 

Fo^terTH 

Freemiu Mamie 

Froj^tCSitwf 

FryFDLCorCoG] 

G'dstouAiiuieE 

Gibbilobcrt 

Gilbert* icHiA 

GloverCailosW 

Gk)verKB 

OraanissS-M 

GravoL-AiiiueE 

'• GeorgiaE 

GrayJohii 

GrayAVeUfordA 

GreeneGIi 

Greene VohieyM 

Gro^'oryDP 

Gregory ME 

GrifflijgCE&wf 

GriffingMHjr 

GriffiugMartinM 

GrimiiWn 

Giiiu'.CIiasII 

IlamlinJulieE 

IlamliiiMrsJG 

HarrisCbasS 

HarrisMrsEM 

HarrisHK-EB 

UarrisM 

HartDavidW 

HarveyJas 

HawIeyC 

HawleyDD-BS 

HawesBE&vvf 



s2f5 
s5 

Al(i 

jy4 
s2-2 
o2i) 
sl4 
n4 
o4 



IlardMicbael 
Hiird\VlILi'oGT 
HutchingsWinll 
Ilvatt.Ja<[SerCoG] 



ol3 
p21 
s21 
JVll 
AlO 

S2S 



04 



IvcsClaraJ 
IvesGeoE 
IvesIW&wf 
IvesJH 

JacksonBP&wf 
s5 JacksoiiLO 
jylO JonesAnnieE 
o3:J Jone;'EM-JA 
s20 JiiddES 
je7 JuddFP 

St) JudsonJR[CoGT 
o27 Koatiiisj:MO[CoG] 
oil KeeJcrBradley 
" iKnappGeoH 
o4 KnappGeoR 
Al8 KnappllannahM 
o2o Knapi)IIinmaa 

03 Kiiapi)Myron 
s5 KnoxCaptA[CoG] 
n2 KurtzHK 

04 KyIeWA[CorCoA] 
eli) LateurChasL 
013 LawlorRevMP 

Nl LaymanE-F 
sl!( LeacliCatherine 



sl5 

oil 

jelO 

sl3 

Jyl4 



MarshEU 

Marsh MrsPJ 

MasonChasB&wf 

MasoiiCE 

Meader\VR[CoG] 

Meokerllcku 

MercbaiUAR 

M«rchaiit.Joel 

xMerrittCII&wf 

MerwiuAW 

MeycrsJarob 

Mc'yers.Julius 

MeyersS 

MeyersM 

MiilerMissEA 

MillerG 

MillerJasE&wf 



034 
024 

sao 

s21 
s5 
031 
a4 
s20 
?27 
019 
Jy27 
o9 



S5 
OlO 



Q.iiienE 
RayinondA 
•' Miiia-Elvira 
RaymondFraukG sl5 
RaymondGeo&wf sl(» 
RaynioudJohnM o23 
RaymondiSam'lG o3 
RaymondLtT[C'oG] sG 



Reed A B 's2B 

ReidCU[CoG] s5 

ReintzeMaryA e28 
ReynoldsFS-MC sl9 
RiceFlorenceA s21 
Richards'nES[CoG] s5 
Richards'aWJ [CoG] " 
olO Richr:ioudW[CoG] " 
N8|RobertsPA[CoG] " 
o30 RobertsonChasS 



Mi!lerJohnH&wf ol2' RobinsonCK 



MiutieJE 

MooreJtCoG] 

MorganCL[CoGl 

Morris^onMi-sSW 

MorseES 

MorseHG 

NashFrankR 

Newberryllenry 

NewberyJM 

Ne\vinanSaiTi''lT 

NelsoiiVv'mBjr 

xNicholsDP&wf 



jelO 



n2 
ol9 

sl9 
017 
si!) 
o26 
o31 
n3 



NichoIsHenriettaS s28 



o3 



ol9 



ol8 
Jv37 



NicholsJohuB 
NicholsRollo 

Mrs Laura 
Nobk^JA 
NoIanS 
NormanMrsWm 

orrisBC 
NorrisJohn&wf 
NorrisSophieE 
" LottieE 
s8'NortliropDA 
Al7 OIcottMinnieD 
ol7 OlcottMD 
n8 OlmsteadMrsSJ 
s5 OsborneChas 
s5 OsborneChasR 
s5 OsborneGeoS 
olSiOsborneEE 
s2();Osborne,r()elL 

s8 OuseyMN[CoG] 
s2l|PagcEtiieM 
s21[PageVVmFrank 
s5|ParrettEiiceueH 
All|Parsk)\vJB 

s5' ParsonsEdwE&wf Al6 
je3()i"FrankE 
slO Patrick K[CorCoG] s5 
Nl|PearccMrsl)avid s28 
n8 PeiiiieklSophia 



RobinsonET 

RobinsoiiHS 

Rol)insouSam'l 

RobinsouWmD 

RockwellRTjr-H 

RogersDwightE 

RolandCH[CoG] 

RolandCMLCoG] 

Rooney J [CorCoG] 



Jy27 

AlO 

024 

o25 

o4 

S21 
836 

e5 



RosenmauB 
RowaiiJennieM 
RowanMrsJ 
" MrsFC 
RnssellTohnK 
RyderGeoE 
Rydirllenry 
St.TohnSaraE 
jcl9 j SanfordMarionD 
0l2,SayersFloraA 



s6 
012 

ol3 

012 

614 

013 
012 
n2 
s29 



n9 ; ScottAL-HowardBsSl 



olO ScottMEmnia 



o34 
o25 

020 
a30 
olS 
s7 
S5 
o25 

Ml8 

oil 
o25 



s21 



sl8 LeacbDora-Miunic N(J;Pe!invJK 



ol2 Leacblsaac o9 

o24 LeonardMrsJnliaAjel 
a31 LewisFA[CoG] s5 
o5 McArthiirJolin s5 

sO McCartbyMattie a18 
jel4 McCorkc"llNaucyA o25jPerrvFV 
o20 McGravvEd olO PerrVHenry&wf 

ol8 McKeeGtiO sll|PikeLM 

o31 McKayAL ATjPiiieMaryE 

ol8 McLaugblinB[CoG] s5J PlattAnnieE 
HendrickEF&wf a19 McLeanDavid je'.) PollyHE[CoG] 

HigbyCL-LW s20 McLcaaiJohn o25|PotterJM 

HinesEdwardA o:W McLeanP 
KiscockilobtS o3 McLeauE 



SeifertEG 
SelleckEE 
SelleckGFred 
SeniorllM 
" EilaJ-T 

ShannonRoM[CoGls5 
SbeaferWLesley a31 
ShearsFredA je9 

SiemonllM jy21 

SignorMrsM-CassaAl9 
SignorMary-Julia o2 
SignorRJ s3 

SinimousE[CoG] s5 
SinimonsP[CoG] 
SmithCbasA 
SmithldaG 
SmithJamesC 
SnellCM[CoG] 
StaplesGco 
StarrCB 
StarrChasP 
StarrMS 
StarrDaniel&wf 
StarrFM 
StebbinsGeoM 
StebbinsMaryE 
StevensDariiis&wfoSl 
s5 j StevensEP-MaryE a19 
.Tel9 StevensGE&wf a29 
AlOj" Anna-LS-MinnieL" StevcnsIIoward ol7 
A3l'PtirdyAima o5!StevensHP[CoG] 65 



MrsCE&dau 
PennvSarahE 
" Mai-yM 
PennySamiiclT 
PeunvWmS 



si 
012 

ol2 

013 

n2 
a2S 
A 3-3 
ol3 
s7 
jyl4 



ScottMatthewW 
ScottSJ 

SeelcyCarolincA 
SeeleySM 

Se€manJohn[CoG] s5 

~ ■' oil 

JclO 



n2 

jc9 
a4 

jel 

s22 



ol8 
jy27 

65 
AlO 

oil 
Je7s22 
s22 
s28 
ol2 
o26 
ol2 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS FAIRFIELD COUNTY, 



235 



ol4 



StevensLE&wf 

StevensMrsT 04 

SteveiisWW sli) 

StewartJ ol4 

StillniauWmJ aSI 

SttttVVH[CoG] s5 

StuaitMrsJeromeS n9 

SproulOhas&wl" oSfi 

SuuderiaudVVVV 

TalcottGeo 

TalcottMissSE 

Taliaferro WTjr 

TaylorWO 

ThorntonCH 

TomlinsonMS 

TreadwcllLP&Avf je 

TruesdalcGussie s(j 

TrumbullWE n8 

" IlattieC 

TweedyArthnr 

TwecdyMrsAB 

Twee.yEdgar 

TweedyES&wf 

TweedyJohu 

TwecdyMrir'JnoMSlE-lG 

TweedyMissJB m25 

'• Nellie 

TwoedyLanraD o35 

TwcedyOliverP o:30 

Twec'dy'JhofE je9 

\VaH.ridgeMrsFS o4 

WallaceAlex n2 

^V■allaceJennie " 

'• Rachel 

WardLewisA 

WardwellMrsL 

"FU 

\Va^hhurnND[CoG]s5 

WaterbiiryJlrifC n9 

V/aterburyCM c30 

\VatermanG[CoG] s5 

WebhWlI[CoG] 

M"elbyChasD 

WhcelockCM 

WhiddenWmM 

WhitcAlexM 

WliitoJenuieB 

" S^ll^ieB 

WiiiteJennieE 

WhitcThosT 

WhitcWA 

Whitf:\irsWR 

" SayrcB-Jas^L 

WhitcWRjr 

WhiteWS&wf 

" HN 

WilcoxCH&wf 

MMldmauAN&wf 

WildmanEN 

WildmanJat^B 

WiklmanLP 

WildmanThoi=G 

WildmanMrs.yW 

WildmanWArthur olS! 

WilkesDB sin 

\Vilke?HB a17 

WilkesJasK p20 

WilkinsonRoval s5 

Wilkini?onRL[CoG]s5 

AVilliamsCN oKi 

WilliamsGH ol7 

■\V)lliameMrsGeoH s26 

" Harvey &wf 

WilponFL 

Wilson J [CoG] 

WintorCH 

"WyckoffJH 



N8 

013 
ool 

Jjl2 
oi") 

jel5 



ol2 
oil 
jel5 
sl4 
m31 



ol8 
o30 



sl5 
s28 

jel9 
je5 

jylO 

n9 

je28 

je9NlO 

a23 

a25 

s27 



Pl9 
s27 
a2 
sl9 

o30 
ol9 



DARIEX. 

AnPtinMrsFA 

AustinFW 

AvcryllW 

BarnesJonathan 

Bateslda-Elia 

BellEU 

BellliobtC 

BrackenWmR 

Brii;!iamAL&wf 

BrowiiChas 

BrownJcnuicB 

BnigtrerhoffFW 



iBcersMosepW jel4 GloverMrpSam'l jel2 
BradleyStep"u-SF o24 GoiildWmB__ jy2(i 



sl2 BurrHattie 
ol9|BurrMarthaM 
a30 I ConiiiigEdwiuB 
e21 ConiiiijjGeoB 
Ni; DisbrowLeviL 
el2JDudleyCl)a!?R 
sSJDudleyMC 

s2(ilEdwardsE-Lillian o31 JoyAG 
NS'EdwardsMrsLewisoll ' KippenJA 



jel4 Hiiiitin<it(inEL aIO 
S27 HiirdJuliaC olS 

o2 JeiiniiigsAlva jc20o9 
nO Jcnningtilsaac je23 
olO'JenningsOB 

s(j Jeuniiigt^ThosJ 
o2SJeniiii)g8\V alter 



o20:EverettCS 
sl3 EverettV.'II 
jeOlFreebornPR 
Bnig^erhort' J i!l!cAo2G I Godfrey EliS 
Brnggerhoft'L:iyL.;yl9 Holies 
liutlerJK s5 JcnningsJasB 

CapesCC o21 JohnsouJW&wf 

ChasmarAlfredE a30 
" ChasII 
ChristieChasR&wf 



silO 
n3 

jy5 

Jen: 

017 
sl2 
sl4 
olT 
s26 



024 



ClockEdwE 

ClockGeoW 

ClockH 

ClockJapH&wf 

ClockMary 

CollenderllW 

Crisi-eyP 

CrofootNewtonll 

DauchvNathan 

" NatieE 

DoiialdsonMissL 

FallRH 

FrcnchLouis 

GorhamCarrie 

HitchcockMrsED s21 SmithFrancesA 



a14 Kipperi]\IB 

All|Ki;appCl)asJ 

0l9;KnappGH 
je29:LawlorMartinP 
o5' LockwoodJo8-Elizs21 
A8lLyonM\V-EA je29 
s8 McCartyAiidrcw Jyi7 
KS'MoreliouseAng''na ?15 

oil I" SClinton 
je29jMorehonseSadieMo24 

ol8' MorehouscStephen n8 

cl2iMorchouse\Vm ol3 

olllWorchouseWP " 
" " MaryE " 

s4 MorrieAM 

031 NicholsAP 



Mallet teSylviaE 
MarshJennie 
ParkerRP 
ParrackDanielP 
PlattMaryJ 
sl2 ScelyB&wf 
s2ir MaryE-AnnaF 

o4 SeeleyEdward s4|MorrieAM n3 

o2() SherwoodUW o31|Nichols;AP ol7 

A30;Sher\voodMisDW olO|NicholsHS oH 

n9;" iVirsFrankliu " iNicholsMarj'J All 

N2!SherwoodFrauk ATNicholsWmJ s8 

" iSherwoodGeo e4 OgdeiiFC je24 

o4'Shcr\voodJiioE " |Osbon)Edw-SJ ol7 

jy24 ]Sher\voodJW&wfje29| OsboriiM rsEdw o24 

oo'SillimanChasF Al7lOsboriieEdgar u9 



IIoIlandPA 

IIowaidHarry 

HoytSR 

" Ravmond 

IIullIIA 

HuUSarahE 

" ClaraF 

nustedME 

LounsburvCW 

MartiiiThos 

MatherDavidB 

MatlicrJnoC 

•' GcoM-LFred 

MeadJB&wt 

MorchouscJE 

" AiinicA 

Orchard WH&wf 

PlattFH 

PriceMigsM 

RichardsAmbrosc 

RichardsGA 

ScofieldAlbertH 

SeclyElisha 

SlausonLW 



SillimanD-MaryB NliPenfieUlCorueliaA si 

" ~ oil] Perry Burr jelSslO 

jv4iSmithNE olO;PcrryMr#Biirr jel3 

s'lOlTaylorElihuN je9:PerryThoi^J f6 

o20ITaylorJE olOiPopeHW&wf jel4 
" WakemanGcorgiaAoSRankinRcvEdE m£9 

sl2VVal]erWmE o5;RaiikiiiEdvardW je9 



s21 kankiiili-aacO 
a12 " CarolineH 
T. . Ti>r.TPT n iRankinWm 
FAIRFIELD. ReedRHarry 
s30 BanksDwight jySllSanfordAVV 
n9 BanksWP b2(;|SchooninakerES 



jy !2j WheclerAlice 
"" I W heelcrJasA 
si 2 



s30 BanksMosesB Jy31 

" I" JEdgar-GeoA " 

BartraniMissEM jel4 
sl4 " Mis'sMA 

BeersMrsH J o27 



a4 

A3 

016 
iiSO 
017 

s7 
s27 



SherwcodFrcd 
SherwoodJiioII 
SlaybackJamesA o24 
SlaybackMrsJA o24 
SniithArthiuL 



Nl 



n2 BeldeiiNat'nM&wfA22|" Anthony 



olOjBcttfCarrieE 
sl4lBibbinsArthurS 
s8|BrackerMH 
a9 Bradley GeoW 
a23: Bradley LB 
a2S BradlevSimonC 
BiiddOgdenD 



A24|SmilhC'E 



o25 
S9 
s5 

67 

OlS 

615 



StantonMrsJaeW je7 BulkleyMrsElizaA n8 



ol8 

All 

018 

Nl 



SmithElizaB 
SmithFannieB 
SmilhFn-d'kE 
SttirgesDH-SEliz ol7 
SturgepElla s7 

" MargaretD " 

Stu rgesH C-MaryPsiSl 



S27 

65 

jelO 
A19 



StreetWE&wf o6 ' Bulkle'yM A ol8lSturgesKate-SaraJs20 

SwalmMrsHAL olSi" MrsEliz-AnnaB " IThomps^onWB m30 
TaylorMrsAE [BurrAunieS o24|ThorpMissDelia o27 

TurnerJnoC s27|BiirrE o2,ThorpnB jyl7 

WardwellWmH ol9iBurrEjr jy27,WakelcyMissEO 

WaringMrsHF je7iBurrFrances sl4|WakenianAP o4 

Waterbnryf'hasG o20 BurrMixHS o24," SB " 

WaterburyFS s27 BtirrJr.IiaF-Emma sfiAVakemanJennieL n8 
WatkinsonAddieM nO BiirrWm 620o24|" CorneliaK 



WattThosJ 
" Ephraim 
WeedMissFA 
WhitueyChasS 
WhitneyOrlaudo 

EASTON. 

AndrewsElizH 



=12:BiirrWillieO 
■' " Catherines 
jeT" HarriettE 
N3iBurrWL&wf 
s21 ChapmanL 
I CogswellJnoD 
FrenchChasS 
o20 GilbertEmiliaF 



s20 WilsonJasA&wf a26 
" WitmeyerJL jy26 



BeersBT-LydiaA o34l" AlmiraB 



Q-yil SOUTHPOBT. 

s7 AlvordED 
sllAmblerLewis 

je9 BakerE 

a24 BaldwiiiNA 
" 'BanksSimon 



OlS 
olO 



62o 
NlO 



296 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



BeldenChasM b13 WakemanMA o21 

BirgeEC o]9 WakemanRP o2 

ISradleyAC o5 WoodJH-SarahB ol7 

KtCbinB I1^HEEN.XE.. X.D 

BrayThosE s25l Greenfield hi^l. 

BrousonJG sl9 BlakemanCA o3 

BulkleyBS o30 BradleyCH 

BulkluylienjA ol6 '• AddieB 
BulkleyC'arlotte Ma15 BradleyGeoW 

BulkleyClintonA sl4 BulkleyDavidB 

BulkleyG ol7|ColeyJennieE 

" ChasF-MaryJ " |CoMtiganJohn 
BulkleyMrsJas 86 GrayUhas-Lloyd 

BulkleyOliver&wf jeB' HallKatie 



Mosie-Katie 
" AnuieLouisa 
BuIkleySE 
BiilkleyWni 
ColeDavidF 
ElwoodLillieG 
GodfreyAdriauS 
Godl'reyAliceB 



HillNB&wf 



WillieB-HoraceE' 



06 JenningsRB 

NlO " IIE-VVmS 

Jt'9 MervvinArthur 

olTjMilbaukEUa 

s9|" C'arrieM 

o3," EinmaE 



0I8 



020 
o3 



GodfreyChsC-Sam'l si); MorehouseJP&wf oil 



GodfreyJno 
GorhamJA 
HallCT 

HallETwf&son nIO 
Hawkins Bdw-CB 0I8 
HawkinsJno ol7 

HeaneyP sl3 

HenshawW ol:J 

Jennings Augustus oil 
JenniugsCH ol7 

JenningtsChas&wf 0I8 



Jennings EB s4 

JenningsGeoP o25 
JenningsHH oB 

JenningsJD o27 

Jenniu'^sJH s7 

Jennings JFred&wfo'J 
JenningsJW&wf ol2 
" MrsAS-MissFS " 
JenningsWC s28 

JesupMrsB '• 

" MissHW 
LaflertyMaryP 
McKeelGeoP 
MeekerChas o5 

MeokerMrsWB-AdaN2 
MilUPA-E 0I8 

MoreliouseMrsG ol7 
Noi-thropWmP 
OsbornJB 
PoffersMariettaC 
PerryJnoH 
PerryWmH 
PikeFrankM 
PikeSamuel 



NicholsHL 
027; Perry FranklinE 
' SmithCH 
SmithClaraW 
SmitliHB 
SinithRD-HM 
StaplesJH 
StaplesJennieS 
TomlinsonLA 
WakemanElijr 
WakemanHN 
WiNonChasW 

GeorgeB 
WilsonCWjr-WW 
WilsonJanie 

MaryB 

GREENWICH. 



0I7 
o25 



RockwellChas&wfoll 



RoseveltJL 

RowlandBdithS 

" HenryL 

RowlandSS 

" HattieJ 

RileyCassie 

RussellJasS&wf 

SchenckMrsBII 

SherwoodAH 



a29 
a31) 

827 

jefi 

0I8 

o3 

ol7 



024 
625 
0I8 
A2.5 
a22 
o21 

Nl 

o20 
o3 

ol9 
o3 

ol9i| 



020 



s28 



AlcottMaryB 

AlleuSamuel jylOiFunstonll 

AndrusAlansonM s4| Funston Maggie 



CarpenterRB s27 

CharlesJasM n9 

ChurcliillCS s9 

ChurchillL-G s5 

ClarkSolomon&wf olO 
CloseAP s27 

UloseAW-WmE a'J 
CloseJnoFifewf 
ClogeJol^t■pllE 
CloseMaryO 
CocksAnniuM 
CocksHunry 
CraftWU 
CristyMoses 
" Annie-Eliz 
" Albert-Martha 
•' Edward 
DalyBLCorCoF] 
DavisJ 
DaytonChas 
Daytonlleury 
DaytonJ-MaryP 
" MrsMatilda 
DelanoRC-Mary 
Donovan W[C"rCoFJ h5 
DoranJohu o2U 

DowiiesSS JyiU 

DuffAnnaM Ml9 

DuffChasR[CoF] so 
DusenberryGE[CoF]'- 
Ferris Addison K n3 
PerrisClarenceO 
" MaryP 
FerrisEUea 
Ferris J W 
Ferris M\V 
FerrisWmL 
Field LillaP 
FinchJared 
PinielsAF[CoF] 
FitzgeraldElizaA 
FowlerS"th\vf&sonsl9 
FrenchWmS a22 

Jy5 
n3 



Sl5 

sll 

oil 

06 

o4 

S20 

Jy2t) 



s5 

018 

olO 

012 

o9 

.iel9 



Ml9 
n3 

je29 
a9 

826 
05 
s7 
n3 



AnnstrongG 

AveryA[CorCP] 

BaileyAddie 

BaileyEmilyM 

BaileyHMjr 

BaldwinLA 

BiUTAlice 

BanksAdelaide 



o4 FiinstonMissNettie o9 
sSJGeo-rgiA s4 

s 6jGreeneIrvin^E o3 

NSlGreen Valentine ol5 
0I8 Green wood Ed w.tv3?26 
a25;" MaryE-JcnnieE s2() 
n3 Green woodNa'cyIIs25 
jy7lGriggHowardG sl9 
BanksMrsCarrieO o28iGrimnDan'lM o5 

BanksWillardN a9 GriswoldMrsMJ 
BeadleMissBlla 
" MissMJ 



s27 



ol9 HaggertvJas[C'oF] s5 
" iHaightVVebster&wf o4 



BenderWwf&daa je22;HardyNellieS 



BennetlreneW 

BoenierEmilC 

BrighamBG-MP 

BrigharaNettieW 

BrushAM&wf 

Brush AEdgar 

" AugM 

Brush Edward 

BrushHelenA 

BrushJosephE&wfs26 

BrushJLindsIey 



s2(i 
A19 



020 



S2li 
n2 



8l4 HeldEmmaA 
s9i" MinnieP 
NlOiHenstedHattie 
" HoehlChasP 
026 HoitMaryE 
" HomeRolandH 
" JHortonWm[SrCoF]s5 
a8 HoweAUen o5 

oil HoweWA-LewisLA3() 
HowlandLabanC s5 
HowlandRevSeneca s5 
SherwoodDavidH Al0iBrushMaryEloiii8es27 [Cbaplain4thRegt] 
SherwoodEC o25| BrushSAugustus a9 HoytHWR s5 

SherwoodLF&wf s29jBrushSM all! [ColoncllthRegt] 

SherwoodSC&wf o3: Brush SR-Emmal sll RoytMrsHWR m15 
StarrGeoO N9!BrushWP s5 HubbardBF s7 

Taylor ArthurC&wfs26 [ComSergt4thRegt] iHubbardFred'kA s27 
TaylorSJ oil BushMH o5 HubbardJA ol2 

WakemanAnnabelIs27 ButlerFannieB e8 Hubbard.TnoT a9 

WakemanMrsM. s28 CableSG s21 HubbardMrsLP 

" MissVirgiuia " ICarpenterDS&ladyo28 HubbardMissMT s8 



IlnstodJosephB 

llui^tedDriNO 

HustedNH&wf 

Hustt'diSylvrD 

" Louise 

JuneHF 

Charlotte 
JuneKebeccaG 
IvuappAbbyR 
KnappAiuelia 
•• iMaitie 
KuappEmmaH 



n9 

s5 
sl2 
s27 

k2 

b25 
o2 

611 

s4 



s5 

813 

65 

ol3 

Al8 

s8 



KuappFDLSerCoF] s5 
KuappJnoH 
KuappUC 
LaForguGW 

[SerCoF] 
LaneKiityA 
LawreuceBenjB 
LockwoodFied 
Lock\voodHaul'ordsl9 
LockwoodMrsLA o27 
LockwoodNF a23 

LockwoodEF O'^'X 

•' NelsonU 

LongMrsOphelia olS 
LounsburyA'reiaAs28 
LyonD[i5erCoF] s6 
Lyon Kd win [CoF] 
Lyon MrsEd win 
LyonFA 
Lyon MA 
^larksCha9A 
MarshallHB 
MartinNellieB 
MasonllenryS 
MayoThos&wf 
McCrackanJE 
McNallGeoG 



019 

a9 
0I8 

614 

s3 
a25 



A22 
a8 



MartinJW-EllenEA31 



65 

o3 
o4 

AlO 
AlO 

n9 



McGinnJames 
MeadAmelia 
'• KatieM 
MeadAnnieR 
MeadAiigustus 
Mead AN 
MeadBL 
MeadMrsCaroI'eM s29 
Meadf'has n9 

MeadCliasN a8 

MeadClarksonS a3I) 
MeadDanielSir ol2 
•' Annall-NelsonB " 
MeadEd&wf 65 

MeadElknnah n3 

MoadFir-Ephraim olO 
MendEilaR-GeoM a15 
McadElizH o27 

MendEmilvC 627 

MeadOeoF 65 

MeadHannahH n9 
MeadHattie-FGC 0I8 



McadUR 


ol9 


MeadldnP 


a28 


MoadLiicindaP 


o24 


MeadMrsIII 


AlO 


MeadMrsIL 


0I8 


MeadJabpz 


si 2 


MeadJasB 


s5 


MeadJohnK 


All 


Mead 'asR 


Oil 


MeadCptJGjr[CoF] 66 


MeadTiVniaii&wf 


s20 


MoadM'rsME 


ol9 


MeadSAugustus 


AlO 


MeadSarahA 


n9 


MeadSarahM 


a96 


" EmmaF 


" 


MeadSol-HannahM o9 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VI8IT0KS — FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



297 



MeadEmmaJ-Lizziesd 

'* Critity " 

MeadMreS-SusieHo26 
MeadSP a30 

MeadSWarren AlO 
MuadWillardH 
McadWiI[CorCoF] s5 
MeadVVJ 06 

MeadWhitmanS n9 
MerrittAndrewB ol2 
MerrittCE[CorCoF] s5 
MerritUohnG 65 

MerrittAnnie s4 

MerrittWH n3 

MorrellLtEph[CoF] sG 
Morton A D-SS n8 

MortouAP " 

MortonSS " 

MosherSarahE n5 
MosherFrankP s2 
MopherSamuelA s5 
OwensAC '• ! 

PalmerDM 
PeckAlbertM 
PeckEliasS 
PeckJosephE 
PeckllarryT 
PeckOecar 
PeckStephenC 
PickhardtEinestC ol4 
PinneoDrTS&wf sl4 
'• KettieL s20 

" MaryS o5 

" JamesArthur 'slO 
PowersLtJno[CoF] s»i 
PutiieyWS All 

PadlordStephenL p8 
RawsonldaJ-VE o2o 
RavJH-MrsKateL o4 
RedfleldEugeneB sft 
ReynoldsAL 
RejTioldsE 
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ReynoldeJasL 
ReynoklsJG&wf 
ReynoldsMinnieH a15 
ReynoldsNettieS " 
" CharlesA " 

ReyuoldsSEdward s7 
n2 



TalbotViolette o5 ThompgonMaryA sl8 BenpdictAntoniaEo28 



TalbotW[SerCoF] s5 TomliusouAnna 



a9 
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o5 TomlinsonEttaJ 
821 TomlinsoDjosjr 
sl2 TomlinponMF 

'• ITomliusonNellie 
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kS VanVlietCW 

N8'" MaryL 
019 WakeleeFannieC 
s27iW< keleeGideoiiM 
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s25 ! WoostcrFredM 

WaterburyEstherL N2! MONROE. 

WaterburyGeo&vvf ^9 BoardpleyChasM 
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031 t laikMrt^CB 
031 ClarKjonnieA 
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o31 ClaikVVS 
" C'oleyJE&wf 
s5 " EdwH 
oil Coniiiij.Granville 
o2S CurtisAB 
je9 " Banuim 
m22 CurtlsRebecca 
" jEa^twoodJuo 
WilkinsonLa'rence " FaspittJBarcIay 
WrijrhtBeiij je9NlO FrenchChasS 
MrsBjnj&dau KlU FrcnchFL 

a9 French W-Sarah 
a4 GravSE 
" HnliSM 
a9 HurdSS 
YarriugtouMrsBM sl4 .lohnsoiiEE 
nTTvn<iv,,~rkv I Johnsonllanford 
HUMI>&TOX. IjohnsonJamcsC 



TalbolWmK 

TeuEyckKE 

TreatChasR 

" JuliaH 

TrumpyBenjF 

UreKoblS 

VauIs'akenEF 

VoorhisJno 

VoorhisKW 

WallaceThomas 

WaltonAlfrwlW 

WaltonMaryE 

WarrenChas 



WusselsEliz 
West^eli-Jet-sie 
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WesselsJas 
Weseeli^WmH 
Wil!>onFC 
WilcoxFN 
WilcoxGeoE&wf 
WilcoxWillit^H 
WilkiusonE 
ET 



WrijrhtBenjMjr 
WrightMrisEJ 
" MissBelle 
WriirhtMH 



sit) BeuedktCSifcwl' 

oil BenediciChasL 

ol9;" EmmaN 
o3 BentdictJ&wf 
a9 Benedict! heoW 
" BlissFmnk-Nellie je7 
03 BirdsallBF-Gilbert k8 
" BriggsStephen jy(J 

s16 BrownNeilie n1 

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a4 
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jyfi 

828 



sl8 
sl4 



s4 

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024 



n3 



RikerSam'lT 
" PhebeA-ElizR 
RippleJacob 
RitchC[CorCoF] 
RitchHudsonL 
RitchLizzieA 
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RitchWmM 
RowellEliza 
RuddRaymond 
RunyanMrsFannie <)9 
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RussellJE-JEjr Jv4 
RykerAB&wf Je30 
SackettHL ©26 

ScofleldGB s5 

[Ho8'lStew'd4thRgt] j 
ScofleldMrsG 84 

SeixasBelleC-HA o5 
SelleckMissAnnie o9 
SelleckChasD aIO' 
SherwoodHattyP nS 
SherwoodCarrieE o20 
SherwoodGW&wf " 
SkeldingAE\vf&dauo4 
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SmithBP&wf je" 

SmithJMerritt 80 

TalbotMary-Susie o5 

1 



AlIisMattieE 

BeardLucyM 

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BeardM 

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BeardWmT 

BennettFannicS 

BennettldaF 

BlakemansG 



All BrownfonW G je7 

Je9 BurtipJW oil 

o5 BiitlerJQA aSB 

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ICarrollGeoP s8 

o29 '■ JapM-ML 

C15 CurterAdolihusS o24 

a£5 Cartel hlizjiA s9 

>3 CaitcrllAiiiel'a o2 

clO CbichctteilE old 

Je9 Conistuck/i-&\vf je£4 

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je21|"' Clcnieulire " 

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o£4 Coni8to(kTC oSO 

o25 CoriiintjGII-WO jy6 

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A3 Dari:CS 819 

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a12 JohnsouMariettaC ell Green WmW 

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oSO 
019 
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oil 



jy3 HallRn>^ee;iL-Julia 88 



n9 LanphearWintonBf 18 Heatlillcrence 
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o9 MandevilleMF 
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BlakemanMrsSG Jel2 OsborneCE&wf 
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ClarkFR n9 PlumbCD 

CocksSB je(i PorterJnoT 

FrenchBennett&wfs21 RikerllC 
GloverllFordyce o5 SearsHatticA 



814 HoytEdra 

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IligginsLH&vvf 825 SmithMrsWallis je20 " SA-WmW " 

IlineWmE n1 SpringAustin oO Jonet^PhebeA oil 

IlolmesJ 821 Ster.ing.'ulia o5 " Ir^arahF " 

IIubbcllNettie-RHolt Sterlinl'LorenzoB a2 KeelerEdw'dS m20a17 
Jndi^onChas o3 TumcyHciiriettaCo24 Lambert JW&wf o4 

" EleanorE " WarnerDavid 0I8 Lahev]\l orris s26 

JndHonML s27 " Mis?M.I-ES-TN " iMcGraihTH n6 

KneenThoa g2() WarnerES s28 MeadBP ol9 

LinsleyJChanncey o5 WheelerA&wf o9 MonrocLM-Nellie o20 

MarchJo8-Wm sfi WheelerChasB s29 MonroeLMir " 

MorganDN A30827 WheelerFW&wf o7 Nickersi nRich'dG n8 
MororanMrsDN a30 WheelerMarvB a28 NoycsJiiIia k1 

NicholsDanielA oil WheeltrPam'eliaB s27 GlmstidLS o31 

XJcholsLonise " ■.,,.™. ^ . ». . . -., iOlmgteclSFrances olS 

^12 SLW CA>AAN. !"Mai-j-E " 

" lAnstinFB ol9 PattersfmJII 

jeOoll AyresAliciaF Jy360o4 PcaseJI^Eddie 



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PlnmbBW 
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ThompsonMrsGeo ol7 BarbonrJohn 
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Jy3sn PurdyGeoE 

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S6 RaymondTkeoW s20 



298 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



RavmoncTWmE 


jy3 BlackmanJP 


jyll 


JudsoTiNellieA 


828 AinsworthWmH 


At 


KichardsEJ 


s2U Blac kman MaryF 


813 


KeanePatrick 


o2o AniblerEII 


012 


RichardBMrsEJ 


s9o4|" AnnE-JoBeph 


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KeaiiujjJohiiT 
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A 24 


RichardsJuliaM 


sl« BlakeraanAustia 


N2 


8l4 " MrsJasL 


oli 


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o31 


LeaveyJohn 


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oil 


Roi,a'rsHB&wf 


eSUlBlakesleeGeo 


o2:i 


LeeMartinW 


jiniArno dMrsEJ 


A J 


'• MainieL 


" 


Blakt'leeSGrace 


821 


LilliesThomas 


o2;j Austin A 


86 


RascoeDewittC 


PlO 


BoothOT 


814 


LumML&wf 


a30 AustinArthurW 


n3 


StJohnLewisV 


A'^ 


BoothLB&wf 


821 


MaasDavid 


8l3 AustinEmniali 


o3l) 


" HaniiiliK 


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BoothJosiah 


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MarbleFaunieA 


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jyR 


SiofieklAliceJ 


o5 


BoothMrsJosiah 


04 


MarbloFP 


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oil) 


SaofteldJoseph 


sly 


BotsfordAdellaP 


025 


McArthurEiiz 


sSlBairdNcllieP 


jeiW 


ScottChas 


n4 


BotsfordDH 


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MiddlebrookS 


o23iBallAlidaU-Nettiejyl2 


SeeleyMelvinaA 


jo" 


BotslordFrankT 


jy3 


MitchellLanrence 


o2J 


BartraniES 


a15 


Selleokil 


ol 


BotsfordGW-Chas ol7 


MitchellNellieE 


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BattersouWn 


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o->0 


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s27 


Beard GeoK 


Ool 


SliiisnalverChri-'t' 


a sl9 


BotsfordHenryB 


025 


MorrisLeviC 


o23 


BeattyGeo 


87 


SilliinaiiJP-CII 


A:il 


Bot^fordLena 


018 


MulleeStantou 


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BeattyJohnP 


m20 


StevensCai-ricB 


017 


BradleyAliceE 


jes 


NicholsHT 


o25lBcecroltJuo-Gco 


n3 


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je7 


NicholsLor.isaB 


sl3 BeucroftMrsGeo 


o2:j 


ThatcherPA 


oiSiBiadlevMrsGW 


813 


NicholsPhilo-SE 


82s BeersFiankA 


jyl4 


ThompsonOD 


ol9 


BiirrMLouise 


olO 


NorthropEmily 


ol8j Beers WmH[CoD' 


85 


TerrellHir-BvaA 




CamplIB 


84 


" LydiaA-Jennie 


'• BcldenFred'k 


o3 


TournierJasU 


Nl 


CainpbellJoha 


022 


NorthropHorace 


s27j'- MrsSarahH 


" 


Trowbr'u'eBBSsie 


\oll 


CarmodyJoha 


" 


NorthropVVmC 


gl3 BeldenGeoW 


827 


WardellTillieL 


o->7 


CarrollJannie 


023 


O'DoloheryJohn 


je9 BenediciClias 


OlO 


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o38 


CarrollPatrick 


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OrrWalter 


o2U BenedictMarian 


" 


■VVaterbiirylN-IP jy31 


CarroUThosP 


031 


PeckAW 


s7 BenuettAugusta 


s22 


WeedPi-aiikB 


o4 


CaseyJames 


022 


PeckDC 


s5 BennottJTAlady 


s28 


WeedFE 


oil 


ClarkAF 


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PeckEMjr 


o2() BerwickCarrieA 


AlO 






ClarkEdwin 


OlO 


PeckEdS-MrsSB 


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a31 


NEW FAIRFIELD. 


" JulieL 




PeckFaiiiiieU 


s2S BettsAO 


oil 


BottsTa^A 


jea4 


ClarkFloM 


821 


PeckHeimouH 


n2 BettsAG 


013 


DibbleWH-L.\ 


o25 : Co) gau Maurice 


023 


PeckMaryF 


814 BettsArthnrL 


a9 


DikemmMrsPB 


st! Collins Andrew 


031 


PerkinsGeoO 


jylliBeitsCJ-EdwC 


a24 


GerowMiraH 


N2!CurtisD 


sl2 


PerkinsWW 


jyl3 BettsHS 


s27 


GorowSrI-PhebeH o2.5 


'• SaraliE-HattieL " 


Pinkney Henry W 


o27 BettsMrsJB 


A31 


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CiirtieS 


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PlaitChas 


sUlBettsLC 


ol9 


" Irvinn;SII-01iasCP " 


DickEllaC 


oil 


PrindleJuliaM 


8-7 BissellClark 


sl2 


Hodi^eMary 


o-^l 


DickWmJ 


" 


RaymoudCW 


h7 BissellEC 


816 


Hopkin^FjewisL 


olOjDikemauMrsLH 


018 


Saul'ordMrsAnnE 


o3 BissollEH 


814 


Kellogg Wm J 


je9 DrewJessieE 


sl3 


SanfordAuiiieE 


a8 BissellllenryS 


m30 


KnappCS 


je22 DuucombGeoP 


n2 


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siaiEganJobnP 


o24 


Sanfordll 


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SaufordJohnL 


o25 riascerBS-WillicL s27 


KnigiitWVV 


o3 FairchildMrsAB 


013 


SanfordWmH 


6l4 BoniiellEugene 


jyi2 


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814 


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018 


Ma-ionLaFS 


f20 FairmanChas 


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ShermanSarahE 


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017 


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ol9 FinneThos 


o23 


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o23 


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612 Bradley AH 


o24 


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jyll 


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ol9 GatelyDG m17o24 


TaylorAH 


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813 


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s2S BrownFrank 


ol 


AugurMiiiott-RB 


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ToiicevChas 


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024 


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o5 


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k4 


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Toll GlovorFH 


829 


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JcU 


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jel3 GloverF'lorpnceS 


821 


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819 


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o-2f) GlovorSC-MaryB 




WarncrDC 


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84 


BuersB'.ntnaS 


s2r HawleyAN-RS 


ol9 


WarnprMrs.Tohn 


ol2IBr,rbankMr8.Tohn 


821 


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a8 


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8l9 


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Nt'HawlevGlover 


OlO 


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N4IBushMarvII 


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BjiitidictDrOA 


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o4 


BeneilictGeo 


o5;naw!cyIIA 


S4 


WasonCT)-S>f 


f22 Buxton WE-FE 


o27 


BannettAA 


o31 ' IIa\vlevMar2raret 


n2 


WlieelerMrsJB 


s2i:BvinetonAH&wf 


027 


BenuettEA 


a26 Ha wleVlWattieS 


a30 


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BennettMrsEmilyA oT HoutrhGA 


0l2 


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BcnnettMerwin 


olS HoiighTames 


82 


WilsonJamesA 


oil CampMrs.T 


o3 


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b2« ITouirhJP 


02fi 


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Tv31 CampbellEllaJ 


OlO 


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jyfi 


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814 


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n2 




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n3 


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(.17 " WmC-ChasB 




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ns 


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BlackmanJasM 


oSC 


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025 


AikenSarahP 


o23 ChichesterMary 


o3 



LIST OF COimECTICUT VISITORS FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



299 



GhichPsterMrsMS olSIGillettcWaltern jySO'KellogsFannieE o5NickersonS-GeoK n8 



Wins 
Churchlsaac 
ClarkTM 
ClarkWW 
ColuiB 
ColeEva 
ColeFVictor 
ColeHeury 
ColeIra 
C'oleMrsIra 
ColeLS 
CoolidgeCB 
ComstockUrGS 
OomstockHS 
ComstockRE 
Comstock3Ir#S 
CotterJohu&wf 
CouchLC 
CoulstonRN 
CoiisinsJas&wf 
" Jasjr 

CousinsJoseph 
CousinsThos 
CoxMissAE 
CraufurdRS 
CroweCaptJapC 

[CoD4thEegt] 
Crowtherlda 
" Lizzie 
CurtisCEversley 
" MamieE 
Curti>EB 
DarrowGcoA 
L)a!*kainMi>Sam'l o"J; 
" JeiinieJI 

DatoiiLizzicJ sl'2 

UayMrsFiancis NlU 
DayFrankW s-^8 

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GotlfrcyFredA ol2 KelloggWin 
s27 GoldingAuguetusC s4 Kelly Alonzo 



jylTIGvi-doiiGcoA 
oil G»rhamFW 



k3 
o4 

jy28 

m30 
jyi2 
o25 

s29 

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Jy4 

Jy3 

n9 

AlT 

o3 
o20 
o2T 
jel 



GreenAnnieM 

IdaJ 
Gregory EstherA 



GregoryJasS 
Gregory LAnna 

AlattieW 
GregorySethK 
GrummanHJ 
GuilcpLW 



012 

je(j 

sl'.t 

s4 

sCS 



S2'; 



o2 Kelly John D 

olO KeniieyJohnn 

a30 KeyserFredA 

" iKifboyJM 
sloiKingChas 



GregoryJaniesF je20 1 KirbySamnelll 



NOiivniglitAuraU 
jy28|KrogetEA 
" I LaniljJennie o5 

o7|LaneJohn o27 

" LeCountKateE a2 
n3 LeonardFrank&wf o4 



aS NickersouGK ol 

o24 ; Nickerson JP s6 

jy21;NorthropEdwin k4 

gi~i01m(;teadAnna a'i 

nS 01m?teadChas 
ol2| [QrMaster4ihEegt] 
ol9|01msteadGM olfi 

025 OlmsteadMrsHO Kl 
jy27iOInis;teadHS ol8 

K4i01msteadGertieE Je2l) 



GuthrieHF&w m30o24 LockwoodB-MDF sl9 



DewaldJuoS 

UibbleRB 

DisbrowMrsJL 

iJotylsaacN 

DouglassCH&wf 

DownsAB 



HantordJei-sie 
•' Myra 

HanlordJosephP 
HanfordLC-RG 
Hanf()rd\VS2d 
IlanfordWH 
IlarrisGeoW 
IlarrisSarah 
HarrisonThoo 
HarveyAnnie 
Has-lemJasL&wf 
HawryC 
IlearnThos 
IlendrickWmH 
IlillChas 
HillKJ&wf 
liitchcockDrD 
Uodge^Uattie 
HoclnettJa^W 
HolmesGM 
• Mrt^GM 
" Mamie-OUie 
HopsonJesee 
HoftAda 
HovtFA 
HoytG 
IIoytJohnH 
HoytMary 
o24jHoytTheronG 
Al5 HoytWalter 



s2SlLock\voodEK " PartrickJA 

LockwoodFStJ s26 " MrsJG 
s4 ■' CarricA " PartreeNellieM 

o^ LockwoodlTelenA o5 Perry EP 
NO i LockwoodJN je20 1 PersonsSusie 
Al I LockwoodSarahE s21 PinknevEA 



Isabella 
GlmsteadMrs.Tosie g21 
OlmsteadLouise o3 
OsbornS a9 

OsboriieThosG&wfs27 



O20i-' EmilyB 
n4 j LockwoodTlioo 
soLockwoodWBE 



k4 
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Sl9 

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027 
oil 
ol4 
Ml9 



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" MissJiiliaA 
LoiiHrMr^NR 
LouiisburyCA 
LounsbiiryWrsW 
LoudonEdwaid 
LycettJos 
si iLvonGcorgic 
n3 LyonMrt^jWS 
NfilLyonLuceuia 
M25!""EnnlyJ 
" MainsJohn 
ol2!MalkinAR 
MrsJulia 



o26 
ol2 

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s29 
oil 
n3 
o24 
o4 
e29 
s23 
jelO 



PinkneyJW 

oil PlattBelle 

e21 PlattChasC 
'• PlattDM&wf 
" PlattJohuH&wf 

.Te3 PotterJM 
jyl2 •' MrsJM&dau-LS " 
n2 PoyvezJulie-Kate o6 

024 PricellP-Hattie sl4 

o31 PriccMaryE oil 

jy7 PriceSB k8 

Nl Prit^el'latt n1 

oG ProwittChilPS a24 
" iProwittHM&wf aIH 
NliProwittJT&wf s7 

ol2 ProwittLouise e5 

QuintardCA 



o23!MalloryMrsAlfred je6 (inintardCarrieM 



DwyerPafkH&wf o31 ! HowardC 
EakleGeoU Jyl5 HnbbellSAA 



EarldJasS Al 

EllsMissCarrieA o4 
EUsGeoN je7 

Ells Ja^E-FannyM o25 
EllsJB&wf Ml8 

EllsLucyA 

EllsRL a30 

EhvoodC[CoD] s5 

ErskineWmH Jyl2 
EvendenJE[CoD] p7 
FavvcettMrsVV o30 
FerrissNettieP s9 
FerryMaryB el5 

FitcbAlice-Agnes o27 
FitchDW-GW o31 
FitchHarA'ey 
FitchMrsJC 
FitchSarahE 
FlaniganPatrick 
FlinnCarrieE 
FolwellWmA 
" EstherA 
FooteJeunyM 
Foot.TF s 

[QrMrSergt4thRegt] 
FrendenthalCH s 
FryEA o 

GaramonsPa'-leyB o2' 
GibbsHoraceS 
GibsonAIexS 



HubbelliSL 

HubbellWmB 

HubbsChasA 



A31|Malone)ohu 
a24 I Maichan tN J-CB 
o25 MarvinJRay 
oluMarvinAIissSA 
o24! Mason WD 
N'JjMattheisH[CoD] 
o20 MattheisJoseph 
jyl2[McEwenAuneJ 
olO McKeeman.Tas 
oSlJMcKinneyWJ 
o20 " David 



s3 

ol2 
oil 

OlS 

jvl9 
sKi 



Huntingt'nLillieMAlO MeadFred'k&wf 



ol9 QuintardHattie 

Nl QnhitardJohnH 
Ml8 QuintardWE 
oil RandallFied'k 
8l2 RandleClara 

so RandleGeoM jylSsSS 
A25;RandleHC oSl 

o5 RandleMr.-nC s2!l 

J3'4 RandleMrsJC MiO 

s21 RandleJC i-i 

" I [Payniaster4thRegt] 
o30 RaudleWP m31 



HntchinsonA 
Je7 IlyattJasK 
HvattJasW 
IIvattMaryJ 
HydeFG-MaryD 
Jackson A 



k4 MeadPeterW&wf o5 RaymondAllieD sSS 



A25!MeekerAJ 

je9;MeekerMi?sCT 
NO MeekerMrsEH 
stJMeeckerlA 

olOIJIerrillGeoTB 



JacksonLeGrand c34|MerrillHomer 
" EM " iMeprillLauraP 

Jackson Wm A je5|" Ellen 
JenningsHM jel MerrillStJohn 

•TohnstonEmmaB a26 MillerGeoE 



s29 RaymondEdsonM o2(! 
sl2 RaymondFB t,9 

o24|" EnmiaH " 

S3 RaymondGW&wf o24 
sl3|RequaNat Al 

s6 EeynoldsCarrie o20 
All RhoadesIIE&wf ci) 
iRhodesHE[USN] JC29 



sS'MillerMrsJuliaA 
jilS MilnesJE-Allie 
019 I.IitchellNellieA 
Al8 MoellerEdwardC 
je27 Montgomery WE 
oil Moody WS-JosP 
NlO MoodyMrsWS 



o4 RiderSamuel2d 
m17o17 RiderMrsWmB 



JohnsonGeoT 

JonesChasII 

JonesIIenrv 

JonesRobtW 

KearneyJoB 

KeatinaP 

KcelerEdwinO 

KeelerFrank 

Keeler">'r^GO-Etta a4 Mosm'anDr&wf 



k9 

821 
012 
a2S 



o2 RitchieMaggie 

sl8 RobertsFB 

024 RcbcrtsWC 

Al5 RuscocJFwf&eon a23 

o23 RnscoFT sT 

c5 EnssCP s29 

Nl RussellDWC s26 



20 'MoodvWinfieMSjr a9 SammisVv'mA o6 



GUbertHW 



KeithI S ":-ister 
Kelloi' E ^ 
KelloggE<therA 
KelloggEnos&wf 
Jyl2 ] KclloggJarvi s 
a22i" MrsMinnieS 



n2 MuckridgcJlrsA 
Al5 NashDavidV/ 
s29 NashGco-Agnes 
n9 Nashll 
s6 KeffAII 



SanndcrsWH m30s10 
f21 ScoficldEmmaP k8 
oil ScoficldEJ 
s2S ScoficldGcoR 
a31 ScofieldMA 
p19 ScoficldOR 



sUKeUoggML 



NcwkirkJCir&wf ol3 ScofieklMrsWD 
o5 KichcifilrsSC Nl Selleck^\.liceE 



s29 
019 

AlO 

s30 
o6 

ois 



300 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



SelleckGWard 


»20 


" MrsHK 


'• 


SelleckHenryK 


NlO 


SelleckMissLily 


Oli 


SelleckMaryK 


Ntj 


'• AliceE 


^* 


SelleckStanton&wfo5 


ScyinoiirELi 


ol5 


Seyni'mrMrsIIeii 


rys2tJ 


Sh'edlockPrances 


[£nG 


Saeppard.Tos 


jel 


" Mary-Maryjr 




ShepherdMaVy 


o5 


SherwDOiUoliu 


o(J 


Sherwood.MissLib'e '• 


S lerwoodOscar 


o4 


Simpson E 


jy28 


SinithAniiaB 


sOO 


HmitliAnuieE 


024 


SinithAsa 


o31 


'• MrsAnnieM-Carrie" 


SmithChasJ 


jyll 


SmithFB 


jyt 


SiiiithJamea 


026 


SmitliLizzieB 


jyll 


SinitliOliveJ 


jyl4 


bmithWinRandel 


86 


[BrigGeneralCNG] 


SpencerJ 


013 


StJoliuS-JaneE 


o20 


StJohnSE 


sl2 


SlJohiiL-SallyA 


820 


StauleySK 


825 


btautonWM 


s8 


StarrOS&wf 


818 


JitewartAudrew 


oC) 


" Anniejr 


" 


StoneMrsMaryP 


m20 


StoreyWinW&wl 


m30 


StreetMrsC 


o25 


StreetEdw-GeoI] 


o31 


StreetEIlan 


025 


StreetFrauk 


025 


StnartEC 


80 


Stiiai-tEW-MamieE " 


StiiartMi-sMary 


ol2 


SturgesBJ 


o24 


TalcottCC 


07 


TaylorGW 


o4 


TayloiHB-IdaV 


025 


TempleArilla 


A26 


TenneyCharlcsL 


Al5 


TeudtGustavus 


a4 


ThomasEphraim 


o20 


ThoipeGeo a29o24 


TieriieyMrsJ 


n8 


TinkerFannieP 


n6 


TownseudMrsCR o24 


TiickJosephine 


of) 


TuckerGH 


Si 


TuUyJas 


AlO 


TuttleChasM 


n2 


"LillieM 


»' 


TuttleSilasP 


027 


UhleChasP 


s5 


[AsstSurgt4thRegt] 


VailDS 


814 


VanHoovearS 


m25 


VolkMrsFrancesA n8 


WallaceWmJjr 


o20 


WaterburyFM 


Jyl7 


WeedEdwP 


n6 


We^dJuliaM 


NlO 


WheaterJ 


m3 


WheelerArthurC 


Bl2 



WheelerClia8C&wfo20 
WheelerCH&dau oil 
WheelerFB ol7 

" Delia 



WhitcomREifcwf jelO 
WiiiteGeoA 821 

WhiteGeoP n6 

WliiteMrsGW 8l5 

WhiteGWiUis Jyl 
WliitneyET&son a14 
"WP 
WilcoxsonES 85 

WilsouMissEIiza 828 
WilsonJosW Ml8 

WilsonOliverE ol 
VVilt^onRobtG ail8 
•' JuliaP 
WilsonThosF [CoD] s5 
WoodFredk s2 

WoodWmN k9 

WoodburyCK a28 
WoodwardMaryH silfl 
YoungHN jj2 

YonngsOS s21 

YoungsSelleck&wfo 11 
YouleWm o4 

SOUTH WOEWALK. 

A tlan tifi Yacht Club a19 
Capt J WPennell-LII 
Nash-TFarrarBurke- 
T J Pennell-Johii W 
Bell-EWestervolt 
BacksterU&wf si 

BakerRV 822 

BanksEK Jy2(j 

B;intaCII[CoD] 85 

Batef>Sniith[CoDJ s5 
BaxterFrankH s27 
•• FiedL 

BeardE a12 

BeardLottieW a15 
" JuliaE " 

BcckerCMichael s6 
BellChasS o30 

BenedictEmmaM o5 
BenedictGWillis s4 
BenedictGeo&wf o31 
BenedictHC n4 

BenedictMrsThos a4 
BenedictThosSd "• 
BenedictWniH a22 
" GH-FE-FM 
BettsLtAA[CoD] s6 
BlakeLtLJ[CoD] s5 
BodwellHE ol 

'• SarahE 

Boeiii?chIIW[CoD] s5 
BoothllH je21 

BoughtonGeoW s20 
BoughtoiiEnoch si 
BoutonWmll n2 

BoylstonFrank Jy4 
Bradley bW 626 

BrittoCHLCoD] s5 
BrownCE-WmH n2 
BrownHSjr Je22 

BrownHW[CoD] s5 
Brown Junius [CoD] 85 
BrownJasA&wf ol3 
BrowneWA&wf Jy3 
BrushWC&wf jy2S 
" Emma " 

BurkeWmC n8 

ByxbceFF&wf slO 
ByxbeeWC[CoD] s5 
CooleyHenryM Nl 
ColeGeoH n3 

ColemanDT[CoD] 85 
CookMary 025 

CooperElidaR a3 

CorbittMrsChasS s22 
CorbettMatthew 822 



CoxEmilieM olO 

" SarahB " 

CoxJoBeph 
Cri8seyES[CorCoD]s5 
Crol'utAJ Nl 

Crol'utGracie n3 

CrolutJasK o31 

CrosmanAJ[CoDl s5 
CroweCaptJC[CoD] 
CryorJosephine a2 
CunninghamPL o25 
DakeJohnW sJU 

DalsenRM si 

DaucbyCS[CorCoD]s5 
UenningJS o25 

DavisGeoA NlO 

DayBFjr je21 

DayGeoW 6l5 

DaytonMrsDavid a20 
" Lizzk'J " 

DibbleJIrving sll 
DibbloLorenzojr si 
DibbleMaryA s20 

'• SadieA " 

DickermanAnnieL a1 
•' ComeliaW " 

DickermanNelson o31 
DisbrowDE&wf oli 
DiverCS[CoD] s5 

DonovanJeremiah s2 
DuftyThos[CoD] 85 
DnncanAL n2 

"• CarrieE '■• 

DnncanWmH&wf n3 
DunningllomerN a2'.; 
" M rsSC-ClaraC " 
ElwellHenryH a30 
EIvDudleyP .Te8ol8 
MissesAAifeDB oliS 
EvendenMissClara sf^ 
E venden JE LCrCoD] s5 
FairbankfDH&wf n3 
FerrisEmmaJ ol8 
ForrisFrankN a2S 
Fen is.Iohnll&wf je22 
FinchWmL s27 

FootLP sll 

FooteShermanD s20 
FooteWC 
FoxIIcnryD 
GodfreyDELCoD] 
Godfrey L [CoD] 
GoldenRH 
Graham Alex J 
GroverLewisC 
GmmmanJuIiaM 
GurryRobt[CoD] 
HainesGeoW 
HallockCF 
IlallockGeoW 



s20 
n8 
s5 



sl2 
06 

Nl 

a2 

85 

s20 

sll 

je23 



HallocknW[CoD] s5 
HamiltonStarr Nl 

HanfordWmAS 
IlaufordWS je9 

IlanfordMrsWinfleldS 
" MissMaryC 
HarrisonThco[CoD]s5 
nart\vickJ[CoD] 
HanschikitAA[CoD]" 
HanschildtOGLCoD] " 



IlarveyGeoB 


a31 


HassettMD 


Al4 


HathawayKate 


sl3 


HaywardChasM 


jyJ 


HeardtyElla 


ol 


HendersonSAM 


627 


HendrickSarahL 


Nl 


" Imogene 




IloU'maulIenry 


815 



IXoganJuliette 

HoytCarrieL 

"■ AnnieE 

HoytChasW 

HoytEdgarB 

'' ElizaP 

HoytELorenzo 



Jyl2 

n8 

o34 



014 



Hoy tFranklin&wf o30 



n3 

814 

s9 
n3 

jy4 

Nl 



b5 

si 

S21 

026 

o30 

si 



si 

814 
Nl 

s22 

m31 

Nl 

A3 



IIoytFred 

IIoytlraE&wf 

IIoytlMortimer 

HoytSam'lH 

HoytWard&wf 

IIubbellVVB 

IIyattJno-WS[CoD]s5 

IlylandWm " 

InvinWniGeo 3^1 

Jenningi?EF[CoD] sS 

JenningsIsaacS s6 

.TenningsLA s27 

JohnstonMrsJA Jyl6 

KeelyEW Jy3 

Kenny JF [CoD] s5 

Kenneyjn[CrCoD]'- 

KidneyElviraF a3 

lvidneyJH[SerCoD]s5 

KtiegnFC sS 

KnappAH[CoD] 

KnappFM 

IvnappJohnll 

■• CharlieA 

KnappPhilipH 

KriegorHerman 

Lan^'GeoE 

L;issirJD[CoD] 

•' Jacob 

Last-crSarah 

LawreneeChasM 

LawrenceJolinB 

Lawtor.FrankD 

LaytonJacobM 

LeesonFA 

LewisLillieH 

Lock wood A Jan eH 

LyonFS-FreddieS a23 

MainsJohn&wf Nl 

INIainsJohnW NlO 

Mallorj'MrsChas s27 

MartinJW[SerCoD] s5 

MathewsonEH o4 

McClureMary jyl2 

Margaret " 

McGra'w John [CoD] s5 
McQiieenMatiieE s8 
MeadFrank o24 

MeadMrs^JolinE a30 
McadSamuel 
MillardJJ 
MillardMamieL 
MoranWm 
MortonCn&wf 
MortonFrei.O 
NashChirence 
XashClarenceC " 
NashFrauk " 

Nash F 11 84 

NashlloraceR si 

NashLewisII si 

NashTheodomsB sl5 
■' MrsFH-WinnnieO" 
NestorJohn o31 

NorthGS Al4 

NortonMaggie All 
" CorneliaA " 

NorthwavNellicG a29 
PakuIskiS o:W 

PalmerSC o30 

PardeeEmilyVD 814 
PardeeDrMB 



630 
o25 
jy6 
n3 

Al6 
8l 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITOES FAIEFIELD COUNTY. 



301 



PeclcAniiicD olO 

PeckMissSaraSD a30 
PeckMi-sST Ml 

PcnnellJuliaM a3 
I'ersLnettC'has k4 

PlattCLICoD] g5 

PlattG<Hj[CoD] 
PlattDeuiiis sl4 

PlattJH[CoDl s5 

RapelyeaVVClCoD] " 
RaymondCT o24 

EajmMCVV [CrCoD] s5 
EaymondEdw n13 
RaymoDclFredW n4 
EaymondHattieA sW 
EaymondSamuel n4 
" MaiyT-ClaraD " 
EaymoudThos s8 

" LizzieA " 

EobertsonWmJ jy4 
EockwellSarahF o4 
EoodllS o31 

EourkeJosepb jy3 
RowauEH jeS 

EusL'lesJW ol5 

liUfsellJamesL ol9 
SWohnChasS n4 

StJohnCaptCC&wfo25 
SammisF a24 

"• MrsWmC 
SammigJS sl2 

SaundersF[CoD3 eo 
ScofieldAB e27 

SciidderWmM o25 
SearlesLW ol8 

SeymourCha8E&wfsl2 
SeymourNS Jy2t) 

SholesAgnesJ n6 

SholeslMrsSanford a30 
SmithCE 82(i 

SmithHD a22 

SmithllJ&wf jeS 

SmithSH[CoD] s5 

SmithWH[CoD] 
SpenceiEevDr Al 

SpendloveJ[CoD] s5 
StaubC[CoD] 
Steveiii^Wml sG 

Stillt-onMrsGC Nl 

SutherlaudMrsG Jyl2 
SwartzC ol9 

TallmadgeEWS n3 
TaylorAnuie o3 

ThomsoiiMrs si) 

TempcrCharlotte kS 
ThomesHalnieriaV 
TierneyJeremiah jyl 
ToUesElidaF p19 

TolleeMH o."; 

Tuck J A Al 

TuckerChasM&wfol2 
TuraerllR oil 

TwissAlexW ol 

VanlloosearH a9 

VanNessEugeneJ jyl 1 
VcatsSusanH o25 

VirtueCW a1 

VolkFA jyl4 

VolkJoeephA a8 

WankS o30 

Ward\vellWF[CoD] s5 
M^iterb'o'WIlLCoD] " 
WatersGeoF s22 

WatkinfC:hasB.ie22o30 
WatkiiisJnoA-SJ olO 
WeedWD[CoD] s5 
WeistmanCH [CoD]" 
WheelerJB aIO 

WheeJerMrsLD o26 



WhcelerPH&wf nIO 

WliileEFiCoD] s5 
VVliiteFAlCoDl 
WhitelJAtCol/] 

WhiteMattieG o25 

VVhitt-onKichard ol 

WUcoxJ a30 
WUcossoiiES [CoD] s5 

WiJlardJVIrsRG e2 
Wil8onTF[.€orCoD] s5 

BOWAYTON. 

BellCW-EmilyB o25 

BryanGeoW o» 

CookOliver je28 

DibbleEmmaS olO 

DlbbleLizzieC o3 

" RobbieB " 

HiltonJohn je9 

HortonLC-Cora o3 

HoytPhebeF n8 

HoytWm s6 

HiibbCA o20 
LoundesEdwiaW 
Lo\\iidesEd\vardW 

LowndesFrdkH sll 

LowndesLizzie o20 

Pre.-tonSarahE oil 

RaymondDL Ml5 

RaymondJacobB o20 

RileEP o23 

StevensWml ol7 

" Hannah " 

Streett-rJH o9 

TayiorHB-IdaV o25 

ThomesArn n8 

ThomesEphraim oSO 

TristramLibbie o9 

BEDDIXG. 

A"bbottTM-FF ol7 

BanksBenjF s21 

" ES-JenuieE '* 

BanksJefse o4 

Bou^htonBS&wf sl3 

•' MissL-Mattie " 

BronsonWm n9 

BnrrMrsJA ol7 
ColeLtFrcd'k[CoA] s5 
CrofutWE 

DenisonWmT 8l9 
" MrsMA 

EdiuondStebbieS s29 

EdmondWM fil2 

Foi^terHarriett «8 

FosterEP 80 

GorhamSarahE el4 

GrayChasS 8l5 

IlefrickWillie e23 

HillAB ol7 

IlillMaggjeH s22 

H'lIlWH s6 

HillMrsWmH 827 

IlillGS s5 
JohneonMissHattie e8 

KingCliasL o4 

LawFreddieH s25 

LawSridneyG&wf e21 
" KeUieM 

LyonJennieA ol7 

Me€kerJosH&wf o2() 

MerchantChas s20 

MilJerPeterH of 

OsbomHenryS 0I8 

Oslx)rneSam''lB sl2 
" MaryL 

PerryAndrewS ol7 

PlattOrin je9 

PorterChaa ©10 



EcadMrsBB s281 

" Carrie '" 

ReadVVS Jy6 

SaiifordMissAL a14 

SanlbrdChas o23 
SauibrdMrsDaniel o4 

" JuliaB-Htlt'iiE " 

SanlbrdDSaminis o4 

SanfordPrancisA sl9 

HanfordJR o24 

SaiifordJVlrsJnoS ol 

SanfordLillie o3 

SanfordMaryA s29 

SanfordMD si 2 
" F'aniiieM 

SanfordThos-TP ol7 

SeUeckPoUy s21 

ShawEdwP-HS *'19 

SherwoodSam'lD a9 

|SullivaiiJnoM o3 

ISniithMLucinda s7 
" EMaria-Joseph 
" MatildaE 

SquireMrsJM e27 

ThomasM s21 

ToddChasB a24 

BIDGEFIELD. 

AdampComeliaC Je6 
" C-MaryW 

AmblerGussie N8 

BarlowSamuelJ je9 

BarhitePhilipL k3 

BarhiteWC a30 

BatesAT n1 

BeersMaryE o20 

BeersWW o3 

BeuedictMrsSeth n1 
BichopRe vDD& wf ol 4 

Bought onGeoru;e n3 

CorbettMichael aS 

CouchEJ&wf ol4 
CouchSimon Je9o30 

EnrightJohn a26 

FayerweatherFM ol3 

GageDSmith 821 

GilbertAbner o23 

GilbertWmA a30 

GnjmaiiGeoBjr n8 

llawleyMP ;ol3 

HtrbertJennieE o5 

HolmesJnoF&wf " 

HoytEbenezerA n3 

HoytEG ol9 

HoytEK n2 

HoytJasE 828 

HuntMrpFrankR Jy21 

" Fannie W " 

Hur-'tNK o25 

HiirlbuttAGH o30 

HurlbuttJulia a24 

" Paustiua *' 

IngersollSaml o5 

" CarrieM " 

JonesEbenezer i»9 

KeelerCA a30 

KeelerGeo n3 

KeelerJS s20 
" RW 

KoelerRR&wf oil 

KcndallRobtR 68 

LoeLHenrietta e6 

LockwoodJM o3 

JuliaM " 

MainHerbertP s29 

MeadHenry jy5 

MeadJamepW Jy26 

MeadMH-JK a22 

MeadEB jy22 



MerwinJB 


629 


MilJerSLizzie 


a4 


MiilpJP&wf 


el3 


Nat-hJD-SarahJ 


jyS6 


JSMcholt^CA 


je£9 


Ncrii^BD 


s22 


NorthropChapA 


jy:^! 


North ropCliasB 


jy6 


KorthmpEG 


tii 


JsorlhropEW 


jy22 


NorthropLinnsO 


k3 


NorthropOrvilleH oSl 


OhnsteadJonas 


gl9 


PaddockAT 


s22 


" EmmaJ 


'• 


RockwellFA 


86 


EockwellJW 


o26 


EowanFrances 


k8 


ScotlHB 


821 


ScottHiramK 


819 


ScottJas-W 


5j:J0 


ScottMrsLauraA 


ol9 


" Laiu-aB 


'* 


ScottMrsSA 


031 


SeymouiLC 


019 


SeymourEufupH 


ol4 


t'eymourWniO 


017 


SholeeDSmith 


a24 


SmithEX 


" 


" NettieM 


" 


SmithES 


oao 


SmithEmmaF 


jy24 


SmithFO 


o30 


" Herbert 




StnitJiLewipE 


021 


SniithSam'lM 


s6 


SmithSylvester 


s5 


Sproullli?aacD 


jy24 


StJohnSamlS 


031 


StanimL 


o2 


StudwellRichard 


o21 


StudwelUVirsE 


06 


" Mary J 


" 


TaylorJerome 


o24 


ToddSO 


.7629 


TrowbridgeHelenE Al 


" AugustaE 


" 


ValdenChaFH 


A3 


WalshAnnieE 


KlO 


" Marj'M 


'• 


WhiteThosC 


" 


SHERHAN. 




BamesAlbert&wf ol3 


BarnesGeoA 


86 


BriggsAbm 


s7 


BriggsAnnEliza 


" 


DurgyGeo 


oil 


DurgyJay 


o31 


FerrieBenj 


jy24 


GelstonJaneA 


o25 


GiddingDB 


819 


HungerlbrdEmilieB s7 


HungerlbrdJaj'&wfslO 


HungerfordLB Je6s27 


JoyceL&wf 


sl9 


JoyceWmH 


87 


LeachChapI 


oil 


MalloryChasA 




MalloryDanielB 


je9 


NorthropJO 


025 


" Paulina 


" 


OsbomDavidH 


o31 


PaceAW 


o24 


PeckElizL 


s7 


PickettChasW 




PickettJM 


" 


SherwoodHenry 


jyi 


WakemanHamet 


DIM 



302 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



WakemanJuliaM o26!CanrIeeJA 



" JosephineR 
WoodruffJNwf&duoia 
WoolseyAlice a21 






jyl4 



CaryDB&wf 
'• HelenW 
Carey Ed wB 
CarroIlJE a16 

CttrterEdw'dBLsl6o20 
CarteiGalenA&wf sl6 
" GalenAjr 
jySjCarterHZ n1 

jyao Chase Ada jy28 

ChildMrsCG je22 

" KateG-AliceG 
ClappWraHE 
ClarkAndrew 
ClaikChasL 
ClarkGeoE 



STAMFORD. 

AdaintsNath'lE 

AdamsWD 

AikeiiCatherine 

AUenPK 

AllenGeoII 

AlleiiLilian 

•' Miuette 

Andei-son.IM&wf a30 

AnioldAClSerCoC] s5 

Avery BenjB o4 

AyresAP-AL-CL sdjCIoseLewisM 

AyresDrChauncey n2 •' AnnaM 

" JuliaA-LizzieW " 

AvresJN&wf s6 

Ayre#SLP[USN] n2 

'• MrsAS-Carrie " 

" Percival-Sammie " 



BaileyMrsJohn 

BakerGeo 

Ballard FA 

BallirdFrankn 

BallardMasonE 

BallardWmM 

BanksDaiiiel 

BanlwellAW 

BarlowJVV 

BaniesSarahM 

BainettOR 

Barl'lotnewEmilyL o5 

BatesMrsBP o2 

BatesFred'k&wf 84 

BeachMary-Lottiejy28 



n4 

s22 

s8 
Al8 

Al6 

o4 

Al6 

s6 

s9 

019 



BealsMi-sAP 

BealsEinmaW 

BeklenSW 

BellAJ-MLouise 

Bell Mrs AJ 

BenedictA 

BerrienMI 

BettsLewisH 

BettsWniG 

BidwellGW 

BillHenry 

BillardJt&son 

BirchDrGW&wf 

BishopMrsEmma 



o23 

sl6 
sl5 
o3 
o24 
s25 
jy20 
017 
Al2 

8lt> 

o20 

jy7 

n9 



BishopMrsHannaholO 

BlakeCE[CorCoCl s5 

Bo\venTE[CorCoC] " 

BowenWA 

BoydSarahB 

BraiidonJH 

BrownCatherine 

BrownChasH 

BrownCW 

BrownEddieF 

BrownGeoW 

BrownMS 

BrownPH 

BrovvnPHjr 

BrownSninnelD 

Brown WmT 



oil 

a9 
n9 
014 
n9 

Al7 

ol4 
Nl 

s4 
ol2 

o4 

s4 



BnisiZcrhofCarrie jyl9 

BurtHciiryO n8 

BriishWmE g5 

BuckleyJM«fcwf ofi 

" Monroe " 

BuntenRobt 

BurrAS 

ButlerMrsJK 

CalerChester 

CalerJas&wf-M 

CallenderRW 



sl9 



ComstockEvaL 

ComutockDC 

ComstockMrsDC 

" KitlieM 

ConklinWC 

ConneryMrsLH 

CouneryTA 

CookSS-NettieL 

CookeFrankj 

CookeWmC 

ConleyWE 

CrabbeGeoW 

CraigieJ Agues 

CrippeiiER 

CummingThos 

CumrainsfWA 

DadeGedT&wf 

DaiiielJamesJ 

Daniel Mary 

DanielWmP 

DanielMrsWm 

DannJnoP 

Da8kamPlorenccEA24 

DaskaniHSawyer sll 

DaskamJasW m22a7 

DaskamMaryJ a1 

DaskamM[CorCoC] s5 

DavenportAB-WE je8 

DavenportEmilyC o27 

DavenportGeorgie s6 

DavenportJasB 8l9 

I)avenportJno&wjel4 

DavenportMB o27 

DavcnportMreTjr sl8 

" Miss&MissH " 

DavenportTjr s^6 

DavenportWB a29 

DavenportWm&wfolO 

DavenportWW jel4 

DavisJWalter a8 

DavisSW el9 

DeanEmilvC n2 

DeanGeoW 

DeCainpA[CorCoC] sS 

DeckerAdaP s7 

Decker Jnojr&wf 

" MlnnieE 

DewdneyMK 

DewingMaryB 

DibbleWH 

DickensonMiss 

DickieCSquire 

DiehlE 

Dixon AC-Jofiie 

Dodge.ISmithjr 

" MrsMarvR 

olfi DodtreMrsJSjr 

ol8 " Julia 

Nl iDolsenCB 

n8 DusinberrePR 

Jy3 ElderW 



s6 
jyl9 

NlO 

n9 
04 

82S 

o24 
Jyl7 

a29 

s4 
025 

s4l 



EnglandBW a16 

EvansSam'lS-SSjr o31 
FaucettGR [C rCoC] 95 
FaulknerHerbertWA4 
" MrsJW 

Fergui?onJnoD-EDs27 
PerrisHenryJ a4 

FerrisMrsHem-yL n8 
FerrieNB&wf 
FessendenOG-SG a15 
Fe88endenSam''lC Je3 
FiuchHStanley jytJ 
FitzgeraldAnth'ny jy3 
FlemingJessie jyl9 
FontaneBelle 
FosterEdwH 
FoxAdelaideF 
FoxBellaM 
" Gertrudel 
FoxGeo&wf 
FrancisMies 
FrenchAH&wf 
FuUerHL-JJ 
GayE 

GaylorCha8&wf 
GaylorMrsGraceG sl5 
GerriatyM a1« 

GiffordGeo o4 

GillespieMrsEm'a a17 
" EmmaTW 
GillespieRH-Ed 
GillespieWmW 
GinderJos-JF 
GlendiiiingGB 
GlendiiiijigGW&wo2t) 
" Laura " 

GlendiningWmK a29 
GoIdyHA-SN m18 
GorharaHenry s14n8 
GreeneET&wf o5 
GreenwoodJohn oil 
GreenwoodWm 
GreyFannie 
GriswoldLD 

MrsDr 
GuernseyMrsF 

Hannah-Emma " 
GnernsevFrankJ o24 
HaffMaryC jyll 

HansonMrsJH jyl4 
HarrisonN a25 

HaslaniThos&wf o6 

Lewis " 

HathewayCnrtisK e20 



Al6 
A2fl 



o27 
oI2 
si 

012 



HawleySilasJ 

HayFrankE 

HendrieMrsJB 

Willie 
HendrieBelle 
HendrieChas-Carrie 
HermannAugust a18 

Christine " 

HermesHenryjr 
HolmesJA 

MissJuliaG 

MissLeilaH 
HolmesJohnA 
HolmesMr8j-Einilyo4 
HoltWWjr a31 

HolIyChasF a22 

HollyGeoT o31 

Holly S oil 

HortonAM[C'rCoC] s5 
HortonE 
HortonTM 
" Nimrod 
HoytAlfred 
HoytAnnaA 
HoytGH&wf 



813 



027 



Al 



a8 
jelt) 

a9 
s25 

88 

jel3 

ol8 



HoytHarvey&wf o29 
HoytHattie ol3 

HoytJA-FEmily sl3 
•' Josephine-WmH " 
HoytMrsJasH jel4 
HoytMrsJH-MissF o4 
HoytMaryC 
HoytMLouise 
" LibbieS 
HoytNoahW 
Hoyt01ivei-2d 
HoytTR 
HoytTW 
HoytWC-CW 
'• CarrieA-BctseyW '■' 
Hul)bardGM&wf s22 
'' Emily-Sallie " 
Hubbard JnoW&wfA4 
HurlbuttFannieT a16 
HurlbuttLR-LRjr o6 
" Harry ' " 

HurlbuttWP 88 

HurlbuttWS AlO 

IngrahamHC&wf o27 
InsleeGage 820 

" CatherineH " 

IrvingMaryL 822 

JacksonMrsME o23 
WmBTjr-WmH 



JamesGeoB a24 

JamesJulieE oil 

JermanJasH n2 

JessupJohnD o5 

JimmersonHF n6 
lohnsChas 8l9 

JonesAD-CarrieE n9 

JouesMrsAT oH 

" AnnieC " 

JonesCD 

Joneses 
lonesFM 

JoneslElmcr 
lonesWmH 

JnddWH«fewf 

JudsonHarrietN 

JuneElbert 
MaryH 

KeithGeoH 

KeithWaylandF&w s4 

Kello^gLouiseL ol2 

KelsoLena 

KendallMrsRR 

KetchamMreJos 
Katie 

KingHU 

KingnianFrank 

KirkChasA 

KirtlandHA s6 

KnappJH[SerCoC] s5 

KnappNellie 

KnappWmB 

KnappWmE 
WarrenE 

KnoxJohnK 

LaheyEdward 

LaurenceEB 

LeeEW 

LeedsFrancisR 

LeedsMissJ 

LeedsMaryG 

LeedsTheo 

LenahanKate 

LeonardMrsGB 
a2 LeverCaptPB[CoC] 86 
s5 LittleMrsMRC o20 
" j" MissAER " 

NfllLockwoodAD je29ol9 
ol 1 i LockwoodBetseyA n4 
jyl2 LockwooclBH All 



Je30 
s27 
o20 

n8 
s29 

jyl2 

a9 

n2 

s27 



Jyl9 

s8 

ol3 

jy20 

o31 

Al« 



a24 

o4 

Jyl4 
s26 
012 
031 
a26 

o9 
026 
s22 

o6 
o18 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITOES FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



303 



LockwoodChasC 


a29 


LockwooflEB 


815 


" MaryL 


" 


LockwoodEmily 


o5 


" Jenuette 


" 


LockwoodMrsP 


ol8 


" Maria 


" 


LockwoodHeriryje6N3 


Lock\vo()d3IrsHn 


yN3 


LockwoodJE 


Nl 


Lock\voodJasL&wfo7 


LockwoodJnoW 


n3 


LockwoodMiltonR s5 


Lockwood Rebecca n2 


LockwoodRobtH 


a2> 


LockwoodSain'l 


ol2 


LockwoodMrsSE 


olO 


" MlsgesWandL 


" 


" MasterE 


" 


LockwoodWmA 


s22 


" Emma 


" 


LockwoodMrsWR a29 


LounsburyCU 


o30 


" AniiieP-Mary 


" 


LoundsburyMissHE 


LouusburyJauieE 


ol2 


LounsburyT 


o31 


LumBD 


Nl 


LynchAlbert 
MackChsFA 


o4 


Al8 


MardenFA 


Je9 


MartinChasH 


o26 


MartinLibbie 


n9 


MasonJosephK 


s28 


McClarenJas 


s28 


McCoy-James 


o4 


McGlassonLizzie 


n9 


McKeazieAlex 


03 


MeadN-Lizzie 


jel 


MeekerGeoH 


820 


MerrittMP 


jel6 


" MariaS 


" 


MessengerMreGW o31 


MessengerTHH 


o3 


MeyerJ&wf 


n9 


MillerAnton 


s8 


MillerCO&wf 


sl3 


MillerCF 


oil 


" AmeliaG 


" 


MillerCH 


N6 


MillerC 


n2 


" Susan-Ida 


" 


MillerF-HelenA 


05 


" AnnieE-JasH 


" 


" MaryE 


" 


MiuorChasW 


oO 


MinorEmily 


jyio 


MinorWmT 


s6 


MitchellJameBP 


o4 


MitchellWU 


s5 


[CorCoC] 




MorganMrsMary 


s7 


MorrisEF&wf 


sfi 


MorriBFE&wf 


so 


MortzJno 


Al6 


MosherBP 




MurdoonfhTda 


n2 


MurrayAndrew 


n6 


MusserWH 


s28 


NelsonJnoC 


Al5 


NesbittLouiseD 


n7 


NicholsChasE 


a30 


NicholsJasH 


sl9 


" MJ-WmV 


" 


NicholsManlyP 


jyio 


NyeSH&wf 


oil 


CConnorJC 


o27 


" Blanche-JWM 


" 


«PM 


" 



PalmerCE s25 
PalmerEE[SerCoC] s5 

PalmerO 820 

PalmerWC o3 

ParkerChasW s5 

PayneET&wf 8l3 

PeckEJ o4 

PeckLewisP o26 

PeckSam'lW o24 

PeckWmH s6 
PerryColAC[USA] ol6 

PhilipsAlice o7 

PhillipsCEH 629 

PhillippKflte o4 

PittRobt Al 

PrendergastW b6 

PriceSamuel Jy5 

PriceWM-JB o2G 

PriceWm jelO 

MrsDC 

ProctoiG sl5 
ProvostCha''ncyAWO10 

ProvostNorman eS 

ProvostPaulineC s21 

EUaJ 

QuintardCR o20 

liamsevMaryA o31 

RappWN jy28 

ReddingGeoH o27 

ReedEmily ol7 

ReedPannieE ol8 

ReedJBjr sl3 

ReedM MlO 

ReedMinnieE 621 

ReedMA 822 

ReedStephenE Bl4 

ReynoldsJulia 621 

RickardRich'dD a30 

RikerEW a26 

EikerPW n7 

RikerGeoK o26 

RikerHV-MM o23 

RitchCynthiaW Jy28 

RitchThosG sl2 
'• MissesSL-CW 

" MR-AM 

RitchWH&wf ol3 

RitchWR&wf ol8 
" MaryE 
RockwellMissER o26 
RohnChr 

RolphHDjr o20 

RowaiiMiseMM s9 

RowlandJH ol7 

RowlandSarahA ol8 

SackettCS&wf o2 

SackettJL&wf o9 

" PredH " 

SackettJW&wf b21 

SaxeGG&wf ol9 
" HerbertK 
" MarionP 

SaxeGeoG&wf je8 
" GeoG.ir 

Schadcjno Al6 

ScoficklAP sO 

ScofieldAlfredH a29 

ScofleklAlfredL sl8 

ScofieldChasH a30 

ScofleklDL NlO 
ScofleldEL 

ScofieklEdwinN ol2 
" ChasM 

ScofieldPanny s27 

ScofieklGE ell 

ScofieklHenryC o5 

ScofieklJasP o25 

ScofieldMrsJno 821 
ScofleldJnoA-WT b12 



ScoflcldJnoR&wf n9 
ScofieldLotticH " 
ScofieldR o26 

" HarrietE " 

ScotieldSarahE olO 
ScofleldSarahP n2 
ScofieldSL ol2 

ScofieldSN n4 

" Rachel-ElizaA " 
" MaryF-EdwP " 
ScofieidWm 84 

ScofieldWW&wf a29 
Searlesira o4 

SeelyA&wf o24 

LibbieL 
SeelyChasS o30 

SeelyKateR ol7 

SelleckPhebe s5 

SheaKate All 

ShermauGeoH a17 
ShermanJA 
SibleyAW Al6 

SillimanMrsSCjr s4 
SinclairPred s29 

SkeldingFM Jel6 

MrsWP 
SkeldingllT&wf Nl 
" Beseie-Madge 
'• Fied'kH 

SkiddyWmH Je9 

SlaterMrsChas 

Amanda 
SlaterCM o6 

SmithArchieH 86 

SmithAE Jy20 

SmithMrsChaeL ol2 
SmithED je29 

[USCadets] 
SmithPG-CE a30 
SmithG jy6 

SmithGeoA ol6 

SmithGeoG&wf s6 
" MrsGeoW 
SmithHenryjr a15 
SmitbJennie 86 

SmithMrsNJ s2 

SmithStephenH&wfs6 
SmithMrsTruman je6 
SmithTW ol2 

SmithWG Nl 

SmithTheoP 6l2 

" GeoM-MrsAddieM 
SmithWM sl6 

SmythJoseph a12 

SnellingJG&wf o6 
" AliceL-HarryG 
SpauldingG n8 

SpauldingRosalieBo26 
SquireBelle-Lewi8Lo4 
" MrsHN-HarryN " 
" LizzieA ' 

SUohnJ&wf 820 

StJohnWmH o5 

StaplesLouieL a4 

StaplesSO c6 

StarkAR ol9 

StarkAnnieS ol2 

StarkWA o7 

StevensAH jylO 

Steven sPranklinD a22 
SteveusStiles ol6 

StevensS jyl3 

StevensonEmmaR n6 
StewartJasJ[CoC] s5 
Stock wellHC a16 

StrobridgeWC n8 

" Elouise-HelenL 
StrobridgeWCjr 8ll 
Strykeritaymond Jeti 



StudwellAC[CoC] s5 
StudwellDW a30 

Stud\venLtEL[CoC]s4 
StndwellWW s6 

[LtCoC] 
SummerfleldTtCoC]s5 
Tafl'Hcury ol8 

TaflPA A>,0 

TallniadgeWH oH 
KatieJ " 

TaylorEmmaG s21 
ThompsonSam'lP 68 
ThonieAT b16 

ToddJnoE n9 

TraceyJL o30 

TreadvvellMC 829 

TrowbridgeM'ryR s21 
Trowbridg«DrWH s28 
TurkiiigtonAR a30 
Turk'tonEmmaA o31 
TurkingtonMrsJnoN9 
" Mit^sJof^ie " 

UmplebyMinnieE a18 
VailCE Al6 

VailRPH 819 

VauNameC ol3 

" MLouise " 

VanSickliuEC 85 

VanSlykeES oil 

WaiteEM o21 

WaiteLamieA o21 
WakemanLH jy28 
WakemanSE a25 

WalesMrsDT ol2 

WaltonChasE a25 

" GeoB-WH 
WardwellCS-JP Jy31 
WardwellFannieE olO 
Wardwelllsaac o9 
" IdaL 

WareSam'l A26 

WaringJasH Jyl4 

WaringJB Ml7 

WaringJLee ol6 

WamerGraceE oSO 
" ThoeW-Fi-ankL " 
WarnerJasC o3 

WarrenGeoL n9 

WarrenJnoJ&wf Jyl4 
" HenryJ-Nellie " 
WaterburyChasP o30 
WaterburyChasH sl8 
WaterbiiryD'\id&wN6 
" SarahM-LottieA " 
WaterbiiryEmilyS o26 
WaterbnryGH s9 

" MJennie " 

WaterburyGL e5 

[SergtCoq 
Waterl)uryJasT olO 
WaterbuiyMarcus 8l4 
Waterl)uryS 85 

[SergtCoC] 
WaterburyWN sl3 
WaterburyWmP 86 
WaterburyWH o25 
" MissMIda " 

WaughDwight 822 
WebbMissD 8l9 

WebbEA p5 

W eedA r n & wf-WB826 
WeedMrsCA 621 

" Jenniel " 

WeedEdgarP&wf olO 
" Hattie-ESjr-Julia" 
WeedP'rank 8l9 

WeedH 84 

Weedlmogene a18 
WeedJasA s29 



304 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



WeedME&wf 06 CurtisLouise a31 


RichardeJasT a2 BrinsmadeL&w 


sl4 


" CoroeliaM " CurtisKannie ol7 


'■ MrsAN-Mi88LN " Bi-insmadeWuiH 


a9 


WeedMH " " Carrie 


RiddleChas-Carrie 0I6 BootbCE 


Nl 


WeedTlmddeasS Jyl3 CurtitiOkjoS Jy21 


Rub8ellRU&wf a15 


BoothlsaacE&wf 


i?20 


WestDuB'C jyl4 CurlisMrsHattieJ 


SaudsSBM o24 


BrownTbomas.! 


s5 


WheelorFG-FGjr N9iCurti8i\IJ[SerCoIv.] sB 


ScotieklCE 87 


BrushRevAP&wf 


s25 


"• CatlieriueK " 


CurtiijMrtKG a12 


ScolieldJ [SerCoK] ?« 


HurrLouiee 


o«» 


" Kendrick " 


CurtitSA s2 


ScofieldJamer^W sS 


Biuiough8SH 
BiutoiiEliP 


a8 


" Leavenworth " 


Curti!?sCB Je9l ScribnerEujieueG jy24 


jy28 


" Kittv 


Curti!*8EO-FrankRs22 


SeeleyNJ o;i7 


BurtonOB 


Al 


Wheelertl a26 


" RichardY 


SniitbJE 828 


ClarkAJ 


o24 


WhitneySarahH s5 


CurtissFanny sl4 


SniithWatsonll&wlNl 


CiirtisMrsEP 


0.0 


WightMr Nancy s7 


CurtissHowardJ si 


SmitbWiUA m17 


•' Belle 


'• 


WiicoxAllieB a7 


" ClaraA " 


SpallEJ [CorCoK] s5 


DrewAmeliaL 


sl4 


" ChasH 


DornianMrsAlice o24 


SpallGeoII&wf sl3 


DimningLyman 


All 


WllcoxGBiick'hamsl4 


DufonrJosephW a30 


SpenccrNel8on tj 


FaircliiklCN 


je9 


WilkinsHR n9 


" SarahA 


StaggCE [CorCoK] s<) 


GregorySam'lJ 


ol7 


WilliamsMrsA 88 


DunbarJaneS 0I8 


StaggHP-.JH s5 


IladleyGF 


Jc2 


WilliarasAW 


EdwardsGrace n1 


StaggMrsJII 01 U 


llallClarissa 


0I2 


WilliainsJasR&wf 06 EdvvardsNovesE s5 


StaggJessieL je7 


HallPaiiliue 


013 


Wilt'ouAAdelia aIO EdwardsRohtL all 


StaggLizzie s5 


IlawleyJC 


s21 


WilsdiiJasjr s-21 EmertfonSamuelF 8l9 


StaggWmA " 


liillMrsDrS 


Jcl3 


WoodburyVVn EmersonWB n1 


SterlingJohnW o31 


HinmanDB 


s£0 


WoodlnuyMrsWH a5 EverleCarrie o30 


SterlingMrsJnoWje22 


MallettLN 


oil 


" WHjr " FairchildJuliaM 0I8 


" Cordelia 


NicliolsChasBifcwfoll 


WoodwardValinaJ a1 FairchiUlMC s28 


StrattonMaggieE jelO 


NidiolsCM 


n2 


Wool^^cySusauP jyT'FairchildSVV jyb" 


TeeleCC mIO 


NicboIsET 


a9 


" SusieF " FitchFrankS s<12 


ThompsoiiFrank a24 


NicholsHL 


Nl 


WrightChasD sSFitzj^erald Annie a35 


ThompsonWM 


PeetWS 


AlO 


„,^^. ^„^w^r^ GedncyKE aT 


Tomlin8onMrsGM o3 


PkimbAlmonE 


n2 


STRATFORD. GilbertMrsChas s29 


TuckerCornelia Je7 


PlumbEIliottB 


S14 


AbbottRevAVR a23 GlinesHorace sl4 


Tucker.IennieC Nl 


PliimbVVillardS 


s5 


AllenGH[(V)rCoK] 66 GrayCaptA CoK] s6 


TunierFH o30 


Radelifl'eChasE 


0I8 


AndrewsNc'llieB s28 GrayMrsLydiaA o2C 


" MaryE 


ReeilCS 




Barrymoi-eMrsWmA24|" Robbie " 


TumerGeoH " 


KeyiioldsSS 


96 


BeachFC&wf s29 HubbellChasE Nl 


TurnevLizzieS s7 


SeeleyldaL 


s27 


BeardsleyElmer 8ll|JuddAB(je9)&wf ol7 


UflordlleuryJ jeS 


SlierwoodRH 


.Nl 


BeanlKleyMij'sR oniJuddAL jy20 


VaillLB a24 


SterlingCS-WB 


s5 


BeersHenrjC s5 JiidtionLewisF s6 


WakeleeBessie sl4 


SterlingEmiiyL 


n2 


BenhamWilbiirG sll|KeynerPhilip s5 


WatersR oHl 


SterlingGL 


Al6 


BillingsJBLCoK] s5 LafieldFrankH&wfo2T 


Well^Chas . olO 


SturdevamSE 


je21 


Birdseyll o4 Lewis<EllaC si 


WellsGeoH s. 


StiirdevautS 


jel2 


BlakemanJH oSOiLewisMrsGeo a28 


WellsNB ol(! 


TaitVVm-FannyH 


sl4 


" AnsonH " iLewisMrsHW Al2 WheelcrEIiz s8 


TurneyJenuicF 


012 


BlakeiiianCD oSl 


•' MarionE " j" WillieS 


TurueyJIrsMA 


013 


BlakemanFW 0I2I 


LevvisSamuelC o25, WheelerEllen " 


TunieyWmH 


sW 


BlakemanFE-AII A2:i 


LinsleyElizL n3, WheelerSarahS Jel6 
LobdellJames A23 WhitingEzra o4 


WardDH 


93 


BlakemauMyraC Jyl2 


WhaleyEben&wf 


s20 


" BC 


" GussieO " " Mary A " 


WheelerMO&wf 


018 


BlakesleeLtHM 84 


LobdellJB " WilcoxeonA n2 


WESTOX. 




[CoK] 


LobdellRebeccaN a26| Wilcox8'nLtC[CoK]s4 




BoothAvisS a30 


LockwoodAddieL " WilcoxsonMaryJ si 


Andrews JosR&wf sl9 


BoothCF[CorCoK] sO 


LockwoodAlidaB aS4 " AlidaM-ChasO " 


BrowningCH 


s28 


BooihH[ScrCoK] s5 


LoomisMaryD WJlcoxsonNF s6 


ColeyDLjr 


012 


B )Oth.Teiiuette o3 


MiUerWillafdM sl2 [CorCoK] 


ColevFannieH 


o3 


B )OthLW 0I6 


MooreCS o27|WilcoxPonW o23 


" EllaC 


" 


BoothNB n8 


MorehouseE s6 


" SC-JC-Tina 


ColeyKatieE 




BoothWuiA so 


[CorCoK] 
MorehouBcManeL n3 


WilliamsAddieE s9 


" JiiliaD-MLouise 


BootlieCB je23 


" Carrie " 


Ferris GT 


nK) 


" MisfHattieDoF •' 


NashMrsWilliam 


YoungsCL 88 


FitchEbenezer 


06 


BoothcStepheuS s7 


OlmsteadWF jy6 


YoungsIzzieL Jy6 


" Ephraim 


'^ 


Botsfoi-dMrsEN o30 


OrrJohnG a24 


TRUMBULL. 


GerharfPhilip 


oil 


BrooksCB n8 


Palm erST-Hatti eE a29 


GodfreyJS 


027 


Brook-MrsCB oil 


ParkJJ[CorCoK] sO' AyreRichard jy20 


JarviBAS 


s6 


CatlinMr;;LS a28 


Patters'nSA-EllaMs26 BeachJII-EKL o3 


[Com'saryGenCNG] 


Clarke [CorCoK] s6 


PeckHT m25 BeardslyEM&wf oil 


JohnsonNathauB 


o27 


CohenSamuel s7 


PeckCarrieL sl4 BeardslevMiles 9l6o26 


OsbornGT 


035 


CookTW-Jiilia n2 


PeckJosH a31 BeardsleySam'lG je9 


OnterbridgeChasE 


CosierB\V[CorCoK]s5 


PeckLL oil BeardslcyMreSG ol7 


SalterOP 


n8 


CurtisAlbertB&wf s29 PeckWm olO " AliceM 


SanfordEmmaE 


" 


CurtisAlbertinaC slSlPlantHenryT a4 BeersFHelena " 


SmitbEdwin 


o31 


CuitisAsaS je30, PlattFC jy 20 " Sarah E 


SmithWmB 


s21 


" MrsMary " 


PerryFredF sll BeersLeGrandG o9 " JaneA-FannieB " 


" MiseAdelaide " 


Power8EA[SerCoK]s5 BeersRE ol7 Stnrges.Tap&wf 


025 


CurtipBelle All 


RhoadesFO-DL a24 Brinsmade.TD n1 SturgesW-Della 


s21 


CurtisEmma a30 


EhoadesSadieE b6 


BrinsmadeMrsJD ol6 


WendlandPhilip 


Jd7 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



305 



sa:; 



o30 



Bradlej'AjjnesA o2 

BradlByAi-ttuirL si! 

Bradley EJwai'dL Al; 

BradleyLiilieb' o2' 

BradleyLowisB oH 

'• HcurieLta " 

BrearSaraiiJ n: 

BiinisJaslI oli 

'• H:iiiniiP-AddieE " 

Biiri-AU'cii-nou T o2' 

BiirrPA. 

BiirrLibbie-Belle 

B-UTW-nH 

B in-WHir 

'• Mi<sEG 

BirrWL, 

CarverCarrieW 

CarverP 

Chapman Esther 

ChapmanLiuraEA o5 

ColeyAunaB-UB o25 

ColeyCarrieE 

ColevHM 

ColevMaryE 

CooliFII 

CraftDjra 

Cra'tWiuB 

DentnjadEIenry 

DowiiesClarUsaJ 

Elw lodEverettC 

ElwoodGjoE 

EhvoodMaryC 

ElwoodW.nP 

Fishei-Fred'k 

GorhamEliza 

" Caroline 

GorhaniEA 



Harris AnnieW 
HarrisMrsGeoL 
HarrisWB 
HedenbersrPB 



TVESTPORT. MorehouseMaryE o24 
NasliEdwardH&wf 06 

Adelaide-Lloyd " 

Na:<liSarah o26 

OgdeiiMrsHA o27 

PageDrltCM&wf 06 

Peters KevAB Ml 

PeffersJasH u2 

PeffersJasP n9 

RaymondFM o25 

liaymondKateC o25 

RelyeaAlbert ol9 

RelycaBJ b15 

" Lissie-Gracie " 

" Mary " 

RileyMrsMaryF p8 

RogersFaimieS o24 

Roger- WS o24 

Ro'wlandWmA el7 

SandersonJos e26 

" Arininella " 
" BellcW-RobtHW " 

SahnonDA&wf o24 

olO SaxtonSR a21 

06 Sher\vood.\ Jy22 

s36 SherwoodCB&wf o24 

Je2t SherwoodM oil 

a3o " Djr " 

Jyl9 SherwoodDW o24 

jelO SherwoodFrancis o26 

sl3 SherwoodllE olO 
SherwoodllenryN o26 

o35 SnerwoodJS o30 

o26 SherwoodMaryC olO 

o2> SherwoodSam'l o26 

AlO SherwoodSilasB s5 

o20:SmithNellieR 06 

" Staples!! a21 
o31|StaplesMaryE 
GorhamFrancesAjy34 StaplesWC a19o19 

G.^rhamGB o35,StebbiusWmH o24 

" MLoiii'ja-EddieW " 1 StephensouW n9 

GrappChas o24 StuartWmC&wf je22 

GrayCarrieL k3 SturgesGeo ol2 

HanfordCE&wf o9,TaylorAW s5 

0I8 TaylorCH&wf je21 

n4 TaylorEW&wf o26 

0I2 TaylorTheodore n9 

jy4 TaylorTillie o5 

HempsteallAlfred o20 ToqiietBH&son o23 

HillMrsAR s6 TylerLeonora n2 

" JW-J'ilia " IWakemanChaa b27 

HabbellJamesE 814" ArettaM " 

" AmeliaA " |WakemanHB o3 

HuUEstelleM e22 WakemanJosepU n2 

HnllHarry-Susaa oil WakemanRul'us s6 

HallMaryB n2 WakemanSB a7 

HiillMrsWmC jyl4 WakemaiiMrsSB s8 

" EuniceB-TalcottB" I " Jennie " 
HydeML-HE o20 WakemanTalcottBo20 

JauaceyEdC s6 WheelerHB o24 

JenningsMrsJnoH s6 WheelerMBW o27 

" MrsAustin " jWhiteJnoW n9 

Jennings Walter o3 WilliamsMrsG o27 

JenningsWmJ&w b27 WoodWmT olO 

JeaupJasR&wf o20 WoodworthBL sl9 

JonesMlnnie o25 " HC " 
JonejOscar n1 WoodworthMaryE s21 

KemperCHjr-Mary n3 WoodworthM! ol3 
KirlingWrnH n9 WrightER m29a9n9 

LathburyRevMr 0I8 WrightMrsER a9 

Laven'orthMiasMA 06 " AMallieR " 



BenedictMissLW 627 
Benjamin WuiH&wsl3 
jBennettEliG&wf " 
BenuettMrsS 
BennettWR 

LSerCoA] 
BensonEJ&wf 
BerryCC 
BetteEG&wf 
BurrMills 
CannonEttie 
CannonJno 
ChichesterHE 
ComstockFrank Jyl3 
ComstockFredH si-- 
ComstockMrsGH s2(i 
ComstockHelenE ol2 
'• Frank 

Corns tockJas aO 

ComstockMarianna o5 
ComstockSL s2h 

ComstockSam'lM NlO 



a31 
85 

a21 
Jyl2 
sl3 
olis 
s22 

si;j 

a29 



o(i 
n3 
o3 
Jy26 
a29 
S20 

olf) 
o26 
025 



LeesJasE 

LeesRobtT 

LeesThosR 

LockwoodAC 

LongMrsJH 

MaplesBW 



ol3 WrightWBurr&wf s7 
gio! WILTON. 

el6 BenedictAN e26 

s8 " LucyE " 

o27 BenedictEA 



McekerA-MaryB o30 BenedictFD 



o27 
Al4o27 



CookeCII 
Corcoran Jasjr 
DavisAaronH 
DavisJohnL 
DikermanHE 
Emery AE 
" Anhieli 
EvansJW-David 
Fitch Arthur 
GilbertB 
" FannyM 
GilbertGeoK&wf sl3 
GilbertMrsH oil 

GilbertJ o20 

GilesLHenry jel 

GodlreyJL o30 

GregoryAnnaMB oil 
'Gregory WD s2G 

iHickokMary olO 

UickokWmH&wf sl9 
!!ousmanEA m26 

HoytLouisaL a25 

HnilbuttCharlotte o4 
i" EstherJ 
HnrlbuttEH 
HurlbuttMrsJane 
HnrlbuttLewisR 
HurlbuttSam'l 
Jackson Andrew 
Jackson Elmer 
JelliffeGD&wf 
JellifleHC 
JonesAbijahM 
" NellieB 
KatzenbergHD e22 
KeelerLeGrandW s28 
KeelerRW&wf k3 
KeelerWL 
" KatieL-Samuel 
KnappC W 
KnappMrsCW 
" MissJA 
KnappJF-JuliaE 
LambertDSR 
LockwoodMrsP 
LounsberyEmma 
MeadGeoB 
MarvinSam'l&wf oil 
MerwinMirandaB s8 
MerwinSamuelJM s9 
" MrsAE-DnncanS ^ 
MillerDavidH o3 

MillerMaryC o20 

MoellerClarence o2 
MorganSE&wf 86 
MyersJC o3 

NasliGeoF 0I8 



OgdenDavidB s26 
OlrasteadElbert Jeg 
OlmsteadEW a23 

OlmsteadEmmaV a26 
OlmsteadWHeury n1 
OsborneliB ol3 

OsborneJosephine s21 
OwenAlbertF »ti 

liandleLeroyW m30 
RaymondLizzie o5 
ReynoldsHoraceS 926 
ReynoldsRuth ol3 

LA 
RileyAlfA Jy31 

SeymourJ-Eliz sl5 
SmithJessieR m29 
SmithMrsSarahE je5 
SmithRevSylvest'rs26 
VanlloovearDI! sll 
WarrenMrsMJ o4 

WatrousMissM: s27 
WhiteEstherT 06 



a31 
o4 
si 3 
a29 
oil 

a21 

87 
8l3 



oil 



025 

828 
OlO 

821 

s7 



306 



sou^^;xIR of the centennial exhibition. 



IjITOHFIEXjXD ootjktt-^. 



BARKHAMSrED. 

AlfordCliarliell ol2 

All'ordltlaA s8 

liac'luFrankM NIO 

BakerAlb't-GeoA o25 

BrovviiC'L 

BurwollAR-EJ 

ButlerFraiikM 

CauiiouCJU 

(.'aseSam'lII 

" Elleii.M^uliaE 

" D\vij;litS 

CaseFA-EmmaJ 

CookeLA 



o-i"; 






DaileyMrsLoui'eMo-J 

DeauCalistaA 

GoodwinC'arrie 

GoiiletDO-F 

HartiNIA 

llodgcJustiu 

HowdEH 

MerrellJaneC 

MeirellSheklon 

MillerK-Martin 

MooreHE 

MooreMri?Nelson 

PenuyRuthC 

ShattuckR 

SpencerFW 

StephensFrankL 

RootED 

TiffanyElIenJ 

VanvetremGeo 

WardBelle 

WardEnima 

WardSaraA 

WardWMW 

WilcoxMrsSA 

YoungDA&wf 

YoungEJ 

" Jennie-Charlie 



BETHLEHEH 

AllenHM^asE 

AllenJaniep 

AlleiiMrsJames 

BacouJosie 

BaconRW 

BirdCW-AliceE 

BlossAmauda-JM sl9 



820 
olO 
sl9 
n9 
olO 
je9 



BlossChas 

BlossNathanH 

BlossSL-MaryT 

CatlinHenry 

FoxTW 

GuernseyMaryC 

" ChasS 

GnildFideliaM 



o3 
s20 
OlO 
o9 
n9 
ol 

s20 



GnildGC-MarillaJ oil 



KassonC 

KasfonGeoM 017 

Krist^onGertrudeP s21 

Elizll 
KassonWT 
LakelloratioN 
LakeRoyalB-AC 
LaFevreMH 
MartinHenry 
AlcCorkellJohn 
MiinsonRalpli&vvfolT 
ParmeleeMrsCC oil 
ParmeleeLizzieM s20 
PeckGeoVV o3 

PeckHW-MrgJEC s26 
PercyGeoW olS 

ScottLF-Jennie 027 
SmithFlorence olO 
SmithFrances sl9 

StoneEdwI-DC A2:i 
StoneGeoO a23o17 
' MinnieS-LucyA ol7 
ThonitionEdnaC si;". 
Thomps-onDW je!t 
WatsonGeoG&wf aUI 
WoodingJonatlian sl9 

BRIDGEWATEB. 

ConditTheoM Jel5 

DoolittleJnoB&wfol2 

JessiipCH n9 

JessupWmC o20 

KeelerJasH m3U 

MeadMrsP a!> 

MallettMarcusB Je9 

MinorJL&wf Nl 

" John-GeoL-Geo 

NorthropJ 

PeckFred'kA 

■' HSophia 

Randal! EdwinC 

SanfordCH&wf 

SaufordHoraceN 

TreatClias'&wf 

TreatJnliaA 

" EinilyA 

TreatStephenP 

WeeksLymanS 

"BA 

WeeksSR 

WooeterChasM 

CANAAN. 

BradlevSM&wf 

DeanMC 

DeanMM 

HawlevMarthaE 

HuntMrsChas 

" MissMary 

Millard.TF 



jc23 CogswellGeoB ol8 BrewsterEdwardE 
DeanDwightE-MUs21:Bre\virtcrGN 
DeanFreiTkG&wf " IBrewt^terW'A 



DeanLP-SM 

Dean MA 

DeauMH 

UudleyEJ 

FerriK.TohnJ 

GaylordHC 

GilletteEdwiuA 

HallGW&wf 

HallMariaA 

HanchettGM 

HuntOliveE 

" CarrieR 

LaneMrsJS 

MaltbieCU 

MaltbieMaryA. 

MillspaughJF 

" Et^tella 

MorrifMrsC 

MoirisCR&wf 

MorriisWniS 

KandallGA 

RaiidallLiicyC 

ReedMi-.^Sidney 

SpuriEW-Ida 

ThayerLC 

TomlinsionRevJA 

TnckerTimothy 

TurnerCE-EM 

Ward Ed ward 

WardFannie 

■' .lohnnie 

WolfeHH 

" MrsHenry 



o5 
s2 
Je3 
o26 
olO 



jy5 BreiceM rr Jas A 
Je5 BiukIiLH 

87 Buckk'y Julia 

o4|C'liipniauMr8jolin a9 
ol7 " LizzieM "• 

oil ClarkFrodkF el4 

sl5 ClaikeCharlotte je5 



GuildGeoC 

GuildGeoS 

GuildLemanA 

Hayes^SamuelP 

HayesStcphen 

Hayes VV'allaceP 

HillHenryC-RD 

Humph reyJno 

Humphrey RP 

HnnterMrwWmA 

JackHonHS 

JackeonJK 

JackBonMrsH 

" SarahA 

JuddLcverettP 

JurtsonFE&wf 

KarrmanllS 



■■1h 
el9 
plfi 
ol9 
o20 

o3 
a23 

AlO 



o5 
o5 

f23 

olO 

A;iO 

n9 

Al8 
Al7 

jel5 

86 

Al9 



Sl2 



ol2 
012 



821 



PendletonMamieE a30 

palls village. 
AverillMrsJJ ol7 

BartlettChasE s21 
BartlettEstelleG n1 
BeldenJohnH B2(i 

BrintonOM-JA ol2 
BrewsterDan o7 

s20 BrewsterDora n1 

o28 BrewsterLeeD ol7 
()3 BrownGH&wf oil 
ol7 BrownMA-LucieC si 
C;anfioldNellie n1 

ol9 " CaddieA 
ol7,ChapmanAP olO 

o28|ClemansJD jeQoll 



COLEBROOK. 

AUynMrsR 

BarberEujjeneH 

BassClaraM 

BassMissNellie 

ButlerJB 

CarringtonEdvv 

•' MrsC-MissKate 

DunnellJB 

HartHattieG 

HovvellMatildaS 

LawrenceMrii;W 

"WP 

LitzbachEliz 

LooniisOP 

" OarrieE 

PcrrionsTimothy 

PhelpsCE 

PhelpsEA 

PhelpsLC 

PhelpsMary 

RockwellC 

SeymourCE 

SeyniourEP 

SeymourJohn 

ScymourMrsJohn oil 

ThompsonClem'ntoll 

'» T ,rH.oT? " 



CochianeMattieE Al9 
CocluaiieRN o24 

ConnvallEdw-MJ n2 
CurtitiLeviE Nl 

EnimonsChasP jyl5 
DeWireMargaret Je20 
n4 



FosierRuisf^ellP 

MB-FredB 

GaykirdML 

GoldAliceT 

MarthaW 

GoldC'arolineS 

CliasS-JU 

olO GoldTS 

o4 GoklMrsTS 

o2.5 GuiklHM 

62ti HallChas 

Nl Harrif^oiiGeoC AlOoll 

8l Harrit'f uMrsGeoC a16 

olO HarrifonJohiiR oil 

Nl RarrisoiiNellieC .ie20 

827 Harrif^ouSusieE e22 

Nl Harrif-ouWF&wf 

HariCW 
o4 HartMrs-EB-LC 
HartGouidW 
IlaitME 
HarlNathan 
IlartMrsN 
" FiaiiccsM 
"SophiaR-JohnM 
s8 HarlTL 
oli;HavilaiidMrpJT 
04 HubhardMisRM 
" iHurlbui'lJuliaL 
sl2 HurlburtMA 



je20 



sl4 

je20 " 
jeSO 
ol7 

Nl 



p28 
829 
o28 
823 
ol7 
jel3sl3 

813 



oil 
a23 

s8 

n3 
021 
021 
820 

o5 
ol2 

o5 



je20 

87 



a7 



LydiaR 
WheelerJS-MrsEK 88 
WhitingJennieE e& 
WoodworthLucy o4 

CORNWALL. 

AndrewsHenryS Je20 



BeersGco 

BeersIIL 

PeersMrsVC 

BlakeCS-Lizzie 

BradfordJF 



OlO 



IvesRogerL 

John St n EM 

JohnsioiiDiiiiusP 

JobnsoiiljB&wf 

Lorbtrllattie 

ManvflllraE 

McNeilVF 

Mars^hEmilyF 

MillaidMvroiiJ 



ol3 
o24 
jyO 

81 1 
013 
822 
Nl 



s27 
o31 
o3 

87 

a31 
ol7 



MinerAL-NellieR a31 



Minerlda 
MinerRobtT 
MousonMrsHC 
JNiouponHL 
NettletonNC 
NickersonLJ 
" MrsOrnon 
NickersonMS 
OldfieldGeoH 
Osbornein 
PerkinsDnnielO 
PcrkinsOrlando 
PierceJAjr 
PrattDM-HM 
PrattRR 
Reed Emily J 
je9 ' RogersCatherine 
je8 1 RogersDwicht 
cSllRogersKateJ 



o2 

814 

je3 

025 

je20 

s20 

s7 
n9 
ol3 
Sl4 
829 
025 
82 

87 

o25 
oil 

820 
je20 



OlO SanfordDrEdward Je9 



BrandtGeo-WmPjySeiScovillelrvingJ o5 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITOES LITCHFIELD COUNTY 



307 



026 
Je20 



je9 
8-25 
o31 
oa4 
ol8 
ol8 
je20 
o3 
oil 
026 
olS 

n8| 



ScovilleMR 

ScovilleMattieJ 

" LillieW 

ScovilleRJ 

SedgwickHarry 

SeelyeFredM 

SheparilElbert 

SkiffCW 

Smith Nathan 

SmithSE 

StudleyGeoW 

SwiltChasR 

SwiftMrs(JeoH 

SwiftMi!?sME 

Swift MaryS 

Swifts 

Thomps'nLetitiaEAlS 

VailloMaryH sl3 

VerillWm s7 

WebbMLM jylO 

WickwireJulia o2 

" Gertrude " 

WoodJohn n9 

GOSHEK. 

AllynEE 

AllyaWM 

BartonHA 

" WillieG 

BeaehAnnie 

BeachFannieE 

" AnnaL-EllaM 

BeachSarah 

BrewsterCN 

BrooItsMissAC 

BrooksJohnW 

DavidsouMissOA 

DicldnsonLouise 

DavisH 

GaylordWillard 

GaylordWE 

" AmvL 

GrayMii^sCL 

GrayFraukM 

" FredG 

GrayMW&wf 

HallMB 

HartRC-Marion 

HazenTA-SarahA o31 

HurlburtFE je9 

IvesTR-GeoC n8 

KeutCon je22 

LandonMissMaryB o5 

LeonardJA n2 

LucasClarinda a23 

LucasFA jy21 

Lyman EW o5 

Ly manFG-MissAE s20 

LymanM-MrsMAHo30 

NorthDrJH n1 

" MrsMaryC " 

NortonEdward&wf o5 

Norton EM-Mary A o21 

" AnnaL " 

Norton EP jy21 

NortonHenry&wf o20 



TuttleCarolineL 
WadhamsAlbert 
WadharasJohnM n9 
Wadhains^lMrsJM oil 
WadhamsMissME s29 
WadhamsMrsNS Je22 
" OctaviaL 
"■ HeuriettaJ 
" MrifFM 
WadhamsMrsNS 
" Misses 
WadhamsWmA 
WellsMrsMaryL 
WhitoCynihiaJ 
EdwiuA 



n2 ! SIossonKatherine o6 
ol6|SlossonMaryH m19 
" SmithMrsM-JosieMoS 
SpoonerCliasL s6 

SpoonerMrsJohn a30 
StoneWK 
StraightFloraA 
StraightOB o23 

StnaftMrsJohnL a24 
"■ Iniogene-MB 
SwiftLA ol6 

UttordMrsEmilyB sl5 
VincentGA 
ViuceutNellieC 



o5 



s29 
o30 
Al5 



HABWINTON. 



jy2l 
ol4 
o24 

s9 

a28 

o20 
jy21 
jelo 
sl9 
s29 
o28 
ol8 
n9 
ol2 

019 
jy3 

jy3ol9 
o(5 



oil 
s8 

A29 

s7 

je22 

a31 
o2 

86 



BalchChasW 
BarberCyrusL 
BarberE 
BarkerVirgilR 
I Bartholomew A 
BoardmanMB 
iBuellVirgil 
[CaseLawrence 
CastleSJenuie 
CatlinMrsA 
" i\lissMary 
ICatliuAbijah 
CatliuLewis 
CurtissGeo 
DanfordGwendolen n2 
GridleyC'ornelia jelO 
GridleyGeo-Julia n2 
Gri..leySA a30 

HinmanEngeneW a24 



s22 

n3 

026 

s6 



031 



LITCHFIELD 

AdamsMrsJH 
" EmmaL 
AllenCM-SarahE 
AlIenFred'kK 
AllenMrsJBissell n3 
AllynAW a24 

AndrewsChasB jy31 
BaldwiuEM je9 

BaldwiuGeoH&wf o6 
" GeoL&sister " 
BaldwinMissGL si 
BaldwinMrsWF o23 
BaldwinWmF&wf s5 
'• DanielL 

BarberCW [SerCoH] s5 
BartholomewUP p8 
BeachEdi,'arD 
BeachGebM 
BeachOscarD 
Heman-FredE 



024 
o20 



a29 BeachWillisJ 
a30 BeckwithMrsJG 



s29 



NortonMaria 
" SarahB 

NortonRA 825 

NortonWW All 

OviattSamuelP o3() 
PageMrsHW ol4 

RichmondMrsBM s9 
RileySC&wf ol2 

SanfordAlson&wf n1 
Stoddard EvaL o24 
ThomasMrsMH jel9 
ThompsonDariusDo30 
TuttleMrsSB n2 



Hotchkiss# 

HotchkissMinaC 

•' RuthE " jBeebePS jel5s29 

NichollsFred'k o30 BeccherAP ol9 

VonTobleJosepli a24 BeklenChasO&wf m2o 



Webster Addison 
WilsouWilber 



s6 



KENT. 

AshmanW 

BailevJuliaM 

BerryCW 

BrittonCP-C 

C'ampDanielB 



s4 
05 
o4 

8l4 



s26 



BishopOhasB 

" JaneG-FrankF 

BishopHiramL 

BissellDwight 

" Lizzie 

BissellL 

BissellPhilip 

BissellSarahA 

BissellSW 
CampMrsOph"IiaR()13 BissellWm 
CurtinHarrietH Ml9;BissellWJ&wf 
DePewNA A30i>' MissHE 

EatonBurritt&wf o5j BlinnFred'k 
" Bjr-Luther«&wf " I Borden JJay 
EatonCA g7iBostwickArthnrEjel6|JuddWalterS 

EdwardsChas&ladysl3'BostwickMrsAM oil KenneyCIaraB 



o24 

n3 

o31 
s22 
024 
s21 
o23 
oil 

a24 



Jyl2 
o24 



CookFF&wf 
CookeJH 
DavisGeoW 
DeForestWillard s7 
DemingMissL 825 
DemiugWm-WC jy31 
DickersonEP ol2 

DiidleyCL s5 

DwyerEdw[SrCoH]s7 
EverestLouiseM s21 
FaganLizzie s25 

FisherMrsFA a7 

Fish'rWD[CorCoH]s7 
GarrisonDeWitt n9 

GatesAnnieH s23 

" GraceM " 

GatesHowardE&wfo7 
GibbsWm ol8 

GilbertllD s7 

GraniiissFM-Sally 
GrannissWG o4 

GravesGeoA o2 

" EdithE " 

GravesHenryB je9 
GravesMrsSarahM 
GriswoldArthiir o4 
" Seth 
GriswoldAR 
GriswoldHP 
IlallWmJ 
HarrisonGeoJ 
IlartHC-WG 
HartReubenS 
HenryChasW 
HickoxGA-Wm 
HinmanJuliaA 
IlinsdaleMrsCB 
HinsdaleCW[C;oH] s5 
HopkinsAlfred ol3 
HopkinsElbertA " 
HopkinsJH&wf oil 
" JennieL "■ 

IIopfordLD jyia 

LDjr-FJ-MaryE " 
Hubbard Ann ieE oil 
Hnmphreyvill"LC o20 
HnniphrevvilleMJ " 
HurlbiitCiarkW a24 
Hutchinsonlsaac a27 
Jackson Ed w[CoH] s7 



oi7 
s6 

Olfi 

024 
s7 

s3l) 

ol9 
o3 
s7 

o24 



Jone?GeoE 
JonesMaryM 
JuddJL 
o30IJudd.TesseL 



GavlordCH 

GaylordNellieF 

GibbsCM-RM 

GibbsJeromeP 

GrangerMrsJ 

HopsonGeo 

" AE-Marj'A 

HopsonJno&son 

•' Misses 

HopsonJohnjr 

KuappAnnieW 

JuddJohnR 

NickersonAllieJ 

PeetAddieE 

PcetSamuelR 



jy5;Bramha!lEJ&wf o23'KenneyGe(i&wf 



o5;BramanWH&wf Jel4 

s4 " MissMC 

8l9 BuelDrHW Je7 

o27 BuellJL sl2 

s29lCableWD[CorCoH] s5 

" CampMaryE a9 

a9 Campbell James o23 

" CatlinJIIoward s22 

o4lCatlinFH&wf ol2 

00 [" JosieW " 

s7'CatlinJasP je28ol6 

olljCatlinT[SerCoF] s5 

s7|ChamplinEE o25 

je9 ClemansHarry o31 



jel3 
sl7 
n6 
s7 
s6 
a9 
820 



PrattBG-OrindaN 828 ClockElginG 



PrattBGrant 

PrattBirdseyG 

RobertsJL 

SkiffEttaM 

SladcSiisieM 



CoeFLLCorCoH] s4 
oSJ CoeLevi-FrancisM s29 
s7| " LaviniaM " 

o24CoitCII 

ol6| CoitMrsHenryR 



KilbournCD[CoH] s5 
KilbournMrsCD oil 
KilbourneDC 
" MrsSM " 

KilroyJulia o!) 

KingMrsO\\enB c>24 
LakcFrnnl^R jeS 

LandonCNLSerCoII]s5 
LarkinJohnC NlO 

LewisMrsCM o24 

LoomisEK[CrCoH] s5 
LovelandLoiiiseJA 22 
MarshBiirritt ol2 

Marshlihoda 820 

MallettAlfrcdB jyl8 
MarshWT [CorCoH] s5 
MarshallSamuel s8 
" Eliza " 

sl2 McLcanAllen m30o13 
o4jMcLeanAGenev'veol2 



SlossonMrsJohnH oG'" Bertha-FannyM " iMcLaughlinET oil 



308 



SOUVEXIR O? TII^ CENTEXXIAL EXHIBITION. 



MacLarenAW-H n8 

McNeilChasK s6 

McNeilMrsE jy7 

" Alox-OS-Anne " 

McNeilEB jH 

McNfilKD&wf s2~> 

McNiilMaivyll o24 

MoiffDE s21 

MorscEJ inl 

M o i>:l' J !;col>-IIE s2T 

MoivoLouis-eA o20 

]VlorseIiS s2:i 

MorscVVmB olO 
•• Af^aliclII 

MoiilthropEP ffi 

MowerE n3 

MoweiliBL sl2 

MowuiTE s5i 

MowerWC sl'i 

Miin^'erFraukES o24 
!Min-p)Lj'PLC'orCoII] s5 

Nevilk'D MlO 

NewcorabJ.I-EH oil 

Ot^boruiieoli e5 

Osl>oniMyron s20 

PagfEUaL n2 

Page Lot! is^a-John o24 

PaiinelecDM ol.3 

PeckHeuiyB a25 
" HC-WJ 

PeckJB-AIaryR el2 
" FraucesS 

PeckLtVVK[CoH] s5 

PerkinsJDi&wf oil 
" EclitliH 
Pe rki n s J Dem''gM27s25 

PhelpsMaryL o24 

PicketGeoP s5 

PickettWP je20 

PlattCH&wf Je28 

PlattllA a21 

PlumbJohnL ol9 

PorterP'.S&wf s20 

PrattMai-yE o27 

Pratt Riley jyS 

PrattSA o30 

PrescottHenryH o20 

RayClaraBelle o4 

" ClaraF-LanraC " 

RobertsMrsMA n8 

" MaryC " 

RowcSamuelT efi 
SaltonstallHattieP s22 

SanfordEdwinB s2 

SanlordFM s4 

SanfordGT[CoH] 84 

ScovilleJuliusA a24 

SedgwickTheoS ol8 
" WmB-JasT 
SepplesJfCorCoH] e5 

SevmourDeliaS ol2 

SeymourEW ol8 

SeymourMaryP " 

SeymoiirOS&wf ol7 

SharpRF[Con] e4 

ShumwayCaptAB s4 

[Coll] 

SlackDr o16 

Stcvon-Robt sl9 

StevensE ol7 

1 rowbridgeGeoH sl5 

TryonWn'i <i26 

TurnerAM&wf e20 
" Albert 

TurnerPhebeM sfl 

TylprHciin'G ol2 

VaillChasII je'iO 

VaillMrsJII o20 

" JuliaM " 



|WadsworthMis8CE822 
WareVVniS a30 

WattsMA o27 

WattsUobtJ !?(i 

WadhanisFF a12o7 
Webst"rLlVVF[CoH]s6 
Wesseli^GenH^USA] 
Wes.-cll^'HW m2os22 
Wei^fel^MrsiHW m25 
VVcsfelsLW&wf p2; 
'• HarryW-FrankW'' 
WesselsMaiyM 
" AunieS 

WetmoroJS[CoH] s' 
WheelerCD sH 

\VlieolerJW[CoH] s4 
WUberlda-Julia jy7 
WilkinsGM o9 

WolcottChasM olO 
WoodriifTGeoC ol8 
•' MrsHS 

WoodrufTGeoCjr oil 
vVoodniffGM&tamolO 
Woodriift'VVH o6 

WoosterDanielT ?22 
WoosterLS Jyl8 

WoosterWfi olO 



MORRIS. 




Burgess Fred J 


o24 


BurgesfHarry 


o2G 


Burgc-ssWS 


o25 


" MrsbarahA 


'• 


CampPW&wf 


o24 


CowlesMrsH 


o2o 


Davis^SM 


Jy28 


FaniliamST 


Je20 


FrisbieHenry 


olU 


HallWA 


oil 


HardJA 


o4 


HarrisonRollinH 


Sl9 


JcimiugsGeoP 


K(! 


KiiigMrsE 


sl6 


LeonardMrsEdwino24 


LovolandCS-l)M 


o27 


LymanMvraL 


oil 


MarcyJH&\\f 


025 


PlerpontK&wf-Jno s7 


SmithGeoA 


8l£ 


'• Virgil 


" 


TurkingtonJM 


o25 


TurkintitonR&wf 


k9 


Turkington>Ii-sW o25! 


WaughCH 


a31 


WhittleseyLW 


a23 


WhittleseySA&wfol3 


■' WilligS 


" 


WhittleseyT 


A23 


NEW HARTFORD. 


Allen Anson &vvf 


oil 


AllenAJ-FS 


s8 


AUenSamuel&wf 


n3 


AlvordEII 


o26 


AthertonJN 


819 


AtwoodMissRA 


o4 


BarrettLafayette 


n2 


BeancyFrarikM 


Al9 


BeaneyWalter 


sll 


BettsEH 


827 


BraggAN 


Je6 


BrinsmadeHK 


m30 


BushnellMrsWH 


815 


CarterCarrieA 


NlO 


CarterER&wf 


o6 


" Eddy-Anna 


" 


CasellCoIby 


^ 


CasellBennett 


828 


CaseJnoG 


A3 



ChapinEM&wf slO 
OliapiuMasterHM AlS 

thapiuGeoW ol2 

C'hapinLfviC s6 

CbapinPhilipE 69 

C'oncLucyL o(J 

CookeAdaJ o5 

CrowKittieM ol9 

DrakeWarreuH s5 

Forbes James " 

GatesIlM olO 

GilletteJosR2d n3 

GilmauCW jiSl 

GilmanHP sl9 

GilrnanWillieC o31 
" EliasE 

GoodwinCP 8fi 

GoodwiiiMrsHC s29 

GoodwinSG o4 
GouldHA 

HazenGeorgie o6 

HendersonWH Je9 

IIolconibKateF olO 
IIotclikissJfuiiieL s27 

JoiietiFredB 8l9 

JonesFrankW o7 

.r()iiesIIR[US:.] 827 

JonesWN o30 

" AliceA " 

KelloggElizaM s27 

Kbllogglleni-yA o2 
•' MrsLE 

KclloggHB&wf Al2 

KelloggMiniiieL jel3 
KelloggMrsSar'hF a19 

KnightEH-FH jy3 
KountzCarrieV 

LeeAiistin o2r 

LooniisBenjG s'i 
LoomisOarcnceF jel 7 
LovclandWB&wf o(i 
" DwightL 

•' MinuieJ " 

MarshMrsHE s30 
" HattieP 

MerrellChasA o30 

MerrellKateJ jcl7 

MertleGeoE o26 

MorseNathan 814 
MosesAF 

NashChasW s5 

NorrisFB n9 

OsborneBS o30 
■' Belles 
PikeWK-CarrieR e29 

PinneyMariaW je7 

PitkinMrsHW je28 

PurintonJH a18 

PurintonMrsjn Jy26 

RichardsJno n3 

Richards WG Nl 

RustSR 85 

RyderMissHA o4 

SeymoiirCarlton je9 

SeyniourJasP Nl 

SeymourRM o4 
" JW-CP 

SeymourSarahM ol9 

SeymourWmC All 

SeymourWS a19 
" CarrieE 

SmithHenryT A28 
SmithMernttE&w oil 

SmithWalter ol4 

GW-IF " 

SpencerGA&wf 826 

TavlorWF 8l3 

ThompsonWE ol6 

WaruerCS 838 



WeaverWW .lyZ 

WhiteJames Jyl2 

WidmerJacob Nl 

WilberMrsSC o6 

WilberTC-MrsAE o3l 
WikoxEF&wf 
ViMlcoxJuliaE s27 

WilliamsMinnieA o9 
WoodruffJno olfi 

WoodruflVVC o20 



NEW MILFORD. 


AclyRevCG 


026 


AclyMissJiiliaHCjel2 


AckleyMrsGeoB 


613 


AckleyJC 


614 


AddisGeo 


ol2 


AllenHowardMcD je5 


AnthonyGeoW 


014 


" WmA-CarrieL 


" 


AntbonyHelenG 


ol3 


BaconMrsDr 


ol2 


BakhviiiAlbertN 


619 


" Eliza 


•' 


BarlowChasC 


o25 


Barlow MrsDA 


o23 


" MissTA 


" 


BarlowThoeD 


n2 


BeacliCM 


a22 


BeachMerritt 


614 


" Mrs 


" 


BeardsleyEmma 


o30 


BeecherSG 


ol8 


" HW-AS 


" 


BennettCharl'teE aIO 


BeniiettPG&wf 


ol8 


BenntttWF&wf 


012 


BlackWniD&wf 


oil 


BlackmanJas 


s6 


Boardn.arMi?sCEjel2 


BoardmaiiKateT 


m29 


" IlelenM 


" 


BostwickEN 


o5 


BostvvickMrsEN 


" 


BotswickL 


8l4 


BotstordC'basB&w 621 


BradleyFH 


621 


Brow iiMrtWmG 


jy]2 


BuckJL-JancA 


017 


Buckiiig'mMrsBWslS 


" MA-Chas^B 




BuckinghamEdga 
BuckinghaniMA 


r o5 
Jv6 


BuckingniSusanB s'l9 


BuckiiigliamWJ 


o3 


CampJW 


820 


CanipLevi 


o5 


(antieldJasE 


017 


ClarkAndrevvC 


n3 


ClarkeAdeliaL 


oil 


ClarkeMrsSC 


ol7 


" FlorenceM 


" 


CleniansST&wf 


n2 


ColepaughJA 


ol7 


CronierChasA 


Al 


EmmonsGeoE 


A3 


ErwinMilo 


017 


ErwinRobt 


o4 


EvansCH 


ol8 


PerrissBF 


o4 


FosterJnoQ 


n3 


ProstGuyJ 
GaylordAW 


oil 


Ml3 


GiddingsEunieP 


n2 


GiddingsLP&wf 


o24 


GiddingsVR 


o20 


Green Geo W 


el9 


Green HS 


b6 


HallockWH 


018 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS- .-LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 



309 



HatchNW-RuthA o34'StoiieMrsMA jel7 

" NoraB-SW-FL " iTaylorDrChaa s20 
HckteiiWmH jeiol" MrsChas-HattieA 



HiUAUcnS-MaryE sl3|TerrellLuna 



HiUSamuel 

HillSarahC 

llillsSH 

HiiieMBessie 

HiaeCarrie-LM 

Hun''urtbrdGeoG 



o9|ThayerEinilyA 
o'i5 TitUisJeroine 
S'U ToussaintGeo 

St) , TreadwellMissJL 
saT.TiirrillAlbert 

s7,TiirrillJS-Lucy 



Hiuiij erford JlL&wf sii VailSS-MS 



HuntE 

liiiutMerritt 

IvesDwightvV 

IvesHenry&wf 

JacksonWuiB 

Kinncylleury 

KirkFred 

KnappU 

KnibloeHeber 

" Mary 

LakeFrankH 



o4 WallerEM 



03 
sH 
o25 
ol8 
slo 
Ol8 
85 
o25 



Wamei-HD 
WeaverMaggieL 
" Carrie B 
WildmanEA 
Wri'-htMnsGW 
"■ FrederickA 

NORFOLK. 

BaxterCJ 
BeachEL 



LasherBiirnettP jy29 j BarberWalterL 
LawreuceEthelK 8l3 1 BattellAnna 



Rej^inald 

LevyAles&wf 820 

LillieGeoF o27 

LinesChas s5 

McMahonAH s21 
McMahonMattieG oil 

McMahonSarah ol3 

MarshGW sl4 

MarshLillieA olT 

MarshOE sl3 

MerwiaCP&wf s20 

" AliceM " 
Merwiu FlorenceEjel6 

MerwiuTD a2.J 

Moore Jame3 sli 
Morehouse RachIM o25 

MygattCarrieC oil 
MygattHS&wf 
" Belle 
NeariugCH 
NeisuerM 



s27 
s26 



sl8 

jy6 

o9 

027 

s2 

85 

o31 
013 
sl5 
ol2 



ol4 

je21 

ol 

07 

Nl 

o30 



82 

85 
Al8 

813 

jel4 
n9 
015 



BattellRobbin8 

BraggMrsSS 

BroWnMaryL 

BurrErastus 

CampAbel 

OobbAE 

CoUarAR-EH 

CowlesAS&wf 

CowlesMissDA 

CowlesJN 

CowlesWJ-Mai-yE b7 

CraneRevEN&wf s2(j 

DillonMaurice ' sl2 

EldridgeMrsJos je22 

" AliceB-IsabellaP " 

EldridgeMissea ol7 

GaylordEL 

GeerldaB 

GraiigerJennette 

UoltED&wf 



025 
05 

67 

o7 

o4 

jyl2 

jy4 



814 HoltHJ&wf 
NettletouArthurT n9 JohnsonLucieM 



NobleAH 

Noble EminaC 

" AugustaM 

NobleCC 

NobleCH-WN 

NobleEUaF 

" HattieL 

NobleRussellB 

PeckChasA 

PelouzeFaiinleM 

PetersenPeter 

Ptien;harP 

Picket tMP 

PixleyAE 

Piatt EllenL 

PotterGG 

Roberts Eliza 

UobertsEllS 

RobertsOrrin 

RobertsSaraliJ 

RobertsonGeo 

SanfordMissCS 

SanfordMrsDC 

SchroederHH 

SeniorJD-OW 

SmithMrsElizaC 

SouleDE 

StarrFrederickE 

StaubN 

SterlingAB&wf 

StewartMrsTE 

StoneBJ-MA 

StoneCB 



o25 JohnsonMaryP 
olO KuappHoraceB 



025 
07 

o27 

olO 
s8 
o5 
04 

014 



i Lawrence A'gustaPol2 

826 MillsMrsCH Je21 

8l4 MyersJulia s28 

822 PhelppLeviP je9 

" jPorterFE je6 

85 RiggsFred o7 

s6 ShepardEdwardM aIO 

A3 ShepherdJA&wf je7 

s5 " MrsJK 

814 ShepardJK s7 

s3o SijauldingAustinA o30 
ol7 Spauldino^PA " 

" i" AdelaideE " 

s5 SpauldingWA olO 

o3 StevensLouiseP ol2 
Oil SwiftEdwardE je22 

85 TerryElIenB n1 
el4 WhitingLL&wf jel4 

86 'WoosterAiistin&wo25 
oU WoosterAF ol3 

N8;WoosterNellieM o7 

'^^\ NORTH CANAAN. 

jy4 
o20 
02 
021 
026 
Ml7 
ol5 
Ol5 



AllynnC ol5 

AyersEdP-EFjr jyl2 

"MrsUEwart 

BaruesHC-CE 

BamesSW-EH 

BassettTom 

BeckleySC&wf 

BeuedictChasS 

Bennetts A &wf 

BennettWm 

BriggsAP 

BriggsCH&wf Al8 

BruwnMrsFrancis je7 

BrownJenny 8l3 

BraggSS 

CaldwellLA 

CartwrightDL 

ClarkMN-GS 

ClarkNJ&wf 

CowdreyGeoW jy3o23 

CorbitJS jy3 

CorbetJS&wf s2U 

CummingsSC sl4 

DunningEUenH o31 

DunniugLyman&wfoG 

FergusonSam'lL o3 

FcrgusonTJ olO 

FergusonW&wf 

•'IdaL 

FergusonWmJ 

FoolcL 

FreenianDL 

FreenianSS 

FuUerGS 

FullerJR&wf 

•' Frankie 

GiddingsEW 

GilletteClias 

GilletteOvidP 

GrangerMaryA 

IlancUetllenry 

HardenbergbJB 

HarveySLC 

IlawtliornSJ 

HeatliGardner 

IIoltlloraceE 

HotclikissCaroline o6 

HumphreyG-WG sl4 



o20 

ol8 

023 

Jel5 

jel5 

s22 

s5 

027 

o25 

sl3 

jelO 

Nl 

n9 

o2o 

a8 

Nl 



HumphreyllU 

HuntEmma 

HiintR 

IshamAugnstaE 

IvesAldernian 

IvesAllieR 

IvesE&wf 

" MrsSP 

IvesJL-SP-EL 



02 

Je20 

025 

s28 

n3 
031 

o5 

025 



IvesSabin-HenryBo31 



el4' AdamTS 
035 AdamSW 

s5 Adam&Wm3d 
je9 AdamsChas 
ol2 AdamsChasSjr 
o23 AdamsGeo 
jy7 AdamsHM&wf 

s5 AQynEP&wf 



.IcnningsWniH 

KlinefelterJH 

LawrenceED 

LawrenceJohnG 

LockwoodGeo 

LounsburyLP 

LynchllP 

MarvinCH 

MerrillMansonA 

MeadllattieA 

" Emily 

MorganCarrieH 

MorrisTheodore 

OakesJE 

OdellAE 

PartridgeAlice 

Part ridge AK 

PartridgeP 

PeaseRMS 

PeotGM 

PeetGW 



n9 
820 



PeetJosephW 

PierccAE 

" BA-ME-RD 

PierceDL-EUenD o34 

" MinnieE-AllceL " 
RaymondGeoE sS 
RaymondWE&wf Jy4 



s29 
a25 

Ml7 

031 
Jl4 
sl2 
o4 
o9 
a2 
018 

Nl 
s27 
Ml7 
ol5 
o15 
095 
ol5 
jel 
o95 
o25 



ReedJB^S 

ReadLII&wf 

" WC-EW 

RikerCatherine 

RobertsEdwS 

RockwcllTC 

RoodEjM-SM 

RoodRM-GII-FK 

RodemeyerJjr 

llootJamesA 

RorabackAT 

SmithCarrieE 

SmithllA 

SpauldingFS 

StevensIIB 

StevensHenryC 

StevensNS 

StrongGeoP 

TaylorJuliaL 

ThompsouCG 

TobeyMilesB&wf 

TrescottWesley 

VVardXC-MrsEA 

WaltersDavidD 

WatsonFred'k s9 

"• Addie " 

WoolfFM 

PLYMOUTH. 

AtwaterNellieJ s26 

BaldwinLl) 

BatesGeoE 

BatesJM 

BeardsleyAS 

'• Mr- Sarah 

BeardsleyCH 

BcardsleyJennieM n1 

" MaryT 

BeardslevSam'lC 

BradleyllL 

BradleyMP 

BuellAggieS 

BuellAndrew 

BuellEttaE 

BuellOliveA 

BuellWA 

" MrsKateL 

BunnellChas 

BiillEliza 

BullWmW 

CadwellPerry 

'• Sarah 

ColeGeoW 

Darrow Wallace 

DaytonWE 

DnnbarLH 

ForbesEH-MI 

GierdinirJohnJ 

GraunisZF 



s5 

024 

825 

jeS 

jel4 

o3 

Nl 

o4 
sl5 
sl9 

o5 
031 

o9 
o25 
o31 
o20 

n3 

88 

0l9 

o3 

Ja9 

ol3 

n2 



Al8 



sl2 

87 



ol8 



sl5 
o30 

88 

021 

A3 

o20 
o20 
023 



021 
822 

s7 



ol7 

Bl4 

s7 

88 

a30 
o9 
.je9823 
GoldsmitliOIiverC slS 



GriffinEsther 

GriffinET 

HarrisonGeoJjr 

riawkinsAS 

IlilIJA 

IlilliardMrsEB 

HillardER 

HillardMR 

" HelenL 

HinmanllarrvE 

HoadleyCarltonE o21 

UoItChasJ ol6 



86 

s5 
n3 

85 

jy22 
o24 
Je2 
Nl 

s5 



310 



30TTVEXI?. 07 THE CENTENNIAL EXmBITION. 



HonghSarahA o2 1 

HuntGeoll olS 

HuiuJuliaP N(j 

IvesiCA a1 

KelseyEmma o9 

** JuliaS " 

KeleeyFrankG k8 

KilbournllE ol(J 

LangdouGE-LR sl2 

Masonllenry&wf o23 

MattooiiDavidE ol8 

PaiutcrEdward je26 

PierpontGeo 822 

PloiicquetUenry s8 

RobbinsUD s6 

EootEdwardC Jy3 

SalisburvDT o28 
ScottGeoA- Freddie gS 

ScottMosesR s5 

ScottWalterll je9 

ScottWH&wf Al7 
SheltonAC jel5 

SmithRcbeccaW o21 

SmithWW ol8 

SullivanFloraA o23 

TalmadgcAnnaC s8 

TallniadgeEM s20 

"Mrs-WillieG " 

TaylorCharlieC sG 

TnttleByron jel5 

ThompsonHelonJ o20 

TollesFP N2 

Toniliuson'Milo s26 

Ward\vcllJM«&wf sl8 

WcllsMrsAD o24 

WellsLizzieB s2(i 

WrigluDrTheoG jy3 

TERRYVILLE. 

AllenGcoM-ChasIjyll 

Allenlloward ol7 

AllenRDII s25 

AndrcwWC so 

AndrewsShennan 68 

BaldwiuNT-R o25 

BeacbAH slC 

BeachBS s27 

BeachllattieE ol5 

BtidlingMrsGW a31 

BtillMrsSAlice 8l 

BushuellGeoE ol8 

DailovEM ?6 

EllsWinB-JnliaE jyl 

FeunGertieM a15 

FeniiJC s5 

GaylordAS Al 
GoodwinAVE jyll 

HotchkissAlbertJ s5 

IlnmphreyGeoA s5 

'• Carries s2 

HunterDwightW a30 

lIuntcTOD sl2 

'■ IlarrietE " I 

LaiigJohn jy5 

McLeaiiAP on' 

MerrimanElpie " 

MerrimanEW s29 

Minor]\IarvL ol8 

IMixFW-JennieM a15 

NiinanJohn jy4 

PalmerCS-EP nI 
PlumbllB jyll 

PlumbNM olT 
" Wallace 

PondEdgarL jy7 
SanfordPorter&wf bI 
StotightonWinnicP si 

Tcrry.Iames&v.-f si 

WebsterMO eO 



Wi!liam!*DR 
WoudWinjr 

UOXBURY. 

BamesEdward 

BariiuriGcoE 

BlackmanMissH 

BlakemanLeonoraL o2 

" HannahL 

BlakemanWN 

BradleyEHN 

CrandallMinnie 

Eas^tmanHemanB 

Gerhard tJohnP 

GilletteDL 

" Josephine " 

Gillette.IeiinieL olG 

GillettellD-AliceWsK: 



o2?. 
o30 



ol9 
018 
je3 



UatchLVN 

IIodgeAlbertL 

Huvlbutilr 

IshamKaticM 

JonesDavidE 

LewisOrlando 

PierccFrankH 

PrestonBS 

PrestonEdwardW s2' 



s25 
n3 
sG 
o7 
Sl2 
je9 
olS 
jel 



PrindleCvrusE 

SeeleyEW 

SewardWB 

SmithME 

SmithSB 

WetmoreFrankE 

" MrslsabellaJ 



SALISBURY. 

Including Lime lioclc. 

AshmanLP 

BalUlII 

BallSarahE 

■' MaryE-EdithS 

BaglcyAlcx]\[ 

BardeiiEJ 

BaniumJII 

BarmmiLucy 

Bart ram EE 

BatcsAdir.atha 

r.enjaminO 

BostwickWni&wf s20 

Brcw><ter:\IrsLD ol2 

BriiitonEnimaJ 

BurrallPS&wf 

CarcySngieD 

ClarkGcoII 

CoatsMrsA 

CoflingJIissCK 

Corasfock^IrsH 

ConklinWm 

CookGoo 

CookllA 

CrowellGeoC 

CrowellGcoG 

DresscrllJ&wf 

DresscrMist:Sallie sl2 

DrummondJii o30 

EnsignJas-IIattic k2 

EnsignPS-IIerbcrt sl2 



olO 
je9o24 
o24 

o3 

n2 
el 3 
Al2 
oil 
NlO 
Jc9 



o5 
s20 

jelG 
o24 
ol7 
014 

Je23 
o24 
bl9 
Al7 
Jy3 

jelO 
sl2 



EvcrtsChas 

EvertsEmmaJ o23 

EvcrtsFred s9 

GibbsMcArthur sl9 

GoodwinED n2 
" Ilezckiah-JiiliaE " 

IIarris]\I-TMrFMC oil 



IlarrisIIP&wf 
" IlPjr 
IlarryGeo 
IIolmesFW 
JamcsC 



sl4 

ol9 
024 

«22 



JewellFA oil 

Johnson WmA a2S 
JonesMaryE s29 

Kuickerb'kerAlice ol8 
KnightHM jelOAll 
KuightMrsHM jeG 
LandonMrsCG s4 

LittleRobt All 

MalloryFR sl2 

Mercei-OUieV o31 

MilesEP e8 

MilesFrederic ol9 
MilesF&wf jy3 

MilesFP s2<; 

MilesWA jel7Al7 

MilesMrsWA o23 

MooreSilasB&wf s4 
MossopBlanche jelG 
■' Alice '* 

OrtonJohnJ ol2 

PraltDaniel&wf ol8 
PrattllR 019 

ReedDavtonS s7 

ReedWmE A 23 

RichardsonA a2 

RichardsonCarric a12 
Richardf^onMB sG 

[Aide-decampCNG] 
RiiddWmB&wf Jc6 
SanfordEP o23 

ScovilleJ el8 

SilvernailFrank sl5 
" Foster 

SparksJlrsEleanoroll 
SterlingWG&wf o24 
WainwrightlCittie sG 
WarnerDcnaldT s22 
\\'ai-iicrWJ s2 

WaltonWIijr sG 

WiesingChaa sl5 

" Wmll 

Wie^ingGeo sl3 

WilliamsMrsMn jeO 
WoodJohnR ol2 

" Josephine " 

VToodworthlleniy sl4 
WoIcottJosieD sl9 



LAKEVILLE. 

BamfrrthJohn 

BissellJB 

BostwickCarrieE 

BostwickEdE 

BostwicklSIrsEJ 

BostwickGW 



NlO 
a4 

AlO 

m24 
jcl 
a4 
BostwickJos&fam jv5 



BryanGA 
BundyGeoII&wf jcl 
BurrallGB&uf sl4 
BurrallJcnnie jcl 

BushncllII a4 

ChapinChasW&wf s29 
Cleavcland?.Iary sll 
ClevelandLibbicW sll 
CleavelandPeter sl9 
CouklinAddieG s29 
CookAnnaM o23 

ConicUWmE a30 

DeweyllS Al2 

DrummondJIrsJno 
EgglcstonFrankJ s20 
FislAVniB 
French'MrsjrS 
GriggsJnoS&wf 
IlarrisonGeoD 
HarrisonJasR 
IlcmmingJW 
IIolleyAII 
KelscyFrank 



KeyworthChas NlO 

KnightHattieR oiiO 

KnightHenryA nG 

KnightJoseph a9 

Kiii<rhtRobt-Geo AlO 

LanaonEdmond s20 

LandonMElla s28 
LandonRaymondF s(5 

LandonWmJ a15 

MenvinJL&wf 619 

MooreMrsELewis w27 
" RobbieB 

NortonThosL AlO 
" MrsHattieE 
Oakley JohnG&w-f s26 

OwenDonglass a15 

PerkinsJonnS je2 

KappJohn a9 

RobbinsMH-SB s21 

RolDbinsSL 825 

" L-Mary " 

RobcrtsAF ol9 

RuddAIIolIy je5 

SandersFK a15 

SelleckJulialM a24 

StillmanDF&wf aIH 

WaltonMrsSeth 612 

WaltonSG 88 

WardwcllJohn je6 

WellsEmmaC ol3 

WellsHattyE o6 

WenckworthEdw s26 

WilliamsHiibert n3 

WilliamsWII sll 

WoodChasW a15 

SHARON. 

BartramlsaacN je9 

BeebeMaryJ n3 

BentonER-CE n9 

BisselllU&wf o26 

BuckleyFrankE n1 

BumpLA-EM s7 

CarterFred'k&wf s26 

Clapplda n4 

CleavelandJH s7 

DeanEdwardK s27 

DemingWG o7 
DunbarES-EstherColS 
Dunbarllorace&wf Nl 

EverettCW&wf ol8 

" Frank-Uattie " 

GagerGE c7 

GayGeo-SaraA ol7 

GoodwinRobtE s29 

HallEdward o24 

HallWni n2 

IlamlinFrank ol3 

Hamlinllarry " 

Hartl^lrsMA o26 

IlazardGeoR s28 

" CorneliaP " 

HazardRoswelin oil 
" FlorcnceE-Josle " 

notchkissllattie s29 

'' CarrieL •' 
HuntZalmonS&vvfoSO 

JewettSB oil 

KelseyGA s;;6 

KniditCharlieS £28 

LandonCarrie " 

Lordllarriett Nl 

LoTcllA Jt5 

LucasLottieE oil 

MonroeCW c!8 

JIoreyLeman a26 
" DL-W;llieE 
MorehonseMrsCWsig 

AlorehoueeJas Ii4 



LICT 0? CONNECTICUT VISITORS LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 311 



Pal'.nerEmelineA llseleJoseph b8 

PeclcCVV-AL s2(! JuddGB-MP s26 

PcckiJeoH oll|KellyCha8 sll 

PeckJO jySeiKeueaLD n9 

PrattSchiiyler ol3'KiugJE s5 
R;i<riicJaiitteldS A80:KingWW Jyl8 

RecdEBwf&son sid LaiibinChasW sl6 

ReedJH o.J4|LantonJB s4 

" PlorenaAC " MahlerBernhard s5 

KootFayette sISlMiuorKateE s9 

SearsMrt'B s28!MinerLillian n8 

" EmilieC " JNettletonAR s5 

SmithDavidL sSO'NortoiiAliceS o4 

SniitliER " •' GertrudeC " 
SinitliGilbertL NSNorionNoahA 
Smith JnoB-DF o24i NormandLouisR 
Stevenson JO sOjNorthGeoP 
TliorpWmFI NSOhrChasA 
TwonibleyWmnF ol.SlOuldEdwardC 
WaiteFB sSTiParkerGG 
PeaseBW 
TH03IAST0N. Ipeasellorton&wf 
BickusJW&wf sl9 PicrpontGcoB 
Bacon MrsCII s7,PotterAbbic 
BissfordSJ 09 PotterChasO 
BaachMrsAndrew sll | PotterDavidS 
" JennieL " |PlattAmraon 
BaardslovIIenry s4 PlattBenj 
BenncttNelson sll RedpatliFW 
BevensWaltei-E jy2l| ReynoldsHP 
BklwellNellieJ o4 RobertsMrsJL 
BishopJasB saOjRyanDaniclJ 
B )tsfordGeo o3l i RyanMichael 
Bi-adfordHP o7 SmithBis^hop&wf s8 

BradstrcetTD&wf oG SmithHS o27 

" AP&wf " SperryHW sS 

BradstreetTJ " StoughtonEC a1 

Bri!=tolG\V-GA o30 StoiiglitonGeoII a23 

" CatherineA " SpencerJC sT 

" MinnieB " IStnartWm sl9 

BrooksOorneliaC s7 StitliffBennettll 020 

Bi-o .k^^Heniy " |Ta!cottWM o31 

B'lunellMrsA oS, Taylor Johnll s5 

B:'.rrDA-HJ N4iThoma!>A a15 

CaritloSW sl9iThomasEdson o20 

C;a'linA p7 ThomasWA so 

Cl-irkeMrsLP ol2;WarnerHenvyR p11 
Clo;nen!?PT o3")| WebsterDF Jyl2 

C)ItonJuanA o7;WcltonHA o'l 

Ooors?enAug&wf sl3 WhiteJasW&wf s4 

OrossmanFrankS sG WolfRobertP s5 

DiiTOwl'orter&wf Je7 WoodJohnll Alo 

Dilger.J-JohnL e4j WoodWarrenM sG 

UiMinPP sTWoodnift'Sarahll s25 

Diinbai-Wilbui-H jy27i\VoodriiffDrW sl8 

' oG 
JcG 



Al5 

s8 

je(i 

jyo 

so 

of) 

s9 
jeT 
o25 
a30 

07 

n9 

jylO 

je9 

o6 



HaydenMrsHcnry oll!HotchkiBsMrsEC sl2 



HattieF-ChaslI 
HodgeHelenR 
HopkinsFN 
LeachL 
MillerLutherE 
WadhamsAH 
WhitingUL 
WhitingJN 
WoodfordJasS 
WoodwardErnestS sG 
WoodvvardNA je20 
WoodwardVV sC 



WOLCOTTVILLE. 

AdtEvieW 

Ai'-ai-dBR-ChasG 

AUdisJas 

AlldisMaryL 

AlldisThosJ 

AllenG-Eugene 

AllenllenryJ&wf 

AUenNelliell 

" HattieA 

ArcherllL 

Baldwin^IissEW 

BancroftCF 

Beach Mary 

BellamyFC 
sl8j Bellamy HP 
oO BirneyRobt 
85 1 BishopJohnD 
sl9iBoltonHenry 



EastwoodJS 

EbnerOscar 

FilloyFW 

FosterWmB 

FokGooL-FH 

FoxLizzieR 

FoxJB 

FrarvON 

Gilbert GcoC 

GilbcrtGW&wf 

" MarvE 

Gil'oertWmB&wf 

GoodwinRL 

Goodwin Ralphs 

GordonGL 

GreeneTC 

IlineChasB&wf 

HoltCB 

IIoltMrsLF 

HotchkissFIT 

HumiftonMorris 

HurlbertCW 

HuxiordDudley 

InnesRobt 



JVl2jWoodruffMr?WS 

jylllWoodrnfllVT 

sGWoodwarrtEmmaAolS 
sl2iWoodwardIB e27 

A23iWoodwardSW o3u 
o2.IJWoodworthF-SE oil 

o^ol TOKRIXGTOX. 



olG BalehChasW 
o3liBarberRC 

" BirgeCM 

sG BissellEdwinR 
jeSiBroadbent Jessie 
joGBurrJohnM 

nS BurrMrs JohnM 
o30j" JohnH 
gl9:ColtGeoK 

p5 CurtisLucius 
o25 EatouGeo 

So EvansGeoM&wf 
s92:GaylordGH 



ol4 
sll 
oil 



Brady AG 

BrookerAP 

BrookerChas 

•' MaryL 

BrookerChasF 

BrooksIsaacW m29o31 



o28 

05 

jy25 

o5 

s7 

Nl 

s21 
a23 
ol4 
Jy25 
Je29 
sl4 

m29 



HrooksJW 

BrooksJohuW 

" MaryE 

BrothwellJohnG 

BrothwellWmH 

BiitlerFW 

CalhoiinJP 

CarsonJasL 

ChampionNathanAo25 

CoeEF .tc29 

CooLW Ml0o24 

[MemBdCentMau'grs 



jel5 
a3(i 

019 
s4 
n2 
s29 
019 



CoeMrsLW 
CoeNW 
CookMrsEUen 
CookMI 
CookPatrick 
CooperFW 
CowlesWA 
CuriisWmG 
DaveyPredG 
DunbarEdwardM 
FarnliamChas 
FarnhamMrsWm 
FarnhamWrnll 
FellowsCL 
FrinkFred'k 
p8 GaniwellJW 

sl3 GamwellTW&wf 

o2G GaylordAug&wf 

AlG," JAu;^ 
" GaylordMiles 

s2fi;lIolleyEH&vvf 

je3 j HoUeyFrancisN 

sill" Horace 

o27 HolIeyMrs 
s9l" Ransom 



Eddie 
HotchkissHE 
HotchkysChas 
HukeErnestT 
Jefl'reyJohnA 
Laddt'M 
LewisCVV 
LewisWS&wf 

Lizzie 
McKeneieJS 
McNeillChasL 
McXeillMrsUL 
" Kittie 
MigoonAF&wf 
" MissesCL-VB 
MigeonLor.iseJ 
MillardAM 
MillardMissM 
MillerHP 
MinerAvervP 
MixWillardW 
NorthFA 
NorthJD&wf 
NnrthLH 
NorthRubieL 
PeckEdwardS-AD ' sO 
PcrkinsAM a2(5 

RoseEdwinE&wf olO 
ScovilleKR oil 

SevmourCN&wf Je91 
SmithLB o3 

StecleEJ o3 

SpittleWm&wf s36 
" MrsAnn-KateR " 
StockingSam'lJ 
TurnerE 
TiittleJL 
TuttleNathanO&wf i- 
VolkmanChasJiI ol6 
WadharasErwinR k2 
WatermanChasI tS 
WceksGS f27 

WclchGideonH&wolO 
WellsMrpIIH o27 

WetmoreL-FC o7 

WheelerFM k2 

WheelerllC p7 

WoodDrLutherH jel4 
WoodfordWatson o31 
WorkmanJS&wf o24 



o3 

o24 
s7 

sl8 

jy28 

a5 

olO 

m1Gn8 
je24 
o25 

sl2 

Jy28 
s22 
s21 
olO 
s27 
ol9 
jy5A8 
s6 
s25 

jy3l 



024 

M30 

n2 



024 
o21 

01 



sO GriswoldMissIW ol9 IHopkinsEJ&wf 
31 i" MissHP " IIopkinsOL 



WARRES. 

AndriggJ 
Barnun'iMrsMS 
87 Bates-IE 
s4lBeemanCE-FC 
0l9lBeemanER-LF 

65 BeemanMrsL-IIelen 
jyS'CalhoiuiL 
ol9|CampAB 
" jCampMaryP 
o25 Carte rMrs AM 
o24 CarterBenjE 
jy27 CarterWE 
je29," Willie 
je9 ChapmanCA 
a4 ComstockSJ 
o24 CiirtissFA 
" jCurtissWT 
je29 CutlerWm 
iilO DerricksonJB 
jel5 DerricksouL 
" " MrsJB 
s14 FooteIIA-W3»r 
a3s14 CabsonFS 
o5 GilbertEmma 
821 " Lestcr&wf 



s5 
017 



o3 



s5 

sr, 

jy25 

ol7 

s5 

o30 
o2 

s5 

b25 

n3 

je22 

jelO 

ol7 
s5 
s5 



sll HaydenAmeliaA sGlHotchkiesEC je22sl2 I!illMarvin&wf Ol2 



312 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



o30 
ol7 



n6 



HopkinsGeoC&wf sl5 

HopkinpVVm 

HumphreyAu'tinRje!) 

HuniphreyGeoA s8 

" Mn^CSG " 

JohnsonP 

KnappAC&wf 

KnappEB 

KnappEH 

Lyman EP 

PeckNellieE 

PerkinsB-H 

Reynokls Arthur 

SackettHomerS 

SacketSarah 

SheldonGay 

ShovellE 

ShoveLaura 

ShoveS&wf 

StonellD 

StrongMA 

StrongMB&wf 

StrongNobleB 

SwiftOrlando 

" HelenT-Clara 

" Grace " 

SwiftRobt SO 

SwiftTallmadge s23 

TallmadgeGeoP sS;^ 

TurrillJnoC ol7 

Tow nerM H-EW-VII " 

TownerSE&wf o:iO 

TownerWII olS 

WeltonWm 

WASHINGTON. 

AbbottE slO 

Acklej;GB sl4 

AngevineMr8.TM jeS.") 
AverillSam'l-LP o3, 
BakerSilenceL o25 
BartonJD jei) 

BeachBP ol(5 

BlackJM t7 

" Araminta " 

BlackRobt nO 

BollcsEB jeO 

BrownMrsMP oli 
" MaryW 

BrnwnO-DavidC ol2 
BrinsmadeJnoC&wfoT 



HagerWC 
HallockAmos 
" IdaJ 
HickoxChasL&wf 



Je20 
o20 



HopkingLouiseL 
LemmonLM 



67 



HickoxEUen 

HickoxEmmaG 

IlickoxEP 

HickoxJG 

IlollisterChasS 

" SarahS 

Humphri'vGS 

" FrankW 

KinneyMyronW 

KornWni 

LemmoiiGeoA 

LemmonW 

LoganWS 

MasonCII&wf 

" LoiiisA 

MeekerDavidE 

McrriamArtliurG 

MitchellJnoR-SS 

MitchellSimeonH 

MorehouscLevi&wf 

Nett let on Dan'l&wfo24 

" MlssHelen 

" Wisf^Dora 

" Clarence 

NettletonSJ si 

Newton^MrsFred'koSS 



oil 

o3 

olO 
ol2 
Mb 
olO 
sl5 
ol2 

s22 

o20 

oil 

o3 



BiirgessGP 

Can'fieldMrsJL 

ChurchllJ&wf 

" M'mll-EdwW 

" MaryB 

ChurchWH 

ClarkAliceE 

ClarkeMarvE 

CogswellRM 

ColeC'D 

ColeDavid 

" MiesFE 

ColtonWS 

FennllM 

Fennllelen 

FennJnoG 

FennLulieG 

FennSethA 

FennSethH 

FordMreChasL 

FordMrsGC 

FordLizzicR 

FordWJ-MrpBB 

FosterWarrenW 

FowlerDrRM 

GibsonFftnnleE 

Glbs onMa riett 

GunnFW-AJ 



AlG 

OlO 



oil 



oSl 

o:}\ 

s7 
oOl 
olO: 
jc8| 
024! 
jel4 
S8 
Oil 

s30 
si 5 
ol7 
n8 
je5 
s8 
s7 
o2G 



NorthropJW 

OdellWmT 

Reynoldt^Susan 

SanfordLillianA 

SeclevPG 

SmithAM&wf 

TitusFrancesP 

TitusLilly 

TitusbL 

TomlinponGA 

WarnerFlorillaH 

WeltonSH 

Wheat on Carrie A 

WheatonMrsJE 

WhiteheadLH 

WhittleseyJE 

WilliampStanley 

" FreddieM 



NEW PRESTON 

AckleyAH 

AcklevFlora 

AveriilUO 

" Julia-EllenM 

BeardsleyMissEC o23 

BeardslevEH&wf s29 
026 
sl3 
sl4 



sl9 
016 

o3 
o20 
Al5 
sl4 
o25 
OlO 

A3 

NlO 

s7 
ol7 
6l5 
ol3 
023 
ol2 

03 



BecmanHW 

BeemanLP 

Beeman^IaryE 

BenedictElizaU 

DennettlliramA 

BennettRutliA 

" JlarvE 

BhikovJW 

BollesIIM 

BollesXellie 

" Carrie 

BolIe^Noble-FP 

Bowles AH 

BrownllenryW 

BurnhamW 

BurnhamMrsW 

" Wisj^LP-D 

CamplIrsDB 

CogswellGeoS 

ComingAugnstaE ol9 

GloverJ-Jehnette ol7 

GlovcrLonise ol8 

GunnSJ oil 



LemmouLizzieP sl4 
LymanChasPhelpsMlS 
LymanDr sl6 

MarvinHelenP o3 

MeekerEdwE s25 

NewcombM rsLMToll 
NcwcombOtisW o5 
SnyderThcoS jel5 
SperryMarieS ol!) 

SperryWS jyl8 

UpsonllcDry 67 

" MrsAA " 

WhittleseyMrsAM o5 
WhittlcsevJT " 

WhittlcseyMills a31 
WhittlesevNII s7 

WhittleseyRobtC ol7 
WoodhullMrsEP si7 
WoosterAM jy3 

WoosterEdwardG Je7 
WoosterJT n9 

WATERTOWN 

AtwoodBronson W o23 
AtwoodFB 65o5 

AtwoodHiramB o:',0 
AtwoodJosW cl7 

AtwoodMinnieF jylO 



8l4 1 HickoxTrnman 
ol9lHookerRalpliM 



AtwoodMrsOW 

" RuthM 

AtwoodMiseS 

AtwoodWn&wf 

BaldwinAL-SM 

BaldwinNF 

BaldwinTP 

BallHattieA 

BarlowMrt^Jno 

BeardsleeE 



k4 

031 

o30 

ol!) 

o2 

019 

025 

Nl 



BeardslcelNIarthaA n2 



BidwellChas 

BidwellCW 

BidwellKatieA 

BowersFredO 

BryanE 

CoulstonSam'l 

" MrsEIlen 

CrittendenET 

CurtisESanford 

CurtisFR 



s20 



o31 

67 

b5 



HotclikissAug 

■ IraC 

HotchkissEM 

Hungerforc.CP 

HungerfordJoel 

HungerfordJouas s20 
Delia 

JuddBcrthaE 

JuddFrankC 

.IiuldllQ&wf 

KincOB 

LcwisRT 

LcwiirWinH 

LockwoodCE 

Lock wood EB 

LockwcoriEllaM 

LovelardJIathaJ 

MarggroflEC 

MattdonAH 

MattocnCB 

MarvinllenryR 

McNeilKatie 

MerwinWrsCA 

MerwinSW 

MungerCE 

MiingerLucieM 

MungerDrWS 

NobleAliceB 

NobleCM 

PartrecFJ&wf 

" CoraE-EllaM 

PartrceJno 

" RC-FJ 

PartrceJro&wf 

" WrsLella 

PeckJoi^^ieA 

" Sarah 

PeckLemanO 

PeckSami'.olII 

PenneyRLR 

PerryMI 
o25 1 Rogers J J 
olIScovilleAH 
s7 SeymourJlrsAnn 
jc27 SharpsteenFrank 
" iSmithSevmour 
s2l'" WH-GeoII 
s20 Sperry .Tared 
a21 Sperry PB 



o4 

n4 
619 



031 

s27 

sSO 

jy3 

jel9 

615 

Si 6 

019 

a22 

k6 

S6 

03 

m20 

02 

o31 

o23 

ol9 

a22 

je7 

ot5 

m30 

019 

627 

018 

031 

Nl 

om 

si 

MlO 

Jy3 

813 

o3 

o3 

031 



CnrtisHHolbrook a24 TollesElizH 



CurtisWmEjr 

CurtissEli&wf 

CutlerLemanW 

DaileyGeoW 

DavisHP 



jcl7 WanierCE 
o24|WarnerIIiramC 



024 

o30 

66 

ol3 

s25 



s27 Warren A [NHGr's]jy7 



o31|WarrenCA je20 

jy28iWarrcnLI- &wf Jel3 
DaytonHen'vTAwlo24 1 WbeelerEli i;9 

DaytonSam'iTitwfs27|WilIeyEmmie'W sl9 
Dlckerman!MrsEBje30 WoodingGuy oil 

DickmanEII&wf sl9iWoodruffMartha o94 
FrenchEugeneC o30|WoodwardD o3 

Nl WoodwardGcoP olH 
*' WoodwardKateA oSl 
ol8jWoolsonAKwfib'n627 

02 WINCHESTER. 

s29jAndre\vsIIarvev n9 
oO BronsonEB-WM A2;i 



FrcnchElsf 

FrenchGB 

FrenchWmQ 

FrostHS 

GordonGeoA 

Hamilton A 

HardFC 



HardDavidM&wf o25 BronsonEH 



o3i Marialv-C^'arrieM 
g21 iCha^ieElleu 

N3FordND 
s21 GoodenonghA 

" jGoodenoiij/hT 



HardJB 

HardWG-CG 

HartLFostcr 

HeminwayBtSrwf 

" BH-MamieJ 

HeminwavMrsJnool2 HartLD 

HeminwavMjr&wfol7|'fohnsonBH 

nickoxFPcrcy Nl iMaiv'iHen lyP 

" Iloward " iMunsillEUaA 



s20 

o3 

n2 
Sl3 

Nl 

027 
n3 
N9 

620 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS — LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 



313 



aS3 

s8 
s30 

Al6 

a23 

Jy26 

s8 



07 

s5 

s9 
827 

06 
814 

s5 

ol8 



MunsiUMS-Ettie 

MurrayDaniel 

MurrayMary E 

NashCarolineB 

" SuaieS 

NashWL 

PetUboneBenjW 

PettiboneML 

StJolinAB[CoI] 

WINSTED. 

AdamsEA. 

AdamsHD 

AlfordPredQ 

AllordGeoH 

AlvordJ 

AlvordJabez 

BachelderLtJHC 

[CoI4thRegt] 
BairdMrsMaryA 
BdirdT 
BaldvvinGertr'deH ol9 
Bai-clayWmV a1 

BatchellerWmH ol8 
BatesA[CorCoI] 
BeactiMissElsie 
BeardsIeyTH&wf 
Benedicts B 
BenjaraiaAP 
" MrsiJR 
BQlsHenryA 
BlakeLM 
BradburyMrsSA 
BradfordGeoM 
BrooksJobu 
BiirnhamGeoS 
BurrAbbieM 
CarapLewisL 
CarringtonEP 
*' LoiifeeM 
ClarkEdw&wf 
ClarkeTM 
Cleveland Rufus 
CoeOhasC 
CoeEUenM 



je9 
Je23n9 
s3!J 

n8 

o4 

019 

a5 

jylt 

o6 

012 

oil 

je20 

Al6 



CoeLtWiIb'rP[CoI] s4 

CoflfeeJP 

CoUHG 

ColtLC 

" JenaieM 

CookeCbas 

Cooke MrsCbas 

CookeGeoD 



sl4 

s2f) 

.Tel9 

o20 
o7 
sl9 



CookeRollinH&wjyll 



CookeLilaP 

CookeJobnP 

CrockerWH 

CrowlevAE 

Culver EE 

Cunnin^bamOE 

DearbornEC 

[CorCoI] 
DonaldsonCJ 
DiittonME 
FancherHenryL 
EainhamGeoP 
FieldMrsMP 
PliinE[SerCoI] 
FraryRS&wf 
PylerPD 
GastonWtnB 
GeeRosa 
Gid lingsFH 
GiddingsMruPH 
GQbertW ^ 



017 

a5 

s6 

e4 

02(i 

m26 



o26 
07 



o18 
jy27 



GriswoldJL MlOrelS 

GriswoldL&wf Al9 

" HattieL " 

HarrisJohnJ a7 

UartGL o23 

HealyAW&wf a22 

HewittCD[SerCori s5 

HopkiusEmmaS ol7 

HorneEttaD 

HorneJJ-WA 

HorneSamuelB 

HiintOD 

" SylviaA-G 

Jackson Henry 

JohnsonMrsLJ 

KarrmannGeo 

KeeganJ [CorCoI] 

KeeuanJP 

KelloggGco 

KelloggMrsGeo 

KellySarahAH 

KingFL 

KingLR 

LanceJ P 

LawrenceEdP 



StarkMiBsAH 

StrongD-EL 

StrongFC 

SweeiWilburS 

TalmadgeMissH 

TatroLauraE 

TullerBelleC 

CarolineC " 

TuttleJohnL&wf s25 
WelchJamesH, o20 
WhiteGeo n1 

WhitingJuliusH 
WilcoxMr^EP 
WilliamsDavid 
WillimanHD 

[CorCoI] 
WilsonRollin 
WoodniffJasG&wf o5 
WoodruffWW 
WrightGeoE[CoI] s5 
YaleJnoD&wf s8 



La wren ceM rs Wnije20 



McDermottL sl3 

Mead EH Nl 

MillsDH&wf 07 

MillsMrsEG o2 

MillsTbos.M o9 
" LSM 

MooreFranklin olO 

•' Maria R " 

MooreRH&wf 625 

M unsillMaryJ o4 

XortonAC 925 

NortonAllenH 6l4 

NortonLR-RuthS s7 

OatmanNellieL sS 

ParsoQsElizaA jyll 

Pease MD s9 

PeckJoha jyo 
PersonsEH 

PhelpsMrsEN s25 

PbelpsGeoW&wf s8 

PhelpsJohnP 827 

PierceMaryM ofi 
PierceS6[CorCoI] s5 

PineFEdgar&wf Al9 

PondFL&wf n2 

PrzygodeOtto o27 

RaffLoiiisaW s5 

RightOS n8 

Roberts Allenjr s9 
" FlorenceM 

RobertsFrank n9 

RobertsHL&wf sl4 
RockwellJnoT &wfs2o 
•• MissAnnieM 
" Theron-JasS 

RockwellKateL jel9 
" LilianM 
RorabackWH 

[CorCoI] 

RoweGeo&wf ol6 

RoweGS [CorCoI] s5 

RowlevHenryH o4 

013 ScottBessieJ ol4 

Jy4 SkinnerCaptH[Cori s5 

o31 Skinner.Tennie a8 

o2 SkinnerNellieM jy31 

m16n9] Smith WellingtonB 

n9 SnowAbelH&wf sl4 

jy3lSpanlding.IavE si 9 



A4iHurlburtWmF n9 
s25|HumphreyLucyA S20 
g2G]HuntChasK b21 

s22 JamesonChasR oil 
a23 JohnsonHiramE o4 
Al2 LawlerJJ jy27 

o6 ManchesterE-WG s-21 

ManchesterJasA o3 

MinerMW 

MixWL 

NellisEllenA 

NobleAnuieE 



jel9 
o7 
s5 

o26 



NobleJE 



s29 
ol2- 
olO 
s9 
a2 
s28 
All 



YorkCJ&wf 

YorkDavid 

YorkMrsJessie 



Jy20 
o23 

a8 



NortonEV&wf 

OsboruWmB 

ParsonsAnnaR 

Parson sEB 

PersonsW 

PhclpsDwight 

" MrsDwigiit .Tyl5sl5 

PhelpsWniB&wf s28 



on 

Al2 
sl5 



■WEST WINSTED. 

AlvordChasL 
" JR-SL 
BatcliellerWT 
■' MrsJA 
BeardsleyER 
BradfordMrsE 
•' AnneH 
BrownJames 
BrownJohn 



a26 

o27 

je21 
o5 

jy2'; 



PlielpsWmC 



jy24 

jyl5 

el4 

a21 



PhelpsWmJ 
PliillipsWmB 
PhillipsMrsWS 
" MaryL 
PitkiuFrancisC 
PotterEugene 
PotterOFiwf 
PutnamAbbott 
RamseyGW[SrCoI] s5 
RenoiiftJH[C'rCoI] s5 
RenonliSarah a24 

Ritt'IIatticM o3 



o20 

A31 

o4 

o5 



jy29;RislugFA 



je2:i 



BushnellJasA-EC A24:KobertsnL[SerCoI]s5 

BushnellJasH '" ' ~ 

CampC &wf 

CampNellieB 

CainpWraL A9!SmithSusanM 

CarringtouGM • Al6 Smith VVardD 

•• JuliaP " StevensEC 

ChamberlinMissF A9|StevensMrsEC 

ChamberlinMrsHC ol 9 : St ockerJ ohn 



12!RockvvellJuliaE "o4 

Je23 [ Sackett Grove-Geo jy5 

jy8,SlocuniJH[SerCoI] s5 

"~ " o20 

611 

sis 
sl4 



MasterWA 
CiiaseDB 
ChurchAmandaE 
CoeDW&wf 
CoeGertrudeM 
CoeSpencerW 
ConeJafW 
ConeMarieE 
ConeMaryC 
CurticeFredC 
CiirtisRB&wf 
CutlerRM[CoI] 
DickermanSF&wf s21 
DrakeHenryH&wf a7 
'' GeoF-AnnaC 
DudleyMrsD s27 

DudleyGeo oil 

" Mrs&dau 
DndleyGeojr 
DnfTMrsJohnL 
GayMaryW 
GrangerDM 
GreeneMA 
GriswoldMrsJR 
HalketThosD 
nallockLH 
HewittlTH 



ThompsouG 
olOl Thompson WA 



n8 
sll 
o20 
MlO 

Al4 

s22 

Jyl7 

s6 

013 

85 



o:« 
ol8 
028 
o20 
jy4 



TiillerChasS 
VaiiSiclunJulia 
VaillJH 
VaillMrsJH 
VaillMrsTF 
WeedCH 
WeutworthGS 
WheelockAA 
WheelockLnc'nB jylB 
WhitiugJJ&wf s20 
WoodfordJolin jy27 
• AB 

WoodfordMrsJno 
WoosterFred'kL 



a14n10 

NlO 

ol9 
s20 
o20 



o3 

s27 



WOODBUKT. 

AllenGeoM s20 

AllenGeoP-LJ 87 

AllenGeoS 820 

" AugustaC '* 

AtwoodMreAlbert o27 
A t w oodMrsCh'ncey N 1 
AtwoodEF jyl3 

je92|AtwcodJoelH ol7 
jel7!BaconDnvidC oil 



HolmesRE-AlinaLol9iBaconMrsJohn o23 



GoddardAliceM a16 SpencerJohriN nZ 

GrangerSA JT^O StackPatrickC s8 

GrantLouisP&wf o4:stannardLilian o5 

Greene WTV ol8 " FrancesB " 
18 



SusieB 
" MasterEdward 
HolmesWP 
riiilbertED 
HnlbertMrsT 
'■ LiicindaRob'tS 
HurlburtJuliaM 



BaconWTjr&wf jel5 



BaldwinMrsHC 

s6 BartoCG 

s8 BenedictMissES 
a21 BettsMrsRN 

" BishopEN 
OlO " HattieE 



s6 
o28 

s7 

Nl 

o4 



314 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



BlackmanEJ 
BradleyCS 
BradleyEnoeL 
BradleyGC 
BrothwellWmC 
BrownG-MaryA 
BullMisDS 
BnllMiPsEA 
BullJuliaE 
•BullLaaraE 
BullThomaeM 
BurtonNB&wf 
BurtonWmB 
CapewellFrankE 
CapewellJT 
ChnrchillJohn 
ClarkMarthaA 
ClarkVestiniaE 
CoggswellMaryA 
CothrenWm 
CraneMrsGP 
CraneHR-Geo 
CroebyMrsJA 
CurtissEJ&wf 
CurtissHD&wf 
" ElizaS-FJ 
CurtissJasG 
CurtissJennie 
" MaryM 
CurtissWS-D 
DaweonFrank 
DawsonHenry 



ol7 

olS 

o5 

olO 

sl3 

o5 

je29 

je20 

o23 

06 

66 

oil 
027 
012 
o20 
0I8 

n6 
olO 

o5 
0I8 

o4 

Nl 

o3 
je20 

n9 

s8 

sl3 
013 
n9 



DaweonMreH-Katece; 

DaytonCW&wf Jel5 

DaytonWm 

DoolittleFE 

DownsJuliaE 

FabriqueBenj 

GordonAlex 

GordonEddieS 

HarveyCP 

HarveyChasM 



MitchellAW jc9s6n10 RnssellCarolineM n3 



s9 
839 
o23 

o4 

86 
0I2 

n8 

86 



MitchelLMreAW 

" AWjr 

MitchellCC 

MitchellWD 

MonsonJN 

MorrisGeoF&wf 

NicholeEF 

NicholsJohnW 

NoyesCarrieC 



s6 RussellDB oH 

" iSanfordMrsAE a21 
o2 SeeleyWSwl&dau gfi 
0I8 SliermanBA&wf o5 
n9 ShermanLM 
06 ShoveHW&wf 
s27 SkellvMF-JnoP 
je-20 SmithChagM 
jyl5 SinithDiKllein:h 



HitchcockFF&wf 827 NoyesEdw'dMcAjyH SmithMrisEliz 



sl9 
Je20 
020 

s26 

027 



HollisterL 

HoUisterSeth 

HollieterWR 

HuntingtonMrsJ 

JacocksJamesG 

JudeonAN-RB 

JudsonJW 

JudsonMreRB 

" CarrieM 

KnappGLeRoy 



olONoyesRevGW&wlsll SmithMrsEmilyL s27 



HL-AgnegF 
iIOakleyMissE 
; Orton JasS 
lOsbornSidneyV 
PageMS 
■ParkerRV 



n6 
0I8 
oil 

n4 

s7 
o24:PartreeSR-JuliaWoll,TerriIlKateC 



SmithGfoG-RH 
n9 Smith Wm&wf 
je7 StoneMreJS 
oll'StrongNM 
s6 SiimmcrsHenryP 
Pl2'" MrsHP 



0I8 
oil 
o27 

b29 

0I2 



Oil 



KirtlandCW&lady s8 

LeiumonCE 

LemmonES&wf 

LewisGeoB 

LindeleyHM 

LinpleyJoeH 

LinsleyWC 

MalloryWillysJ 

MinorChasD 

MinorCJ 

MinorLiUieA 



o4 

Bl3 
85 

je7 
023 

69 

87 

o11n9 

a26n4 

n9 



PercyGeoE 

PercyllattieE 

PercyJuliaE 

Perk ins JohnB 

PierceGE 

PrescottWR 

ProctorGeoN 

" Wallace 

RobertMrsJohn 

" CG-Linda 

[RobertpJohnH 

iRootHomerA 

RassellBS&wf 



NellieA 

ol2,ThomasSherman o5 

oil' Thompson Jas oil 
jy6l" MissAR 
o7N2lTomlicsonHS&wf Je8 

a22 TylerJas olO 

olO/' JlrsHattie "• 

" iWalkerFA " 

a21 Way Fred W " 

" iWellsWJ-WE o4 

06 WhiteCordeliaC a3 

olOjWoodruft'KatieM sl3 

sl2lWyckoffRevJLE 821 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS — NEW LONDON COUNTY. 



315 



KTE'W uonsjiDOKr cDGTJJsrrr-Y: 



BOZRAH. 

BaileyPhebeJ o26 

BaileyWm&wf o30 

BrifjhamNA s28 

CookeMerrill ol6 

FellowsFE-FA a9 
Fitch WH&w-AD jel2 

JohnsonEdward m'2o 

KaufmanChas m25 

Mapk'sAliceA 630 

PalmerCL o23 

PeucUetonCA s2' 

PendletonCVB o30 

SeviiiGeoV n3 

SmithEetellaJ oSO 

SmithMrsGeo o5 

SmltliLuciauH o31 

COLCHESTER. 

AbelFC olO 

AdamsJN 
" JiiliaM 
AveryFT&wf sKl 

AveryGeoB olO 

AveryMrsOW slO 

BackusJabez Je22 
BackusJnoR s(i 

BakerAldenA&wfjy22 
BakerArtharP jy-22 
BigclowAR c)31 

BigclowJasD Jy25 
BiirelowLizzieB olS 
BillWni OlO 

BuellHP on 

BulkleyJames sl3 

ChampliiiGC s21 

OhapmanLeander Je9 
ClarkChas el3 

ClarkeJI ol7 

CrarfnMreAE-EIIa 
'• Katie-Eddie 
CartisWmS e26 

" FannyS " 

DawleyCH a31 

DayMary b7 

DinsmorelraA Je9 
DuttonHaniet o25 
FooteDrN jel3 

FordHB ol7 

FullerFL olO 

GardnerRH olO 

GatesIlB MlO 

GillettLizzieB 
GillettMaryE 
GilletteJosiah a31 
GilletteMary 
GriggeTN a31 

HallJE s6 

Harvey WmE&wf 
HaywardNellie sl2 
" Belle-AnnieH " 
HaywardWmH n8 
KenyonEL o26 

LeffingwellSarah slO 
" Mary 

MainebrJonaeC o20 
MarshllC jy5 

MarvinKfenry s6 

MillerHenry-Geo el3 
OtisMrsAlmaE olO 
PalmerHenryS-DPoll 
PattonEmmaS 
PattonLizzieP Jyl7 
RaneomAnnieS Jv22 
" Carrie W-ES "" 
" ChasN-WmS 



RansomE&wf-Ejr a1 
RansoniJnoS a1 

RathboneLconora s7 
RobinsonDrMW o26 
RogcrsCH OlO 

SclieeleCE 

SextonWallace 828 
ShoUJuoP-lIenry olO 
SmithCT&wf o2-4 

" Florence L-ChasP" 
" CnrrieEl-NcllieA " 
SmithJoseph s2r 

SnowEC-EvaE st 

SnowKannie 
SparrowMrsB 
SpragueDII jel7jy22 
'• Mrs^DH 
Standis^hGcoG olO 
StrongDvvightB o2o 
StrongEH-KL sO 

StrongMrsEW ol2 
StrongNelsonH sti 
" Sarah J 

StrongPR clS 

" FannieM 
StronsWE-WJP ol2 
•' MElla 
SwiftDrSE-JnoT p6 
" AlmiraE-CaroL 
SwilfGeo-Edward sl2 
TempletonFaimie Pli 
ThomasJiioW Jj'26 
TracyGeoH nQ 

TreatMrsJP s9 

" LillieB 
WheelerJoehuaB s26 
" AureliaL 
WilliamsNellieE Bl2 
WillianisWmA olO 
WorthingtonO sl3 

•WrESTCHESTKK. 

AdamsWP s20 
BigelowAR-AbbyM s8 

BrainardSN 821 

BrainerdWmJr b19 

BrownMaryA 88 

BrownThosS s6 

CarrierDemas 821 

CarrierEdgarA s21 

CarrierPL e21 

MrsFL AlO 

CarrierGE o2fi 

DayDavidB MlO 

DayJMaria aIO 

LoomisCT a17 

LoomisMiltonL s6 

PeckGeo n2 

SiemsWH f6 

WoUertonMaryE olO 

EAST LYME. 

BeckwithEH o9 

Beckwith.TE 620 

BeckwithNoble o7 
Calkins^DrDan'l je2 
" ElizM-AbbieA " 
" ArthnrB " 

ClarkEdwardD s25 
CJomstockCJ 820 

ComstockMW&wf o4 
CutterWmT jefi 

GriswoldGeo o6 

" CarohneE " 

GurleyChas Jel 

HowardEdwin je20 
KcablesHE o4 



KeablesLizzieM o4 
LeeMrsJohn o4 

" Lillian-Mary " 
LippincottLiz'eA Jy22 
LuceCaptEdw o4 

" MissLizzie " 

LuceFC&wf o25 

LiiceJohnW&wf o4 
" MastOhas&Frank" 
MarehantAL a30 

MathevvsonRevP o4 
MooreE o26 

.MooreF jelslo2() 

MurrayFrankL jyi2 
XilesilrsHB ol8 

ReedAncel&wf o25 
SturtevantOP i 

VVayHenry j 

Way^asA ■ 



NI ANTIC, 

BabcockChas-HelenA 
BcckwithRC sl3 

BoIlesChasC 8ll 

BollesPA sl3 

BoiidSaraM: o20 

BiishCelesteE Jy5 

DenisouBS ol9 

DeStranscliMrsO je8 
FitzgibbonJno ol7 
Gates Walton ol7 

GostonW'm 018 

HavensHE ol7 

Havent^SW a31o24 
HavensTP a31 

HavensWalterL " 
HuntleyMrsNJ olO 
LesteriiW o24 

LuceEC e20 

ManwaringEdgarBol7 
MungerDrE o24 

PalmerHF&wf a24 
ReedEA s20 

Shepards'nMrsEM ol9 
TeinpleRevJF&wjyl4 
WhaleySR s25 

WhittleseyMD ol9 

FRANKLIN. 

AyerEEugene o4 

BaileyEB-MiesME sl9 



si 5 
87 
sll 
a31 
oil 

87 

a30 
o31 



BellWL 

CrossMrsJno 

Prink.lohn 

HuntingtonHL 

HydeElfis-Miss 

HydeWB 

KingsleyTHC 

KingsleyCA-Bertie 85 

KingsleyMrsHH ol7 

KingsleyHW 

LaddHLM 

LambGilbert 

SmithDL 

SmithEllal 

SmithJuliaO 

Smith.TOwen&w 

SmithPO&wf 

SmithLK&wf 

SmithOS&wf 

SmithLO&wf 

StarkweatherGE 

MrsGE 
VerplanckPredA 

Julias 
WoodsworthMreEB 

jyr 



je7 

a30 

n3 

s4 

o6 

8l6 
Mil 
Mil 

jel 

jy3 
sl6| 

027 

04! 



GRISWOLD 

ArnottW 
BarberRR 
BarberSam'l 
BromleyGeoW 
BrownJulia 
BrowningBH 
'• SarahE 
BurdickGeoD 
C'ampbellAUenB 
CampbellDwightB s8 

DawleyJosephN Nl 

DodgeJO o« 

KinneldaW ol2 

LeonardHoward ol9 

LeonardJE sS 

NorthropJP s4 

Tilliuglia8tGeoF m15 
TylerGeo-PrankJ o4 

WeaverAlpheus s20 

JirWETT CITT. 

BoyleP ol3 

BradyHattieM o7 

BrownGeoW je20 

BrownMaryF a16 
" NeUieE 
BrownOscar 

BrownLydiaJ s25 
" SarahL 

BrowningWA&wf olO 
" Ida 

BurnhamAC-CC o25 
CollagonThos 

Corey GJ-DF o22 

CrockerChas Jyl7 
DavisonMinervaE s8 

EnsworihAWjr o5 

FanningFredkH sl9 

FennerFA 8l4 

" MrsAddie-HW " 

FitchRW 025 

FoxMrsEP o31 

GeerSL s7 

Holmes^GeoJ All 

JohngoiiHL mSO 

LathropEdwin 829 

LawtouAT-EC All 

LeeThosE 8l3 

LesterJamesP o2S 

LewisGeoW o5 

PalmerGeo o2(! 
PartridgeHannabCo27 

Phillip(a)L jy£9 

PotterFM'ayland sl9 

PriorDK-ChasE olrt 
RayChasH-SarahL o5 

RoodJoseph 87 

ScottSam'lT 06 

ShipnianThosL oSl 
" MrsPL 

TracyJernieR o3 

TylerChat^O o31 

WebbJA 84 

WoodLncyJ o7 

WilsoiiWm oil 

YoungAR o5 

GROTON. 

AllenFrankG o4 

AllenNellieM o31 

AndersonAA 87 

Avery A P o20 

Avery DeliaW 0I6 
Avery ED-LizzieM 8l8 

" JuIiaA-CoraV " 



316 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



o26 

Al8 
c27 
014 
je24 
a8 
o4 



Averj'Henry 

Avery JIariana 

Bailey MP 

BillFred'k 

BillF&wf 

BolIesJoshuaA 

IJranianC 

BiiddingtonStep'n o30 

BurrowsCIaraE o27 

ChaucyMariaP je2 

ChapmanFannieE n8 

ChapinaiiSimeonAoll 

ChutiterEmnia b19 

ClaikeAiinaB sl6 

C'oeErnest-Julia o4 

CoeGerlrudeL 

CoppDN-BA 

"• KateB-Julia 

CoppJiioJ 

OraryGeoB 

DaboUGeoW 

DabollLE 

EakinWmS&wf 

" MasterWniS 

DenisonWalterP 

PergusouJasA 

PishErastiiB&lady 027 

FishJennetteE n2 

GallupBFrank 

GalUipESd 

GallupFred'k 

" LucyM 

GrayEinilyM 

GniyRoblA 

HaleyJnoB 

HewittEA 

HallowayEdwinS 8l4 

LathamCC oil 

LathamEH o9 

Lons^GM je9 

Min'erEM-ME s27 

MorganEbeu'zr m24o9 

" MrsE m24 

MoreauJS&wf ol4 

" Clara A " 

MorganSarahH 

Morgan WH 

OrrVVmS 

PeacockEdM 

PerkinsIraA 

PerkinsMaryCoe 



sl9 
A22 

e2' 
Je9 
0.3 
All 
je2 

m22 

nS 



027 

slO 
o25 

olC 

o25 
m24 



n2 
S25 
a30 

AlO 

n3 
8l9 



SinithRev W A&wf ol2 



StricklandPA 

" Lizzie 

ThomasES 

TurnerAliceE 

WalkcrLauraA 

"■ JuliaSA 

WalkerMaryP 

WerdenChasE 

WilliamsPE 

WoodhullRevJA 



s22 

o25 
820 
ol7 

017 
o4 
06 
o4 



MYSTIC BIVEU, 

AlexandcrJasH 
AehbeyD 
Ashley HannahR 
AshleySW 
AahbergWS 
Avery Parmenas 

" Bessie 

BarkerEP-Wn 
BeebeLeonard 
BentleyllarriettL 
BentleyWWarrcn o28 
BerryEmmaC olO 

Bradley.Jennie o27 
Burrowf CaptB&w ol9 
BarrowsBenjP sl9 



013 

S20 
a9 
ol3 
AlO 
Al2 

a22 

826 
o3 



BurrowsJuliaV 

BurrowsLizzieA 

ClarkOrlandoA 

CliftEC 

CliftUelenM 

Cliltlra 

CliftSarahS 

CraryMrsGB 

CraryJD 

DemsouJasTH 

EdgecombJnoS 

EldredgeCH 

E IdredgeGeoHAwf o2;J 

FishEmilyH ol3 

FishMrsHoraceW o3 

" Emeline-KatcH " 

" FannieL-SusanL " 

FishWmR AlO 

Fon?ylhThosC&wfo27 

GatesGenevie olS 

■' MrsJD 

OatesMrsGeo ol9 

GatesGeoP sl9 

GatesJaBS-ClifM AlO 

GaryHarriet n9 

GaryMrsJP N2 

GrayMP o9 

GregorJ Nl 

Guernsey LM All 

HammondMargarct 66 

•' ClaraM 

HeathChasR 

HeathJnoS 

HuntGeoL&wf 

NettieC 
LambGeoO 
LatliamGilesR 
McGuireEW 
McGuireQuincy 
MooreGeoSr 

WmH-MrsGeo 
MorganLiitherA 
MorganWalterC 
Murphy A A 
NoyesMrsED 
NoyesPaulA 
PackerGeoD 
" MrgSR 
PackerHannahQ 
ParkChasH&wf 

George 
PotterWmH 

BridgetR 
PrenticeMary 
RathbunJA 

MrsJA-MrsGP 

FannieA 
RickerMiltonH 
SawyerMrsMosesH o3 

HortenseB 
SeamanGeoL 
SheffieldPH 
SissonChasC 
SparksHK&wf 
StarkMrsMaryB 

MrsNancy 
StarkWL 
TribbleAgneaV 
TribbleEllaF 
WheelcrWmEir 
Wilbur.TnoP-WA 
WilburRP 
WilliamsAlbert 



ChcsterMJ olS StandiehSarahE o5 

CollinsThosB oll| [StandishHill] 

FitchWalterW b28 StandishWS-Pannie 
GrumleyMrsEM jel2 SweetDrChas&wf o27 
HancoxNJ m18 TalcottHan&wf s26 

" PrancesE ■•' jTalcottMaryA o28 

LathaniAMatilda ol2 ThomasCS s29 

" 1 Thomas WmG 89 

o23;ThorpSW ol2 

019 ThroopMr8H'n'yHo2«) 



MinerAbbieJ 

MinerDrOE 

Morgan A V 

MorganPW 

PalmerRobtjr 

PalmerKobt&wf 

PotterElihuH 

RathbunNW 

SearleJBC 

SpicerAuuieC 



ol7,TuckcrH 
s28:"' AbbieC 
ol3' WarnerJosS 
ol7i" LouiseE 
o:;i5 1 Waterman A-JE 
olliWilliamsNC'-MS 
ol2|Wood\vortbDS 
" SophiaH 



g26 LEDTABD. 

sldJAllynlsrael 
ol2|AllynNB&wf 



sl3 

Nl 



o5 

a25 

s20, 

88 
a23 

jyio 

Al2 

8l5 
o26 

sm 

A24 

ol9 
o3 
S20 

" i 
olO 
012 

a9 

ol3 
o3l 



olS 



a9 
025 
S23 

828 



LEBANOTf. 

AhellChasJ 

AbellFred'kA 

AbellHenryW 

BarberWP 

BillJC&wf 

BrownLucyEIecta a2 

CraudallMr8AliceSol2 

CrandallJC oil 

DolbeareEdwinM 823 

DolbeareSophiaM s22 BrewsterFrankW 

FowlerAnson&wf ol2 Brewster Jno 

"■ HattieR " jOhapmanlsaacA 

PowlerFrankP sl3 CookEdward 

FullerDan'lT o6 CuttingChas 



AveryDrAGeer 

AveryT-AmosG 

AveryBillingsT 

Averj'Maggie 

" EllaL 

BillingsMaryJ 



ol3 
ol8 

Nl 

827 
O20 



ol7 
jel6 

N» 

ol7 

813 

ol8 

Bl3 

s5 
o6 

87 



WilliamsMaryP 
YarringtonEA 

NOANK. 

ChesterAS 
ChesterDM 



All 

Al2 

013 
a25 

Nl 

o26 
Jy27 



GayWmR-CW s22 

" EmmaP-MaryR " 

GcerWmS A1987 

GibbsEH s27 

GoodwinBelleM 

GroenGeoF 

IlatchEHza 

HaynesSamuelE 

HazenMarcusM 

HewittEW 

IlewittGeo 

" Angeline 

HewitlGH 

HinckleyMrsEK 

HinckleyEN 

HoxieGeoH 

HullChasP 

HuntingtonEB 

"BF 

HuntingtonWm 

JacksonAlbert 

" EmilyW 

JordanJH 

McCallChasC 

McCallGeo 

ManningAB 

ManningEF 

ManningJP .„„ 

MasonMrsJamesF o5 

NoyesMrsFrank 

NoyesPrankK 

" Helen 

PeckhaniHH 

PeckhamJessieA 

PeckhamRobtC 



DuttonMH n2 

GalliipAnua 8l6 

GallupCM 812 

GallupMrsJA sl5 

s22! Gallup Joseph A ol7 

s21 GallupJWesley el3 

09 GallupRussell Bl6 

je9j" JeunieW " 

o3l!GeerIG s6 

8l4JGriswoldAddieS 8l3 

GriswoldLizzie sl2 

|GriswoldLH&wf All 

sl3 LarrabeeA Je22 

o31 Larrabeellenry jel4 

o30 LarrabeeMrsU jel5 

ol2j" Wm-NathanP 

a30|" Adam-HannahM " 

822 LesterNathanL o4 

LesterWml 825 

NormanHR ol8 

O'BrieuEverettS 8l3 

ReynoldsEdw Ml9jel9 

" AnnicC Jel9 

ReynoldsEraeline s28 

RogersOlive s6 

SpicerEdwE ol7 

SpicerJnoS-GW o20 

StoddardAddie ol7 

StoddardEdmnndjr a7 

s2liStoddardOO Je22 

r21 I 

» LISBON. 

ol8!Bi?hopCha9 ol2 

n6 BrowneWTyler 82 

jy5 ChipmanRM o27 

PeckhamWW&wf o27 IlatchLF sl4 

PettisOE&wf ol2 Mathew8onM'rthaHo2 



s26 
OlO 

sl4 

s8 
Ol9 
827 
sl4 
Je9 



CIS 
025 



" CarrieW " 

Putnam Re vGeoL o27 
RandallJnoC&wf ol9 
RobinsonHattieE s22 
SmithAA ol9 

SmithLP 
SpaffordEP 



RossGeoA&wf s25 
LYME. 

AndersonHK&ladyelS 
"• Josie " 

89 BeckwithAngieA a24 
s6 BeckwithLS-EJ a31 



SpaffordHenryA 
SpauldingD 



BecbeHoraceW 
sl2'BigelowDE 



o« 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS — NEW LONDON COUNTY. 317 



BillJamesA 

BilMamesAjr 

BillJNelson 

BillLecomptonC 

BillLiuwoodA 

Bill Lodo wick 

BradburyAE 

BrainerdH'nryMWjy3 

BrockwayChasL ol2 

" MinnleE-NellieG " 

BrockwayTC&wf ol8 



8l4 



S21 
oil 
S28 
018 
g21 
018 



8l2 



CaryWB 

Daniels MrsH A 

DrummondJasE 

ElyBA 

ElyEdnaJ 

ElyPlorenceE 

" FannieC 

ElyDrJG&soa 

ElyMissP 

ElyWmH 

ElyWmN 

GillettePascalL 

GrifflnED 

GriftinRL 

" MrsBM " 

GriswoldFlor''ceAjel5 

Gris^woldMrsKS sltj 

" FanuyA " 

IlallJS s6 

HarleJW a9 

JewettRM sl3 

LaPlaceFA 822 

LaPlaceldaG sl3 

LayAureliaC oil 

LordHS&wf 

" ArchieE '* 

LordJudahH 

MartinJulia 

MarviuAD 

MarvinMrsAM 

Marvin WmJ 

MatsouJ jel4s29 

Moloney Mrs&MiasMlO 

MorleyChasL 

MinerCH 

NoyesR&wf 

" WalterC 

PageMis3 

ParkerMS 

PeckMissEM 

PeckJWarrea 

PeckOM 

RathbunBA 

RathbunLizzie 

RaymoudCarrieL Jy25 

" UelenL 

RayinondJasL 

" MrsHesterB 

ReyuoldsCE 

ReynoldsEO sti 

ScheiffleiuMissEE e27 

SeldeuLizzieC s6 

SissonHB&lady 

SissonHenryB 

SinithJno-Fred 

StarkWmH 

StarkNG 

SterlingAsahelM 

SterlingOB 

StevensMrsTH 

TerryChas 

TerryFrankA 

Terry JN 

WariierLillianE 

Warren.TR 

WilsonJK 



HADLTME. 

BrockwayCarrie a21 
BrockwayJB&wf o31 
" Georgie " 

BrockwayMissME 622 
BrooksChasE a17 

BumhamEC-CN ol9 
BurnbamHC&vvf s28 
ComgitockES Jy27 
ComstockMiss a21 
GatesChasD-WE s6 
Gates FE^ J 828 

Harrison WF s6 

HolmesStephen o27 
HolmesSR o25 

HungerfordCW o20 
HungerfordJosW o25 
HiingerfordRE jel2 
MatherFanny 
MatherKateli 
PhelpsSamuelH 
SeldenArthurC 
SeldenWmE 

MaryE 
SheldonKateP 

Chryssa 
SpencerMissAC 
StarkHattie 
WiUeyCliasM&wf a22 

MOSTVILLE. 

BabbittAddieV o28 

BakerDavidH 

BakerJnoS 

BollesDrJC 
JCjr 

BrowningLewis 
Al4|BrowningSniith 
s6 1 BnrchardAbbieC 
ol8 BurchardArthurW a'19 

ChappellCN g7 

ChainplinMrsCptC a31 



iScofieldJF 
StarrDA 
[StoddardJasG 
IThacherWF 



ol6 

821 

ol7 
n4 



ol2 
o25 
o26 

s8 
c25 

8l6 

o6 



sl5 
ol8 
822 

Nl 
o31 
jy4 



820 
ol9 
je29 
829 
Ol4 

o6 
o25 

n6 
Ol7 
a21 

S8 

o3 

ol3 

jy24 

ol8 

Bl4 
o3 



ChurchElizaM 
623IChurchSarahP 
a30 ComstockLA 



ol8 

s2o 
ol7 
o27 
jelO 
je9 

8l2 

sl3 



823 
ol2 



8l3 

.Te9 

s28 

62:^ 

o4 

s5 

Je9 

A3 

Al6 

s29 

jel4 

o25 

o5 

a9 



Corns tockMr 

" MaryD 

DartGeoW 

DolLeareHenryC 

DolbeareJamesG 

FitcliAE-SarahE 

FitchElizaR 

GardnerMrsAJ 

HickokCH 

HillhonseJW 

HomeDanD 

HurdAlbertC 

HnrdACora 

HurdSA 

LaddMarvin 

LandphereFA 

LefflnojwellO 

LyonDanielD 

PalmerGeoS 

" AliceM 

ParkerJennieE 

ParkerSC 

ParishRN 

RobertsonAlexC 

" WR 

RobertsonCM 

RobertsonJoa'naHo31 

RobertsonMaryB a31 

RobinsonAug 8l3 

" AbigailR " 

RogersAH-BenjG o7 

RogersErnest ol8 

RogersJeiinie 6l4 



s21 
o28 
s21 
o23 

s7 
ol8 
olO 
a28 
o25 

s6 
031 

o5 

s8 
a23 
o23 
Al9 
Jyl2 

o31 
o30 
ol6 
oil 

o30 



NEW LONDON. 

AllenWmH 8l2 

AUynChas sl8 

" HeleuL 

AUynStanley a28 

AmesNathau'lH 66 

[Colonel3dRegt] 
ArcherEdwin&wf a9 
ArmstrongWA sl9 
ArnoldAC&wf 
AruoldChanncey 
ArnoldCHMrs 
ArthurThosT 
AveryJRjr 
BacouCG 
BaconMW&wf 
BabcockLewis 
BadetAliceW 
BadetCarrieP 
" JennieB 
BadelFH&wf 
BadetThosP 
BailevLeander 
BakerED 
" HarrisC-Isaac 
BarnsWH 
" LJ-KD 
BarryCjr 
BarryMrsCarlos 
"GMaud 
BarryCarlos 
BatesMrs&2child'n n9 
" MissAE 

BattisTittisB a17 

BeachTE[CorCoD] s(> 
BeckwithAngA ol9 
iBeckwithChasB sl3 
iBeckwithCG s7 

jBeckwitbCH 
BeckwithCyrusG o5 
BeckwithFD[CoD] 62 
BeckwithGW o7 

iBeckwithJason&wfsG 
I'-FJ 

BeckwithJE o25 

BeckwitbMH 64 

BeebeMissEC n2 

BeebeNJ 8l5 

BeldenRN ol9 

" Samuel&wf " 

BellowsSB 86 

" AnnieL-DexterW" 
BenjaminWO oil 

"ChasA-MaryE 
BentleyCaptWH 

[CoD] 
BillingsWW 
BindlossThosP 
BishopAP 
BishopCA 
BishopGilbert 
BishopJS-Henry 
BishopMaryE 
BlydenburghLB je29 
" BB 

BoardmanAlbert 
BoilesWalterA 
BondHenryR 
BondMB 
BondWmW 
BossChasDjr 
" HarryE 
BossJopephS 
BoeeRobertP 



o^ 
o24 
n6 
ol8 
Jy28 
o31 



BragawJL[CorCoD]s6 
BrainardGeoL sl8 
BrainardMaryG Je(i 
BramanEE olO 

BramanFrancisN sti 
[Surgeon3dRegt] 



BramauMrsFN 
BramauH 
BrewsterJohnW 
" MaryE-AlberU 
BrownGorton 
BrownMissIT 
" EdwinT-GeoT 
BrownJohnH 



sl4 
012 
o31 

a9 



86 



BrownLSmith-OO n9 



BuckleyJohn 

BiirbeckJohnC 

BurbeckWH 

BurdickHC 

BiirdickJames 

BurdickLauraA 



s28 
018 
s7 
a9 
n8 
sl6 



BurdickLafayette sl6 



616 

je9 
825 
s22 

819 

OlO 
ol7 
o20 
ol7 



BurdickWH 

BurgessAlbertT 

BurnhamT 

BurrMrsWalterR 

CalkinsDrFW 

CalkinsWE 

CallahanP 

CalvertJC-AM 

CalvertJiiO-F 

" Gertrude " 

CarpenterZT&wf 820 

CarrollMissJ o25 

CaseJohnG a3 

CaulkinsEH&wf 8l3 

CaulkinsSam'lW 

ChaneyCP 

ChaneyRial 

ChapelGeoH 

ChapelHiram. 

ChapelJasR 

ChapelWalterP 

ChapmanGP 

Chapman.TacobA 

ChappellChas 

ChappellColfax 

ChappeUWS 

" MrsHS 

ChesterAnnieM 

ChewEH 

ChewJL 

ChurchillMrsJR 

"CW 

Churchill WH 

" LizzieB 

aappJWson&dau sl3 



019 
sis 
s30 

s7 
o7 
026 

68 

o9 

sl4 

a2 

je20 

o27 

oil 

o3 

Ml9 

019 

o31 



s27 
n2 



OlO 



Jy28 
S25 



ClarkEP&wf 
ClarkMrsLD 
" Harry P 
ClarkeMrsGeoBj r 
ClarkJnoS 
Parmelia 
ClarkMaryA 
ClarkMaryParker a17 
CoitMrsR-Ellea o20 
CoitWmB jy28 

CollesterEB a24 

CoUinsDP o25 

ComstockMrsAJ n1 
ComstockFred'k ol6 
ComstockFrankA ol8 
ComstockJW a31 
ComstockMJ 86 

ComstockMaryE jy29 
ComstockWHH Jy26 
ConeChas-Lillian ol3 
CookAD 
CornellFH olO 



318 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



CrandailAnnie o7 

CrandallFitchD " 
CrandallMr&Mrs a30 
CrockerChauncyC 
CrocKerEdwN 
CrockerHenryN a15 
C'rockerWinE[CoD] 8l 
CroltonGeoT o5 

CroninWWLCoD] 84 
C.iimpMisBFC N(i 

CnnninKhamWmBolS 
s(j 

Al5 
o9 

m27 

82 



CulverU 

CutterCW 

DabollEV 

DabollGeoS 

DabolUIH 

DaboUWolcottA 

DaggettMrsOE 

" MissM 

Dai-tJessieG 

Uartll.vl 

DartJWarren 

DartEEdson 

" SAnuie 

DaiTowEE&wf 

DarrowJE 

DarrowM 

DarrowfJellie 

DavisChasW 

DeCorseyHenry 

DenisonEA-SA 

DeuifionFA 

DeunisonWmA 

DennisEliasM 

" NellieM 

DickinsonMajW 

[USA] 
" MrsJohn 
DoutjlassAlbertC 
Doii.;lassEU 
DouglassFerrisW ol8 
DoiiglassFerd&wf n8 
DouglassHH-MA n3 
Douglass J A 
DouglaesRobt 
DowFrankW 
DowIW-MrsME 
DowcettWm 
DudleyS&wf 
EdgarJeunieL 
EdgecombRS 
EgglestonMrgJW a30 
EversTimothyJ s21 
EUiottWniH a30 

FairfaxWMcNeill jy28 
FeklmanHenry n9 
FengarGeoW 
FieldHarryP 
FilsonHelenA 
FitchAugJ 
FitchMrsGeoQ 
FltchMrsHT 
FoxL 

FreeseChasF 
FrenchJC 
FreemanMrsHN 
FullerHC 
GaillardMrsWA 
GartonWmM 
GetchellEllen 
GoddardGW 
GoddardGeoFred jyl2 
" JatnesC " 

GoddardJnoC a17 
Goddard.JC[SrCoD] s2 
GoddardWmH o6 

GoftFP[SerCoD] s6 
GoffFraukP sfi 

GoodvviuWalterA s8 



si31 

827 
sl5 
s23 
el3 

el6 
o25 



014 



o4 



o30 
oil 



Sl4 



o4 

023 
Sl9 

olO 

813 

o27 

o4 



GortonHH o6 

GortonJohnS-GA o31 



027 

85 

ol9 

814 

sl3 

o7 

m30 

85 

a26 



GortonWmS 

GossLtF[CoD] 

GoveDW 

GrantAM 

GrantHW 

GreeneAliceM 

GreeneOL 

GreeneWmE 

Griffin AT 

GrimesWallaceG 

GriswoklCC 

GriswoldGeoF 

" MrsSarahJ 

GurleyMissEG 

HaleyMiss 

HalseyJeremiah 

llandChasH 

H:indFW 

HardwickMrsFA 

IlarringtonMrsS 

IlarrisAE 

HarrisAR-Eliz 

IlarrisCurtisE 

IlarrisFredH-CF 

" FannieS-AH 

" MaudG 

HarrisGW&wf jy28 

Harri8LtJE[CoD] sO 

Harris JaniesN&wfs22 

" LizzieR-SarahD " 

HarrisJnoW ol8 

Ha88onDrAB[usA]o24 

UassonJnoA je27o4 

IlavenJC 

HempeteadEJ 

HempeteadLP 

Hempstead WD 

HessL 

HewittAP 

HewittChaeJ-AW ol7 



o23 
oil 

jel8 

Nl 

o4 
028 

si 

ol9 

o28 

Jy26 

s7 

82« 

el8 



JonesJno 

KeefeArthnr 

KeefeEdward 

KeeleyWL 

KeeneyWD 

KeeneyJasA 

KennersonGeoB 

KeelerJnoM 

" MrsME 

KeeneyEdwin 

" JuliaB 

KeeneyFloraM 

KeeneyGA 

KeeneyHenryG 

KeeneyJoseph 

KeenevJC 

KceneyJE-FM 

KeeneyNelson 

KimballRJ&wf 

KunzelraanMissM o31 

"Misses Liz'e&Annie 



Jy3 

o24 

o5 

04 

04 
N3 
n8 
o27 

017 

o23 
o24 
028 

82 

A23 
o31 

s6 
K9 



o4 
s27 



024 



a28 
Sl6 



813 



jy5 

89 

je24 
je5 
825 



Hewitt Walters 

HicksWmH 

UillJamesH 

HilliarBH 

HirschHI 

HobronUrA 

HobronCB 

Hebron HAG 

HobronWEd 

HogaiiIra 

HoggettN-W 

IIpriinsEdH 

" MaryE 

HoltAC-MissHJ 

HoltFW 



o3 

827 
s4 
o4 
06 
8l3 
023 

85 

Sl9 
019 
a2 

OlO 
024 



Al5!HoltMisse8LM&FEN2 

OlO 

017 

ol2 

017 

a31 



oil 



ol6 
jy5 
o25 
m27 



HoltSarahA 
HoltWmA-ES 
HoveyPB 
HoweChasW 
HowardMissLD 
HuntiiigtonCC 
HuiitleyKitty 
HutchineonMrsEE o5 
'• MamieW " 

IngersonFA o21 

JacobsAbraham a3 
JeflfreyCC[CorCoD] s6 
JeromeBW o4 

" MissIdaPtC-H-L " 
JenningsCha'*B jy28 
JenningsEB&wf o30 
" MlssJA " 

JeromeAM o3 

JewellDrOH o31 

" FrankD " 

JohnsonQertradePoaS 



LangMiss 
LalhamDD 
" MrsMA 
LathaniEllenH 
LathamMrsEH 
LatimerChasB 
LatimerFred'kB 
" Louise 
LafimerJamesM 
LatimerRichardR ol7 
" AnnieD-EmmaBol7 
LawlorPP 82H 

LeamedEdw je)9 
LearnedSC-Sarah je8 
LearncdWalter&w s6 
" Horace " 

Le.'DMortimer&w s20 
LeeBenjH 

LeeMissML oil 

Lewisl'hasC 
LewisMrsEmmeli'e o9 
LewisLeander a31 
" Walter 

LesterCH jyl5 

LippittAC-LE o30 
LippittCC ^^2 

LiveseyOL jy2lA3lN9 
LoomisCO sl4 

LoomisFrancisB 8l9 
LyonGeoR 
LynchBL 
" AugiistaTH 
LuganTimothy 
MackEA 
MahanBryanF 
MahanKittie 
"Lizzie 

ManierreBenjF 
ManningHW 
MarckwaldMaryD o31 
" Frank " 

MarshWL o30 

" MrsLottieB-Carlie" 
Mai?onWm[C'rCoD]s7 
MathewsWA&wf o24 
" AS-WillieB 
McDermottJasO 823 
McMuUenPeter o28 
MaxsonHerbertB o20 
McGinleyJohn o20 
McGuireThos o5 

MeadMrsS-AnnaL b2 
MercerJnoD n3 

MercerMisa o7 

Metcalf.TM AlO 

MichaeW si 

MiddletonFrancE m30 
MiddletonWD jy28 



MinerChrisC rtSS 

[USCadets] 
MinerChasH jyl 

" LawrenceW " 

MinerFW&wf je2N9 
MinsonJohnH a31 
MoodyCWw&son o23 
MolthropWmH o21 
MorganEF&wf 
MorganlleniyW 
MorganJC 
Morgan J S 
Morgan J W&wf 
"• KittieL " 

MorsranRicardoR Jy28 
MorrisJR&wf je6 
MorrisRichardC o9 
MosierMrsCortland o9 



o30 

o25 

o4 

8l4 

sl4 



s25 
o25 

8l6 

jy2« 

sl9 

828 

si 8 
o27 



MowerCE 
MnnnLC 
'• ClaraE-SB 
MurdockFM 
MyergCH 
Newberry FredM 
NewcombPredS 
NewcombJas 
" SarahN 
NewcombJasE 
NicholsF-EllenA 
" Nellie-Franklin 
NilesJohnM 
NorkettFrankS 
OluisteadLuciasS 
OsbornllJ 
OeboniWillieH 
Osgood WmB 
ParmeleeFH 
" WillisG-ClarenceF" 
ParsonsHA s5 

ParsonsM rslsabella 87 
PeabodyFS oil 

" MariaL " 

PearsonGeoW 
PeckChasH 
PeckMrsJB 
PendletonMrsChasolS 
Penhai!owA[CoD] 84 
PerryWalterR o4 

" AnnaB " 

PhillipsAbraham je3 
PhillipsE 88 

PoUockLottieC o20 
PoUockSarahH 
PorterAH&wf 
PorterDrIG 
PotterHN 
PotterJesseL 
PrattWD 
PrentisAdamiSfcfiim o4 
PrentisAF&wf o7 
"• Miss " 

PrentisChas n1 

Prenti8Chs2d-Edw s20 
PrentisEjr n2 

PrentisJennieR 821 
PrentisJnoA a30 

PrestonJobA Jy31 
PrinceHempstead a29 
RandallFrancesS 830 
RausomMissME ol9 
ReevesWO 86 

RichardsMrsEllenE 
RichardsFrankG 
RichardsFredA c7 
RichardsNG o3 

RichardsWH Al8 

RittenhouseCD Jel5 
RoachMJfSerCoD] 84 
RobinsonJA&wf o23 



AlO 

012 
o5 

Bl 

s4 
04 

AlO 

027 

ol8 

o24 

o2 

s6 

8l3 

jy5 
je2 



jy6 
ol9 



o20 
o21 

85 

87 

s21 
o2 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS NEW LONDON COUNTY. 319 



s6 
024 
olO 



Robinson SarahE 

RoeWL[SerCoD] 

RogersEllen 

RogersED 

" EmmelineF 

RogersGeoP&wf 

RogersLillian 

RogersPM 

RogersMrePM 

RogersSP&wf 

RoweChauncey 

RoweMrsEB 

SalterMaryW 

SalterMrsThosG Jy20 

" TGO 

SaxtonWH 

SaxtonLucretia 

" WHjr 

ScapliuWm 

SchoberPW 

ScroggieMrsJ 

'' MissM 

SheaJnoM 

SheedyJ no 

SheffleldWW 

" HP 

ShepardJT 

ShepardJT2d 

SheridenPP 

ShermanJE 

ShepardCJ 

ShepardMrsGT 

SholeeAW 

[DrumMajorSdRegt] 
ShortPredW a13s2 
ShortFred'kW s6 

[Quarter-Mr3d3dReg] 
SibleyMrsJP a16 

SimpsonJC n9 

SlstareMrsChasG o25 
SmithElia8P[CoD] 
SmithFA a25 

SmithPR&wf sl2 

" MastersBC&RP " 
" CarrieA " 

SmlthFredW 06 

SmithGeoA 
SmithHB s6 

[Adjutant3dRegt] 
SmithJaneR o24 

Smith Jos [CorCoD] s6 



olO 
o24 

s26 
Oil 

s8 
n2 
o24 



04 



MlO 

s4 

o5 
8l9 
0l7 

o7 

06 

o5 

0I6 

o24 

o37 

s6 



SterryJameeN a29 
StetsonMrsBell o-i8 
StettuerAN Jy28 

StewardHerb'tjel2sl6 
Ste wardMrsNa' cyjelT 
StewartNathauP s22 
StilesEW o30 

StoddardEmma jel6 
Stoddard Daniel a7 
StoddardHenryH oil 
StoddardJas s6 

StricklandCWjr o7 
StricklandJDT 



..^ „_„»..T^..<^mT I ArmstrongLD o25 
NO. STONINGTON. 'ArmstrongSarahA s28 
AllenOB o26 ArmstroiigWmH s30 

Avery Andrew Je9 AruoldMrsMaryO sl3 
AveryJohnD Nl ArnoldSylvester o25 

BiUingsG^MaryA o26 " GW 



BoardmanMrsSA Je3 

Arthur-Harry 
BourneEdwardG a18 



FannieE-LizzieH " 



jy6ol2 
0I6 



StrongGeo 
StyerGussie 
TateBenjR 
TateChasH 
Tate EC- AT 
TaylorChasK&wf m30 
TefftCA s6 

TeflftHattie-LucieE 66 
TiflanyldaD jy6 

TinkerEA[CoD] s4 
TinkerMissEH 
ThacherAnnieM 
ThompsonlW 
TingleyGeoB 
TinkerEAtCorCoD] s6 
TinkerGFi&wf g9 

TooleTH o30 

TottenCALCUSA] 8l9 
TubbsWmH 

[LieutCol3dRegt] 

sl9 



n2 
o20 
oil 
sl3 



o4 

si 

A5 

s2o 

jeS 

je24 

slfi 



SmitUND 
SmithNellieM 
SmithSamnP 
SmithWmW 
" Hamilton 
SmythMW 
SolomonC 
SommersRob't 
SpaldingJuo 
SpauldingCP 
SpenserWdlard 
Stacy AM 

StacyGM-ClaraV o23 
StarkBenj je24A29o25 
StarkBenjjr-WM a29 
StarkGypsey o25 

" GraceEC 
StantonllenrvD&w o5 
" ElIieM-JuliaE 
StarrP[CorCoD] e4 
StarrOeoE o25 

" WmS-CarrieM 
BtarrJoseph-Fred s5 
StarrWmH o26 

StaynerMarianRH s2i 
gtClarePE[SefCoD]85 
StebbinsFM s29 

StebbinsJC All 



o9 



m26 
0I6 



oil 



Al4 

s26 
825 

AlO 



Al9 
je6 
06 
0I2 
n2 
n8 

jy3 
o26 

n2 



o27 
o9 

n2 
oil 

n8 



TurnerChas 

MissAIice 
TurnerChasH 
TurnerJennieP 
TiirnerMaryJ 

LucyC 
UlberJeanB 
VameyWHw&sonjelO 
VodwarkerJF ol2 
WalkerChasW a30 
WadsworthHO&wf 
WalkerCW 86 

[HospStewardSdRegt] 
WallerTMwf&dau o9 
WagnerAndrew o7 
WareCB 

WarnerAliceH o20 
WarnerWD&wf 8l4 
WatrousBP o27 

rWeaverArthurD je30 
WeaverFrankA sl3 

MrsCA-AnnieA " 

WalterB " 

WeaverllC&wf 
WeaverMrsJB 
WebsterG 
WestHE&wf 
WheelerDC 
WheelerRftlph 
WhittleseyGD 
" MrsBJ 
WilberMrsSM 
WilliamsCG 
WilliamsGeo 
WilliamsGeoM 
" Peleg 

WilliamsHenryE 
" CD 

WilliardJno&fam o4 
WilliamsLR o21 

WoodsByronA 8l9 
" Ella 
WoodworthNath'nA24 
WoodworthO sl5 

WrightFred s4 



olO 
AlO 
o25 
ol9 

ol9 

s7 

025 

07 

n4 



BoumeHE 

BourneJasR 

BrownAnna 

BrownChasH 

BrownMrsPMira 

BrownJamesS 

BrownJamesW 

BrovvnJnoB&wf 

BrownNelsonA 

BrownWP-Hemano26 

BrowningElizH 

Chapman AB 

ChesterHM 

ChesterJohnC 

CoatesAllieB 

CoatsGF-GD 

CollinsAP 

" MrsElectraJ " 

CollinsFrancieW Jy21 

" ClarkeonA " 

" AChalkley " 

EdgecombNathanS n1 

" JEmma " 

GeerWelcomeH 

HewittDwightB 

HewittWmS 

HilliardWmH 

HolmesElizabeth 

MaineMAlice 

MainePrankieE 

MeechWW 

RandallDH 

SmithLeviT 

SiseonOA-BP 

StewartMrsDW 

VincentChasW 

WheelerDudleyR o21 

WheelerEdgarH Je9 

Wheel erMrsEzra 

HattieA 
WheelerNMary 
WheelerSamuelB 
Williams J 

NORWICH. 

AbbeJA 

AdamsMissE 

AdamsHJ 

AdamfJosephjr 

AikenWA 

AUenAmosD&wf 

AllenCH&wf 

AllenMrt^Ethan 

AllenFH&wf 

AllenJA 

AllenNR 

AllenWmH 

" Henry&wf 

" EmilyT-Su8£mG 

AlbroHenryC 



AtchigonT[SerCoCl 86 

AtwaterMB&wf o3 

AustinWillisR Je6 

Austin WillisR&wf s6 

AveryAlfredW mIO 

AveryDelia 

Avery MrsNP 

AveryOPifewf 

BackusAsa 

BackusEL 

BachelderGE 

Bailey MrsEBC 

BaileyHenryJ 

BairdCatherineP 

BakerMamieL 

BaldwinChasL 

BalfourThomas 

BallouLeonard 

BoIlesAlbertS 

BarberWL 

BarnesJHolyoke 

Bars tow JnoP&vrfA24 

" MattieR " 

Barstovi'SR o21 

BartlettMrsAnnie o28 



olO 
025 
026 
o4 
Nl 
k2 
oil 
n2 
je23 
031 
ol9 
o25 



Jyl5 
sll 
OlO 

jy3 

jelO 

03 

013 

Ml9 

02 



jyl9 

0I6 

06 

sl 

a24 

s26 

sl5 

je20 

Al5 

Al2 

828 
sl9 
Sl5 
s27 
s9 
Nl 



s6 

NlO 

je23 

825 

jel4 



BattyCS 
BasterJB 
BeachEL 
BeachLillieW 
BealeHWA 
BeckwithMi88AL oil 
BeckwithChasR 84 
" HoraceE " 

BeebeAH 0I8 

BeebeGeoE ol3 

BenjaminGeorgie s9 
BenjaminJacobC sl5 
BennettDW[CoC] s4 
BennettHL&wf Jyl7 
Belts JBurr 
BettsWR-TC 
BidwellEG&wf 
" CarrieE 
BidwellWmP 
" Fred'kN 
BillHenry&wf 
BillHenry-FredA a25 
BillSarahH 0I8 

BinghamCH s4 

BishopGeoG sl9 

Bi8hopDrIIM&wfje28 
BishopNL&wf Jyl2 
BishopNP&wf 
BishopSB&vpf 
BishopWW 
BisselliMrsEH 
BlackfordLP&vi'f 



s7 

8l2 

Bl3 



m29 



OlO 
o23 

s25 
sl-i 

87 

sl9|BlackstoneL&wf jel9 
A21 1 BoardmanByron sl6 
Al9iBoardmanJameB a81 
" jBoerumEmily a21 
" BogueGeoF[CoC] 84 
s25[BorzanirLtJF[CoC] s5 
AldrichCS" o30 BottomGeoG-WL 821 

AlexanderSarahH sl8 BottomleyJosA n8 
AlmyAH sl5 BradyMV Jy4 

AndersonEE a23 BrakenridgeBCjy6ol9 

AndrewsAmos 0I6 BrakenridgePL sl9 
AndrewsMrsEG jy26 BranchEP&wf o4 
AndrewsPannieE a29 Branch RosenaM o4 
AndrewsPStM o30 BrandFJ sl4 

ArmsLoulieW o25 Brand.TnniusA o25 
ArmsTW Je6 BraytonMortonL 82 



220 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



BraytonSamuelL 

BreeclAndrewH 

BreertRA 

BrcwerAH 

BrewerJMilton 

BrewsterMrsA 

BrewsterEL 

BrewsterEM 

BreweterDrJnoA o24 

BrcwsterJolmD s26 

BriggsCE[C'orCoC] s6 



p2 CoitJasB 
o9 ColeCM 
olllColeSNettie 
n2 CollinsMattie 

8l4 



jei 



Brook i^GeoE 
BrowuAbbieA 
BrownArthurM 
BrowiiEJosie 
Brown FlI 
BrownJA&wf 
Bro\viiLnciii8 jeSOoSO 
BrownMaryL s'l 

BrownKobt sll 

BrowiiMrsR s2i: 

" FrankE 

BrownWmO s2 

BrowuiugAmosA old 
BrowningCD&w'f slU 
" Frank " 

Brown ingSarahP ^? 
BrowningWni A69t 
BriggsMariaS o5 

BrockMrsHarrietSo28 
BurdickCli aIC 

BiirdickWmM o24 
BnrnettWni ol8 

BurnliamCA&wf jyO 
Burnluim\VR&vvfjyl2 
Burton W[SerCoC] s6 
BushnellChaBP o21 
BushnoUD .Te28s20 
BiishnellMrsJennie o5 
BiishnellRW m22 

Biishneim-JaBS 
BiighncllWM 
enaB 



Al7 

o4 
ol2 
CollinsMaryS a9 

ColyerMreWhitson " 
Comst'kWAS&w jy26 
ConantWalterF sll 
CongdonChaeN 
CongdonWmS 
ConnellWmP 
ConverseCA&wf 
" Miss 
ConverseEA 
ConvergeTR 
CookAbbyA 
CookAdin 
■' LauraP 
CookDW 
CookEC 
CookHuldah 
C'ookIA 
CoBgroveThosH 

[CoC] 
OonsinpSusie 
•' Emma 
CaseAnnE 
CapeChasH 
CaseFannieM jyl4A25 
CaseGeorgieA 
CaeeLutherR 
CaswellLloydJ 
CaulkinsChasC 
CharaberlinGG 
" ChasL 
ChamplinDW 
ChamplinEdm'dL ol8 
ChamplinEJ slS 

ChamplinHC oil 

ChandlerChasE s7 
ol6 ChapinMrsJen'ieBol2 
s9 ChapmanES&wf jy5 
ChapmanLizzieD oil 



SlC) 

sis 

on 

ol2 
613 

615 

822 

6l6 

622 

sl5 

do 

825 

s6 

olS 

624 



CnrrierJM 

JennieE 
CurtisAE 
CuBhrnauFIarryG 
Cutk'rAmosC 
DanielsJohn 
DavisAE 
DavisAT 
DavisChasHad 
DavisC'B < 

DaviesRevJno 

[Chaplain3dRegt] 



6l2 FreemanSH&wf 
" I Freeman VO 
je22 FullerEdwD&wf 
Al9 FuUerFD 
jytj FullerGeoW 
je27FullerW alter 
jySeFullerWmW 
g4|GaleChaBW&wf 

85 



o5 
Jc8 
olU 

80 

n9 

69 

je8 

a21 

s4 



ButtonGuvD&wf ol7 ChapmanMrsMA ol4 

ButtonDrLL o20 ChapmanWmF ol9 

" MreHelen-LLjr " CheneyMrsHC ol3 
BylesGeoS cl9 Chesebro'ghMr8DLo7 

ByrnesFA Jy5 ChiirchSH ol9 

ByrncBTho8&wf a12 Church WA olfi 

" Louie-Addie-GT " 'Cilley Gertrude o4 

CampAlfredH&wf 86 ClappEdwC Jy26 

CanipFS&wf ol9ClarkAL o4 

CampbellAlex sl2'ClarkGeoR 628 

CampbellGeoM AH^ClarkJT MlO 

CampbcllPeter&wfo23:ClarkWebster ol4 

CampbellWIIW Ml9 Clarke WillieW 827 

825 ClockSLizzie Al7 

o6 ClevelandC'has jy4 



GallupOhagR 
GallupLA&wf-EMo31 
GallupWmA&wf a31 
GardnerAT 
Davic-FH MlO GardnerBessieG 

DavisGeoW o26 GardnerEdwinP 

DeanMay k9 GardnerEM&wf 

DeanPerry 811 GardnerJH 

UeardenJas 8l5 GardnerL 

DenisonMB 8l " EmmaJ 

DeWolfEllenL o7 GardnerUS&wf 

DexterMD o9 GardnerPO 

DickeyAW s8 GardinerES 

" AnnieM " jGardincrWH 

DickermanGA s7;GarratyDA[CoC] 

DobBonWm sKijGarraty P 

DodgeEM 8(i GatepSC 

DolbeareFred'kW AlSGeeHenry 
DorranceAmosP ASGeerAlbertD 
DorranceGeoE sllGeerEllen-Lncy 

Dowdllenryll ol8,GeerGeoW&\vf 
88 DoweFrancisE ?6 GeerGeoWjr 

8l8 DowlingJno[CoC] 84;Gibbe]MrsEN 
822 j DoylcWM o4 GifiordlrvlngN 

DresBlerMraWm b2] iGilbertAliceH 
DudleyLW s4 GilbertNathauS 

DugganJames 820|GilbertSAlpheu8 

DurfeyEd jel :GilmanDavidjr 

DurfeyHM olS GilmanHarrie 

DurfeyJW " GilmoreDuncan 

DuryeaJH o21 " AnnieC 

DyerAlice je8|GilmoreJamesG 

DyerCha^E A5|GiesySamuelH 

EatonMrsCJ o4| Gilbert Jos W 

EbbertsCS[CorCoC]sf) [Paymaster3dRegt] 



AID 
ol4 



A2r. 



CapronMr?Edw 

CardwollGeoR 

CardwullMabelA 

CardwellWH 

CarewChaBJAwf 

CarevC&wf-Etta 

CarletonDrCM & wfjeS 

CarlisleMrsWmT oil 

" MS 

CarpenterTVV 

CarrChaBN 

CarroUAdameP 

" GeoW 

Carroll LW 

" CharlotteL 

CaBcMrsLR 

CartcrChasW-SM ol2 

CarylE[ScrCoC] b6 

CarylJA[SerCoC] " 

Cofli'eeJohn 821 

CoffreyLizzie a9 

CoggshallJohnA^ olS 

" EffleM 



o7 
019 
ol6 



821 
je24 
a25 

826 

sl9 



CobbAmosE&wf ol8 



s7 
826 
8l9 

62 

MlO 
o26 

68 

o24 
jel7 



CobbLM 

CobleighJohnR 

CoffeeAlbert 

CoxJennieE 

CrandallJN 

CraryJnoT&wf 

CrarySAA 

CranstonWBL 

CravenGeoJ 

CrawlordMrsWm o23 

" JosieG 

Crawley Alva 

CreedPS 

CruttendenJosT 

CruttendenJT 

CrockerRC[CoC] 

CrowellFC 

CrowellZC 

CryerGeoR&wf 

CunninghamJH 



017 
o25 

818 
Al2 

o21 

86 

013 

n6 
s6 

Al7 

84 

jy28A30 
o30 
8iO 
ulO 
a24 
024 

A3 

03 

64 
821 

jel4 

AS 
67 

814 
o25 

A3 



EcclesJohn 

EldridgeJB 

EllingWm 

EllingMrsWm 

ElliottGeoE 

ElliottMissLC 

ElyJS 

EDglerChas 

EngsRL 

EvansGeoC 

FanningJE 

FanningJT 

MrsLouiBcB 
FanningMM 
FarnhamCN 

Mary-Millie 
FarnsworthF 
FarrellJ[CorCoC] 
FarringtonWC 
Field JnoW 
FilerCW 
FillmoreCJ 
FillmoreOM 



o23 Gilberts A 
jy4jGii?eySam'lH 
ol8 " LHerbert 
6l2|GoodrichMA 
818 GoodrichRH 



o4 
a2 



a21 
018 



FilBonJF[SerCoC] sOGreenlBaac 



FinchChasH 

FitchEA 

FitchES&wf 

FitzgeraldPat'k 

FoUettGeo 

ForbesPeterW 

FordMrBjnoH 

FoeterllarrietB 

FosterLFS 

FovvlerFrankE 

FrancisJno2d 

" Alvah 



GoodspeedGS&wfM25 
GoodwinJD 019 

GoreChasE-Dan'l 82 
A22iGoreDanielW ol6 
N9|GordonEE ol3 

A28|GordonJennieA o5 
jel6|GordonWraA s30 

" GordonWmH o9 

ol7 " WmS 

A9|GormanJ[CorCoC] 66 
" GosBMrsWarrenL ol7 
MlO Gould Augustus 825 
B6GouldDH 016 

o31 GouldFC Jel3 

ol2[GrayJP s20 

jel7 GreenhalghMrsES a3 
o5 

8l3 

o27 

Mil 



o24 GrifflnFannyS 
ol2 GreeuFrankE 



n2 

Sl4; 

o23 

n3 
626 
05 
o26 
JJ-27 
bOO 



GreeneMrsG 



" Gardinerjr " 

GreeneJasLloyd&finsS 
GreeneLeonardV All 
GreenwoodllelenFolS 
GuilfordMaryE o7 
GulliverAH a29 

" MrsDF-CC-FP " 
GustinMrsNB si 

jelSlIIadleyGH o3 

s27|HaileDrAB a30 

" 1" MaryH " 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITCKS NEW LONDON COUNTY. 



321 



a29 



a5 

827 
05 
8l3 

s27 



HallGeo 

HallJohnD 

HalseyJ&wf 

HamiltouGW 
Hamilton.ISl&wf 
HamiltonLVV 
" Gurdon 
HatnersleyWm 
HammettMrs&Miss s6 
HamuiondMrsEUa a12 
HammondHK ol9 
HanfordWJ n2 

HanuaJnoWi&wf 822 
HaiderWmH Al5 

" GeoVV-GeoWjr " 
" AunieE-AnnieR " 
HarlaudEdward o3 
Harriu^tonEF a30 
HarrisAustia ol8 

HarrisGA ol4 

'• GR-Elijah 
HarrisonSam'l o25 
HartGH[CorCoC] p6 
HarwoodCL&wf Jy28 
HaskellChasC jyl2 
•■ MissEvely " 

" MissNcUieG 
HatchAC&wf s28 

HathewayNellieL olO 



HaveiiRM 

" MreAP 

HawesVVmA&wf 

HawksAmelia 

HawkinsJuliaA 

HaynesRevZS 

ilenderson James 

HendricksonTB 

HerrickAlonzo 

HewittGL&vvf 

HibberdWmH 

Hig','iii8SE&wf 

HiggiusWC 

Hia:ginsWmW 



012 

02 

n6 
826 
o20 
s7 
jel4 
o20 
sl9 
ol9 

87 

o31 

sl8 



HiDckleyEracrett All 



sl4 
jyl8 
o25 
628 
sl2 

jyi9, 



HillAnnieE 

HUlEllea 

HilllraJ 

HohlS 

HolbrookChasS 

HoldeaCarrie 

" Nettie 

HoldenMrsChasW s28 

HoltEA a24 

HoltThosJ sl5 

HolyokeMaryB n1 

HopkinsAliceL s5 

HopkiasCarrieE a25 

HiipkiusSamuelS oil 



HydeGR-LH aIO 

HydeMrsGeoR a9 

" KatieS 

HydeLewisA&wf 

" MA-SusieC 

IrishWmP jel5 

IsbuUPranklinS s7 

Jeuuing8jnoB&wfol9 

JenninrjsWniHjr 8l2 

JewettHenryA o3 

JewettSLizzie 

JillsonGeoW 

JohnsonCC 

JohnsonFrank 

" MrsMaryR 

JohiisonP'kMcK jyl7 

JohnsonJM jyl5 

JohnsonOLjr 8l5 

" PannieC-PrankC 

" SusanP 

JonesDavidR 

JonesJH 

JouesWS 

KeelerGW 

KelloggRevGN 

KelleyJH 

KellyMS 

KenyonCH&wf 

" MissCarrieS 

KibbeMrsSeymour 66 

KiesGeoW&wf o5 

KiugCJ o4 

KiiigPEdw 8l6 

KiiineAW&wf 

"■ MrsJoelS 

KinneCH 

KinneEleie 

KinneyElijahC 

KnightMrsLM 

" MissLacyP 

KirkerJames 

KuappSam'lB 

KornCH 

LaddJohnC&wf 

LanmanEdwardB 



Jy29 

NlO 

s30 



Jy4 
o25 

jyi 

o20 

o9 

o20 

Jy21 

a31 



s25 

o20 

ol3 

Jy6 

84 



Jyl9 

ol8 

A23 

a2 

o9 

A30 



LaumauWC 

" GertrudeH " 

LathamMrsWmL Jy27 



8l4 

a21 

Al2 

s28 

o7 

JJ-26 

ol6 

84! 

jyi5 



HopsonJesse 

HortonChasII 

HortonMrsWT 

" LenaP 

HonriganMichael 

HoustonMaryD 

" SusieE 

IIoveyEdward 

HoveyHenry 

HoveyLewis&wf 

HoveyWmH 



s6 
825 

A3 

a5 
Al2 

m30 
620 
623 
jy26 
HowardEdw-WS Jel2 
Hoy t Miss AL ol9 

HubbardMrsS s6 

" MissesHubbard " 
HuntingtonGF 
HuntingtonGW&wo27 
HuutingtonJiilia a24 
HuntingtonJO n2 

IIuntingtonMary 6l6 
HuntingtonSaratiR a9 



LathropBW 
LathropCliasE 
LatliropEH&wf 
LatliropEjr 
Lathrop lames 
LathropJS 
LawrenceAbbott 
LawrenceFW 
LavvsonSHenry 
LearnedE Ml0je6 

[MemBdofConnM'grs] 
LearnedMrsE s6 

LearnedRJ je26 

LeavensFrankJ jeS 
" MissesJM&LucyG" 
LeavensMrsMil ' o6 
■' JennieL " 

LeeMrsClias m29 

" MissSM 

LefflngwellAbbieCol2 
LeffingwellMrsDrEM 
026 
LesterAmos-JF o5 
LesterAA o26 

LesterCDwf&son ol2 



LewisCarrie 

LewisEramaJ 

LewisMrsHB 

LewisMP-CJ 

LincolnEM 

LiudsayAllan 



oil 
je22 

All 

oil 
o4 



LindsayMary s26 

LindsayThomas o20 

" MaryA-RoseL 

LippettNorrisS AlO 

LockwoodA s5 

LockwoodMrsEM oil 

LoomisEllaC ol4 

LoomisFrankN a29 

LoomisHS&wf 

LoomisMrsWF 

" MrsMR 

LorbushJosieM 

LoringGeoH 

LovellEU 

LovellFH 

LubyJno 

LucasLizzieH 

LucasSolomon 

LuceMrsJC 

LyonsJas 

MabbetGeo 

MaddockGeo 

MaginnisElsicA 

MaiueAlbertB 

" MariaW 

MaineSW 

ManterGilbert&wfoll 

MaplesJudson ol8 

MaplesLouie-Pr'k ol8 

MaplcsNH o5 

MarcyA olO 

MartinGeoH&wf o5 

MartinLiitlier 

MatherChasN 

MayGertrudeR 

MaynardMiss 

MayuardSLC 

McC'onigleWJ 

McComiellJno 

McCordJasJ 

[CaptCoC] 
McCordWm 
McFarlaneAlex 
McKeeJas 
McLaughlinGeoj r 
McLaughlinP 
McNamaraJno 
McNamaraJnoR 
McNeilColin-Jno s25 
McNeilDanP o9 

McNellySarahE a24 
Man ningHS [CrCoC] s6 
MeechLizzie " "" 

MeechLP 
MenckMrsC 
MershonJB-CA 
MillerAndrew 
MillerChristian 
MillerWH 
MltchellMrsAG 
" John&wf 
MitchellGA 
MitchellMissML 
MonahanJos 
MorganChrist'r 
MooreLvdiaC 
MorrellFG 
MorrisonJnoH 
MowryJD&wf 
" MissesSL&LC 
MurrayDennis 
Nash Asa 
NashAsajr&wf 
NewtonJM-EA 
NewtonMrsJasW o25 
NewtonWmS je22 
NicholsMrsSS 828 
" Franklin-OlinS " 
" Monroe " 



a9 
a4 

ol 
07 

8l8 

s4 

jy26 

OlO 

05 

Nl 

8l2 

je20 
Jy6 
Al6 
OlO 

827 



s6 

JV7 

a31 

02 

05 

o23 

04 

s6 

o27 

s21 
825 

s5 
s28 

n3 
o21 



a25 
jy5 
n4 
o24 
820 
s25 
o31 
ol2 

MlO 
n9 
OlO 
827 
0l7 
a7 
sl3 
oil 

8l2 

026 
012 

sl9 



NicholsWG jyl3 

NolanRG sl3 

NortonHB 823 
" MissesEP&EM " 

NortonWillieA a3 

" HarryA " 

NoyesCD 620 

NoyesMaiyJ-JD sl4 

" MissEM *' 

OlcottOliviaT s3 

OsgoodCH jel5 

OsgoodHH jel3 

OsgoodMrsJM sl6 

OsgoodMamieG sl3 

" LillieM " 

OsgoodWmC o25 

PageWmH mIO 

PalmerAJ-LM oil 

PalmerBH&wf sl9 

PalmerMJ jyl'J 

" Grace -Frank " 

PalmerME ol7 

PalmerWS&wf slS 

PalmerWillardll ol6 

ParcellsPhilipM jyll 

ParlinFannieE o2 

ParlinSR o20 

ParkDJ ol8 

ParkGM a24 

ParkJD&wf-AP o5 

ParkerEFjr jy5 
ParkerGfcoB jyosll 

ParkerHL&wf k1 

" SusieM " 

ParkerLizzieR n2 

ParkerMrsS 821 
ParkerTimothy&wsl9 

PartridgeMrsEB a26 

" CSears " 

" MaryLouise " 

PattisonWm 65 

PeckJnoHsr a16 

PeckSetliL sl5 

PeckhamCyrusT a1 
PeckhamAlburtus o4 
" NG-AS 

PeckbamldaMay ol4 

PeckhamJasR o7 

PeckhamMrsR o2(i 

PendletonAB "• 

PendletonBP ol2 

PendletonEB m22 
PendletonEmilyB ol3 

PerkinsCW 825 

PerkinsDanielW 82J 
PerkinsJnoCifcwf o5 
" WillieR 

PerkinsJnoT 825 

PerkinsME ol8 

PerkinsTA&wf m26 

PerkinsWM&wf sl3 

PerkinsDrWSC a21 
" MrsDrWSC a21o10 

" Florence olO 

PerryMrsN sl2 

PersonsHenryG 628 

PettisJM 812 
" AddieEH 

PhelpsChasII a8 

PhillipsMrsEE o30 

PhillipsHT&wf o2tt 

PierceMarthaC o4 

PierceMoses o24 

PierceWmB o3 
PitcherGeoW&wf ol7 
" GeoE 

PitcherHA 6l9 

PlattMrsCB 8l5 

PlummerJuliaM o25 



322 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



s2C 



a30 
012 
sl3 
o25 
a81 

?1 
021 
sll 

ol2 



PlunkcttHenry p20 
PollarclHirain 
PopeSylviaA s2(i 

" SaniiiB 
PotturChasH&wf el8 
PotteiFi-aiikM jyti 
PotterWmPjr slti 

PrattAJ Al6 

PrattAliceM-OW 
PrtiiticeArthurC 
PrenticeAW&wf 
'• JiissAuna 
Pronticelll 
PreuticeMrsJB 
PrenticeMi'i^Wm 
Pi-estonCH 
EandallAuuieB 
" EUaE 

RaudallLW&wf 
RantrerJII 
RathboneChasA 
" MrsClai-aA 
i?avvsonWr&wf 
RiivMrsEmmaL " 
ItaymdiulMrsTheo 8l3 
" Carrie I '-ChasH " 
RaymoudGeoC 8l4 
RaymondMrsT sl2 
" MissCar'e-Charlie " 
RevellJohn slS 

ReynoldsCS jyo 

Rcyuold!»MrsDB slG 
ReynoldsGco 
Reynoldf.TC 
ReynoldsThosS 
RiceAC 
RichardsCL 
" MissAda " 

RiddleWBwf&sou a19 
RiplevGeoC&wf oil 
" Faitli-NellieB " 
Ripley J 

RipleyJnoC-MJ 
RipleyM 
RitcliieJaa 
" LucvP 
RoatliEA 
" FrankA 
RoatliEdniD 
" OliviaT 
RoatliGL[CorCoC] s4 
RoathKatieM a31 

RoatliLM-LolaB s28 
Robei'th;onWB&wfA29 
RobinsonJoseph olO 
RobinsoiiWn o4 

Rockwell MrsMW je8 
RoL'cr ;',H a30o30 

Rogrr OwiditH o25 
RoirersMrsGW 
" GeorgieT 
RogersJoabB 
RotrersWillisT 
Ro-(!rrtWH[CoC] 
RuddMamieS 
Rui^L'lesIIenry 
Rii^'LTlciiSarahH 
Rnsr-lesWC 
Sau-erFW 
SaiiudersUFN 
[CoC] 
SaundersIIN 

[CorCoC] 
SchillincEva 
ScottRobtG 
SearsMrsCP 
ScavsMrsNathan 
" MarvL-Nathan 
" CFrcddic 



o26 

o26 

a24 

ol4 



sS3 
ol8 

NlO 
Al 

p8 



05 



6l 

e4 

s8 

je2o<) 

je2 

jyl8 

n8 
s4 

S() 

aO 
ol7 
Al9 
A2r> 



SearsWmB 
SucleyThos 
SetchellGeoC 
•• MA 

^?evinJuoF&wf 
SevLuNDouglas 
SeyniourSO 
ShavvLillie 
■' JenuieL 
ShawMrsMinnie 
SheflieldLizzieK 
SheftieldMissME 
ShelmerdineA 
SheridanChas 
ShennanJE-riU 
SliirleyStilesE 
SholesAnnieA 
SholesSanfordH 
Sisi^onMH 
^i;^erCO&wf 
SlaterML 
MiiithAbbieM 
■;mithAF 
SmithMrs Avery 
SmithClarcnce 
SmithEmniaE 
SmithEN-AdaW 
SmithFannieB 
SmithFrankA 
SmithFrankH 
SmlthGeoE 
SmithGeoScfewf 
I Smith Joseph A 
!SmithLW&wf 
SmithTII 
SmithWmR 
StaiitonClara 
StaiitonGII 
•' Francis 
StantoiiHowardL 
StantonMaryA 
StantonStilesT 
[Aide-de-campCNG] 
StaplinLucyA s20 

StarkClintonE si!) 
Starkw'therMrsHH n6 
" Lizzie-Henry 
Stedman.IohnW 
StednianMaryE 
StedmanMElla 
SterryEdwA 
StetsonAIfred 
SlewartAcnesS 
StewardCM 
StockwellLE 
StockingDC 
StockhigFrankB 
StockingMrsML 
StorvMrsJA 
" NellieE 
StottJohn 
SpaldinL,'L-E 
SpauklingMrsL 
" Sarahs 
SpoonerMC 
SpeneerByron [CoC] f'4 
SpencerJB&wf 8l8 
SpoffordldaF ol2 

SpoffordLEF&wfo7N9 



a19 ThomasGeoH jy3 

ol3|ThompgonMr8AP n1 

oll,ThompsonER jy31 

" i Thompson EL sS 

sl5 ThiefherSS je9 

TibbittsHW sll 

TillinghastLA o23 

TorrauceA s20 

TourtellotteFrank s21 

•' MrsGD 

TracyJosephT je22 
TracyMary a18 

TrcadwayElizP o2 
TreadwayFannieL o6 



WilliamgPA si 

WilliamsRobt Al 

WiirnisMi-s\VMA5ol8 



TrolandA&wf 

" Edwin 

TrolandJohn 

TrumbnllNellieP 

TubbsCA 

TubbsOH 

TiibbsWm&wf 

TuckerWC 

TurnerEmerson 

•' Lida 

TiimerJohn 

TunierWO 

TweedvDS 

TwietEF 
oLSTylerFred 
sieiTylcrFrank 
o26,TylerJanette 
jy4 TvlerHuldah 
o2ti UphamAN&wf 
BlliUtleyEmnia 
s20 UtleyFrank 



s7 

A26 

g29 
s4 
o4 

jyG 
o9 

p28 

jy3 
s21 
e2(i 
o9 

84 

018 
oG 
o20 
o2(i 
031 
a4 



WilliamsouJos 

WilsonJohnH 

WinshipHB 

VV'iuti88(. hasS 

WintersCJ 

WintersFannieE 

WitterCA 

WitterHattieL 

WitterMrg(MD) 

WoodFred'k 

WoodhullEHzB 

Woodman WmO 

WoodmanseeHCP 



o2? 
s28 
sH 
87 
01 J 
oil 
025 

81 

a36 

s30 
o3 
o5 



WoodruflJH m25 

WoodwardRG ol7 
WoodworthAJ o4 
Wood worthCB&wf o5 



WoodwortJiFH 

WoodworihGeo 

WoodwoithJF 

YerringtonllL 

YoiniErWrnB 



s7 
o23 

i-Vi 
815 

86 



oi3 V'anHoovearS&ladyo4 



SpragueSeth 

SpragueDrSL 

SiittonRobtK 

SwanTW 

SweetAL 

SvdlemanMrsHD 

T'annerCGilbert 

TaniierFrankC 

TonnyAllon 

Tewki^burynE 



ol6 1 Vaughn ANH a29 

o30 VaughnAH ol7 

" EugeneA " 

VaughnChasW olO 
Vau^hnNellie " 

VanWagen'rMrsREo5 
VergasonMrsN jy27 
WalkerAA&wf o2 
WalkerJag&wf o27 
WalkerWC o23 

WardNannieB a4 

WarnerJohnE o5 

WebbAB-jVIabelS 8l2 
WebbClxas&wf 
WebbMrsJulius sl4 
" Grace " 

Weeks W A [CoC] s4 
WellerJohn o9 

WellsDavidA o7 

WetmoreThosT ol2 
WhaleyCH o23 

WhaleyStephenF ell 
WheelorAL s") 

WheelerEdw'dS Jel7 
WhittemoreMM<fewo5 
WicksWillie jy3 

WightJohn&wf sl4 
•' AddieA " 

WilburAsenath o2 
WilburBessieL jyll 
Wilbur I ohn-Chas s25 
WillardMrsJohn a5 
WillardWW si 

jyfi WilleyEG 023 

827 WilleyKatieJ o24 

n3 WilliamsMrsAC a5 

02 WilliamsEW&wf si 

03 ■' Master?LB-WT " 

04 WilliamsFredP 826 
o26 WilliamsMrsHP sfi 

WillianisMrsHenry o9 
jy31 Willi amsLB a31 

o23iWilliamsiIaryE o3 



s7 

oil 

sC 



822 
oil 

sl2 

Nl 

jyl8 

s20 

s4 

OlO 

826 
je24 

84 
ol8 
ol7 

jyl4 



[AsstSurgeonSdRegt] 

OLD LYME 

ApplebyNelson 
Caulkin^HM 
CaulkiusLA 
ChadwickChasN 
ComstockllL 
DeWolfGeoW 
HarrisDrGW&wf s27 
HaynesAlfredB ol7 
HuntingtonJS&wf " 
• AnnaL-CD-JosS " 



017 
s21 
je9 
sl3 
s21 
ol7 



Nl 
ol7' 
s21 
820 



LayDJ 

LeeWS&wf 

MorleyDavid 

MorleySM 

" MissGraceD 

NoyesRicbard&wfol7 

" WC 

PeckhamAN ol9 

SwanLizzie-Miss o2 

PBESTON. 

AveryAnnette 

AveryEuniceH 

AverjIEdwin 

AveryNoyesW 

BabcockMaryA 

BarnesEverettP 

BedentChasW 

BenjaminAm'ndaWo7 

Brown ChasH je20 

ButolphChas&wf jel2 

ChapmanChasB a8 

ChapmanLina 

ComstocliEW 

CookSL 

BavisEmmaL 

GallupHJenuie 

GeerNellieW 

GuileDanielS 

HillES 

JenningsChasF 

KinneyGeoW 

LoringMrsMaryF 

LoringWmifewf 

PalmerHH 

PalmerMarthaA " 

PhillipsChasF&wfASl 

PhillipsMaryT sl6 

PrenticeCW o2 

KicbardsFrankF Kl 

RichardsJohn o25 



ol7 
sl2 

87 

sl3 
o23 
o31 
o26 



Jyl9 
02 

8l6 
812 

014 
oi7 
s29 
OlO 

on 

06 
o7 

el2 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITOES — NEW LONDON COUNTY. 






RobertsonMrsJno o5;0obbEIkanah 



slG ColburnCH 
a31 OolliiisJouieL 
A24|CollinsMaryR 
oil CrockerEU 



SholesNancyA 

StoryChasF 

TannarAsahel 

TannarMinnieM 

WitterElizaH 

SALEM. 
BowersEugeniaP jylO iDavisFredP 
Chad wick FE ''e9iDavisHH 

FoxJM-HB 
GallupAO 
HarveyCtiarlieW 
HarveyEB 
" SarahA 
MinerFD 
MoiintjoyWP 
OrdwayArabelle 
SissonJohaW 
WeaverHCL 
WilliaiU3CT-E0 
WilliamsHE 



jel4 PerigerMA 

024 PerrinChaa 
A24 PollardWJH-AE oli 
olliPotterFD s27 
P29|ItandallJP-CD ol8 

o25!Cro\vleyT[CorCoBJ s4[liaudallWmV s22 

iDavisAnuieE 061" MaryA " 

" MaryJ " ReyuoldsThosW ol4 

~ ■" "~ o4'ReynoldsWH&wf o2G 

sl9'RiceFrankG NlO 

jy-HlDavisHB&wf odoj" LucyE 

Ma4l£)avisJDaniel-JnoJo5 RossHermanC s25 

N2iDenisonEliasS o28i"SHjr 

Nl DenisouLeua s26 Sheeli'nTP[S'rCoB]s5 

" DeuisiouRusselA Ml9,ShellieldF\V sl9 

o'^JDickeusJR-PM-HF o5!SmithEdvvwf&dauo20 

0I6 DickensSL&wf sl2,SmithJoseph o21 

A24lSmithJost;phE&\v e20 

n2 Smith WmH&wf o23 

je22 SpaldingDB o27 

s22 ! StantonMrs AP olO 

g27|StantouBF2d oil 

o5 StantonMrsCT 8l4 

025 StantouCliasTjr o5 
iFitzpatrickRevJS g26'StautouGeoD sl5 

026, Flaherty J [SerUoB] s3iStantonGW sl9 



o3 1 CrnmbHeniyA 
o5 ~ " 



■^IJDonovanKateA 
^'p\ DormauJosephR 
olO|»lliottHB 
o'fSJFairbrotherLD 
olSipaxonMariaL 



WilliamsNelsoaN olSipim^eyJulieiS 
WilliamsRA 8l9lpjgiiSandsH 

" CA-PE 
WilliamsWP 



SPB\GUE. FrinkGeoH 

AlbertineET s4'^ardmerB.J 

AllenEM&wf-EH o27;^^^i ^?""'/;^^„ 
Bello vvsHenry je9 ^^.'2"?^i"T^'p^^ 
BennettNathan ol7,g"*"?i?'^„^* 

BrewerMrsEinilyC s30 S* £< w w *i',?i" ^-t 
Bi-ewerDrMK qonlHaaaoxF-MayE ol9 " PL 

Bu^usPatrick jeq'HollidayW[C'rCoB]s6 TapleyMrsGeoW je30 



n2 StantouMissHP 
0I2 " MissGN 
sl4 StantonMaria 
ol2,StantonNP 
silSStatesBenjPjr 
Al8,StateeIlenryM 



jel7 
n8 
ol3 
o26 



Corey .Mrs GeoH 
CutlerJW 
DeMoratLB 
GordonM irthaE 



ol7 



Hovvardrhr>3 



gJiHubbardEP 
„j j! Hiimi-on WmH 
gj9 HydeMsDr 



HamiuoudJohaA n9 gy<J"!^^ 
LovejoyJP o30;S^'ii:,'^i 



LovelandGeoD 
SmithAnaieC 
SmithJC 
SraithMrsLM 



s4 ThayerJnoW n8 

jel6iTillinghastMrsSK oiC 
o27 TracyBF-LucyA sS) 
8l4!" LucyA " 

s27iTruinbulIHP 
821[TrumbiillJA 
jy4 TrumbullMariaB 



oOfi'HydeOS 

fq'JoiceJuo[CorOoB] s6|TuckerVarnnmS 
*QlKirbyMrsAl.iiiraD o28 TownseiulGD 
g^l" MaryF-MartbaP " 
Witter David A&wfA-ii ', ^^ang worthy JH o9 
li R,,fh >' LoperEP-RFjr o26 

srnvivrT .v MahoneyJ [CorCoB] s6 
STOMNl,T >X. JMainHattieL ol2 

AbbeChas a25 McGannJJ[SerCoB]85 

AndersoaJS o30 MinorWarren ol7 

" MrsEJ " iMossAnnaL-SalliePs9 

Allen MrsCaptRiy n2 MossMissOE 
AtwoodEii2;ene jel6 Morris J [CorCoB] 

820 MiillerHenrvA 
05 NilesFD-SVV 
o9 NoyesAveryD 
n8 NoyesJos 

je7 OberJnoE 

0I2 0'NeilP[CorCoB] 

821 O'Sulliv'n J[S'rCoB] s4 
o9 PalmerAlesS Je9 
OiiPalmerET s21 
n2 PalmerHClay o9 

olO PalraerlraH o26 

8l PalmerMrsIH o23 

021 ;" Henry R-FrankT " 



BabcockJP&wf 

Barber.TB 

BarberPS 

BentleySam'lH 

BlivenGjoW 

BoltoaHelenM 

BraytonDrChasB 

BraytonFW 

BraytonJamesP 

BrownDan'1-HC 

BrownMrsGeoD 

BrownJamesP 

BrownTH 



o2 
A30 

jy4 

o5 

ol7 

" Ninall 

TownsendllenryC 84 

VincentMrsJolm 8l4 

VogeJFrederic o9 

WaldronJC jel7 

" ClaraA " 

WaldronSC Nl 

" Mi^sFH 

olSiWallaceR o27 

84 WheelerElizaM o26 

0141" Emily A 

629iWheelerGraceI> oil 

o9!WheelerJo8ephW ol2 

0l2!WheelerRic'(iA olO 

026;" LucyA 

s6 WilkinsonThos ol4 

WilliamsJSjr Je9 

WoodGeoH-L n2 

WoodHenryL s22 



a9 
Dean James A yi 

DewhurstClarena Al-i 
DewhurstFredE a14 
FishJohnO&vvf oil) 
GaleMaryE a21 

GallupMW 813 

GallupSimeon s9 

" LT 

GraffOtto[SerCoA] s6 
Haley Mahlon si 4 

HolmesBL Je22 

HolmesEvelyn oil) 
JacksonJasW o3 

JonesWC[CorCoA] s6 
LambSam'lS s20 

LamphereGeoN 829 
LatbamJDLCorCoA]s4 
LewisMrsBenjFjr o9 
LevvisHenryE o2 

]VIallorj'BELSerCoA]s6 
MaxonS[CorCoA] 84 
McAfl'ryRichard o2 
MinerFrankD ol7 
MorganMreMarj'A s(J 
NewmanE[CorCoA]86 
NoyesWmS jel2 

PhilpottRG 86 

[SergtMaj3dRegt] 
Saunders VR[CoA] 86 
a2'.) 



BuckleyM[CorCoB] s4 " ArtieT 
BurdickJuliaA Jel4 PalmerJnoS 



Nl 



BnrrowsLtD[CoA] 86 



Biirdickr.W n3 " HM&wf 

BurtchAH b22 PalmerLN el 

CarpenterMary jel4 PalraeiTDwight 

ChaceGeoA n1 PalmerMrsTbeoD s25 

ChesebroAG s21 PalmerThosW&w 0I6 

ChesebroMrsED 0I8 PendletonAverill sl5 

ChesebroFanny o25 PendletonFP oSi " Mr8JuliaH-CallieT"|ClarkeFrankC 

ChesebroSani'l o28 PendletonGurd'njrNlOiChipmanC^basE pfilCliftHenyM 

ChesebroSH-ES s20 PendletonH oil IChiptnanHP o2 CliftMrsIra 

" Mr^EL-MreLM " " LB-Jennie '• ClarkGC[SerCoA] 86 CliftRuby 

CobbEdwardB a5 PendletonJasB NllCrouchEmeline oil CliftWalter 



WoodbridgeLucy Re27 



AveryAbbieL 

" CarrieA 

Bi dwell FS 

BradleyFL 

BrightmanCC 

BrownChasH 

BrownMaryF 

CarmichaeijR 

ChapmanDrAT 



Nl 
o27 

84 



Al3 

oil 

Ml9 

s25 



88 
88 

s9 

Al(» 
StJ 

sti 
s25 



SawyerMH 

" Hortense 

SchoonoverAH 

SchoouoverJS 

SimmonsAH 

" EmniaA 

SmithLP 

Stin8onGC[C'rCoA]s6 

SuttonWF 

TaylorAnna 

TaylorDA 

TaylorHMay 

TribbleJF&wf 

WheelerSH 

WilbHrJ[SerCoA] 

WilliamsCairii'F 

WiIliam8Eb'nA&wol2 

WilliamsRL[CoA] 84 

YonngHH[CorCoA]s4 

MYSTIC BRIDGE. 

AIlvn.TnoH 026 

AppclmanMrsWH oil) 
" Min'ieE-GustaveH" 
BaldwinCS s27 

BaldwinME Jy28 

BarberLeauder Jy3 
BeebeAeldieE o30 

" LillianE 
BeebeCG-ET 
BeebeEdwardS 
BrowneFannieE 
" SarahP 
BrownFlorence 
BrowneJII 
BrowneMaryA 
BrownMrsSS 
BrownSamuelS 
Bucklyn.TnoK 



N4 
s30 
021 

ol3 
0I2 
ol9 
06 
o5 
AlO 



BushEB 

s9 1 CampbellJames 
o3|ChaseRIM 
b6|" MrsMaryG 



o9 
sU 
oil 

All 

o23 

ol'.» 
n2 
fill 



324 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



CliftWm Je30 

ComuFrankE 06 

CottrellMrsCH oil 

CottrellEmmaE s9 

DeiiisonAlbert el3 

Denit^onAnnaC O)i0 

" ElizaM " 

DenisouHarrictB aIO 

DenisonliraacW AlO 

DiulleyWniB Jy3 

EdgocombVVC o28 

FooteJP' ols 

Foi-f^ythJiio sl2 

Foi^ythVVH 8l3 

GalesJE o9 

GayJP jy4 

CJatesGnrdonjr glO 

GroenmanGeoII All 

" Master vVmC " 
GreenmanGH&wf 0I8 

" Annie " 

GieeumanThosS o3 
'• CR 

EillMC sl2 

HolmesnirnniC a24 

HolmesMreHC jel5 

HolmesWiaK oil 



HopkinsGeoO a1 

HoxieChasD oil 
lIoxieCaptJH[CcA]j'4 

JacksonE&wC o4 
" FrancetiC-Eliza " 

JackfonlraW o3 
KeablesThosS 

KeelerEdwardP 826 

LandersWniEF s6 

[MajorSdRegt] 

LangworthyD aIO 

LewisWclcomeB aIO 
LyonLtJR[CoA] 

McKenzieCF sl3 

MalloryC B2;i 

MalloryMrsDD n2 
" DDjr 

MatloryEP-Kate je9 

MalloryRob't je8 
MarcroftEbeu a10n3 

MooreGeoT sl3 

NoyesEHz jel7 

NoyesIraP s6 

O'BrienAbbieG o30 

PackerElifihaR o23 

RandallEP&wf ol4 

KeyuoldsGO a7 



RichmondDO k3 

StillnianElizG je9 

StottJoeeph s4 

TrippGeoEifcwf s27 

WilliainsBF olO 

WilliamsElias o21 

WoodinanT sl4 

pawcatuck. 

DavisChasS s6 

DavisMrsThosS s6 
GearyCaptD[CoB] 

HallMaryL e25 

MorganCA o4 

MorganllP olO 

PeckhamBJ o5 

PrenticellR o4 

SheffieldThosD o21 

TaylorLtW[CoB] s6 
TwomeyLtM[CoB] s5 

VarsOE n3 

WATEBFORD. 

BeckwithJas'E 0I8 
BeckwithSarahE 0I8 
BeebeCE p9 

iieebeWmC n8 



BeerpJM-MaryH 

BoothWm 

BramanWD 

BrooksBA 

BrownBF-EttaP 

ChapmanNath'lA 

ChapmanRW 

ComstockMB 

[DanielsES 

DavisMortonH 

GatesPhilo 

GortonAlbertD 

GortonFannie 

JuddAL 

KeeneyMarcusH 

iLesterAE 

jMathewsJnoB 

|MorganHenryE 

PalmerJnoB 

RogersHenrvA 

SnilthNellieC 

StantonJnoD 

I" BG 

TefftAlfred&wf 

WightmanPG 

WilliamsAA 

iWilliamsHW 



k3 
01 -J 

o2 
o20 
0I6 
je9 

f,9 

813 

0I8 
02 
o27 
027 
o27 
027 

Kl 

07 
s4 
07 

Nl 

s9 
o5 
031 

ol4 
sl5 
813 
Sl3 



LIST OP CONNECTICUT VISITORS — MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



325 



BeebeAaronF 


018 


UaileyChasA 


013 


BrainardMrsF 


827 


BrainardH 


ol3 


" Fisk 


'• 


BumhamAA 


n3 


CarpenterDC 


ol8 


DicksonJas-Wjr 


ol8 


HillsBA 


97 


RichJasC 


Je20 


ScovilleSS-HE 


019 


ShepardTA 


ol3 


EAST HAMPTON. 


AbbeHH 


ol2 


AbelllrwinH 


ol2 


AlbrightEllaJ 


018 


AlbrightEM 


Al7 


AlbrightHenryH 


ol9 


BaileyFrankJ 


024 


BartonAnnaM 


s20 


Barton AW 


o7 


BartonEC 


sl6 


Barton J D 


028 


BartonMrsJosD 


o31 


BartonWE 


je20 


Benton Lucien A 


sl6 


BevinAG 


s8 


BevinCG 


ol6 


BevinGeo 


o7 


" ChasW-NP 


>■• 


BevinMills 


si 3 


" JennieC 




BevinPhilo je20sl3N9 


BevinMrsPhilo 


012 


BlissMreEA 


012 


Brown DD- Anna 


n9 


BuellEUaM 


sl2 


BuellFredP 


n9 


ChildsHV 


S20 


ClarkElla 


s7 


ClarkHaydeaL 


018 


ClarkHenryG 


n2 


ConeEG-ErnestG 


024 


DayNellieM 


sl5 


DunhamFH 


ol8 


FreemanMrsEB 


s20 


GilletteMaryS 


s4 


GoughEmmaB 


88 


GoughGeoW 


87 


GriswoldJB 


K3 


HalingMargaret 
HillsMrsBA 


b7 


s7 


HouseJH 


o3 


IvesJoelS-EmmaB 8l3 


MarkhamHenryP 


o24 


NileeEliz.Jane 


si 5 


EichEmmettB&wf n8 


RichllattieF 


a8 


SearsClarkO 


je9 


Sex'onGeorge 


s28 


" ClarissaCB 


" 


SkinnerHaw'y&wje29 


SkinnerSam'l 


613 


SmithFlorenceA 


a8 


SmithHowardN 


n2 


SmithJWB 




SnowHenry 


o24 


StarrJno&wf 


je29 


StarrWilburF 


n3 


StrongMissL 


ol8 


StrongLnmieG 


ol8 


StroncfLncyC 


ol6 


Veazpyll&wf 


s20 


WatrousDW&wf 


s20 



OOTJ3SrT-2-. 

WatrousHarmony s20 GledhillSarah o4 

WhiteGH b28 GledhillSW&wf ol7 

WilleyMA 84 GrahamMrsLo'iseBo6 

iHotchkissChas sll 

MIDDLE HADDAM. HonseAG 819 

o24 HnngerfordEC&wfAl7 

ol9j" Mi!??AL-Robert " 

ol7 HungerfordRL-JW 

ol9jagger Allen o20 

o23[jaggerJoseph o2 

erMellion o3 

erSG-BetsieM o3 



CHATHAM. 

ol8 
ol3 

827 

BoUesMrsENS 

CarrierAmeliaA 

CarrierJohn 

ChildsEmmaE 

ClarkEmmaM — -,„„ 

HiiliardPH-Car'eMolSja 

HurdCyrus&wf ol4ljaj 



Linda " IJonesGeoS 

Hurd(;yrusjr Je5 JonesJE 

JohnsonMr8lIoraceN9l" MB-ClaraA 



JohnsonHL o26 

'' CaplNC&wf 
KeighleyGraceA o23 
McLeanNM n9 

MaikharaWillieN o31 
NortonJC ol7 

RamsdellChasE s8 
StrongCE Jyl4 

ThompsonJW a26 
WhitmoreEA o21 

WhitmoreMissML o24 
WorthingtonCL o21 

CHESTER. 

AbbeyGM&wf 

BatesCJ 

BatesJW 

BrooksMA&wf 

BrooksMJ 

BuckinghamHiram 

BuehnellWmW ol3 

CanfieldWmJ 

RillaH 
ChappellBL 
ChappellEL 
ChappellFG 
ChatfieldCN 
ClarkAlidaB 

MaryL 
ClarkAnnieS 
ClarkCharlieS 
ClarkEIlenM 
ClarkMrsHG 

MaslerWG 
ClarkJosB&wf 
ClarkJH-CarrieC 
ClarkLewellyn 
ClarkSusanB 
ClarkWF 
ClarkWinnieM 
ClarkWmN 
Clark WNjr&wf 
ClarkWS ol7 

ClarkSW-TeresaA o5 
o3 
s20 
827 
827 



8l6 



n8 



829 



012 

o9 
a2S 

a28 
o3 

827 
s5 



o4 



o23 



ColtMrsSH 

DaileyJnoW 

DenisonFR 

DenisonJK 

DeweyFrankA 

DickinsonChasT 

EganMrsJno 

ElyClarissaE 

ElyMC 

FosterFrankO 

FrancisGeoC 

FnssellHorace 

GardnerFannie 

GardnerHenrjr 

GilbertAHamilton 

GilbertDC 

GladdingGeoS 



s6 
a24 



ol6 



ol2 



KlineJnoF 

LaddOG&wf 

LeetJH 

LcwisMissJA 

L'HommedieiiEK s20 

L'HommedieuNE a31 

LippmanJ a28 

LordChasE ol3 

LordJannetteE ol6 

LordJasL 

McKinneyCathe'e m25 

MorseSnsanA 

MortonRevWD&f a12 

ParkerClara 

PrattDrA 

" JM-ClaraB 

PrattJennieA 

" Hattie 

RootLC 

RussellCaddieS 

" HE 

ScovilleEF 

SeldenllenryD 

ShailcrFisk 

ShailerSam'lR 

SheldonFrancls o30 

ShortlandSF&wf o23 

SillimanMrsFrank 627 

SillimanFred 

Silliman E 

SillimanMaryE 

SillimanSam'lC 

SillimanTC 

SmithEdgarW 

SmithGW-JuliuB Jy26 

SnowAW 013 

SouthworthMraAA s7 

" MissLouiseH " 

SouthworthFrankA s2 

SonthworthWC b7 

SpencerRP jc7 

StarkJL 

SteamsGeoF&wf o3 

SulIivanHarrietE olG 

TumerSW 87 

TumerMrsSW je20 

" MisBeBGM-JcBsie 

TylerBelleA o23 

TylerEW o3 

TylerRC 

WarnerArdrewE a26 

WatrousGeoH ol3 

WatronsMrsJElmersS 

WatBonWm o2 

WeaverCIintonH 

WebbStephenA 

WebbSJ 

WcbbTS 

WellmanChas 

WilcoxGW 

WiUcoxWF 



Al2 



o5 
a2G 



a23 
je9 



a30 
a31 

b27 

jy5 

s6 



012 

017 



WillcosMreWF 


s27 


WoodruffMrsHA 


o6 


WrightNettie 


89 


W rights J eannette 


CLINTON. 




Bacon S J 


jyl2 


BarkerWA 


o5 


BeachJ&wf 


014 


BlissJE 


026 


Bli^sJH 


814 


BradleyCarrieM 


olO 


BradleyJennette 


olO 


BrooksAJ 


030 


BuellEdgar 


024 


BuellGracieA-EM a12 


Buellllorace 


Nl 


BucllJesseH 


n8 


BuellLizzieB 


828 


BucllCaptM 


023 


BuellRoxana 


828 


BnellWmH 


ol7 


BurnesIIarveyE 


sl5 


BnshnellAsaS 


023 


BiishnellMrsAsa 


o5 


BushnellEA 


028 


■' ME-Mamie 


" 


BuBhnellET 


jy3 


BushnellWC 


s25 


DavisAlfred&wf 


o5 


DavisEllisC 


o4 


DibbellEldredA 


jyl2 


DibbellEA&wf-WEo2 


DoaneCE 


n8 


DoolittleWA 


s9 


ElliotEA 


a30 


ElHotGE-MaryC 


A2:i 


" GraceR-GeoEj 




ElIiotMrsGeoE 


oil 


EIliotWH 


oil 


FamhamRA 


m3 


GrinnellAliceH 


828 


GrinnellGC&wf 


o5 


GrisiwoldMrsAC 


o4 


HnllNellie 


89 


HillChasC 


o31 


HilliardMrsGeoB 


s21 


ElilliardLewiBF 


m22 


"AugUPtusWLewipB" 


HilliardMrsWmD 


ol9 


HiibbardAlb't&wfM22 


HnllAE 


n4 


HuIlGeoW&lady 


o2 


HnllJolinA 


o23 


HullLL&wf 


05 


HurlburtMrsJE 


01 T 


JonesJH&wf 


Jy6 


KelseyGL 


09 


KelseyMrsH 


s6 


KelseyWmH Je9s6 


ParkerJno 


Nl 


ParkerMrsJno 


016 


ParksMrsCA 


019 


ParkeChasE 


019 


PeltonMissGJ 


024 


RedfieldFrankH 


ol9 


SnowMissElla 


n9 


SimpsonRevJW 


827 


" Henry-JE 


" 


StannardS 


821 


StantonlnoA 


014 


StevensAO&wf 


je2 


StevcnsCD 


024 


StevensMA 


jy20 


StoneMrsJnliaA 


o21 



ITaintorMreMariaAoSl 



326 



SOUVENIK OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



TuckerLutherH sl4 
WelluianUairyA n8 
Wellniujilleuryifcwfor) 
WillcoxFredkW o2 
WoudLukeE Jy24 
WrightBH-JBjr ol7 
WriglitJuoB&lady o4 



CROMWELL. 



BaileyWC 

BarberAnnieE 

BoardmanArthur 

BotoUeJD 

BuflerErnestP 



024 

825 

86 

je9 
Jyl5 



BiiUcrGH&wf Al8 
BriggsAlbertJ-DL n1 
CoeEdwS&wf s25 
ConioE[CoH2Rgt] 87 



WarnerJH 

VVarnerMissLL 
WaruerMaryE 
WarnerJMR 
WatertiChasE 



s5 WalkleyMP 

S26 WalkleyVN E 
a24 WalkleyWH 
s2tt,WeUsMP 

a2 

EAST IIADDAM. 



m31 GelstonLucy oil 

s5 GladwinLaura ol9 
m3]s5 GladwinSidneyM jy28 
Jj28 GleasonSS o6 

GoodspeedGeoE 827 
VVhetlockMrsHW o27l *•*"* "aui/ajb. I Good^peedMrsGE ol8 
WilcoxFred'k s6 AckleyMrsJ Nil" Georgiana " 

" Caroline " jAlexauderJames a17 GoodspecdLouieeENl 

WilcoxGeoS s26:ArnoldDwightE s26;" WillR " 

WrightWB-EA AlS.AttwoodBerthaP s21 GoodspeedWH nlO 
nwin^.m. BabcockDS Jy21 Griffin J noS ol8 

UUUHAAl. I" LauraE&LuluJ " lGro88Mr8EA jy28 

AtkinsEdwin jy22 BarberChasC o23| " FlorenceCMarianE" 

BaklwiuHS 87 BarberJG 8l3:Gro8BTho8Jr jy28 

CampJulieW s6 BarkerMrsJnoG sl3 Ila8keIlEdvardG je22 

SallieB " BatesGW-MaryE jel2 IlicksJnc C el 



je9 



CrumbieDean 
Dudley My ronS 
DudleyRevMr 
Ely HA 
ElySelden 
FrisbieCB&wf 
FriebieRussell&wf o4 
GayLillieO s9 

GriewoldRS s8 

GunnMrsJnoB ol4 
HaiimerEdgarM o6 
HanmerGH[CoH] 84 
HanmerGeoN n1 

HansconiAliceM 
" JennieW 
HubbardAlice ol4 
HulbertWmE 8l3 

HntchinsonLauraDs25 
Johni*onSB&wf s27 
JonesEdwardR m22 
L'HominedieuJ Je5 
Mann i ngThaddeus jy 6 
MernaniAddieP 
MurravWinfieldS AlB 
NobleArthnr s26 

NobleWM-EmmaA 85 
NolanJnojr s27 

PaddockSeth 85 

PhelpsEM Bl3 

PhelpsHattieE el3 
Pier8onMrsMarg''t sll 
PriorJB 8l4 

ItanneyWm jel4 

SageChasP 828 

SageEJ[CoH2Rgt] 84 
Sage.TK n1 

SageMaryK s30 

SavageEmmaL 825 
SavageFrank 
SavageGP[CoH] 
Savage JnoH 
SavagcMaryG 
SavageRB 
SavageSaraM 
Savage WL 
SmitliLinus 
SmithLB jyl4 

StcveneMrsElisha s26 
sl3 
ol2 
Al9 
0l2 
Nl 
o21 



CanipSinieonS&wfolS BeachLucyJ 
CampTberesaP o4 BennettJasW 



CanfieldWmH 

CheeebroughAS 

" HC 

ClarkCharltonR 

CoeDB&wf 

CooperC^H 

DavisHenry 

FooteLnciusH 

FowlerWC 



s7 HolmesSK jel3 

Nl Hungerlord JW&vcf s6 

s7BennettWmH ol2 HuiigerfordRE o]2 

olljBinghamRobtW o27 JohnsonEmory&WNlO 
" BinghamMrsRW Je8 KingMri-CLT m31 
N2!BoardmanCW slO LynanHuntlDgton je6 

ol2 BoardnmnP k9 MackCL o20 

gfi BoardnianJnoP o4 MartinE-Eliz a!9 

e7,BoardmanMrsMGjel4 MartinSamuel s? 

je9i" Eugene " iMatherMrt^ELou'aMSl 



Ml6|BoardnianNS 



sl9 
Nl 
a8 
027 

86 

m29 
Jy27 



StevensEmma 
StevensFrances 
StevensHS 
Stevens. Ino&wf 
StickncyWS 
StockingHE 
" AddieE 
StockingHW&wf 826 
StockingRalph&wfs30 
" Herbert-EdwW " 
WaenorMreFJ b26 
WamerCM olS 



HartMarvE-KateS a22 BowersNelsonH 



IlickoxlW 

IlickoxMA 

IIubbardEM 

IIubbardFredP 

HubbardJennieE 



Ml8 MatheiOzias 
n9 McCallCarrie 



je9 BrockwayChris'rC o4 McCallS 



BrookBEC 
s22j Brooks JS 
a21 BrooksLL 
a23 BrovvnellCE 



826 MillcrChas&wf 
812 MitchellEO 
s26 MitcbollG 



Ml3 
Al9 

je9 
oil 
b26 
025 



HubbardT-RalphK 85 BrownellCH 



a8o6 NewburyMr8AreC828 



o2r 

a2(; 
sii: 

816 

o12 
Al9 



HubbardWC 

JacksonA 

" DeborahA 

JohnsonMaryE 

LeachGeorgieP 

LeachLM&wf 

" Lou A 

LeachOscar&wf 

MerwinAH 

" SLizzie-EllaE 

MerwinBF 

MerwinEP 

MerwinErailyP 

MerwinllS 

MerwinLucyS 

Mer\vinM[aged82] o2() 

MerwinMT-Ealph o25 

MerwinWL a24 

MosherPhilo a30 

NettletonHenryJ o20 

NewtonAS-JOP s6 

NewtonFredS e7 

NewtonMaryG 

" KatieL 

PnrmeleeWA 

" FlorenccW 

ParsonsEllaA 

ProutCW 

RogersEH 

RogersJA-NancyV s7 

ScrantonMreSS a25 

" Katie-Bertha " 

Seward StephenA s7 

ShelleyldaA a9 

StrongMrsTP 86 

ThayerEA&wf 821 

Tibl)allsGG s5 

TibballBHH 

" GeoA-Sam'lG 

TuckerAR 



85'BrowiiellEd\vC 



o25 
820 
a24 
o2(i 
Je2() 

CliarterJW 
ChipmanJuliaL 
ConeAllie 
ConeHaltieL 
ConeRob'tB 
CoueRob'tS&wf 
ConeWA 
ConeWC 
C'oneWmL 
CookMreDrNS 
DanielsFL 
DayAmasa 
Day ton AH 
DickiusonMreML 
" AL 
DunneM 
EmmonsDB 
EmmoneEA 
EmnionsFrancisL 
EmmonsGeoE 
EmmonsGertieE 
FowlerWmLjr 
82iFowlerOP 
" JFullerWA 
s6 FullerWL 
TuckerMreHenry a23 GardnerKatieA 
Tucker J R a23 Gates JS 

TuckerMC s6 Gates WL 

WalkleyDH i31 GeerMrsJnoA 



S6 

a23 

a22 
NlO 

814 



BrownellMigsHC 
•' MissAF 
BunceJarcdT 
Carriers A 
t'arsonGeoL 
CliadwickMrsMS 
ChafleeAW 
ChaffeeEW 
" AmasaD 
" KateD 
" LpisC-NellieE 
ChamplinCA 
HattieE 



a8 Newbury C'C 
016 NewburyED 
06 NicholsJH 
" INicholsJobH 
ol9 NicholsWniEjr 
8l4 NilesAnnieL 
sll NilesHattieE 
831 NilesHB 



oil 
oU 
je21 
a4 
s4 
018 

Al9 

a19o19 



Al6 NuttingRevJasH o6 
813 OlmstedAlb'tE&wsia 



" jPalmerJosR si 

" ParkerFH Al5 

" 'ParkerHC olO 

ol9 ParkerJennieM 8l6 

" IParkerLucyM 830 

Chapman J W-MC Al5 ParmerWF ol6 

Nl PeckCD 87 

oS PeckErastusF 86 

Al9 Peckllenry ul 

816 Phelps]VIr8Fr'em'nol2 

s26," MrsSH '• 

821 PollockEdgar a30 

Al5 Purpk'DavidT ol6 

AlG RathbunTS-SE ol9 

s26 ReynoklsWC s6 

Bl8,ReynoldsMrsWC ol8 

el8 RichmondWC ol9 

Je8 RootFrancisG 8l2 

8l9 RnsBellWmW o28 



a7 SewardMarshallT s27 



oil 

S27 

je9 

s6 

All 

a31 
85 
06 

s7 
m30 

613 

ol6 

881 



ShattuckGiles 
SillimanAJ 
SillimanGB 
SmithFW 
SmithJeremiah 
" Erastus 
Smith WmE 
SneadSam'IS 
SneydS-JnoP 
SpencerAgnea 
SpcncerNancyM 
SpencerRD 
StarkHS&wf 
Emoline 



s9 
Al6 
Al6 
ol8 
031 

ol2 
ol9 
o30 
ol2 
ol9 
013 
ol2 



019 StebbinsLizzieB a26 



LIST OF CONNECTICUT VISITORS MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



327- 



SwanEverettE ol8 LewisAA 
SvvanFrancisD s26|LewisMreWard 
SwanMnsRB n1 LordCaptRM 

Tiffany MrsFA e28 MackDL 
Vroom;j;B-GeoA jylOi&IackEllenR 
WakemaiiGeoB n2 MackJerome 
WariierDB&wf olSiMassonFredN 
GeorgiaL-NettieL"lMatlierRH 



WarnerEC 

Wat roil sD 

'• MrsLucieA 

WatroiisMH 

WayHK 

WheelerA 

WilliamsMrsJF 

WilliainsLB 

WrightJiioA 

Wright VVilburP 

Yates VVmL 



o4 MorleySM 
ol-iNottWP 
" ParkerFannieR 
a3 ParkerMrsG 
jelO'ParkerMissMJ 
ol7;"' MissAS 
jel6iParmeleeAnsiista o2S 



ComstockRo'b'tH s8 BonfoeyEllenE o23 
FrenchGeo b8 BrainardAll jy2s2<)o'27 

LynnElmerA sS BiainardMrsAlfredsaO 

NorrisRW 822 BraiiiardCornelius olt 

NorthropJE&wf Jel4i" LettieJ-KateA 



AllPanneleeER 
el3|ParmeleeEF 
sl2 PostGilmore 



60 



ESSEX. 
Bannini;rMrsGeo 
BeebeFH&wf 
BlakeHV 
BraddockAC 
BrockwayAlexisC 
BallJE-DC 
BuckiiighamGP 
BurrowsMrsSarahA 
BushnellljewisB je7 
BushnellNelsoa 
BushuellWA 
CaseMrsMarthaS 
CheeneyGeoA 
ClarkCL 
ComstockBela 
CorastockEB 
ConistockGeoH 
DenisonMrsWmL a16 
" AL 

DickinsonGW s8 

DickinsonTN o6n6 
" EE 

DickinsonMrsJN 
DoaneAP 
DolphChasS 
DuncanRevJno 
" ChasD 
FordhamTP 



olO 
sl2 

s7 
jel 

n2' 
jy3 

a4 



s22 
S26 

je29 

s28 

625 

s6 



n6 



PoetLW 

PostMary 

Po6tML 

PostWmO&wf 

PrattAbraham 

" Edwina " 

PrattAllieE-SareEo20 



Bl9 

Nl 

ol3 

64 

s4 

s2 

jel5 

AlO 



PrattChasE 
PrattEW&wf 
" CR-EWjr 
PrattHenryA 
Pratt HC&wf 



Nl 

S28 



o31 
jyl7 



a22 
s21 
ol7 

olO 
o30 

n2 
628 
n3 
o25 



PrattLi zzie A- Julia621 



PrattLydiaG 

PrattOC 

PrattMrsSusanH 

" AStJ 

RedfieldHP 

RedfleldJB 

" JEjr-MA 

RedfieldWH 

RigersBelleA 

RogersCarrieS 

RogersDS 

Roger?HeleaL 



Jy25 

88 
A25 



s28!ShailerTA 
o26 Smith M rsCarrie 
823 ! SmlthFlorenceM 
" SpencerltL 
0l2iStevensBH 



GardinerRevAS&wsl3 StevensHenryR 



CF-Ju!iaB 
GladwinEH 
GladwiuHE-MA 
GladwinCaptWm 
" ChasA-Mabel 
GladwinWmP 
GoddardAE 
HaydenDH 



HaydenNehem'hA5s27 

HaydenTS 

HoughCS 

HallMB 

HarringtonChas 

HarnsonS 

HoughWmC 

" Graces 

HoveyMrsME 

" FlorenceE 

HowardC 

HowardChasL 



oil 
a30 
n2 
o5 
o20 
OlO 

n9 

o6 

Nl 



HubbardDrCH&w a27 



HuntSam'l&wf 

HurlbutJamesC 

HutchinsonJnoI 

IlslevRevS&wf 

IrwiiiGW 

KelseyChas 

KnowlesJoeephE 



05 
oil 
je9 
Ml5 
o18 
67 
o5 



olO 
a30 

jyi 

628 
a30 

821 

ShailerJ E-EuniceANl 

s8 

n9 

s21 

jy3 

Nl 
8l9 
621 

jyi 

Gene vie ve-BelleA " 
SwanGW 
TaylorGnssieA 
TookerEC 
TreatWmE 
TuckerEsther 
TuckerMrsNH 
TnckerOP 
TuckerRichard sl9oll 
WareH s28 

WightmanWV a30 
WUliamsECjr sll 
WilliameGeorgia o31 
Woo6terClarehceK 88 



StevensAlaryJ 
ol7 StricklandSirs 
031 
8l4 

jy3 
je7 
o31 



016 
o2 
s8 
oil 
olO 
825 



Woo-terEDeF 88 

WooPterLL 88 

WrightAM 828 

CENTERBROOK. 

BeckwithJT 822 

BonfoeyGeoP&wf ol8 
BophnellGeoD o20 
ComPtockAW jel4 
Com8toekEK n9 

" MattieJ 
CometockHattieS 826 



Belle 

PettingillAL 

PlammerJF 

PrattJM 

RoseCH 

RogeMD 

ScovellCarrieC 

ShailerEmery 

ShailerSW-SR 

ShailerWW 

SpencerFW 

StannardRF&wf 

WebberLD 

HADDAM. 

AmoldEC 

AmoldFW 

AmoldGeoW 

ArnoldLizzieM 

ArnoklLN 

BaileyOliverS 

BrackettMrsAL 

BrainerdCepha8Jr je26 

BrainerdEzraP a29 

Bi-ainerdHattieB o4 

BrainardHH o31 

BrainardHL&wf olO 
MrsWP-iJattieL " 
Nellie-Hezekiah " 

BrainardlraH a21 

BrainardJS NlO 

BrainardMaryE o25 

" MarthaE-Dan'l 

" Geo A 

BrainardWmP 825 

ClarkMrsAS-Mr8SDs9 

ClarkEmersonG a29 

ClarkFrankK 

ClarkllattieH 

ClarkJnoW 

ClarkMaiyT 

" DanielM 

CookCC 

Daniels Willie 

DickinsonCA&wf m24 

" LeoraG 

DickinsonGA 

DickinsonHattie 

HazenGeoH 

HazenDrMC&wf 

LewlsEE 

LucasCharlotteA 

RichardsOP 

Ru^sellCiaraT 

RiiesellDC 

RussellHelenA 

RusseilJosieC 

ShailerJS 

ShailerSneanM 

" IrvingT 

SkinnerLeonardD 

SmithWilburP 



Brainard ER M 1 6a28s20 
8l6;BrainardMrsER s20 

n9 BrainardOliuA ol7 
sl6 " AsaA " 

o3 BurrOrlando-Mary 86 

N9BurrSarahS ol9 

s26 ChildTheo jel5 

o6ChildJH s7 

ol7iChi]dMrsJH n6 

ClarkGeoMw&dau o23 



s6 

jel5 
sl2 
n9 

NlO 



ClarkThosJ&wf ol9 
ClarkRB NlO 

DavisCllntonB sl5 
DickinsonLizzieM s27 

FannieL 
FreemanES 
FreemanOrrin 
FuUerN 
GayWN 
GladwinAH 
GladvvinCO-Gns Je27 
GladwinGS&w o19n10 
GladwinRJ&wf a2G 
GladwinSN je27 

HineClaraS sl9 

IlineS 614 

HubbardMiseHM n6 
HullAE-JM . m26 
IIiintingtonD-S a17 
HuntingtonMrtD n2 
KnowlesHeauorJ o2tt 
MayRE 66 

Menvinlleman jyll 
NoyesCorneliaB m22 
Noych^DrSeldenW m19 



n3 
n2 
je26 
a26 
a30 
828 

821 

m22 
Ml7 

n2 
ol7 

o6 
a31 

n9 



RoedAO 


024 


ReedMrsAG 


NlO 


ReedRoswell 


o25 


ScovilDaniel 


sl6 


SmithWJ-NE 


026 


TliayerRE 


67 


ThayerMrsRB 


n6 


" MrsG 


" 


Usi-erCJ 


86 


UsherJessie 


s4 



KILUNGWOBTH. 

BamumChasB s20 
BarkerChasP a28 

BarkerEdvvardD je2;J 
DavisGeoM n9 

EvartsClifford s22 
GriswoldShenn'nE.je9 
GriswoldSherw'dC n2 
GriswoIdWE&w s20 
" Edith 

HammondSusanP n3 
KelseyHoratio s23 
KelseyMrsMaryH o21 
LaneJHarvey&wf 820 



^ . o26'LaneMar}'A o5 

SpencerTrumanA o27|LeeJH a17 

TylerAW-RoUinWASOiLordEverettE Jv7 



TylerCS 

TylerLizzieN 

"Warren 

TylerNathan 

TylerRollinU 

TylerWm 

WilliamsBA 

HIGGANXTM. 

BaileyNW 



ol? LordldaA-Ch'st'rCASO 



■*^31 NettletonAG 
,„|Parme1eeElvina 

019 ParmcleeEW 
f* ParmeleeLW 

0^^ RedfieldCG 

OlO RedfieldSG&wf 
iRnttyL 

jyl StevensAlbertaB 



84 
67 

Jy25 
je9 
a30 
021 
a12 

B2a 



328 



SOUVENIR OF THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



MIDDLEFIELD. 



AndrusMD 

AtkinsOf'i^ian 

AugiirAII 

AugiirChasP 

AiifiiirPM 

BaileyEIIS 

BaileyMA 

BirdseyET 

CoeAlvinB 

CoellenryS 

CoeJoft-phE 



o5 

o4 

m18a9o4 

ju4a15 

BilOjyT 

juiooas 

Ait 
o4 



Jy24 



BarroweBW 
" Mela-MEdna 
BarrowsCW s27 

BarrowsSO s28 

BarryLF Jy4 

BarrySP a9 

BeaumontThogW s20 
BeebeM'ryR-El'nSsSl 



ChaffeeGeoA a28 

ChaniberlainllA JylO 
ChapmanAllettqM s6 
ChapmaiiEA&wf a3 
ChapmauHelenM s4 



ChapmaiiMattieJ jy34lEd\vard8LizzieG 



BellDrWmC 
BenliamChasE 
elSjBenhamEW 
N^i Benton Abigail 
Al'i BerryA.I 
Crowellllenry&wf o(; BidwellJamesE 



Curtislral) 

DenisonAC 

FitchCD&wf 

FowlerDennis 

GrayWmD 

llubbardChas 

Ing